A Lost Community
ABC (ended 2010)


I returned to the magical island known PaleyFest on Sunday, this time to celebrate Lost, which premiered on ABC ten years ago this September. It's hard to believe that nearly a decade has passed since Oceanic Flight 815 crashed and introduced many of us to Josh Holloway's chiseled chin and sculpted chest, but it's true. Nine and half years have gone by since Dominic Monaghan's Charlie asked the now-familiar question, "Guys, where are we?"

Over the course of six seasons and 121 episodes, fans would feed their growing addiction to Lost by attempting to unravel the series' greatest mysteries, including "What's the meaning of life and what happens when you die?" which executive producer Damon Lindelof said during the show's PaleyFest reunion was one of Lost's biggest questions. For six seasons, fans dissected episodes scene by scene, attempting to unlock the puzzles they were convinced were hidden within. Comedian and panel moderator Paul Scheer credited the series with the birth of binge-watching, because of the way it captured viewers' attention and drew them in, often for hours at a time. I can't speak to whether or not that's actually true because I've been binge-watching TV since I left the womb (back then it required a lot more VHS tapes), but I do know that when the Lost premiered, DVRs were basically unheard of, Twitter didn't exist, George W. Bush was still president, and the actor who played Walt was a young boy. Now it's 2014 and Malcom David Kelley is a grown man, and Lost has a legacy unlike any other network series that came before or after it. 

With such a large cast, not every Lost alum could make it to the PaleyFest panel, but those who were present made it all worthwhile. Joining Scheer on stage were executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse as well as cast members Josh Holloway, Jorge Garcia, Yunjin Kim, Ian Somerhalder, Maggie Grace, Henry Ian Cusick, and Malcolm David Kelley. An audience member even dressed up as Matthew Fox, complete with a cardboard mask, which just goes to show that Lost fans are some of the best fans, even if they're also sometimes a little intense.

The celebration really felt like a reunion as the cast talked about their fondest memories, the things they stole from the set, how certain characters came to life, and more. The evening kicked off with a screening of "Exodus: Part 1," though Lindelof joked that they'd debated showing the real finale. What, too soon?


On taking mementos from the set:

Several cast members admitted—somewhat reluctantly, because there were ABC executives in attendance—that they'd taken mementos from the set. Lindelof quipped that "Maybe the cover of the hatch fell off a truck, so I was like 'Oh! This fell off a truck, maybe I'll keep it and make it into a coffee table!'" Cuse admitted to having the countdown clock from the hatch, but joked that it just showed up as a package and that he didn't take it. Jorge Garcia has a few paintings that look similar to those found in the mental institution, while Yunjin Kim, Maggie Grace, and Josh Holloway all nabbed clothing. Ian Somerhalder, whose character Boone was the first casualty of the series, said he took "his dignity."


On storylines left unresolved and questions left unanswered:

It's no secret that Lost's legacy also includes some pretty pissed-off fans who were left unsatisfied when the series finale didn't tie up all the loose ends. When asked by fans about specific scenes and why there weren't resolutions to those storylines, Cuse said that "Every question begets a question," and that there "wasn't a way to answer all the questions without it feeling very didactic and boring." Lindelof also jumped in to say that in some instances, those scenes were written and still exist on the page (which they might auction off one day for charity), but at the end of the day, the writers' room decided it was better to leave them unanswered.


On their fondest memories:

"I made out with my sister once," joked Somerhalder before recalling a prank Maggie Grace and the rest of the crew played on him when, as he went in to kiss her, he discovered the hard way that she had a mouth full of minced garlic. "One of the proudest moments of my career," laughed Grace. Holloway found it difficult to choose just one memory. "It was such an amazing magical creative experience from start to finish," he said. "I feel like I've been run over by a truck."



On cable versus network television:

Both Cuse and Lindelof have made the jump to cable since Lost ended, and when asked if they thought shorter seasons would've been better for the series, Lindelof said that he was grateful the show was on network television and not cable. "Doing it any differently than we did it would have resulted in a different show," he said. He admitted, however, it would've been nice to not have to limit Sawyer to saying "son of a b*tch," because sometimes "holy f*ck" would have been a better, more appropriate response.


