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Season 1 Episode 4

Civil War Cannoneers; Night Vision; Clearing a Minefield

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Aired Sunday 10:00 PM Aug 25, 2002 on The History Channel
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Episode Summary

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Civil War Cannoneers; Night Vision; Clearing a Minefield
AIRED:
R. Lee Ermey answers viewer's questions about Civil Wars cannons. He also discusses new night-vision technology, and explains how the military clears minefields along with a few other questions about first aid kits and the Khukuri knife.
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    • TRIVIA (5)

      • The APOBS (Anti Personnel Obstacle Breaching System) can clear a path through a minefield 45 meters long.

      • The first U.S. night-vision scope (called Starlight) used in the Vietnam War for a rifle weighed a hefty six pounds.

      • The Civil War cannon crew went by numbers. Number 1 would clean the barrel after it had been fired. Number 2 takes the ammo to Number 5 who loads it into the cannon. Number 1 then rams it down the barrel. The gunner sights in the cannon and has Number 3 to move the cannon right or left as needed. Number 3 punches the powder bag through the fuse hole and Number 4 inserts the primer into the hole and on command, fires the cannon.

      • One of the artillery pieces used during the Civil War, the Parrot Gun, had a barrel that was generally 78 inches long.

      • Modern day artillery pieces can accurately hit targets 14 miles away.

    • QUOTES (2)

      • R. Lee Ermey: The newest generation of N.V.G.'s (night-vision goggles) are so state-of-the-art, they can't even be exported out of the United States without a license from the State Department. And we like it that way!

      • R. Lee Ermey: Aiming and firing a cannon back in those days (the Civil War) was more art than science and when you consider these solid shots left the cannon going a thousand miles an hour, you needed a pretty good artist to hit the mark.

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