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Welcome to "The Rising Sun" tavern! (Off-topic Thread)

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    dpebbleson

    [141]Feb 17, 2010
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    Glad to see you as well! I am enjoying every moment! Never knew how precious freedom really was!

    As for El Sol Saliente, and z/s sounds. A cousin of mine who also graduated from English, is now learning to speak Spanish, and she has a theory that Spanish and Serbian phonetics are very similar, and apart from some differences, I agree. There is a lot of s in Spanish words, and also in Serbian. And basically all other voices are pronounced very similarly or actually the same, so I have no trouble with pronouncing Spanish - except for the accent perhaps, which one must hear for each word in order to figure out.

    Where do you find all those fonts and stuff! Pretty great searcher and researcher you are...
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    boom-moo

    [142]Feb 17, 2010
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    dpebbleson wrote:
    Glad to see you as well! I am enjoying every moment! Never knew how precious freedom really was!
    You sound a lot like the Great Dragon

    dpebbleson wrote:
    Where do you find all those fonts and stuff! Pretty great searcher and researcher you are...
    Google is my best friend I just do a lot of research and from time to time great goodies are found which I love to share

    That is very interesting about Serbian and Spanish, I would have never thought they shared similarities. But then I am not used to seeing or listening Serbian around, so I couldn't tell. Yeah, s is a common sound in Spanish. Very glad to hear I could pronounce a decent Serbian if my life depends on it
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    dpebbleson

    [143]Feb 18, 2010
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    Great Dragon is my idol!

    Don't worry, you'd perfectly pronounce Serbian, because every letter carries only one sound, so it's very easy concerning phonetics. As for grammar, I sometimes wonder myself how I learned it...
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    boom-moo

    [144]Feb 18, 2010
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    dpebbleson wrote:
    Don't worry, you'd perfectly pronounce Serbian, because every letter carries only one sound, so it's very easy concerning phonetics. As for grammar, I sometimes wonder myself how I learned it...
    Every letter carries only one sound in Spanish too, so there must be similarities indeed. Grammar in Spanish is also a killer, especially verbs. It's good that we've learned our languages as mother tongues, I reckon some are way harder to learn in adulthood than others.
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    illegalferret

    [145]Feb 18, 2010
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    English is a nightmare with all it phonetic sounds etc. The children i teach are learning to read phonetically, it's working mostly but is playing havoc with their spellings as the sounds and letters don't always line up!

    Mind you, both you 2 have a fantastic grasp of English, i certainly coudn't go to a board and hold written conversations in any language other than my own!

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    dpebbleson

    [146]Feb 18, 2010
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    Thanks for the compliments, Sarah!

    Yeah, English phonetics is a nightmare... But believe me, Serbian grammar beats all Indo-European languages in "Horror Grammar Category" - seven cases, numberless conjugations, more irregular plurals than regular ones, three genders for nouns and adjectives, some phonetic changes which even I have doubts of, possessive forms varying every now and then... If I was a foreigner I would give up learning Serbian in the fifth minute of learning it Seriously. I am actually stunned when I hear a foreigner speak it.

    I'm learning Finnish at the moment, and it has even more cases - 15 cases! But actually many of these are just there instead of prepositions, so it's not so scary as it sounds
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    boom-moo

    [147]Feb 18, 2010
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    Thanks Sarah Maybe I make you guys cringe at times but being in this site and talking to people is a good way to keep learning. Only yesterday I learnt the "passage" bit *winks eye at pcdsa*

    Serbian sounds really hard indeed, Danko And Finnish doens't sound any easier but I'm talking out of ignorance. I got two degrees in Irish (another crazy hard one) when I lived in Ireland which I'm very proud of. I passed both oral and written exams but sadly it's almost all gone since I obvioulsy hadn't had the chance to practise it with anyone ever since. Oh well
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    illegalferret

    [148]Feb 18, 2010
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    Don't worry about it Esther Im still learning things about the English language! You guys and your knowledge of multiple languages put me to shame, the only other langauge i've learnt (more than a few words in) is French. And after studying it in school between the ages of 9 and 15 i gained a C at GCSE!
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    boom-moo

    [149]Feb 18, 2010
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    Better than nothing, Sarah I have a decent French, enought to find my way around Pierrefonds

    And well, the master the one language that is internationally more relevant so whatever
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    dpebbleson

    [150]Feb 18, 2010
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    I agree with Esther, this forum is currently one of the few places where I can practice my English. I used to have a solid knowledge of German, but now I just know how to present myself and that's all, and that's mostly due to lack of practical use of it.

