Little House on the Prairie

Season 5 Episode 3

The Winoka Warriors

0
Aired Wednesday 12:00 AM Sep 25, 1978 on NBC
3.5
out of 10
User Rating
101 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
The Winoka Warriors
AIRED:
Albert challenges the obnoxious Winoka School football team to a game, and everyone gets ready for a heated competition. Elsewhere, Adam faces a difficult situation with an unmotivated blind student and his widowed father.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
Saturday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • I'm afraid I didn't find much to enjoy about this one at all.

    4.0
    The fifth season had a promising start, but I personally felt that this episode was really badly written and that was a shame.



    The uppity Winoka School, a private establishment which is attended by the 'upper classes' of Winoka (as well as Willie and Nellie Oleson, of course) are challenged by Albert and other students from the livery school to a football match. The trouble is, their star player is lured away after being given a scholarship by Mr. Standish as he wants the Winoka School to win the match due to the fact that his son is a pupil there.



    The livery school name themselves 'The Winoka Warriors' and what they lack in size and speed, they make up for in team spirit. Unfortunately though, this episode just never properly caught my attention. I was very disappointed in general.moreless
  • Decent *****Spoilers*****

    8.0
    At school, there is a very dumb student named Luke Hoskins. He is huge and dumb. Albert challenges Jeb Standish and the "Dakota Dragon" football team to a game, everyone prepares for a heated competition. Jonathan is the coach for the "Winoka Warriors," Nels and Charles help them. Nels helps the livery school and Harriet and Nellie were upset. Nellie constantly agreed with her mother and Nels yelled at her. Willie doesn't mind and says he'd like to join the livery school, Disaster hits when evil Mr. Standish arranges for the Warriors' best player to be transferred to the Winoka School. At the same time Adam struggles to make a breakthrough with one of his older blind students, and the boy's widowed father--who always dreamed of sharing his passion for farming with Tom--is too disappointed and ashamed to help his unmotivated son. Fortunately, the Warriors' need for a tall, muscular quarterback sparks a wonderful opportunity for Mary and Adam to fuel Tom with a sense of self-worth. When making pennants, Laura and Andy unknowingly give Albert an idea to trick dumb Luke. Albert tells Luke that the game was moved to a far away location. The game starts without dumb Luke and the game is close. As the last play approaches, Luke comes, back from the empty field 2 hours away. He threatens Albert and Mr. Garvey comes up with a throw Albert play. They get the touchdown and win. The ruling after some complaints was touchdown. Tom and his father are happy and Harriet is upset. The episode ends with an over voice saying the t the first forward human pass was that day.

    The look on the Olson's face as Albert flies is pure comedy. Nels is happy and Nellie and Harriet are sad. Willie being the only one on the bench is funny too.moreless
Melissa Gilbert

Melissa Gilbert

Laura Elizabeth Ingalls/Wilder

Patrick Labyorteaux

Patrick Labyorteaux

Andrew 'Andy' Garvey (1977 - 1981) (as Patrick Laborteaux)

Melissa Sue Anderson

Melissa Sue Anderson

Mary Amelia Ingalls/Kendall (1974 - 1981)

Richard Bull

Richard Bull

Nels Oleson

Matthew Laborteaux

Matthew Laborteaux

Albert Quinn Ingalls (1978 -1982)

Linwood Boomer

Linwood Boomer

Adam Kendall (1978 - 1981)

John Ireland

John Ireland

Frank Carlin

Guest Star

Brad Wilkin

Brad Wilkin

Tom Carlin

Guest Star

Peter Canon

Peter Canon

Mr. Hoskins

Guest Star

Leon Charles

Leon Charles

Standish

Recurring Role

Ivan Wideman

Ivan Wideman

Thomas

Recurring Role

Michelle Downey

Michelle Downey

Sue

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (7)

    • When the kids are playing the football game in "Winoka", you can see that they are using the Walnut Grove sets, because on the right side of the screen, the future blind school is visible.

    • When Albert at the table eating breakfast with Charles you can see he is wearing a Band-Aid, which wasn't invented until the 1920's by Earl Dickson.

    • Goof: The final score of the football game is shown as 26-24. The only way to score points in football in the late 1800's was by a touchdown (6 points) or safety (2 points). The score of the game was 24-24 until the last play, when Albert made it into the end zone, and the referee declared the play as a touchdown. The scorekeeper then added two points to the scoreboard, but he should have added six to make the final score 30-24.

    • When Laura, Andy, and their team are looking for a football coach, they agree that Andy's father is the only one who works at night, so he's the only one they can ask. In the next few scenes, though, whenever the kids are practicing with Jonathan Garvey, Charles and Nels are always watching and/or participating. Weren't Charles and Nels supposed to be at their jobs? I have a very hard time believing that their rude and bullheaded boss, Mr. Standish, agreed to let them sit around during the day and spend time with their kids.