On character deaths and secrecy on set:

Lost was a famously secretive series, and the actors rarely ever knew anything regarding their own characters in advance. "They only knew what the characters knew," said Cuse, which is why the constant worry of being killed off loomed large over the set. After Boone's death, it was obvious that no character was safe. Daniel Dae Kim actually called the writers during the third season to say that he was thinking of buying a house, because he wanted to know if it was a good idea. Somerhalder, for his part, had no hard feelings about being killed off, and thanked Lindelof saying, "You gave me death, but you also gave me life." 


On creating roles for actors they liked:

When Kim auditioned, she actually read for the role of Kate, because Sun didn't exist. Garcia actually read for Sawyer, because Hurley wasn't a character yet either. Cuse and Lindelof eventually wrote Sun and Hurley, and tailored them for the actors they liked, noting they enjoyed Garcia on Curb Your Enthusiasm and said, "We gotta get that guy in Lost!" Pieces of the actors eventually found their way into characters, too. Lindelof recalled how Locke's wheelchair became a plot point, citing how Terry O'Quinn would walk down the beach and sit alone listening to his iPod. J.J. Abrams saw that and said, "That guy's got a secret." It was then up to Lindelof to figure out what that secret was.


On the series finale:

Cuse confirmed that everyone was not, in fact, not dead the whole time. Phew, glad we got that one sorted out and we can go back to discussing important issues, like how much we all miss Damon Lindelof's Twitter and his tweets to Fancy Feast.


Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 5/23/2010

Season 6 : Episode 17

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Huge Lost fan can't count how many times I've watched even though yes I was one who thought they died at the crash so my theory was wrong I still love this show now I'm rewatching for the summer with knowing they are not dead and still keeps me on edge. Can't seem to grow tried of this show and I do miss it very much but all things must end bummer! Since ABC owns lost I wonder if they will bring it back someday with the kids returning to the island as young adults, Walt, Aaron, Desmond's son, Jin & Suns daughter the 2 kids from the crash (we don't know what happened to them besides maybe at the temple) so they could have a whole new series of course Aaron should be a doctor! But nothing will be as good as the original! Love Lost best show I've seen in a long time.
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I loved Lost and not only because all the characters were a joy to watch and also not only because each episode was too curious and amazing to watch for a person who loves fantasy but also because I could imagine and actually dream of surviving in a lonely island if ever in trouble with all those passengers they actually made real to my mind. I wish to find a sequel of Lost with the same cast, maybe they grow older kind but like a continuation of the first, maybe like the Island actually brings back the dead alive and time travels and all that. It was a true fantasy and amazing connection with the show and will be forever. Thank you to the creators, crew and cast of the show. Good Luck for the future!
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A good show never gives up all the answers unless it wants to be forgotten; it allows you to wonder, and create your own end. When you leave a question mark, you have the audience go back for clues, whether they are happy with that fact or not. I was disappointed when I saw a news article this week saying LOST decided to finally give answers, and haven't read it (in case they actually did). People keep ASKING the questions for the obvious fact they have not (or had not) been answered.

I once went to a famous rock garden in Kyoto, Japan (Ryouanji Temple) and stared at the rocks and patterns racked around them for the better part of an hour. My ex-girlfriend's father, who took me there, asked me if the garden spoke to me, saying that many have said that the garden will tell you something if you listen. It did, but when he asked me what it said I told him that it was for me, and he smiled. I won't tell you either, but I will say that what it tells you is a mirror of who you are.
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I've never gone to any of my high school or college reunions...but I'm pretty sure you're supposed to have the 10-year reunion 10 years after something ends, not begins.
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Don't even get me started.
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I kind of accepted by the last season that they probably weren't gonna give us all the answers I was still let down by the series. I think eventually the writing on the show got bad around season 5 and 6. If you look at the show as a character study only, which everyone wants us to, I still didn't find what a good chunk of the characters were going through as interesting. If they wanted people to always look at the show as a character study like everyone's saying then they should have portrayed it that way, no where near the beginning when the show was at its peak were Cuse and Lindelof telling us that we wouldn't have all the answers to the show. Kind of seems a little backhanded to me to attract viewers and I believe people have a reason to be upset with the ending and no not because its too "complex."
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what a great show. every once in a while i still think of the show and the amazing characters it had
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was not NOT dead? that's the hell of a confirmation :D
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"Lost has a legacy unlike any other network series that came before or after it."

