Monk

Season 3 Episode 6

Mr. Monk and the Girl Who Cried Wolf

1
Aired Friday 9:00 PM Jul 30, 2004 on USA
SUBMIT REVIEW

Episode Fan Reviews (3)

4.9
out of 10
Average
310 votes
  • This was suppose to be Sharona's farewell

    6.5
    If you look at the production code you will see this was the last episode Bitty Schram worked on before leaving. And when the season continued with the episode Mr. Monk and the goldfish which inroduced Natalie; it was said that Sharona remarried her ex who was in this episode. To be frank I found it not so credible because the last time her ex was there he was a jerk. And I can't believe she went back to him. I'm glad that when she came back she was no longer with him.
  • What season is this from?

    8.0
    I think this episode shows what I've been contending for a while - each season has good episodes and bad episodes. Okay, maybe this year they frontloaded the so-so episodes, but I think you could have shown "...Cried Wolf" in Season 2 or Season 3 and nobody would say, "Oh, this is a not-so-good Season 3 episode."

    In other words, this episode is...well, average. Or a little better. Just like many of the episodes.

    We're back to Adrian without the overacting moments they occasionally indulge Tony Shalhoub by providing. They didn't overdo his illness moments (the nurse stuff at his apartment could have gone on much longer, and thankfully didn't), and the only really extended scene, Monk battling it out with Howard Krenshaw (Ted Bagley), gave us a different side of Monk - neurotic vs. neurotic, to the death! It was interesting watch Adrian get shout-out-loud mad.

    Otherwise Monk is the persistent long-standing friend to Sharona - neither he or Disher are willing to give up on her. Ted Levine is I think a little ill-served here - Stottlemeyer doesn't really get a chance to show much sympathy here. There are moments when he clearly thinks Sharona is nuts, and not so much when he gets to make a definite statement of faith in her before the proof of her story shows up at the end. Ted Levine packs more emotional punch into the scene where he empathizes with Monk having to go into a parking garage.

    Bitty Schram does a good job of a woman being driven to the brink of insanity and/or self-doubt. She seems a little weak and non-confrontational in spots, but presumably the killers are working with a good knowledge of her psychological make-up and are good at exploiting those weaknesses for maximum effect.

    The mystery is a little more mysterious (probably the best of the season to date), in part because like the occasional Columbo episode, we see a murder still underway (check out "A Stitch in Crime" with Leonard Nimoy). We don't actually see the real crime until the third act or so, and it's portrayed in an appropriate chilling method without the blood and gore of the last couple of episodes. Of course that means they have to slip in the blood and gore into the "haunting" scenes. *sigh* The ability of the killer(s) to track down Sharona wherever she was and seemingly teleport in and out (she couldn't have been out of the bathroom for more then 10 seconds at Kroger's office) gave those scenes a regrettable "Friday the 13th" movie feel.

    Kudos though to Emma Caulfield, who's probably the most impressive guest killer of the season to date. She basically brings the same casual-killer vibe to the part that she did on Buffy.

    The rest of the cast, not so much. Stanley Kamel got a bit more chance to do some "real" psychologist scenes without them going for laughs with Monk, and it was nice to see a little more of him. Howard probably gave the next best performance, as we get another (presumed) OCD patient. Sharona's husband Trevor barely made an impression (neither did Benjy, once again), and is the whole family shape-changing mutants? I expect Sharona to show up played by a different actress one of these days - Benjy and Trevor keep changing faces, so why not? :)

    Oh, that brings us to...Niecy Nash as Nurse Varla. Although she actually solves the case, she's a really annoying and overblown character. Granted, Sharona's not at her best, but we've got to question her judgement if she ever thought Varla was a qualified substitute to work for Adrian. It's also hard to believe she's a nurse - some of her line delivery ("I'm going to treat you like a man.") was both painful and insulting to the character - both her character and Adrian. As a nurse we're supposed to believe she has no understanding of what mental patients go through? This seems to be one of the show's occasional lapses into playing mental problems for really cheap and unbelievable laughs (pipe-in-the-head guy from "...12th Man" is another), and just get us to "care" for Adrian. Once she toned it down a bit after the first apartment scene, Ms. Nash was a little more easy to watch, but I'd have to say she's not a character I'd ever want to see again.

    At least one cute in-joke - Ted Bagley (Howard) and Jerry Levine (director) played a married couple on Will & Grace.

    Overall, I'd rate this around a 7-8. It was a clever mystery, a good guest killer, and all the regulars are excellent, and there are definitely a few keeper scenes (the OCD Patient War in Kroger's office. But the cheap laughs with Nurse Varla and the absurdity of the efforts the killer(s) go prior to the crime force me to mark it down a point or two.
  • Has Sharonna gone crazy? Only Adrian Monk can solve the case of the invisible dead guy

    10
    Such a great episode and such an impressing episode I thought. The character of Varla is wise-cracking and has the best lines. Emma Caulfield did a great job also of making you think she was just the understanding teacher, and then Wham! She turns out to be one of the bad guys. Didn\'t see that one comming. The story line was great. When I first saw they dead man, I screamed! Screwdriver. Head. Good stuff. Classic. If I saw a creepy, bloody man and noones else did, I would believe I was crazy too. Poor Sharona, I would hate to have to be in a situation like that, where you have to question yourself.
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