    And finally I remembered an anecdote I wanted to tell you for quite a while, and it's very connected to English. See, I think it was year 1999 or 2000, I was between the seventh and eighth grade in the elementary school and by that moment I was learning English for three years, and was always proud of myself, having all A-s on tests and such. And that summer I went to my cousins in Macedonia, where I stayed for a couple of weeks. One evening I was walking across the city of Skopje (which is their capital) with my parents, and suddenly a gentleman stopped us, and said: "Sorry do you speak English?" and added "Parlais vouz Frances" (I don't know French nor do I like it, so sorry if I made some terrible mistake in this other sentence). This gentleman then, I think, added that he was from Korea or something like that, he was probably some tourist, or on some conference there. Then my father pointed out to me, and I answered, still thinking I'm gonna shine in English: "I speak English."

    "Well, can you please tell me where the hotel Continental is?"

    I had no idea where the hotel was, but my father knew and he told me to tell the Korean man to just go straight ahead, and at the first traffic lights turn right, and there it will be.

    And then the problem arose. I couldn't speak. I felt suffocated.

    "It's... it's..." And I pointed with my hand maniacally in that direction, and then waved to the left. The Korean man still awaited for me to utter something meaningful, but all I could say was "It's... It's... Go..."

    The episode ended in that way that he gave up, smiled and went into that direction, probably hoping he would stumble upon someone who actually KNEW English.

    That was the seventh grade, and I was able to speak English out loud when I was in the third grade of my high school. Such a sad story Well, it's true, because I noticed that knowing the rules, and grammar and writing language is one thing, but actually speaking it something entirely different. There were some kids in my class that spoke it really well in eighth grade of elementary school, and I was always ashamed that I just couldn't do it. But then in high school I realized it was just a psychological barrier, that probably goes from perfectionism, or trying to say everything right. But no one says everything right in a language, even his own language. So paradoxically, when I decided that I don't care if I made some mistake in plurals, or forgot to add that famous 's' to present simple third person singular - I finally managed to talk in English, and not to make as many mistakes as I thought I would.

    With the ability to speak, I dared to enroll at the Faculty of Philology, even though my original plan was to study maths, as I liked and still like it very much.

    So that is "the drama of speaking English" by a young man keen to oppose all the hardships of speaking out loud in ruthless world, and when everything was against him even the gods themselves
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    boom-moo

    [151]Feb 18, 2010
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    dpebbleson wrote:
    I used to have a solid knowledge of German, but now I just know how to present myself and that's all, and that's mostly due to lack of practical use of it.
    Isn't it a big pity? I used to be fluent in Irish, French, Italian and Portuguese but having lost the chance to practise them I've lost tons of them. I still have a decent French since I get French channels on tv, but Irish I only spoke in Ireland, Italian in my previous job and Portuguese with someone who died so I can babble but it feels really meh. I speak Spanish, English and Basque yet though.

    dpebbleson wrote:
    "Parlais vouz Frances" (I don't know French nor do I like it, so sorry if I made some terrible mistake in this other sentence).
    It'd be "Parlez vous Fran├žais?"

    dpebbleson wrote:
    when I decided that I don't care if I made some mistake in plurals, or forgot to add that famous 's' to present simple third person singular - I finally managed to talk in English, and not to make as many mistakes as I thought I would.
    That's it. Most people never take the plunge because they are afraid to make mistakes. It's actually ourselves who give those mistakes more importance than any native who are doing their best to understand us and are usually glad that we try.
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    dpebbleson

    [152]Feb 18, 2010
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    When you mention Basque, I remembered something I read in a magazine, also ten years ago (today is the day when obviously I remember things I did ten years ago - my past is haunting me, please help to stop it! ).