Yeah, because it beats the legacy The X-Files made before it and Breaking Bad after it.
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Lots of great and interesting tidbits. I wish I had been there to see the reunion.
Perhaps Cuse thought they used an alternate ending to the finale, cause everyone appeared to have been dead the whole time to me.
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God, another one. Ironically, your avatar face-palming is very apt here.

Jack's dead explained it all but people just didn't watch the scene or didn't bother listening. The events on the island were real, and among the most important in Jack's life.

But eventually everyone died... either on the island or years later after escaping the island. For example, Hurley and Linus were apparently on the island for a while after the events of the finale as the island's protectors and eventually died.

Since they were all so tied together by such important events and time has no meaning in the afterlife, they were all brought together in the "flash SIDEWAYS" world before they took the next leap to the whatever came next. So that world where they flight never happened was the afterlife prepping them for what comes next.
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Ironically, talking about God is what ruined Lost.
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they were only dead during the final season. the flash sideways if you will. purgatory. that's what they said during this reunion. i always thought that so it made me happy to have my opinion reinforced. saying that though, ive always been on the side of, they answered most things that i wanted answered. i don't need or want every little plot point to explained.
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There were two cases in which we saw what happened to people after dying. The first case is when they were involved with the whispers (most notably Michael, when he explained the whispers to Hurley). The second was the flash-sideways. But no, the whole show was not about dead people on the island. If you thought that, either you misunderstood the finale (rewatch Jack's scene with his father in flash-sidways), or you must have seen a version made in some alternate reality, in which they were all dead the whole time...
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I've read a few different reports on this panel and in none of them is there any mention of Henry Ian Cusick (beyond the fact he was there). Was he silent the entire time or just didn't say anything noteworthy? Talk to us, Desmond!
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He really didn't say much of anything, which was a total bummer. He chimed in when they talked about the fact that they never told the actors anything in advance, but that was about it.
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Hmm.. That's a shame. Thanks for sharing. Desmond was one of my favourites so would have been good to get some words from him.
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You know, True Detective leaves things unanswered and everyone is like "oh whatever, it's fine it was all about the characters anyway." But when Lost leaves things unanswered, everyone goes into a rage.
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Pretty apples and oranges comparison there. TD was an 8 episode anthology vs. LOST being a 119 episode 6 season network drama. TD was also supposed to portray and did portray a real world case. Other than Hart's daughters having been abused and thus the set up of the dolls, what loose ends did that show leave? Not everyone was caught, but in real life not everyone is caught. THAT had a hint of realism there.
Fan of both shows but completely different especially in how much mythology they portrayed.
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I still rate LOST as a very good series, granted IMHO the first 3 seasons were above excellent the series was well worth following and seeing through to the end. Having said that, I don't like C&L, I don't think they're good writers. I know there were issues with a strike in Season 4 but the final 3 seasons (S5 particularly) were pretty messy.
I don't need every red herring to be answered, if they tried to do that this show would still be on and have 100 questions left unresolved, but when you put red herrings out there it's not unreasonable for your fans to expect some kind of resolution.
I disagree with their statement about it being good to be on network TV rather than cable, granted a lot has changed in TV watching since 2004, but the main function of a network drama is not the creative artistry of it, but how many eyeballs it can reel in and how many they can keep. That formula does not lead to a script that is paced from beginning to end because you want to be on as long as you can and make as much as you can.
This was proved by the 3 year $30M contract both C&L got to wrap up the series in 48 eps. They wove an intricate story over 3 seasons and 71 eps. (Total btw was 119 not 121) and couldn't then tie everything up in the final 48. Especially since they introduced a bunch of big plot lines to go in S4,5 and 6.
I was fine with the Finale, they had to end it somehow and the way they chose was fine. Show certainly could have been better but it was still a very good series. First 3 seasons were edge of my seat be in front of the TV for the start of LOST events and for free television that ain't such a bad deal.
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Lost is, and will always remain, my most favourite show. It was never ever about the destination for me. The journey with these characters made it all worth it. I binge watched the first 3 seasons of Lost during my college days and have some of the most intense memories ever. It truly was a 'lightning in a bottle' kind of show.
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I don't read the comments anymore, it makes me so angry. But I'm so glad I scrolled down this one because I've often felt that the entire world got a huge stick up their ass for not being spoon fed the answers to a deeply complex show. I have no unanswered questions about Lost, between what we were told and what we were given enough clues to infer I have 100% satisfied my desire for answers. This show was masterful from beginning to end (which was clearly planned all along, I'm sure the last episode wasn't written before its time but it's obvious to me they knew where they were going for the entire course of the show). The cast is, other than The Wire, the best ensemble in the history of the medium, and this show laid the groundwork for much of the fantastic television we are getting today. One of the best and most influential television shows in history. Period.

