M*A*S*H

Follow
CBS (ended 1983)

USER EDITOR

fireballil

User Score: 2036

  • Season 11 Episode 7: Settling Debts

  • The two soldiers that meet Col. Potter at the start of the episode are a 2nd Lieutenant and a First Sergeant. The following goofs apply: (1) the lieutenant salutes Col. Potter, but the enlisted 1st Sergeant does not. Sometimes a high ranking NCO doesn't respect officers, but he's still required to salute them, (2) what is a 1st Sergeant doing on a field patrol with a 2nd lieutenant? Most 1st sergeants work at the company garrison level alongside colonels and lieutenant colonels, not junior officers, and are rarely seen in the field.

  • Hawkeye and BJ are tending a patient while Margaret and Klinger try to distract Colonel Potter from going into his tent until Hawkeye and BJ have finished. Why didn't they just get Colonel Potter to tend to the patient, which would keep him busy and allow the others to prepare the party? Of course we wouldn't have an episode then, but still.....

  • Season 11 Episode 6: Bombshells

  • In the episode's final scene, BJ introduces himself to Corporal Sonnerborn by his last name only. After BJ gives Sonnerborn his Bronze Star medal, Sonnerborn refers to BJ by his rank. Since BJ was not wearing his Captain's bars at the time, Sonnerborn could not have possibly known BJ was a Captain.

  • Season 11 Episode 5: Who Knew?

  • Klinger tries to get Charles to invest in hula-hoops, which are apparently brand new, but Klinger mentions them back in Season 5's "Dear Sigmund".

  • Season 11 Episode 4: The Joker is Wild

  • No one takes note of this little fact, although Hawkeye most certainly should have done so: the accepted wager was that B.J. would pull a joke on each and every one of the main characters within 24 hours. By his own admission, B.J. did not do so. The fact that B.J. arbitrarily altered the wager makes no difference, as he did not inform Hawkeye of the change. B.J. should have been the one up on that table.

  • Near the beginning of the episode, as Hawkeye and BJ walk out the swamp, there is what appears to be a large grey wall that rises up beyond the limits of the shot in the background. Is this meant to be a cliff maybe? Something to show that the camp actually does move around, though it's not often mentioned.

  • Season 11 Episode 2: Trick or Treatment

  • Colonel Potter tells Father Mulcahy, "Welcome to the club, Padre, you saved a life." This actually wasn't the first time Father Mulcahy saved a life; in the Season 5 episode "Mulcahy's War," he was in a vehicle with a wounded soldier who couldn't breathe and he saved the man's life by performing a tracheotomy.

  • Season 10 Episode 21: That Darn Kid

  • Charles appears to be getting shortchanged on his salary. He receives $50 as a stopgap measure, which he promptly pays to Rizzo (still owing the original $50). When the full payroll arrives, Charles pays Rizzo $150 in interest, and then has to pay him his final $50 to clear the debt completely. This is a grand total of $250 dollars. Margaret, as a major, gets $400 a month. Surely Charles would get at least that much, and probably more, being both a doctor and a member of the male persuasion.

  • This is the second time on the series that Hawkeye has doled out the payroll. The first time was season three's "Payday" (episode 70).

  • Season 10 Episode 20: Picture This

  • In the scene where Col. Potter is painting Charles and Margaret, Charles calls him "Col. Potty".

  • The painting created in this episode would appear in spinoff series AfterMASH.

  • Season 10 Episode 18: Heroes

  • Margaret comments irritably to some reporters that they have a Post-Op full of wounded soldiers whose heroics are being ignored. A short time later, when the end is near for Cavanaugh, there is not a single wounded soldier in Post-Op. Nor has there been any indication that the wounded had been moved out.

  • Season 10 Episode 17: Promotion Commotion

  • And another problem for Luther Rizzo: his promotion board consists solely of medical officers. We are led to believe he's the motor pool sergeant, which means he probably holds a vehicle maintenance MOS (63 series). He would need at least one officer from the Quartermaster Corps to make his board legitimate. It's actually a good thing Klinger was the only one promoted; his board was the only one per the Army Standard and the only one that would've held up against an IG investigation. He appeared before the board in full dress uniform, and he's a medic appearing before medical officers.

  • At one point during the promotion board, they address Rizzo as Corporal (E-4). According to his rank insignia, Rizzo is a Staff Sergeant (E-6).

  • Igor is an E-2 Private, which means he shouldn't have to appear before a board to get promoted to PFC (E-3). In the Army, the only requirements for promotion from E-2 to E-3 are six months time in grade and a good record.

  • In this episode, Klinger gets promoted from Corporal to Sergeant.

  • Season 10 Episode 16: Where There's a Will, The...

  • Hawkeye leaves Major Winchester his bathrobe, saying "Purple is the color of royalty." However, the bathrobe Hawkeye usually wears is RED, not purple.

  • BJ realises Hawkeye is still alive when he comes across a patient with vertical mattress stitches using white cotton sutures. This is a little baffling as a positive id. Vertical mattress stitching is the most common type of all stitches and white cotton was generally used when nothing else was available: pretty likely at a shelled Battalion Aid station.

  • Hawkeye's trademark surgery is vertical mattress stitches with white cotton sutures

  • Season 10 Episode 15: Pressure Points

  • In the episode, when Dr. Freedman asks, "How old are you?" Colonel Potter responds, "62." He also often states in other episodes that he snuck into WWI underaged. He would have to have been born in 1903 at the latest to be underaged in 1917. If he were 62, he would have to have been born in 1891. What's up with that?

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
More
Less
Today
7:00pm
WZME
Saturday
No results found.
Sunday
9:30pm
WZME

More Info About This Show

Categories

Comedy

Themes

Sitcoms, history defining moment, moral dilemmas, social commentary, pondering life