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ABC (ended 2010)

Deja Vu

  • Avatar of Omnia87

    Omnia87

    [1]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 03/22/09
    • level: 2
    • rank: Sweat Hog
    • posts: 24

    It's been a week already. A whole week since the finale. After watching the end of the only show that I ever thought was perfectly attuned to my sensitivities I decided to let the whole experience sink in. Just letting it simmer and see what kind of insights might come up after some subconscious processing. Insights came, but not the kind I was looking for.

    I've been checking out a couple of threads on this forum and had a very strong deja-vu. If you want to know what triggered this experience, visit the Battlestar Galactica forum on this site and look for finale related threads, you'll get the picture. But for those of you a little more time pressed: Battlestar Galactica was a sci-fi show stuffed with suggestionsof mysteries-with-interesting-resolutions. None of that was the case and instead we found out that God did it all. Normally I'd put a big spoiler sign there for those of you still watching the show on their own pace, but to tell you the truth, I don't give a damn about preserving storyline experiences for anyone anymore. I mean, either you are the kind of viewer who really cares a lot about intricate plots, in which case I've saved you a huge disappointment, since you're not gonna get that. Or you'll be one of those people that were suddenly struck by a mental illness (on which I will soon elaborate) and rushed to defend the show, claiming that all of that didn't matter, because the plot was inferior in importance to the character development. If you're one of those, then it doesn't matter how much I spoil, because the plot didn't matter to you to begin with. Which is why I feel a little like I'm stuck in one of those flash-sideways. It's as if I'm suddenly seeing something familiar and am overdosed by an array of previous traumatic experiences. After that major disappointment I thought: 'well, there's always Lost. They wouldn't do that to me. These guys have a plan, no way they'll let me down'.

    This divide between the people who loved the finale and those who hated it can be perfectly illustrated using the character of Locke. Locke had two sides: one blinded by the faith he used as a compensation for his dissatisfaction with his own life, the other that finally gave in to desperation and faced the sad reality of his being. Those who loved the finale seem to me like the former. I on the other hand feel much like Locke did at the end of Season 2, looking guilt ridden into Eko's eyes and exclaiming: "I was wrong".

    No matter what anyone can claim here, the plot was the main drive behind the story, it was about the mysteries, the mythology. EVERY episode had at least a subtle hint of a grand inticracy that every single viewer hoped to one day understand. And don't say it ain't so. NONE of you watched Locke and Boone find the hatch and thought: "Boy, I sure hope they never open it up and see what's inside. That would take the mystery right out of it". Or when they find out it was Desmond's inability to push the button on time that crashed the plane, you were thinking: "If only they hadn't told me that, I prefered my own version of why the plane crashed". And then there must've been those of you who saw the Dharma Orientation film and thought: "it would be so courageous of the writers if they leave the real purpose of the Dharma Initiative out of the show, that way I can ponder it for the rest of my life".

    Yes, it was clearly 'courageous' (I can't believe some of you use this, of all adjectives, to describe this cop-out) of them to wrap up the 6 year long suggestions of complexity and mind-boggling causality with a 2 hour swoon fest, without wasting a minute of their prescious time to explain something about the Island, or the Light, or that sinkhole with the electromagnetic security. If only Sir Arthur Conan Doyle understood this, we could've all read the premise of a riddle and then fill in all the blanks ourselves. Cause according to a lot of you, that's what great storytelling boils down to: letting the spectators finish the story themselves. Do me a favor, if you want to come up with stories yourself, write an f-ing book. But don't come here with this pretentious air of condescension, claiming to be surprised that we actually thought the story's author would finish what he started.

    Let's face it people: you love the show, we all did. You loved the characters, we all did. We had to, otherwise we wouldn't have stuck with this show for 6 seasons. If the characters were not believable and interesting, it wouldn't be worth watching. But those of you who claim that this is a great way to end this show are in denial. You loved the show too much to admit that this is at least a bit of a let down. You're afraid that it'll spoil the good memories, the six years of faithfully settling behind your tv every week. And then you come with these statements of admiration for the fact that you were left to your own devices, that no one impeded on your right to come up with your own reasons as to what would happen if the black smoke would leave the island. Or think of who built that sink inside the 'light'. The responses were exactly the same with Battlestar, and it simply can't be a coincidence that both shows attracted a major following looking for a story that challenged their intellect, but sadly all misinterpretted the signs that the shows were giving out. In both cases I'm being treated as if what I expected was unreasonable, as if there was no sensible way you could expect, after having seen so much of the show, that there was something interesting and complex that would be explained at the end of the story.