If you feel like you didn't get enough out of this show to enjoy it, perhaps NCIS or Law and Order is more your speed. Good acting and writing, but doesn't really require an audience connection, you can come and go as you please and everything will be wrapped up in a neat little package at the end.
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Any show can be complex if you just throw meaningless stuff that not even you (the writer) know what the hell they are.
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I agree with all of your sentiment, I loved the show and didn't need all the mini mysteries solved and could accept truths such as the island was simply magical. However I strongly disagree on one point, they did not have a clue how it was going to end of even season 2 when they started.

Of course we can never know either way but I don't think ANY show knows what is coming, that is unfortunately not how TV shows end up being crafter. Look at the fact that Locke's miraculous recovery wasn't invented until they had started filming. Jessie Pinkman was supposed to die in season 1 of Breaking Bad and not even The Wire knew what was to come when they started season 1.

Shows evolve to fit actors and storylines are often moulded over time, but the point reamains that I did love how Lost ended up.
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Wow. Sure take it personally there TJ. Are you on the writing staff? Yes it was a very good show, read my comments above, but the 2nd half didn't measure up to the first. PERIOD. It wasn't even about answering the myriad of questions the show posed and yeah the internet community is guilty of getting so enthralled in the real meaning behind so many of the events that the show took on its own life in Cyberspace. However C&L were fully involved in that with all their podcasts and internet comments etc.. They were reading the fans comments. Put it this way, some of the speculative threads I read on the internet were a lot better than the route these two guys chose to take. If you think they were spot on best ever, well good for you. You just don't have to so sanctimonious about it.
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Can you tell me then what the purpose of the temple station was? And why was Walt 'special'? I wish we were spoon fed with answers, but they even denied us little breadcrumbs. You seem more butthurt than most of the fans, enjoy your ignorance :)
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The temple isn't originally (or ever?) a station, it was something built by the ancient Egyptians who were there long ago and is most likely dedicated to the black smoke, which we see "lives" below it, there's even egyptian wall paintings of this in it.
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They've said numerous times they were forced to drop the Walt storyline because the actor was growing faster than the story allowed for them. This isn't news. Temple station? Honest answer: not sure. Did that one thing ruin the whole tv show for you? If it did I feel pretty sorry for you that 120 episodes of a show are ruined for something so trivial. As for being ignorant, I really don't see how that's even possible. I'm ignorant because I'm willing to allow a writer leeway to tell their own story? As opposed to people that loved the series for five seasons and then revise history to say the show sucked because it didn't end how they wanted?

