M*A*S*H

Season 7 Episode 11

Dear Comrade

1
Aired Unknown Nov 27, 1978 on CBS
8.2
out of 10
User Rating
45 votes
1

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Episode Summary

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Dear Comrade
AIRED:
Hawkeye and B.J. discover that Charles is living the life of Riley, thanks to the attentions of his menially paid Korean servant, Comrade Park, a man of unusual skills. He has an important contribution to make - a native remedy for a seemingly insoluble medical problem.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Dear Comrade is a fun, but generally forgettable, episode.

    7.5
    Dear Comrade uses a plot device that is now common (if somewhat overused) in the TV genre -- the voiceover. In this particular episode, a Korean civilian named Kwang is secretly investigating the 4077th to determine the cause(s) of their unbelievable survival rate during first aid of wounded soldiers. And, of course, we are given clues to this observation: a close staff with the leisure to have a little fun in their "off times" so they can focus all of their seriousness when the attention phrase "Attention! All personnel! Incoming wounded!" is echoed.



    We also get the "more of the same" interaction between Hawkeye, B.J., and Charles -- fortunately, I wouldn't ask for anything different from this group.



    What was particularly interesting in this episode was the focus on the doctors' determination of a cure for a bad rash that seems to have affected multiple patients. I found it curious that the solution was simple while the doctors hypothesized complex solutions to the problem. This seemed somewhat out-of-character for the doctors, and indeed, intentionally so. This is their "flaw", so to speak. Their lack of knowledge about the land is what inhibits them from perfection (That, and you can't save everybody, of course). I thought this conclusion of Kwang's (and of the writers on the show) was particulary poignant and fitting.



    Gary Burghoff did not appear in this episode, and this was notable. His humor to the show would have been nice and would have been an interesting characteristic to touch on given an outsider's view. Not to be.



    Dear Comrade is not particularly funny or serious -- it's observational. Much of the observation was telling and smart, but the result is an episode that appears mediocre compared to the many first-rate shows that made M*A*S*H so great.moreless
Alan Alda

Alan Alda

Captain Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce

David Ogden Stiers

David Ogden Stiers

Major Charles Emerson Winchester III (Season 6-11)

Gary Burghoff

Gary Burghoff

Corporal Walter Eugene "Radar" O'Reilly (Season 1-8)

Harry Morgan

Harry Morgan

Colonel Sherman T. Potter (Season 4-11)

Jamie Farr

Jamie Farr

Corporal/Sergeant Maxwell Q. Klinger

Loretta Swit

Loretta Swit

Major Margaret J. "Hot Lips" Houlihan

Sab Shimono

Sab Shimono

Kwang

Guest Star

Larry Block

Larry Block

Cimoli

Guest Star

Robert Clotworthy

Robert Clotworthy

Pt. Welch

Guest Star

Dennis Troy

Dennis Troy

Corpsman #1

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (2)

    • Klinger comments to Kwang that he's thinking of getting a howitzer himself--"Just think of the self-inflicted wound it could make!" This is the same man who once said that he would never shoot himself because he would ruin a perfectly good pair of nylons.

    • When Hawkeye receives the howitzer instead of his expected jeep, Potter orders him to get rid of it because the sight of it in camp will draw enemy fire. After trying in vain to have it sent to a non-combat unit, B.J. suggests that they put it out of their misery by removing the firing pin and pouring cement down the barrel to render it useless. That's all very well and good, but it still looks like a gun, which was Potter's whole point.

  • QUOTES (4)

  • NOTES (1)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • After Hawkeye and BJ disable the Howitzer that has been mistakenly delivered to them, Hawkeye says, "Death takes a holiday." Death Takes A Holiday is a 1934 film directed by Mitchell Liesen.

    • Klinger is serving dinner in the Mess Tent and he says, "Welcome to Max Klinger's Kamikaze Kitchen!" There are quite a few kamikaze references on M*A*S*H. Kamikazes were Japanese suicide pilots in World War II. Their job was to crash explosive-laden aircraft into enemy targets. "Kamikaze" literally means "divine wind."

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