    I read that Basque are actually the indigenous people of Europe. In a way, they are the "original" Europeans, and their language is, as I understood, an isolate language, totally different from other European languages.

    I also learned that there was a culture in Europe that had a capital somewhere in Serbia (but this was, like, 5-6 thousand years ago, when Serbia wasn't even planned ), but then they were overrun by these Indo-European peoples who rode horses - and who actually were the predecessors of nowadays Germanic, Slavic, Celtic people and such...

    Also I read that this civilization, of which the traces remain in Vincha near Belgrade, had a period of complete peace that lasted for some two thousand years! Can you imagine that? Two thousand years without peace... And then the aforementioned folks came, and we've had wars in Europe every century...

    But I strayed from the topic. Have you heard of that theory of Basques being indigenous to Europe, like for example, Native Americans were indigenous to North and South America? And I know it's not important, but are you Basque or Spanish?
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    boom-moo

    [153]Feb 18, 2010
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    dpebbleson wrote:
    I read that Basque are actually the indigenous people of Europe. In a way, they are the "original" Europeans, and their language is, as I understood, an isolate language, totally different from other European languages.

    Have you heard of that theory of Basques being indigenous to Europe, like for example, Native Americans were indigenous to North and South America?
    Being Basque I've of course heard of it. Basque is older than all languages known and shares no resemblance with any. Wherever it originated, it didn't become affected by any other and managed to survive throughout the centuries which is pretty amazing especially since it's been tried to be erradicated during the time of Franco the Spanish dictator (people were forbidden to use it on penalty of death).

    dpebbleson wrote:
    And I know it's not important, but are you Basque or Spanish?
    I consider myself 100% Basque. The Basque Country claims its independence from Spain although it uses the wrong means (terrorism). It is a huge political issue. One of those topics we talked a while ago that are better left for ourselves, remember? I usually say I'm Spanish unless I'm talking to a Spaniard. The rest of the world wouldn't know where the Basque Country is, some don't even know where Spain is

    dpebbleson wrote:
    this civilization, of which the traces remain in Vincha near Belgrade, had a period of complete peace that lasted for some two thousand years!
    Absolutely unbelievable and most commendable, especially these days. Must feel amazing
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    dpebbleson

    [154]Feb 18, 2010
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    boom-moo wrote:
    Being Basque I've of course heard of it. Basque is older than all languages known and shares no resemblance with any. Wherever it originated, it didn't become affected by any other and managed to survive throughout the centuries which is pretty amazing especially since it's been tried to be erradicated during the time of Franco the Spanish dictator (people were forbidden to use it on penalty of death).

    That can sometimes be the case with the things that are strictly forbidden. The harder you push them down, the fiercer they defend themselves. My people were pushed that way by the Turks - The Ottoman Empire - for centuries, and everything was forbidden, but in the end we were the first of the oppressed people who claimed independence, and some have theory that actually our language is the means by which we won the battle. The language was affected, but it survived, and with it the feeling of nationality.

    I've never heard how Basque language sounds, it must be very interesting to listen to all the new words. As I said, I'm learning Finnish at the moment, and it's quite different from other languages as well. Most of the words are new, unknown to me, and that's fantastic, like opening a magic vault

    boom-moo wrote:
    I consider myself 100% Basque. The Basque Country claims its independence from Spain although it uses the wrong means (terrorism). It is a huge political issue. One of those topics we talked a while ago that are better left for ourselves, remember? I usually say I'm Spanish unless I'm talking to a Spaniard. The rest of the world wouldn't know where the Basque Country is, some don't even know where Spain is

    Yeah, I remember that discussion, I agree it's all politics. I assumed you were Basque, but I wasn't certain, so I asked. I agree that some people in this world probably don't know where Spain is There are much more ignorant people than one would guess...