    • Early in this episode, while "Big Dumb Luke Hoskins" is reading out loud, the other children are laughing at him, and when he is done, even the teacher Mrs. Garvey makes a rude comment to his face about how long it took him to reach the end. None of the other regular teachers that we saw on the show allowed students to laugh openly like that at another student, and certainly, no other teachers have ever made comments like Mrs. Garvey did. She ended up being a very good teacher throughout this fifth season, but it's a noticeable flaw, and her tone was different from teachers like Miss Beadle. Hersha Parady (Alice) has joked that Michael Landon used to make fun of her for that, because she was louder and more forceful--nothing like Miss Beadle.

    • In this episode, Laura and Albert repeatedly refer to one of their classmates as "Big, Dumb Luke Hoskins." They do it in Charles and Caroline's presence, and yet the children's rude behavior is never corrected. Neither of the Ingalls parents have ever abided by name-calling before, especially Caroline, who really lost her cool in Season 1's School Mom, when Laura called one of her schoolmates "Dumb Abel." Yet in this episode, the kids' treatment of Luke Hoskins is completely disregarded.

    • In the football scene, Melissa Sue Anderson (Mary) is cheering on the sidelines, waving a flag back and forth. In previous interviews, Anderson has said that these exact kinds of things symbolized her breaking point with the show--at least as a regular cast member. She continued to appear as a guest star from time to time, but she didn't like the idea of her character (a blind woman) being in situations that a real-life blind person probably wouldn't be involved in (like watching a football game), and she never wanted to be a prop.

  • QUOTES (7)

    • Albert: (when Caroline gives him breakfast, he scrunches his nose) Mush?
      Caroline: It's good for you.
      Charles: Eat.
      Albert: (sighs) I guess beggars can't be choosers.

    • Adam: Why did you send him to school, then?
      Mr. Carlin: I told you, because I promised his mother.
      Adam: I think you're a liar.
      Mr. Carlin: How dare you say that to me!
      Adam: I said it to my own father once. I can say it to you.
      Mr. Carlin: I love my son.
      Adam: And I love my father! But when you live in a world of darkness, the only light that exists is truth. You're no different from my father. You sent Tom to school so you wouldn't have to look at him!

    • Adam: Say it--"I'm ashamed to look at my son."
      Mr. Carlin: I'm ashamed to look at my son! (long pause) God forgive me. I'm sorry.
      Adam: Now we can both help him.
      Mr. Carlin: What can we do?
      Adam: We start by letting him know that he can make something of himself. That he can do something--anything. That he's not as different as he thinks he is. And we can't do that, Mr. Carlin, unless we get him back in school. That's up to you. You can make him.
      Mr. Carlin: He's in the barn. I'll go get him. (leaves)
      Charles: (to Adam) You really are something, son.

    • Adam: (about one of his blind students) What worries me is what's going to happen to Tom when his father's gone.
      Carrie: Where's his Pa going?
      Laura: Carrie, everybody has to die sometime.
      Carrie: Not Ma and Pa.
      Laura: Carrie--
      Caroline: Laura, I think we can find something else to talk about.
      Laura: Yes, ma'am.

    • Mr. Carlin: (to Adam about his son) Let's face the facts, the boy is blind. What's he ever going to be able to do?
      Adam: I'm blind.
      Mr. Carlin: But you're a teacher. Tom's not cut out that way. The only thing he ever wanted to be was a farmer, like me.

    • Mr. Carlin: I told you I've heard enough!
      Adam: Look, I understand how you feel, Mr. Carlin. After I went blind, my father treated me the same way you're treating Tom--as if he was some kind of freak, as if he'd committed some kind of unforgivable sin just by losing his sight. You're ashamed of him, aren't you?
      Mr. Carlin: He's my son.
      Adam: Yeah, that makes it worse, doesn't it? It makes you feel guilty. You don't like that feeling.

    • Charles: All right, now about this schooling.....everybody needs an education.
      Albert: I've been doing all right.
      Charles: Come on, what do you mean you're doing all right? You're sleeping under a porch, you're shining shoes, doing odd jobs--not to mention the gambling. You don't want to be doing that for the rest of your life.
      Albert: Well, what's wrong with it?
      Charles: There's a lot wrong with it! A man's got to make plans for himself. He's got to get an education. You need to set some goals.
      Albert: I've got a goal, Mr. Ingalls.
      Charles: Oh. Well, now we're getting somewhere. What is it?
      Albert: I want to be rich, like Mr. Standish--only not as mean.
      Charles: Well, I can guarantee you Mr. Standish went to school.
      Albert: Maybe that's what made him so mean.

  • NOTES (2)

    • This is one of Merlin Olsen's (Jonathan Garvey) favorite episodes.

    • Veteran actor John Ireland appears in this episode as Frank Carlin, the father of a blind football player. In season 3's "Little Girl Lost," he played Laudy, the drunken ex-miner who saves Carrie's life. Ireland was a well-known character actor; he was nominated for a best supporting actor oscar for his role in "All the King's Men", and was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He died of leukemia in 1992 at age 78.

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Andy: My pa doesn't know anything about football!

      Merlin Olsen, the actor who played Jonathan, Andy's father, played professional football for the LA Rams for fifteen years.

More
Less