    They practically dangled that carrot in front our face by making clipshows called 'Lost: The Answers'. What answers if there are no questions then? And then there are those who keep saying: you can't expect them to explain EVERYTHING. No I don't, but at least SOMETHING. Like: how did Jacob's mother 'make it' so that they can't hurt each other? Who was on the Island before her? And how did they get their 'powers'. How come everyone seems obsessing about the MIB opening his mouth to someone, while nothing seems to happen. What rule prevented MIB from entering the temple while Dougen was still alive. What does the light do? What actually prevented MIB from getting off the island? These are meaningful questions, not trivial details that have no impact on the story. (And please don't try to sooth me with your own simple reasons, it can never be more than speculation, since you didn't come up with it).

    But let's not blame it all on the finale, let's face it: the entire season was a disaster. All they did was run around from one Island to the other, the plane, the sub, the plane, the dynamite, the plane, the dynamite, every time with a different party. Desmond being with Locke, Desmond being with Jack, Desmond being with Locke, etc. etc. etc. With weird twitches at the end like Widmore, having devoted his entire life to protecting the Island, sacrificing everything for it, and yet being convinced in a minute or so that he can take the MIB's word for it. What was the point of him going out of the show and at the same time out of character? Or how Ben goes from a good guy to a bad guy and back again more often than he had done in the other 4 seasons combined. They waste an entire season trying to make it seem like there was an alternate reality, only to have everyone live out some pretend other life before they find out they're dead. Honestly, was that really necessary in the afterlife? That Desmond gets a kick in the butt from Charlie and goes off on some weird revelation spree? Why couldn't they all come into the afterlife knowing full well what happened? Why make this weird off-key reality, where Jack has a son (with Julliet? does she forget about all this when she bonds with Sawyer and remembers the Island? Cause if not, how does she deal with her feelings for him and her son when they 'move on'?), and Desmond got along with Widmore, in which they pass the time a little for a week before they realise it's BS! Are we supposed to believe that Sayid prefers to spend the afterlife with Shannon, a girl he knew for little more than a month than with the love of his life, who he was willing to kill his friends for? And why does Ms. Hawking suddenly know (again) that it's all pretense, without actually wanting to do something about it? That said to me that they ended up not understanding their own characters at all. Omniscience is not a character trait. The reason she knew more than Desmond in his flashes throught time was because she had some knowledge from the past, not because she was some sort of oracle. And then everyone is in the church, all smiling and happy, and who sits outside? Ben. What happens to Ben after all this? Does this 'in between reality' collapse with him in it? Does he stay in the 'fake world' knowing it's not real? Or if he does know, how does he deal with it? No one knows. But I'm told that that's the 'fun of it', that way I can try to 'fix' the plotholes. The whole story just opened up like a dural sack, but unlike Jack... I'm done counting to five.

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  • Avatar of aidorrocks

    aidorrocks

    [2]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 08/28/07
    • level: 10
    • rank: Holy Level 10!
    • posts: 302
    fantastic post. so many great points. the only thing that i don't agree with is the finale of battlestar galactica. they've pretty much said from the beginning that it was all god's doing, the six in baltar's head especially. it's not like they didn't warn you in advance. i was on the side of "battlestar galactica finale was awesome" (with only a few minor grievances e.g. laura roslin wasn't supposed to set foot on earth, she was just supposed to lead them & die)

    but i didn't think the same for lost. i loved the flash sideways/alt. reality right up to the point i found out it was all just them dead. i felt that was such a waste of half a season. but also that a lot of the mysteries weren't resolved.

    again, fantastic post!
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  • Avatar of ssa2204

    ssa2204

    [3]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 03/25/06
    • level: 6
    • rank: Small Wonder
    • posts: 88

    -aidorrocks: I completely disagree with your assessment of BSG. They NEVER hinted that this was going to be another Touched by an Angel. The Six in Baltar's head was alluded to through out the series from being a chip in his head to insanity brought out by guilt. But at no point did anyone ever suspect this was some idiotic angel crap. I watched the show from the debut and visited numerous forums throughout the airing and never once did I ever see anyone else suspect this. Why should they, this was sold as Science Fiction.