    And about that 2000 years of peace, it's amazing. Those people were agricultural neolithic society who worshiped mother-earth, and by looking at the statues they made you see this progression from war to peace. At first these figures of goddesses were rounded, sort-of chubby, and very hospitable: a typical statue would be of a woman with big breasts (symbolizing fertility) stretching her arms at her sides as though she is going to give someone a huge hug of welcome. As times progressed, and Indo-European invaders made their way into these territories, the statues changed also. Now the chubby lady became a thin woman holding in her hands two thunders (symbolizing weapons, war), and apart from female goddesses, male counterparts began to appear, gods of war and alike. And that was end of paradise that lasted.

    It's something our professor called the First Europe which was truly united by peace, unlike many other Unified Europes that use wars to achieve peace.

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    boom-moo

    [155]Feb 18, 2010
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    dpebbleson wrote:
    That can sometimes be the case with the things that are strictly forbidden. The harder you push them down, the fiercer they defend themselves.
    Very true. Like magic!

    dpebbleson wrote:
    My people were pushed that way by the Turks - The Ottoman Empire - for centuries, and everything was forbidden, but in the end we were the first of the oppressed people who claimed independence, and some have theory that actually our language is the means by which we won the battle. The language was affected, but it survived, and with it the feeling of nationality.
    The feeling of nationality is one of those things that no one could ever take away from us. We can be deprived of freedom, forbidden to speak our language, invaded, oppressed... whatever, but the feeling lasts. Of course that having the chance to share our cultural baggage with some or our kin strenghtens it, but I don't think it ever fades. Think of the Great Dragon, being the last of his kind. Doesn't he have all the right to hate Uther?

    dpebbleson wrote:
    I've never heard how Basque language sounds, it must be very interesting to listen to all the new words.
    here is a typical Basque song for kids. It has the lyrics so you can satisfy your curiosity about new sounds


    It is amazing how History can be read through the cultural and artistical manifestations. The least we wish for, the happier we seem to be. Fits people who were content with which mother nature would give them. The only weapon those people needed were farming implements and tools. Progress is not always a good thing.

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    dpebbleson

    [156]Feb 18, 2010
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    boom-moo wrote:
    Think of the Great Dragon, being the last of his kind. Doesn't he have all the right to hate Uther?

    I concur with you, he has every right. As a ruler, Uther is perhaps successful, and doing the best he can, but as a man, he is hypocritical and ruthless, and has killed a lot more people than the Great Dragon did. Not to mention the fact that 90% of the series is based upon the past that is haunting him, but mostly hurting others, the most obvious and catastrophic example being the release of the Great Dragon.

    boom-moo wrote:
    here is a typical Basque song for kids. It has the lyrics so you can satisfy your curiosity about new sounds

    I listened to it, it sounds very interesting, and jolly, but that's probably because it's a song for kids And what does "handitzen handitzen" mean?


    boom-moo wrote:
    It is amazing how History can be read through the cultural and artistical manifestations. The least we wish for, the happier we seem to be. Fits people who were content with which mother nature would give them. The only weapon those people needed were farming implements and tools. Progress is not always a good thing.

    Progress... I have another impression that's very fresh, compared to the previous ten-year olds Well, I went to Belgrade on Monday to see Avatar 3D, since the cinema in my city is currently under reconstruction and isn't working. Due to the string of bad luck that's been with me these days, in the cinema I found out there weren't any free tickets, so I traveled some 300 km from here to there, and back again, for nothing But that's not the point. 'Cause see, this cinema was located in a sort-of gigantic shopping mall, with tens of shops, restaurants, clubs, and what not. And there were like hundreds of people everywhere, talking, chatting, eating, eating, drinking, smoking, laughing, buying, buying, buying, and there was so much noise that I was a bit disoriented. I don't have agoraphobia but suspect that I could have easily get one there. Then I went into a huge store (perhaps not incidentally called 'Mammoth' which sells books, CDs, DVDs, notebooks, pencils; then I went into another store with technical items, and there were computers big and small, cell-phones, numerous gadgets. But the one thing that was common to them all were, of course, the prices. The prices everywhere. And I thought, do we really need all this stuff. Do I need this high-tech gadget that I will probably have to replace in a year or two with a newer one? And, anyway, who is going to buy all these things? You may call me conservative, but I don't like this commercialism everywhere, the fact that everything is made in great numbers for the masses, nothing is personal, nothing has some peculiar, one of a kind character that makes it unique, like some handiworks, like a poem, a short story... And when I think of it, I won't be surprised if they invent some machines that will compose poems like in a factory.

