Monk

Season 4 Episode 16

Mr. Monk Gets Jury Duty

1
Aired Friday 9:00 PM Mar 17, 2006 on USA
9.7
out of 10
User Rating
480 votes
13

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Monk is summoned to jury duty against his wishes and must solve two crimes: he has to convince the jury the defendant is not guilty, and solve the mystery of a corpse outside the jury room's window.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • i love this episode so much!

    9.8
    i don't know why but i love this episode so much!



    i'm thinkking it is because i got a little frustrated when all the other juries didn't belive monk, so when he was proved right was so happy!.



    plus i love the story too. i really don't know why i couldn't see it coming that the girl was involved O_o but oh well.



    i really felt bad for monk because nobody thought what he thought was importante so i felt sorry for him.





    overall i really liked this episode. i think that the story is reallly interesting, maybe is just my opinion but i just couldn't take my eyes away from the screen, and i wanted to whatch re-runs!, because it was so awesome!moreless
  • A great end to Season 4.

    9.4
    I really loved this episode. Monk showed his quirks in court and in the jury room, which annoyed the other jurors and made this episode a pleasure to watch. I believe it was very well written with an interesting plot and a lot of \"Monkish\" moments. Although good enough to be an end to a marvelous season, (the first half was better though)I don\'t think I would consider this one of my favorites. The DVD is out- and I am definitely planning on purchasing it. Overall, a great episode and one that I would recommend watching to any Monk fan!moreless
  • Great send-off!

    9.5
    I particularly enjoyed this episode. It was interesting to see how regular people interacted with Monk and his issues. The way the twelve jurors slowly came to the decision that Monk's not totally crazy made me feel good. However the moment in court when Natalie was handing Monk a wipe while everyone was looking at him kind of bothered me. Nevertheless, the end especially blew me away; I was intrigued how the woman escaped in such an interesting way-watching a murderer carry out the rest of her plan was fun to interpret. Overall, great episode; can't wait for season five.moreless
  • Season 4 ends fairly well.

    7.5
    Before "Gets Jury Duty", Peter Wolk wrote "Gets Fired" from Season 3 which is a great episode which allows everyone involved to shine. His second episode though isn't as successful although it's not bad.



    One of the main problems is that he took too much from "Twelve Angry Men". The plot line like "Gets Married" is great for Monk and a really given. However so much was taken that it was less of a homage and more of a rip-off of the movie. Monk is well-grounded in this episode and it's interesting to see him work with a jury and try to convince them his way. It's also an episode that we don't see an over excessive use of his phobias, fears, and obsessions like most episodes in the last few seasons. Sure the I.D. scene went on way too long, but that's really the only time the comedy gets out of hand. It's a great development for Monk to be able to work with a large group like a jury.



    Natalie is there to get the ball rolling and comes off quite a bit shrill here and more or less like a kindergarten teacher than a partner/friend. Other than the first couple of scenes and an annoying I.D. scene, she doesn't get to do too much here which can or can not be a good thing depending on how much you like her which I don't, so it's a good thing for she's in poor form really in this season especially with a couple of exceptions.



    Stottlemeyer and Disher are really underused here and are more there just to complete the plotline instead of doing anything useful. They come off rather cartoonish here.



    The supporting cast is very well cast although with no big names. Also, the mystery is very interesting and Monk solving two mysteries while in a jury room is interesting as well and sort of like in "Paperboy" where he solves two cases by reading one newspaper and of course the main case. Finally, the humor I like said isn't overplayed much except the I.D. scene. So overall, "Gets Jury Duty" is one of the better Season 4 episodes if the other regulars could have been used more usefully and they could have ripped off less from "Twelve Angry Men".moreless
  • the best episode ever

    10
    this is the best episode of monk it was truely hillarios with the arguments of monk and natallie about the id and no idea i laughed for a long time this is the episode that knowone will ever forget.i dont mind watching it again. i hope monk has many more seasons in the future. m o n k i s t h e b e s t s h o w o n t e l e v i s i o n. i w i l l n e v e r f o r g e t it.moreless

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (7)

    • In this episode, Monk has difficulty saying the word "butt." However, in "Mr. Monk Goes to the Office," he had no trouble saying "Caucasian buttocks."

    • How did Juror 12 get a gun into the jury room when it's supposed to be secure?

    • The prisoner was being transferred from local to federal custody. The local (state) and federal courts do not share courthouses in San Francisco, so there would have been no reason to make the transfer in the lobby of the local (state) court.

    • Given that the proceeding would have ended in a mistrial, the evidence would have been needed for the new trial and would not have been left in the jury room unattended after the jurors were dismissed.

    • It is surprising that none of the jurors, court guards or judge seem to recognize Mr. Monk. Given how often he participates in criminal cases, the judge and court officers at least should be familiar with him.

    • A black safety pad is clearly seen in the dumpster under the garbage bags when the criminals come down the garbage chute, with the level of garbage near the top. When they open the side of the dumpster, the level of garbage has dropped significantly and the pad has vanished.

    • When Juror No. 12/Pat is talking on her cell phone in the motel regarding her airplane reservation, she confirms that it is a flight to Bôgota (the capital of Colombia), but the closed captions cite it as a flight to Buenos Aires (the capital of Argentina).

  • QUOTES (29)

    • Monk: You know, I usually don't like shaking hands, but if I ever met the man who invented Tupperware, I would shake his hand.
      Natalie: I think he might be dead.
      Monk: But I would still shake his hand because he's probably perfectly preserved.