    - Omnia87: Excellent essay. You should actually print this out and send it to the writers and producers, as well as post it to any blog our website they have. I was never sold that much on the idea that Lost was completely Science Fiction (unlike BSG). I was prepared for some supernatural ending.....but one that freaking made sense and was a *#&@ logical conclusion to a six year journey. I have never before known of any shows that insulted their audience as greatly as we have seen with these two shows. They had absolutely ZERO respect for the fans and viewers.


    I wonder if these same women blathering on about how happy sappy they are for this ending would also appreciate Sex and the City ended with with the xenomorph from Alien popping out of their stomaches and ripping their heads off.


    I have to say, right now I do not know what I hate and despise more. This idiotic and childish ending, or the simpletons that bought it because it had a nice tear jerker hug-fest ending. Screw imagination, creativity, talent, and logic. Just making everyone have a nice group hug at the end and these people will grab their tissues and blabber about how lovey dovey the ending was. Thanks to BSG and Lost, the message has been sent that studios need not employ writers with talent, imagination, or creative skills.

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  • Avatar of aidorrocks

    aidorrocks

    [4]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 08/28/07
    • level: 10
    • rank: Holy Level 10!
    • posts: 302
    ssa2204 wrote:

    -aidorrocks: I completely disagree with your assessment of BSG. They NEVER hinted that this was going to be another Touched by an Angel. The Six in Baltar's head was alluded to through out the series from being a chip in his head to insanity brought out by guilt. But at no point did anyone ever suspect this was some idiotic angel crap. I watched the show from the debut and visited numerous forums throughout the airing and never once did I ever see anyone else suspect this. Why should they, this was sold as Science Fiction.




    the chip/insanity/guilt explanations were just baltar saying what he thought it was. six constantly told him during his theories & long after that she was an angel sent by god & that everything was part of gods plan.

    i did suspect it & did put a theory on tv.com's bsg forum during the 3rd season. it stemmed from things that happened in the original. the ship of light, these people dressed in white that only certain people could see & hear that had magical powers. in the original scripts they were called seraphs, tho never actually named in the show (google seraphim). i theorized that they were going to make an appearance in the new bsg & that they were super powerful aliens that had some grand plan. if you think to the last bit of dialogue of bsg were baltar & six talk about god & say something like he hates that name, kinda says to me that he's some super all powerful being that has a plan, but not god the way we think.

    ssa2204 wrote:

    I wonder if these same women blathering on about how happy sappy they are for this ending would also appreciate Sex and the City ended with with the xenomorph from Alien popping out of their stomaches and ripping their heads off.


    quite literally laughed out loud at that. i would maybe even consider watching satc if that were to happen.

    as for the writers of lost. i think the reason that they said they wouldn't talk about lost after the finale aired was because they knew eventually someone like "omnia87" would come back at them these kind of hard hitting questions that they can't possibly answer.
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  • Avatar of motleylil

    motleylil

    [5]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 03/02/07
    • level: 19
    • rank: Fall Guy
    • posts: 971

    I think I'm going to kill somebody. Basically, you opinion is that if someone doesn't think exactly as you do, they must be stupid or mentally ill. Go to hell. I have never said that the most important thing for me was to have answers to the mysteries. I enjoy good writing and good directing. I understand how people can feel disapointed to have about 10% of the answers they expected to get, but the finale was well written. In terms of dialogue, how the story was structured, the writing itself was good. So I fail to understand how that makes me mentally ill.

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  • Avatar of WickedWierdo

    WickedWierdo

    [6]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 03/19/05
    • level: 3
    • rank: Soup Nazi
    • posts: 17

    Calm down, it's his opinion, only you would know if your mentallyil or not... And come on, I mean I loved lost and I still do, but I agree that any fan that does not see that the way they ended lost was a load steaming **** is I denial

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  • Avatar of ajokurvanyad

    ajokurvanyad

    [7]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 05/25/10
    • level: 4
    • rank: Thighmaster
    • posts: 167

    @Omnia87


    now i've managed to read through your post for about half of it and i already have one question: are we related?

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  • Avatar of anthem47

    anthem47

    [8]May 29, 2010
    • member since: 02/18/08
    • level: 7
    • rank: Talk Show Host
    • posts: 378

    I think there's a difference between answers not being given and the answers not being liked. I know you said not to answer these questions, heh, but bear with me, I'm going somewhere.


    How did Jacob's mother 'make it' so that they can't hurt each other? Because she was the Protector of the Source.


    Who was on the Island before her? Another Protector.


    And how did they get their 'powers'? From the Source.