    Again I will appear conservative if I say that I like long walks. They are best if they are in some park, or by a lake, but you don't need the park or the lake, you just need people, and some real talk. Walk and talk. And I know I am not perfect either, and am also double-faced in all this argument because I am - or used to be - a sort of technomaniac, but now I really feel sick of all this technological process that has thrown us into circulus vitiousus consisting of buy-repair-buy new phases that repeat themselves. I do rely on my computer a lot, and this chat in this "Rising Sun" of ours proves it: but at least we are thousands of kilometres apart, and this is the only way; the fact is some people connect through social networks with the friends that basically live almost in the same street as they do.

    And of course this buy-repair-buy new cycle forces us to always seek something new, to upgrade, to acquire, to pile up things, then throw them out of the house or something like that, and I also ask myself, where does all that techno-garbage go, when it's done with. Some of it goes to recycling, of course, but there is a lot that just pollutes this planet.

    My professor of philosophy wisely said that if a man wants to be happy he has to have small needs, not to want many things, but to be satisfied with what he has. And this professor isn't that wise, if he were wiser, he would realize that most of the time he is just having a monologue about himself

    Anyway, that's what you said, Esther, these people had a long period of peace because they were satisfied with what they had, with the land to till, and their simple life. They may have lived shorter than we do, they may have known lesser than we do, but they lived in peaceful life. And more and more I just like small places, small towns, as opposed to these metropolis-****places, where there is no quietness.

    Now, to stop the preaching, that's what progress word reminded me of. And let's imagine (because this is pub after all ) that I was some drunken guy unsatisfied with something, having a long monologue, but I'm different from him 'cause I know I have probably bored you to some extent (Internet texts are much harder to read than those on paper, I figure those Dostoyevskian monologues will be very hard to read on this Kindle thing ), and for that I apologize.

    Cheers!

    Edited on 02/18/2010 4:05pm
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    boom-moo

    [157]Feb 19, 2010
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    *does the 'It's Friday' dance*

    dpebbleson wrote:
    I listened to it, it sounds very interesting, and jolly, but that's probably because it's a song for kids And what does "handitzen handitzen" mean?
    "handitzen handitzen" means "growing up, growing up". Yeah, it's jolly because it's for kids. It's the kind of song that teaches little kids stuff. It basically follows the development of a kid as they grow up from babies to kiddos. Like when they start using their hands to grab things, their legs to walk, their eyes to see, ears to listen, mouth to taste and so on.

    I find it funny that you made 300 km to watch a movie when it's been like 4 years since I last stepped into a cinema I just can't get bothered to go unless a movie is really appealing to me, and that is hardly ever the case. I don't have agoraphobia either but I feel really uneasy in crowds. No matter how much I want to be in one place, I only feel like running away when I can't take a couple of steps in any direction without bumping into someone. My city is small so the malls are far from gigantic but still they are big enough for me to feel like they are massive when they are full of people.

    We certainly don't need half of the gadgets and stuff we own. I am the first to have every possible little thing, but I hardly buy any myself. I am appreciative of all I get, but I could pass without most. I particularly hate cell phones, I reckon they are useful when used correctly but they've become a very intruding tool. There's no way to take a quiet walk any longer without the cell phone going off. People just ringing for the silliest of things, interrupting a perfect moment, a stare, a conversation, a reflexion, a though, a scenery. It irks me to no end. I've tried to get rid of mine but since I drive a motorbike to work every day, I have to keep so my loved ones are at ease. I absolutely tend to leave it behind in my leisure time though, and mostly use it as an mp4. My last invoice didn't reach 2 euros, which is way beyond ridiculous.