The perfect example of this is in that article. They really had to say they weren't dead the whole time? 5 years later? That's embarrassing that people still need to be told that. But because Jack didn't jump on screen yelling "hey, we weren't dead, this is what really happened!!!" people are confused because they can't find the context clues in the episode. Sorry, but if you can't do that, you are the ignorant one, and as I said, maybe a less elaborate show is more your speed.
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Next to twin Peaks, I believe Lost is the best television has given us. The best meaning that it changed my perspective on tv and what it could do for/to me. As it wasn't aired in The Netherlands in the first years, I had to buy the DVD's and never regretted it. Lost changed cable tv in our country also as it was (season 6) the first series that aired with a delay of only two days. They understood how important is was to the fans. That was fantastic for those days. Hasn't been done since by any Dutch cable company.
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Excellent taste my friend.
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As do you my friend (should have seen it coming with that picture of Coop) :-). BTW I am planning a re-watch review of TP's first season this summer.
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I don't know if I've ever enjoyed watching a show, and then talking about it the next day, as much as Lost. I know there are lots of people really angry about how it all ended, and sure there were some annoying things left unanswered, but that doesn't take away from the overall enjoyment I felt over the years watching the show.
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"Every question begets a question," and there "wasn't a way to answer all the questions without it feeling very didactic and boring." Lindelof also jumped in to say that in some instances, those scenes were written and still exist on the page.

To date I refused to watch anything with their names attached, I hope I am not alone on this.

They are still pretending to have unreleased answers after 10 years? When would they like to release them, in 30 more years? These guys are pathetic, they should admit that they don't have any. As much as people say that they didn't care for the mysteries, it was the aspect, that drew most viewers in. And as much as I loved LOST for me it became unwatchable. The least they can do is have the decency to release their shitty 'boring' explanation and apologise for misleading their very own fans.

If you disagree you're in a better position then most of the disappointed fans, I'd really like to be as ignorant about the ending as you are and be able to rewatch LOST again. So excuse us caring haters for our strong opinions, but we need to let out our frustration at times ;)


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I appreciate your views and can understand them even if I don't agree with them but to call anyone who disagrees with your opinion as ignorant is arrogant, incorrect and in fact, ironically, it smacks of ignorance yourself.

Some answers I thought were good, some I thought weak but acceptable and others were inferred. It's been a while but I can't recall any major points that really irk me. And that is coming from someone who was completely obsessed by all the little mysteries from season 1 onwards. I can understand those who found the answers they did give as disappointing but I don't see the argument that major parts were simply ignored.

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I said "ignorant about the ending", I did not call anyone ignorant and apologise if I offended anyone.
Everyone who liked the ending admits that for them it was more about the journey then the destination, so in my eyes they ignore or blend out parts of the series to make it more enjoyable.
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That's certainly not true for me - I very much liked the journey, yes, but I also very much enjoyed the ending for itself. Season 6 as a whole wasn't great, but the finale, I loved.
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Fair enough, but saying "ignorant about the ending" is still not correct, even if they liked the show but were neither in love nor hate for the finale then they aren't ignorant of the ending, nor would you be ignorant if you loved or hated the ending. You say that those that liked it have blended or ignored parts but it is possible that people simply liked it, they haven't necessarily tricked themselves but just have a different opinion.

If fact the only people who can be termed as ignorant about the ending are those that didn't understand it or infer all the information as others did.

Personally I loved watching the finale, sure I found some things to be a bit thin (the heart of the island) but to this date I have never heard a different ending which is remotely close in terms of quality let alone better.