    Okay, I'm being intentionally obtuse there, but these answers are not giant leaps of logic. It's fairly clear that if Mother is on the island protecting it, and she passes that responsibility on to someone else, then there was probably a protector before her who passed it on to her. The Source was clearly where their powers come from because when the Source was switched off, Jack's powers disappeared. The thing that confuses me, and I mean this respectfully because I really enjoyed your post and always appreciate well delivered arguments, is that these questions are not asked about other works. Where did the Force come from? Why was there only two Sith at a time? Can you break that rule? Why does Frodo's sword glow when Orcs are nearby? Because that's how it was created. Yes, but how does it know? It just does. I don't know, maybe people do ask these questions but I've never heard them before. They're the conceits of the story, it's how the rules of the universe of that story work. In Lost, life is represented by a Source, there is always a Protector who exists to guard it, the Protector is ageless but not immortal, they can grant powers to others.


    You're right it does seem to come down to that Man of Science, Man of Faith thing, which is funny because I'm not even remotely religious. But I do grant authors free reign to set up the rules of the universe they're playing in. If they say Vulcans can read minds by touching someone's face, I think...um, okay, go for it. MIB said in The Package that his smoke form can't cross water, were Man of Science fans expecting a direct explanation for that? The hydrogen molecules in the water interact with the electrical energy in his "smoke" and cause him to short out? It's like wondering why silver bullets hurt werewolves. Silver itself isn't toxic although it's not something you want absorbed into your bloodstream.


    But then I think I've always thought there was a Source-like concept going on. I didn't think it would have a physical presence like the Source does, although I can see why the writers needed there to be one so it could be switched on and off, but I always thought the island was something very powerful, very spiritual, very pure. The day Locke said the island healed him, I put the show in the Fantasy/Adventure catagory. Maybe that is the final source of the split between fans, the fantasy/sci-fi split...although broad sci-fi, space opera (which I don't mean as abad term) has 'universe rules' that I've mentioned, people may have been looking at it more from that perspective.


    I hope it's clear that I'm not simply a finale-apologist. In fact I might be in a unique catagory in that I've never said "oh, it was just the characters", it was that I was never, ever expecting answers to some of these questions because I'd already granted that that's how the Lost universe worked. The island heals people. I have no idea how, I'm quite sure it can't be explained in realistic terms, but it can and that's one of the reasons why it needs to be protected.


    This is probably a good time to point out the finale didn't tick all of my boxes. I wanted Walt addressed, for one (ignoring the fact he's being addressed on the DVD, supposedly). Based on what I've said before, I'm fine with the fact Walt is special, that's fine. But I hoped he would serve some function in the plot. Of course, being functionless isn't even an unanswered question, more of a loose thread. We like everything in our fiction to serve a purpose, otherwise what was it for? Was Walt just a special kid who came to the island, not someone who came to the island because he was special? We don't find that satisfying, understandably. Funnily enough, that puts Nikki and Paulo in the same catagory, serving no purpose, although at least Miles got their diamonds =P


    Another middle ground, and I'm not just saying this to adhere to the whole one positive/one negative rule hehe, is that the writers did need to clarify things. If I'm right about the Source being a Gaia-like entity, the life force of the planet as well as all of us, then I get that you can't answer "where did the Source come from", "who was the first protector" without going to big-bang/creation areas. BUT, and I totally get this, I don't think it would have been spoonfeeding for Jacob to briefly say "the light was always here. In fact without the light, there is no 'here' ". A touch more clarity would be nice (although maybe that's not enough, I'm not sure. To be doubly sure, Jacob says, "the light's been here since time began. Okay, let's go...").


    I just realised how long this is, no one will ever read this, heh. But I hope I've put my own unique side across.

    Edited on 05/29/2010 8:06pm
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  • Avatar of jbangin12

    jbangin12

    [10]May 30, 2010
    • member since: 02/16/10
    • level: 1
    • rank: Weatherman
    • posts: 16
    anthem47 wrote:

    I think there's a difference between answers not being given and the answers not being liked. I know you said not to answer these questions, heh, but bear with me, I'm going somewhere.


    How did Jacob's mother 'make it' so that they can't hurt each other? Because she was the Protector of the Source.


    Who was on the Island before her? Another Protector.


    And how did they get their 'powers'? From the Source.


