My Three Sons

Season 6 Episode 32

London Memories

0
Aired Unknown Apr 28, 1966 on ABC
6.9
out of 10
User Rating
13 votes
1

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Episode Summary

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London Memories
AIRED:
The Douglas family returns from a trip to Britain and as the family watches home movies of their vacation, the amateurish footage reveals the reason for Steve's current moodiness: He is still carrying a torch for a lovely widow.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Steve becomes a character any adult can identify with.

    10
    Anyone who has lived to adulthood can identify and empathize with Steve in this episode.



    After returning with the family from a trip to London, Steve seems withdrawn and melancholy, and a gaze at a picture finally tells the others why: while in London, he had fallen in love with a lovely widow and mother, who seemed to have similar feelings for him, but nevertheless gently refused his proposal of marriage. He is still carrying a torch for her once back in the states.



    My high rating for "London Memories" is partly personal. Most adults have known someone that they hoped to share their life with, but somehow or other had their plans thwarted. This episode can be therapy for such sentiments.

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Barry Livingston

Barry Livingston

Ernie Thompson Douglas (1963-72)

William Demarest

William Demarest

Uncle Charley O'Casey (1965-72)

Fred MacMurray

Fred MacMurray

Steve Douglas (1960-72)

Don Grady

Don Grady

Robbie Douglas (1960-71)

Stanley Livingston

Stanley Livingston

Chip Douglas (1960-72)

Ben Wright

Ben Wright

Sir Walter Marsden

Guest Star

Anna Lee

Anna Lee

Louise Allen

Guest Star

Richard Peel

Richard Peel

Freddy

Guest Star

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (0)

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  • NOTES (6)

    • You will please note (by checking the episode's production code number) that this was the last episode of the season in "air date" order only. Most television stations now show the episodes in "production order". For various reasons now under my control, this guide is laid out in that production order which is the order given to television stations airing the show. This doesn't necessarily mean the order in which they were filmed either - that's a whole other story!

    • Don't ever underestimate the power of television to convey an idea, just like classic literature. It can also be effective in identifying with a personal issue. For many people, this episode hits home, as they find themselves still carrying a torch for someone they once knew, trying to get over it. This episode surely reminds us that there is life afterward. [Thanks to "TV King" for this quote.]

    • Desilu Studios stock company actor Jerry Rush who appeared on many episodes of various Lucille Ball series, can be seen uncredited as the tall graying man in the first group of people waiting to be seated at the restaurant early on in the episode.

    • Both Anna Lee (1913-2004) and Ben Wright (1915-89) had recently filmed what was to become one of the greatest motion pictures of all time, Robert Wise's production of "The Sound of Music" (1965) at 20th Century Fox Studios.


    • The original on-screen credit says the episode was Written by George Tibbles. However, the original CBS Synopsis sheet erroneously says it was Written by Douglas Tibbles.

    • Interestingly, George Tibbles got his start as a writer working for earlier Don Fedderson Productions like "The Betty White Show" and "The Millionaire". He also wrote for the "Leave It To Beaver" series for Writer-Producers Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher. They were also the team behind the old "Amos and Andy" sitcom of the 50s. In the 60s they turned to horror-comedy with "The Munsters" (1964-66). It is here that both George Tibbles and Douglas Tibbles provided many scripts of this classic series, in addition to working on "Sons". George even co-wrote the original Screenplay for the family's Universal feature film, "Munster Go Home!" (1966), made after the series was cancelled. This by the way, was the first time the Munsters were actually seen in Color, the series having been lensed in drab Black and White. Note too that after "The Munsters" TV Series ended, George Tibbles created and wrote the late Ann Sheridan series "Pistols 'n Petticoats" with Connelly producing. Tibbles even co-wrote the show's theme music.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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