    I don't think you are conservative, I share a lot of your feelings. Laptops, iPods, digital cameras, cell phones... you name it, all those I've gotten from others. And I use them and I love them but I dunno. I feel way better when I get something from my dad. He is different and great at buying, at least at buying for me. He would surprise me with a nice cardboard storage box, a notepad, a string of glistering paper play cards like the ones I had as a little girl and stuff like that. My mum rolls his eyes at him saying I am not his little girl anymore. I simply love it.

    I won't be surprised either if they'd invent machines that will compose poems, that's a pretty scary thought.

    Ah, here we go. The long walks I was talking about before. I sadly know no one around me who is always up to go for a long walk leaving the cell phone at home. Put on some sweats and trainers, pack a sandwich, a coat, grab a backpack and off you go. How good does it feel to sit in the grass and share a laugh? It feels like freedom to me, and I miss it. I used to take these walks to the lighthouse at sunset with my dog. It was just him and me and a bunch of fishermen watching their rods coffee in hand. I would sit by the ocean and let the breeze make a mess of my hair as I felt the salty taste of the waves on my lips. I would just sit there, stroke my dog and realize that life was perfect and simple and enjoyable. That I was tiny compared to that ocean but that it was alright. My dog died some two years ago and I have never found the courage to go, sit and lean against that lighthouse again. I do rely on my computer a lot as well, but it doesn't prevent me from enjoying any other of the little pleasures that I love: reading, writing, making puzzles, and talking to people. I have a Facebook account (that I never use) and I was surprised when all my friends (the ones who live close by) sent me friending requests. What for? We meet at least once a week (working schedules and whatnot don't allow for much more) but I'd rather talk personally with them just once a week than leaving messages on Fb. I mean, it can be fun and all but I dunno. Not my cup of tea when it comes to (physically) close people.

    The techno-garbage that isn't recycled goes to poor countries, as most miseries do.
    dpebbleson wrote:
    My professor of philosophy wisely said that if a man wants to be happy he has to have small needs, not to want many things, but to be satisfied with what he has.
    I agree. I still want things, but I often find myself not enjoying them so much once I have them. It's like they are cool to have and I feel a 'need' satisfied but they don't really fulfill me. Like they are masking a more profound need. It's hard to explain.

    It didn't sound like preaching to me and I wasn't bored reading your post in the slightest I would have actually bought that unsatisfied drunken guy another drink and offered a way better reply not being because the phone at the office won't stop ringing, customers coming in and whatnot so I can hardly concentrate on what I'm typing.

    Have a lovely day
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    dpebbleson

    [158]Feb 19, 2010
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    Thanks for the Basque song explanation!

    boom-moo wrote:
    I used to take these walks to the lighthouse at sunset with my dog. It was just him and me and a bunch of fishermen watching their rods coffee in hand. I would sit by the ocean and let the breeze make a mess of my hair as I felt the salty taste of the waves on my lips. I would just sit there, stroke my dog and realize that life was perfect and simple and enjoyable. That I was tiny compared to that ocean but that it was alright. My dog died some two years ago and I have never found the courage to go, sit and lean against that lighthouse again.

    I had a dog as well, he died some three months ago, he was only six months old, some mean people poisoned him. He was a Labrador Retriever, and one of the gentlest dogs I have ever seen, and crazy about guests. And he was a great, great friend, always up for a game. Humans should learn from dogs about loyalty, really... Dog will always walk with you, always will have time for you, whenever you come home, he will greet you with joy, wagging his tail. I remember when I took him, everyone told me how it was a great obligation - and it is, at times it is quite an obligation. But when he passed away, I realized how the place is somehow empty, and I would carriy twice the burden if I could bring him back.

    boom-moo wrote:
    I do rely on my computer a lot as well, but it doesn't prevent me from enjoying any other of the little pleasures that I love: reading, writing, making puzzles, and talking to people. I have a Facebook account (that I never use) and I was surprised when all my friends (the ones who live close by) sent me friending requests.

    I also rarely use Facebook, and made an account for the sake of some cousins that live in other towns. I actually used to loath it. Now I show up now and then, but still I think I have posted something on that wall three times in six months.

