Lost

Season 4 Episode 4

Eggtown

7
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Feb 21, 2008 on ABC
SUBMIT REVIEW

Episode Fan Reviews (93)

9.1
out of 10
Average
1,275 votes
  • After a solid start to Season 4, this episode comes as a little disappointment.

    5.0
    Of all the season 4 episodes I have so far seen, "Eggtown" is easily the weakest of the 4, which most people would probably agree with. It is strange when looking back that some of the weaker additions of the series have been Kate episodes. Subsequent to her solid centric episode debut, "Tabula Rasa", the character of Kate hasn't been given as strong a backstory of depth of personality as the others, and given her past history and how it should affect her present situations is surprising. The root of the problem lies with her hormones, unfortunately. As with most great TV shows, the writers have to employ a little romantic tension into proceedings once in a while and this will obviously please the shipper fans. This would be fine if one romantic partnership existed on the island that concerned Kate. The writers try to complicate the situation, uneccesarily so, by bringing in other characters. The decision to choose between two men has never been so difficult for any female charcater, fictional or otherwise in history, yet Kate manages to make even the most indecisive person appear positive. What makes matters worse is that even the men have contracted the illness and will continue to throughout the remainder of the series. Is this the Sickness? Has a Lost mystery been answered? Sawyer can't choose between Kate or Juliet and even had a fling with Ana-Lucia. He seems to have some affection for Claire as well. Jack seems to bounce between Kate and Juliet with each passing episode. At this stage of the series you would have thought that things would have settled down but unfortunately not and, for me not being a shipper, I find this element of the series to be the weakest area. Yes, Lost is essentially a character driven series and the romantic tensions created is a part of that, but it shouldn't be too much of a focus, as it appears to be in this episode. There are better ways to explore the characters, particularly at this stage of the game. Nethertheless, there is enough in this episode to almost balance things out. Like the last episode the island events don't seem to move very far. Much more happens on the island than it did in "The Economist" but you can definitely feel that this is a ploy by the writers. They are building the tension up, that you feel that at some point things will just explode. That explosion would be largely delayed until "The Shape of Things to Come". For all of the Kate moments, "Eggtown" is as much a Locke episode as anyone. It even begins on Locke's eye, tricking the audience from the get-go. Locke has come a along way since Day 1 on the island. Fans of the gentle, island worshipping would-be hunter of old will probably be disappointed in the direction that this character has took since midway through Season 3. At the end of the day, Locke's actions are only driven by what the island has and still can offer him, as has been case since the beginning. The only things different is his methods, which have become more demonstrative. Locke has found his true home, and, unlike his parents, the island, has taken care of him and, now in some way, he wants to return the favor by giving it what it needs at this time, a new leader. Since the end of Season 3 Ben has felt his grip on the island controls slipping because of this man and now Ben tries to rub salt in Locke's wounds. Locke, once again, is in a fragile state. He has lost contact with Jacob and, in this episode he has lost contact with everyone else. Taunting Locke at the beginning of the episode is Ben's way of cutting through Locke. Ben employed the same tactic on him in Season 2's "Maternity Leave" and with very similar reactions from Locke. Despite, all that the island has given him and shown him and helped him face, to the extent of seeing his father dead at the hands of Sawyer, Locke remains angry, tormented and far from being free.
    But instead of sitting down and thinking about his next moves quietly by himself cross-legged, as he did so often in the early days on the island he now takes his frustrations out on people and Miles gets it the worst. Never before have we seen him so violent. Just as we can't understand how Kate can not choose between two men, so radically different from each other and her own personality, so too can we not fathom how Locke can be so bitter and remorseful after being on an island that not only saved his life from a plane crash and from a skeleton pit but brought life back to his legs. Off island, for a second, we finally get to wrap (or so it it would seem) Kate's fugitive storyline, which is a consolation because we don't get to see Kate's love life settle down. On island we see Kate leave Sawyer alone in an Other's bed (oh, the thought!) and off island in the future she has distanced herself from Jack also. So, it would seem that the Kate tennis ball ended up not bouncing to anyone but the back of the court. Of course, as we would see later the two of them did share a rather short-lived relationship. But the highlight of this flashforward is not the rather straightforward trial, which netherless features a revealing cover story for the events on the island, nor the reunion between Kate and her mother, but the reveal of Kate's "son", who is none other than Aaron, Claire's baby. The writers do a clever job in setting it up that Kate really has a biological son and that the father is Sawyer. That Sawyer is the father would make sense as Jack would naturally have a problem with wanting to see the baby, due to jealousy. The fact that it wasn't adds a further mystery to events off island. It is likely that both the fact that the baby is being protected by the cover story/lie the survivors have concocted to prevent any reveal of what happened to Claire and subsequent others on the island. Add to that Jack's guilt that he would be, as step-sister to Claire, Aaron's nephew and you have a lot of burden for Jack to carry on his shoulders. The biggest question, however, is what becomes of the beautiful Claire. The end of the season doesn't help is solve the mystery. We discover she suddenly disappears but pops up a la Christian Shepherd in the jungle and in Jacob's cabin. Has Claire become an apparition of Jacob or the smoke monster? Speaking of Claire, many fans were annoyed at her behaviour following Charlie's death. Sure, she seems to have gotten over the loss quite quickly, but some people do get over these things more easily than others, either due to inner strength or maybe happy pills! At the time of writing this review I am witnessing someone acting similar to Claire. So, trust me, it does happen!
    Back on the island and we see an odd scene between Daniel Faraday and Charlotte Lewis, playing cards. Faraday is trying to remember what the three cards laying down on the table are but fails to remember all of them and is disgusted. Take this moment with Faraday's very first flashback scene in "Confirmed Dead", where he says he can't remember why he is upset and we are led to believe that somehow Daniel has a memory problem and that also he may be involved in some time travel.
    The whole memory plot thread would be further developed in the following episode. One of the most impressive elements of Lost, is its continued ability to pull storylines and themes from seasons past and recycle them or even elaborate, expand and develop them, proving that nothing stays dead and untied up on the show [okay, except Libby!]. In this episode and this season's case it is the early Season 1 episode, "Raised by Another", which is given another spotlight and audiences are made to re-evaluate the events of that episode in light of the events seen in "Eggtown". Both creepy Locke in Claire's dream and Richard Malkin, warn Claire to not let anyone but her raise her baby or danger will befall them. Has this sequence of bad events begun? Also, Locke said to Claire in her trippy dream that she gave the baby up and that now everyone pays the price now. Of course, this dream was on island and we know that she hadn't and wasn't any time soon going to give the baby up. She was off the island but never did. Locke is saying in the dream that she DID give it up. If Claire's dreams were a premonition of events to come [Lest not forget that she dreamt that her baby was in danger and that someone was coming to kidnap her, which died happen] then this episode is quite a foreshadowing, proving that the writers knew where they were going to take the show from Day 1. This, in some ways, was a bit of a filler episodes, despite all the important revelations, which depends alot on Kate's undefined and over-romantic character. Lost Unless it is Penny and Desmond, romance isn't the best aspect of the show. And this episode only proves this. All in all, a disappointing addition to Season 4.
Saturday
No results found.
Sunday
No results found.
Monday
No results found.
More
Less