Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman

Season 2 Episode 15

Return of the Prankster

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Aired Sunday 8:00 PM Feb 26, 1995 on ABC
8.6
out of 10
User Rating
57 votes
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Episode Summary

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When the Prankster escapes the prison, he continues with his plans to torment Lois' life, and now he also wants to kidnap the president of the United States.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    Bronson Pinchot

    Bronson Pinchot

    Kyle Griffin/The Prankster

    Guest Star

    Rick Overton

    Rick Overton

    Victor

    Guest Star

    Harold Gould

    Harold Gould

    Edwin Griffin

    Guest Star

    Sal Viscuso

    Sal Viscuso

    Bobby Bigmouth

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (9)

      • Nitpick: When Jimmy got an idea to help with Lois' sleeping problem why didn't he buy ear plugs for Lois rather than earphones?

      • Goof: When Lois & Clark talk to Bobby Bigmouth, Bobby is eating a pickle. But in the episode "That Old Gang Of Mine", Bobby, although he is known to eat everything, gave a pickle away, implying that he doesn't like them.

      • The map of the motorcade labeled New Troy in fact looks like it is a New York City subway map of lower Manhattan.

      • While the Prankster (Griffin) and Victor are going through the hard drive of Lois' computer they discover a novel she is writing. This novel will later become part of the plot in the third season episode "Double Jeopardy"

      • The newspapers covering the walls of the Prankster's hideout have the headline "President wins close election". This doesn't make sense: of course whoever won the presidential election is the president! A proper headline would say the name of the person who was awarded the office. However, it could possibly be the reelection of the sitting president.

      • Goof: Special Agent Carrigan cites, very specifically, the attack of President Jimmy Carter by a swimming rabbit as having occurred April 21st, 1979. However, the event actually happened on the 20th of that year.

      • Nitpick: When Griffin is reading the info on Superman on Lois' computer, he says that the beam that blinded superman was invented by Dr. Faraday. Dr. Faraday invented "the device", but the beam was created by Dr. Leit.

      • When the Prankster freezes the Planet staff, the newspaper that surrounds Perry's face is from Lois' fruitfly article from "Pheromone, My Lovely".

      • The scene where Griffin's father (played by Harold Gould) pretends to be a painter to gain access to Metropolis Power and Light is a duplication of a scene the actor played in The Sting 20 years earlier, in which his character pretended to be a painter to gain access to a telegraph office.

    • QUOTES (2)

      • Clark: I think the better question, Chief, is why was Griffin here in the first place.
        Lois: My continuing degradation comes to mind.
        Clark: No, I think that's just a bonus.

      • Lois: Jimmy, give me back my dress.
        Clark: Now there's something you don't hear around the newsroom everyday.

    • NOTES (1)

    • ALLUSIONS (2)

      • Kyle: (to Lois, chained to a pressurized steam boiler) Today we're going to turn the pressure all the way up to here (indicating the danger zone). Thanks for playing along. Johnny, tell her what she's won.
        Victor: A trip for one into orbit. Don't get steamed.

        The "Johnny" referred to is probably the late John Leonard "Johnny" Olson who had been the announcer on 32 televised game shows, including The Match Game and The Price is Right at the time of his death in 1985.

      • Prankster: All work and no play makes Superman a veeery dull boy.
        The Prankster is putting a spin on the famous line "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy", a proverb dating back to at least 1659 but made famous in the Stanley Kubrick film adaptation of Stephen King's novel The Shining. The line, which does not appear in the novel, represents the story's main character, Jack, and his spiral into madness.

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