For me I was glad that all their time on the island meant something in their lives and there was no "reset", I also appreciated the idea that we saw some deaths but others got off the island and lived on ,or indeed continued on the island. If you elaborate on what exactly made you dislike the ending then I can understand your opinion more.
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I'm with you 100%!
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Not as sour on the show as you are but I also boycott any programs Cuse and Lindelhof are involved with. I'm fine with JJ, he got this show off to a great start but unfortunately turned over the reins to a pair of writers who lacked the vision to see this through.
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Lost was, is, and may always be my favorite series of all time. So many brilliant stories, characters, and mysteries. Honestly, I don't mind having some of the mysteries unexplained. Hell, there were a few which I wish had remained that way (I could have done without the whispers being explained through Michael). Granted, there may be some annoying holes in the story because of unresolved mysteries, but for the most part, it could never change how exciting and beautiful the show was throughout its entire six season run. There have been shows that have at least gotten somewhat close to the great character drama and/or the compelling mystery of the show, but no show has managed to be as great as Lost on so many levels, at least for me.
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For those of you who want to watch the whole thing. :-)


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"What's the meaning of life ?" = easily the most interesting recap of the show I've heard. I might not be in the majority, but I've always found the characters' journey more interesting than the mysteries of the island. If you keep that in mind when watching the last season and the finale, they become way more palatable. For instance, you don't have to worry how Jack can have a son in the afterlife and how "real" the boy is, what matters is what it tells about Jack as a human being, trying not to repeat the mistakes of his own father. Actually, the "Ben as a teacher" episode, akward as it was, is one of my favourites of this season, precisely because it asks this kind of questions about destiny and the meaning of life.
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To me. Lost is the perfect imperfect series.
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LOST is my favorite show...i don't understand all the haters.

Was everything explained/hand-fed to you....NO, but many things were explicitly explained and some could easily be figured out if people just gave it a little thought instead of just jumping to conclusions.
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Agreed! I honestly think that only d... very stupid people thought that they were dead the whole time...
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I don't understand how anyone that watched all six season can think they were dead the whole time, it boggles the mind.
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Wait, people don't realize the island was all real? Did no one listen to Christian Shepard?
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Apparently not. On this thread alone there are a bunch of people that didn't either watch that scene or bother listening to it.

Jack dad, Shepard, quite plainly laid it all out with some exposition and people still didn't get it.
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I love LOST and miss it, no show before or after has been so addictive. It did in fact turn me into a TV addict as I scour the internet/cable for shows that can make me feel the high again...no luck yet...guess Ill stick to crack until the next LOST is made.
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I don't know why some viewers thought the finale meant they were all dead this whole time.

Especially when Jack's father explicitly said that his time on the island was real and the most important time of his LIFE. Seriously, they used his dead to provide the final exposition.

And yet viewers still claimed "THEY LIED TO US! They were dead the whole time"
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I agree, you even see Jack's death on the island.
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So when did they die?
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When Christian is talking to Jack, he says something about how some died during and how some died long after the events of the crash. They just looked the way they looked because The Island was the most important time in their lives. Their influence upon one another and the experiences they shared bonded them together in this life and the next. It didn't matter when or how they died, but rather, that even after death they were all together in the end.
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For those who didn't die onscreen, we don't know precisely, but some time after Jack's death, each one at his/her own rythm ( pretty much what Christian says ). For all we know, Sawyer, or Ben, or Hurley, or Kate, could have died one week, one year, one decade after leaving the island, or at age 80+ ( which would explain why Kate, when she's got her memories back, claims to have "missed Jack so much" ... )
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Some when they died in the show (Jack in 'The End', Charlie in 'Through The Looking Glass' Sayid, Jin & Sun in 'The Candidate')
others like Sawyer & Kate died off screen, most likely old age.
How are people still not getting this? they wanted answers spoon fed to them but Christian Shephard explained everything about the afterlife to Jack in the finale. Did people just not listen?
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Thank you!

Exactly, and it drives me nuts when people shake their heads and say "No, they told us they were dead the whole time"

People just need to go back and listen to Jack's dad speak again. He lays it out as plainly as one can.
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Wow, I have wasted 10 years. Hopefully now with distance the hyperbolic hatred about the finale can subside and we can all appreciate just how ground-breaking and wonderful Lost was, especially at its peak. Even the finale had moments of greatness, although it also revealed what we'd gradually suspected, that the show was not following a grand overall structure, that the writers weren't planning ahead and that ultimately they were more interested in intrigue than clarity. I could amplify the flaws and say they negate the show's strengths but that would be irrational. What is true is that apart from a lull in early Season 2 I found every moment of the show gripping, even when it was clear the moment wouldn't amount to much. There are very few shows about which I can say that.