    Okay, I'm being intentionally obtuse there, but these answers are not giant leaps of logic. It's fairly clear that if Mother is on the island protecting it, and she passes that responsibility on to someone else, then there was probably a protector before her who passed it on to her. The Source was clearly where their powers come from because when the Source was switched off, Jack's powers disappeared. The thing that confuses me, and I mean this respectfully because I really enjoyed your post and always appreciate well delivered arguments, is that these questions are not asked about other works. Where did the Force come from? Why was there only two Sith at a time? Can you break that rule? Why does Frodo's sword glow when Orcs are nearby? Because that's how it was created. Yes, but how does it know? It just does. I don't know, maybe people do ask these questions but I've never heard them before. They're the conceits of the story, it's how the rules of the universe of that story work. In Lost, life is represented by a Source, there is always a Protector who exists to guard it, the Protector is ageless but not immortal, they can grant powers to others.


    You're right it does seem to come down to that Man of Science, Man of Faith thing, which is funny because I'm not even remotely religious. But I do grant authors free reign to set up the rules of the universe they're playing in. If they say Vulcans can read minds by touching someone's face, I think...um, okay, go for it. MIB said in The Package that his smoke form can't cross water, were Man of Science fans expecting a direct explanation for that? The hydrogen molecules in the water interact with the electrical energy in his "smoke" and cause him to short out? It's like wondering why silver bullets hurt werewolves. Silver itself isn't toxic although it's not something you want absorbed into your bloodstream.


    But then I think I've always thought there was a Source-like concept going on. I didn't think it would have a physical presence like the Source does, although I can see why the writers needed there to be one so it could be switched on and off, but I always thought the island was something very powerful, very spiritual, very pure. The day Locke said the island healed him, I put the show in the Fantasy/Adventure catagory. Maybe that is the final source of the split between fans, the fantasy/sci-fi split...although broad sci-fi, space opera (which I don't mean as abad term) has 'universe rules' that I've mentioned, people may have been looking at it more from that perspective.


    I hope it's clear that I'm not simply a finale-apologist. In fact I might be in a unique catagory in that I've never said "oh, it was just the characters", it was that I was never, ever expecting answers to some of these questions because I'd already granted that that's how the Lost universe worked. The island heals people. I have no idea how, I'm quite sure it can't be explained in realistic terms, but it can and that's one of the reasons why it needs to be protected.


    This is probably a good time to point out the finale didn't tick all of my boxes. I wanted Walt addressed, for one (ignoring the fact he's being addressed on the DVD, supposedly). Based on what I've said before, I'm fine with the fact Walt is special, that's fine. But I hoped he would serve some function in the plot. Of course, being functionless isn't even an unanswered question, more of a loose thread. We like everything in our fiction to serve a purpose, otherwise what was it for? Was Walt just a special kid who came to the island, not someone who came to the island because he was special? We don't find that satisfying, understandably. Funnily enough, that puts Nikki and Paulo in the same catagory, serving no purpose, although at least Miles got their diamonds =P


    Another middle ground, and I'm not just saying this to adhere to the whole one positive/one negative rule hehe, is that the writers did need to clarify things. If I'm right about the Source being a Gaia-like entity, the life force of the planet as well as all of us, then I get that you can't answer "where did the Source come from", "who was the first protector" without going to big-bang/creation areas. BUT, and I totally get this, I don't think it would have been spoonfeeding for Jacob to briefly say "the light was always here. In fact without the light, there is no 'here' ". A touch more clarity would be nice (although maybe that's not enough, I'm not sure. To be doubly sure, Jacob says, "the light's been here since time began. Okay, let's go...").


    I just realised how long this is, no one will ever read this, heh. But I hope I've put my own unique side across.



    I actually read this whole thing and it was very insightful. It was very nicely written and makes so much sense.
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  • Avatar of Omnia87

    Omnia87

    [11]May 30, 2010
    • member since: 03/22/09
    • level: 2
    • rank: Sweat Hog
    • posts: 24

    @ aidorrocks:

    Thanks for your kind words, appreciate it that someone actually took the time to read the whole damn thing. ;-)
    Obviously I've heard many people come up with the same argument for BSG that you are now presenting, that it was always clear what was the driving force between all that took place in the show. Well this may be true, but I always got the feeling that something else was going on. I mean, in the ads for BSG's final season (you may have seen these) they often marketted: you will know the answers, suggesting there is some sort of scheme behind it all that we were about to be made aware of in the end. I don't mind a supernatural explanation, but to say: 'it was god and we're not gonna share his great plan' is just crappy writing. I think secretly RDMoore was happy he made a God refference in the beginning of the show so he could fall back on it when he didn't know how to end the show properly. One of the big indicators for this theory is that we have been teased for a long time during the show about the 'opera house' sequence, only to find out that the purpose of those events was just to visually mimic the vision. Other than that it had no grand purpose that this oh so powerful God couldn't accomplish without spamming Roslin and the like with LSD trips.

