Mission: Impossible

Season 1 Episode 22

The Confession

1
Aired Saturday 9:00 PM Feb 25, 1967 on CBS
7.0
out of 10
User Rating
30 votes
1

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Episode Summary

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The Confession
AIRED:

The team must break a Communist assassin who killed a U.S. Senator.   The public assumes he was working for his government, but the Secretary believes someone else may be involved.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A good episode. Not a great episode, but a good one.

    7.0
    Having changed Barney and Willie's explanatory photographs with standard portraits in the last episode, here they're back to the originals, leading one to wonder why Dan would keep shifting his picture collection around.



    Someone made a good point: there was really no reason for Dan to be on this mission, and a good reason not to have him there; he's no artist. Considering that the show had already started cutting back on his presence in the episodes, this would have been a good one for it. After all, someone had to paint that portrait of McMillan in the first place, so why not just use him or her? There could have been an additional complication: McMillan could have insisted on using a pose entirely different from the pre-planned one. Probably there were two reasons why they didn't take the sensible route: we would have missed out on the rather nifty gimmick of "instant painting" (even better than painting by numbers!), and they needed the required, unexpected complication--in this case, McMillan attempting to touch up the painting himself. Dan's explanation--that he had originally had blue paint in that spot, and of course yellow and blue make green--was rather lame, and it's incredible that McMillan, an artist himself, fell for it.



    Apart from that, the episode was rather fun. Rollin looked like he was having a good time playing the low-class, tough-talking hood who got stuck in the same cell with Solowiecheck. Solowiecheck, on the other hand, came across as something of a wimp, which is not something you'd expect to find in a hired assassin. Rollin's preparations for an escape should have been obvious to the veriest dunce, yet he ended up having to spell it out for Solowiecheck--another weakness in the show.



    Willie's strength was not required for this mission--he actually got to play an interactive role, as the reporter who was really Rollin's colleague. He did a pretty nice job of it. I liked how he didn't actually have to pull out a gun to get Rollin to leave his car--he just started to reach.



    Rollin, as usual, did a good job of stalling around when it appeared that McMillan wasn't going to oblige with a confession. One thing did not ring true--when Townsend started to step into the picture, Rollin said nothing. You'd think that he would have called out Townsend's name, or at least exclaimed, "YOU!" It seemed like quite a long moment before Solowiecheck blurted out, "You're dead!" and Cinnamon realized who it had to be.



    They did have a closing comment for the show, and a rather punnish one at that--referring to McMillan's and Townsend's "overexposure". However, it didn't seem forced, like so many of the remake's closing remarks were. All the the team were chatting around--Willie teasing Rollin that he was a good actor, as though it was a new discovery, Rollin asking about how it looked, etc, so that Dan's comment blended in.moreless
Steven Hill

Steven Hill

Daniel Briggs

Barbara Bain

Barbara Bain

Cinnamon Carter

Greg Morris

Greg Morris

Barney Collier

Martin Landau

Martin Landau

Rollin Hand

Peter Lupus

Peter Lupus

Willy Armitage

Bob Johnson

Bob Johnson

IMF Voice on Tape (uncredited)

Pat Hingle

Pat Hingle

R.J. McMillan

Guest Star

David Sheiner

David Sheiner

Andreas Solowiechek

Guest Star

Kent Smith

Kent Smith

Senator William Townsend

Guest Star

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Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (7)

    • The police van leaves the jailhouse before Willie does, yet Willie somehow gets far enough ahead of it that he can stop and wait for it to pass him.

    • After McMillan tries to touch up his portrait with yellow--only to have it turn green--Briggs steps over, takes his paintbrush back, and explains that he had blue paint underneath, which mixed with the yellow to make green. As they walk away, the two green brush strokes have disappeared.

    • Dan tosses aside the picture of Willie during the dossier scene, but as seen later Willie is part of the team.

    • Wouldn't broadcasting Rollin's picture over the air to as many people as were said to be watching along with his confession to Solowiechek that he wasn't actually a criminal pretty much destroy his anonymity and ruin his ability to act effectively anymore as a secret agent?

    • Why is Dan on this mission as an artist? His presence isn't required and his lack of artistic skills actually endanger it. Why didn't he just get an artist from the dossier? Instead Barney has to come up with a gimmick to make Dan look like an artist, which even Dan points out is risky if McMillian messes with the portrait.

    • All of the Guard's dialogue at the jailhouse when Solowiechek is first put in the cell is badly over-dubbed.

    • Trivia: Dan destroys the tape himself in a tank of acid.

  • QUOTES (1)

  • NOTES (1)

    • The character's name Solowiechek is a play on the name of production executive Herbert Solow, who mock-prodded writers to include his name in scripts.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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