Oh and I just realised that Damon Salvatore was in Lost, I'm slow.
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you are slow. hah how could you forget boone
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No I know Boone, I just didn't realise he was Damon at the time.
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haha, funny
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i dont watch that show, but he wasn't Damon until after he died as Boone.
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I think what the writer is referring to is something that I noticed, too. When Ian Somerhalder came back for the finale, he was no longer playing sweet, naive, Boone. He was playing wise-cracking Damon Salvatore from The Vampire Diaries, his new job. It was very obvious to me, and it bugged me. But I was glad to have him back at all. I just wish he had remembered how to play Boone.
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Damon was defintely first, he was born approximately 140 years before Boone. He also died approximately 140 years before Boone but that didn't stop him.
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The only reason I know and like TV.com is because I use to religiously go through the Lost episode reviews and comment/ discussion threads.
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Really? I can't find any staff reviews for LOST episodes here on TV.com. Do you have a link?
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Love the ending or hate it, Lost transformed the way we watch television. With Lost, it was no longer about 42 minutes every week on TV. No. Lost made you think about the character, mysteries, and storyline for what seemed like an eternity, until the next installment came. I remember people talking about it extensively at work, school, bars .. anywhere. Audiences were so immersed in the Lost culture; they would read books, articles, and countless wikipedia entries in order to find historical references in an episode, or plot insights they might have missed.

In no other show in the history of television have so many characters been scrutinized and extensively assessed by the audience. Every character was layers deep, and we could all relate to at least one of them on several levels. We saw how each character developed on the island whilst understanding their past (and sometimes their future) simultaneously. We saw them seek redemption, seek understanding of themselves, and seek peace with others. No main character was bland. It was what made the show so captivating.

Ultimately, we loved lost not because of the mysteries. We loved Lost because it was like a drug: powerful, addictive, and instilled, invoulantarily, in our daily lives.



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Amen to that! Great comment. :-)

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Thanks :)
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Loved it from start to finish. Without LOST we'd be without so many good TV shows today and so very few are perfect so i'm fine without all the answers, that's just life. :D
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I hate to say it because I watched every episode, either as it wired or recorded to watch later that evening because I didn't make it home it time to watch it from the beginning, but by the end I was just happy to know it was coming to an end. The first season was great, but then the mysteries and questions kept coming without any answers. And I know a lot of people liked that, I didn't. I was readng a series of books by Robert Jordan, The Wheel of Time series that did the same thing, and like the books I was beginning to grasp that they had chewed off more than they could ever swallow. Too many storylines that didn't seem to tie in. too many mysteries about the island. too many questions about the corporation, the hatch, the energy, the smoke monster, the plane they found in season one, the wooden slave ship.
So by the end, unlike say How I Met Your Mother, or M.A.S.H, or Breaking Bad, or The Wire, where I wanted watch the series to see how it ended, I was watching Lost just to say I sat through it. I wasn't expecting much at the end, so I wasn't disappointed with the finale like a lot of people. I had low expectations, and they met them.
Also, I want to see more of the Wire. With McNulty.
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Watching it until the end because I'd already watched it so long was what got me through season 8 of Dexter!! LOL. I do agree with a lot of your points.
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I gave my entire Lost DVD collection to a "friend"--not a good one...
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Yet Dexter is your display pic haha That finale was so much worse than LOST, It was a spit in the face to fans, and that 'lumberjack' scene. Laughable.
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But he didn't say he actually bought the entire Dexter series...LOL. Any season after 4 was a complete waste and quite probably the last season of Dexter was the WORST of any show that went more than 2...
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It's just an icon. However, Lost's final season was beyond stupid. Dexter's was just weak...
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Didn't stick with Prison Break then? Good call, season 4 is a travesty.
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