    @ motleylil:

    Don't be petty here, the reason I used the term mental illness was because it seemed as though some kind of virus made its way through the message board, where a lot of people suddenly seem to forget what kind of show they were watching and start coming up with excuses for failings of the show.
    Also, don't discount the possibility that you are actually a simple mind. You're trying to suggest that anyone of any degree of intellect can have any opinion, without the opinion having to be an indication of his state of mind. If you say you think the finale fitted the rest of the show, that it was 'well-written?', 'structured?', I'm sorry I just can't help but wonder if you're blind or just purposely ignorant. Have you even seen the finale's of the past seasons? My god they were amazing weren't they? Most of them much greater than a large feature film. You can't say season 6 had the same level. I don't believe in a 'lazy intellect', someone who's secretly intelligent but who isn't triggered by any sort of intellectual stimulus. If you watched Lost and didn't care (seemingly to any degree) about the mysteries, that's just weird man. You didn't care what was in the hatch? =P Honestly? ;-)

    @ ajokurvanyad: I don't know, are you Dutch?

    @ anthem47:

    I've read your entire post and you make some valid points here. But the nature of the Force in Star Wars was never suggested to be of importance right? In SW they didn't spend more than a 100 hours trying to engage the viewer to wonder about where the force came from. Just like in Lord of the Rings, the movie never tried to 'bait' the viewer into thinking about why the ring was powerful, and suggesting that at the end of the road, this would be revealed to us. Star Wars and Lord of the Rings are a lot of things, but never have I heard anyone call them 'the great mysteries of our time'. In these films, the supernatural elements were introduced very early on (in LOTR there's even a prologue explaining the nature of the ring) and so they were established to 'just be'. The reason why the 'I am your father' scene worked so well was because most of us didn't see it coming. We all thought it was a lot simpler: Luke = good, Vader = evil, Luke + Vader = Fighting. In Lost the whole show teased us that there were a lot of elements at work behind the scenes, and that it would be fulfilling to find out what they were. To just say: there's a Source, it's got a lot of energy, so everything is possible is just not that intriguing. In the end of season 2, when desmond realises that the plane crashed because of him, that was brilliant. We were all behind our tv's like: whaaaaaoooow. It was simple and logical yet incredibly smart. But none of that kind of structure was present in the finale. The mother was the protector of the Island and thus she was able to make rules you say. But Jacob never bothered to change the rules for his own benefit. Why not change it 'so that they CAN hurt each other'. It was left completely in the clear what the protectors were able to do and what not, making every miraculous step they take seem as a Deus Ex Machina.

    Edited on 05/30/2010 12:22am
    Edited 2 total times.
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  • Avatar of ajokurvanyad

    ajokurvanyad

    [12]May 30, 2010
    • member since: 05/25/10
    • level: 4
    • rank: Thighmaster
    • posts: 167

    anthem47 wrote:


    Where did the Force come from? Why was there only two Sith at a time? Can you break that rule? Why does Frodo's sword glow when Orcs are nearby? Because that's how it was created. Yes, but how does it know? It just does.


    you know that worked for audiences 30 years ago.lost wasn't writen 30years ago.in those 30 years storytelling evolved to the point of at least dumbing down an explanation for the audience.no more it just does explanaions cause we've outgrown those


    anthem47 wrote:
    MIB said in The Package that his smoke form can't cross water, were Man of Science fans expecting a direct explanation for that? The hydrogen molecules in the water interact with the electrical energy in his "smoke" and cause him to short out? It's like wondering why silver bullets hurt werewolves. Silver itself isn't toxic although it's not something you want absorbed into your bloodstream.


    yeah,something like that.it really doesn't take all that much time


    anthem47 wrote:
    The day Locke said the island healed him, I put the show in the Fantasy/Adventure catagory. Maybe that is the final source of the split between fans, the fantasy/sci-fi split...although broad sci-fi, space opera (which I don't mean as abad term) has 'universe rules' that I've mentioned, people may have been looking at it more from that perspective.


    now this is just me but i was willing to view over these minor miracles because i thought there was going to be explanations for the other gazillion mysterys that would make sense....but there's only so much miracles one can stomach



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