    • Monk: (reacting to an envelope in Natalie's hand) I've been drafted. They've reinstated the draft.

    • Natalie: I can't believe they're still renovating this place. They should put up a sign: "Your tax dollars not at work."

    • Monk: Don't get me wrong. It's a great system. It really is the best justice system in the world.
      Natalie: I agree.
      Monk: I just don't want to be part of it.
      Natalie: Mr. Monk, what if everybody felt that way?
      Monk: Everybody does.

    • Monk: I work alone. I'm a lone wolf.
      Natalie: You're a lone wolf.
      Monk: Even when I was on the force, I didn't like having a partner. I can't work with other people.
      Natalie: Okay, well, I think that's sad.
      Monk: I agree. It's very sad.

    • Monk: Thank you, Natalie. I know you mean well. I'd rather be sucked out of an airplane window.

    • Reporter: (on television) Sergeant! Sergeant Stottlemeyer! Excuse me, can we get a word, please?
      Stottlemeyer: No comment.
      Reporter Sergeant Stottlemeyer!
      Stottlemeyer: Actually, it's Captain.
      Disher: Yeah, Captain Leland Stottlemeyer, with three Ts. Four, if you count the one in "Captain."

    • Jury Clerk: If you do not hear your name, you are excused.
      Monk: Here it comes.
      Jury Clerk: (reading) Adrian Monk.
      Monk: There it is.

    • Agent Lapides: (to an envelope he's holding to his ear) What's that, sir? Yeah. I'll tell him. (to Stottlemeyer) The attorney general says, "Don't screw it up."

    • Judge Rienzo: And you are?
      Monk: Adrian Monk. Capital A, small d, small r, small i, small a, small n, space...
      Judge: Thank you, Mr. Monk. I think we have it.

    • Monk: Your honor, I will not be able to serve today, unfortunately, for a number of reasons. First off, uh, there's the bathroom (pause) situation. I can't share a bathroom. I just can't. You can ask Natalie. Natalie?
      Natalie: Yeah, he's persnickety. He's very persnickety. He's persnickety squared.

    • Judge Rienzo: Mr. Monk, I have seen hundreds of people pretend to be disturbed to avoid jury duty, but you, sir, are in a class by yourself.
      Monk: You're too kind.
      Judge: Well, it's not going to work, sir. You have a seat, Mr. Monk.
      Monk: Objection.
      Judge: You are juror number eleven.

    • Judge Rienzo: Whose phone was that?
      Monk: It's hers, your honor. Number three. And she fell asleep. Yeah, you. Number eight, your honor.
      Judge: Nobody likes a tattletale.
      Monk: I think number nine is a tattletale.
      Judge: That'll do, Mr. Monk.

    • Juror: What are you doing?
      Monk: I was making them even, so we can all concentrate and not be disturbed by uneven venetian blinds.

    • Monk: Do you mind if we trade seats?
      Juror: Why?
      Monk: I'd rather be number ten. It's my favorite number. It's kind of important to me.
      Mr. Cobb: You know what, pal? Nobody's trading anything with you. Now sit down, okay? I mean it. Sit! Okay?

    • Monk: When I'm ready, I'll tell you the solution. That's how it works.

    • Monk: Here's the thing. I don't like working with partners.
      Foreman: Well, like it or not, you've got eleven partners now.

    • Disher: Sir, could you repeat that, please?
      Stottlemeyer: Yeah. What part?
      Disher: Everything after "Pay attention. I'm only going to say this once."

    • Foreman: Did you talk to the judge?
      Bailiff: He says it's too late. He's already sent the alternates home. You're stuck with [Monk].

    • Mr. Cobb: What the hell kind of detective are you?
      Monk: I'm the kind of detective who wonders why someone would take the time to wipe off the handle but not the blade.

    • Monk: (from the window) There's a body in the dumpster!
      Natalie: You want a hot toddy and mustard?

    • Patel: We should not listen to this man. He is ruining America for everybody!

    • Foreman: Six to six. We go into extra innings.

    • Monk: (from window) Who is she?
      Natalie: No ID.
      Monk: No idea?
      (repeated several times)
      Natalie: No ID!
      Disher: No ID!
      Monk: Check her identification!
      Natalie and Disher: No ID!
      Monk: Are those orthopedic shoes?

    • Mr. Cobb: What are you doing?
      Monk: (whispers) You were smoking [in bed].
      Mr. Cobb: I'm allowed to smoke. Read the sign.
      Monk: It's keeping me awake. And you're going to start a fire.
      Mr. Cobb: Then there's no problem. You're awake, right? If there's a fire, you'll see it and you put it out, right? Hey, right?

    • Disher: Captain, [Escobar] just said he was going to scratch his nose.
      Stottlemeyer: Okay.
      Disher: It's the way he said it. It was like a threat.
      Stottlemeyer: He threatened to scratch his nose.

    • Juror: Killing someone to get on a jury. That's a first.

    • Patel: (to Natalie) You should listen to this man. He is good for America.

    • Monk: I think I'll stay and straighten up [the jury room].
      Natalie: No. (leaves the room) We're going...

  • NOTES (3)

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • Monk: If I ever met the inventor of Tupperware, I would shake his hand.
      Earl Silas Tupper (1907-1983) invented Tupperware's air-tight seal in 1942. Monk, born in the late 1950s, probably remembers Tupperware parties from his childhood.

    • This episode has numerous allusions to the classic film, Twelve Angry Men (1957), including a single juror initially voting not guilty, a juror speaking in a foreign accent, baseball references, and the same type of blade used to commit the crime in the film.

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