    And about cell-phones. I hate them, always did, and always will. I had no intention of buying one, but received it as a birthday present. And it's funny how things change in communication. When I was a kid, and some other kid wanted me to go out, he would stand under my window (I live in an apartment on the first floor) and yell "Daaaankoooo!" Then people would call me on my home phone, but since the cell-phones entered the picture, almost no one calls me on my home-phone, and interestingly, many of them are ashamed if someone else would pick up the phone, and they would have to present themselves or something. They are so used to contacting a person directly without need to introduce, that now it's kind of unsettling thing if someone else answers Then you've got all these strategies, like, 'I'll ring you at your cell-phone, and then I'll call you at your home...' Which is ridiculous...

    I congratulate one of my friends, he still hasn't got a cell-phone, and nowadays that's quite an achievement

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  • Avatar of illegalferret

    illegalferret

    [159]Feb 19, 2010
    • member since: 05/16/07
    • level: 25
    • rank: Coconut Phone
    • posts: 4,912

    *Crashes into the raising sun* It's the weekend everyone!! Woop!!

    I must addmit i have facebook and use it a lot! Mainly to keep in contact for free with my friends from home and around the world, i also love things like IM so that i can chat with my twin sis who's at uni miles and miles away from me. I know i could (and probably should) call her but its cheeper to use IM. As for mobiles I've got one but only really use it for quick calls when im out and about to find out where friends are and for texting my family and friends with small bits of info which don't merit a phone call! In my student house we do have a landline which most of use to recieve phone calls from our parents, mine in particular phone twice a week and we talk for about an hour at time to make sure i'm fine! I think facebook and texting has its place but its still nice to have someone shout up the stairs "Sarah! Your mum's on the phone!"

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  • Avatar of boom-moo

    boom-moo

    [160]Feb 19, 2010
    • member since: 02/05/07
    • level: 75
    • rank: Rowdy Roddy Piper
    • posts: 135,680

    I'm so sorry about your dog, Danko *hugs* I can't believe someone poisoned him I really despise animal abusers! Golden Retrievers and Labrador are probably my favourite breed, they are so intelligent, loyal and friendly... people should learn indeed a great deal from dogs, they are loving and faithful and only expect some love returned. I have always grown up with doggies and cats and I think a kid's life is much enriched because of that. I know how shallow one feels when we lose them, I'm so so sorry. How was he called? Here's my dog, Hotz (Basque for 'Cold' ). He was an adorable Samoy that lived for almost 15 years, pretty good for his breed:

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    This is Kika, my kitty:

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    Lol, yeah I remember how it was to be call and be called at the top of someone's lungs to go out and then to come back for lunch. My neighbourhood is pretty quiet so kids still do that here, I always remember it with a smile.


    Danko wrote:
    They are so used to contacting a person directly without need to introduce, that now it's kind of unsettling thing if someone else answers Then you've got all these strategies, like, 'I'll ring you at your cell-phone, and then I'll call you at your home...' Which is ridiculous
    That is very true, we are becoming robotized somehow. I gotta reckon that I've always hated speaking on the phone, so I only pick up the landline when strictly necessary (and I don't consider it to be strictly necessary when I'm alone and by glancing at the number I can tell it's not for me )


    illegalferret wrote:
    *Crashes into the raising sun* It's the weekend everyone!! Woop!!
    Yay Hello Sarah! *waves so she joins in our table* Using Fb a lot is nothing to be ashamed of, whatever works for you is fine And I see your point, it is a great means to keep in contact with people who are far away and instant messengers are terrific to save on phone bills indeed. We are all in different situations but which I'm really pleased about is that we all found this pub to hang around and share a bit of our lives.



    *huggles her Merlin friends*


    illegalferret wrote:
    it's still nice to have someone shout up the stairs "Sarah! Your mum's on the phone!"
    It is indeed. I remember the feeling when I was living in Ireland and I used to talk to my parents twice a week as well. My roomies also got calls and it was also nice to give them a shout and see their beaming faces as they approached the phone

    Edited on 02/19/2010 11:41am
    Edited 2 total times.
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