My Three Sons

Season 1 Episode 14

Mike's Brother

1
Aired Unknown Dec 29, 1960 on ABC
8.2
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Episode Summary

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Mike's Brother
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Constant comparison to his brother, Mike, leaves Robbie feeling inferior and angry—and their father has to face the consequences as Robbie and Mike are about to come to blows when Steve shows up just in the nick of time from work.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
    William Frawley

    William Frawley

    William Michael Francis 'Bub' O'Casey (1960-65)

    Fred MacMurray

    Fred MacMurray

    Steve Douglas (1960-72)

    Tim Considine

    Tim Considine

    Mike Douglas (1960-65)

    Don Grady

    Don Grady

    Robbie Douglas (1960-71)

    Stanley Livingston

    Stanley Livingston

    Chip Douglas (1960-72)

    Russ Whiteman

    Russ Whiteman

    Charlie Ellis

    Guest Star

    Russell Duke

    Russell Duke

    Barnaby Hawes

    Guest Star

    Arthur Lovejoy

    Arthur Lovejoy

    Mr. Fogelson

    Guest Star

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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    • TRIVIA (0)

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    • NOTES (4)

      • Never more obvious so far in the series, but in this episode particularly, it is plain to see that the view across the road from the Douglases is merely a large backdrop hanging from the rafters of the studio soundstage, which is in fact a gigantic blowup of a photograph of the real-life location.

      • For trivia sake, Steve's family station wagon - a Chevrolet, naturally to please the show's original sponsor - has the registration number JTN-127 (and in some episodes it's even JXN-127!) and is clearly seen in many episodes, well into the color years of the show, even though by the third season the Douglases have a new station wagon with the same number plate.

      • As mentioned in the last episode, look for the kitchen scene when Chip is trying to take a peek in the pot on the stove. This is the longer complete scene and is used here without music as the abridged piece was scored with music at the beginning of the previous episode.

      • Born in 1922, John William McGreevey is the show's current Story Consultant during this first season. He will become a frequent contributor of the program until the end of the seventh season, penning over 30 episodes. McGreevey began writing plays and radio scripts while a student in English/Theatre at Indiana University, 1938-1942. Moving to Arizona shortly after his marriage in 1944, McGreevey worked as a writer and announcer for radio station KTAR in Phoenix, and worked well as creator, writer, and director of a southwestern regional network radio show from 1948-1952. [His son Michael McGreevey was born in Phoenix is 1948; and would grow up to become a writer like his father]. During the early 1950's McGreevey began concentrating on live television, writing dramas for Armstrong Circle Theatre, Lux Video Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One, and Climax. He produced more scripts for the latter series than any other writer. In 1955 he made the transition to film and television and moved to Southern California. Since then he has written several hundred scripts for a wide variety of television series, as well as movie and mini-series scripts and adaptations for the stage. His most prominent television credits include co-creator and head writer for "Black Saddle" (1958-61), co-creator and Emmy nominee for "The Farmer's Daughter" (1961-64), and more than 30 stories for "Family Affair" (1966-70). Other shows include "Adventures in Paradise", "Bat Masterson", "The Flying Nun", "General Electric Theatre", "Gidget", "Grindl", "Hazel", "Ironside", "Laredo", and "Zane Grey Theatre". Probably the best known of McGreevey's writing credits was the series "The Waltons", for which he wrote more than 20 of the episodes aired and won an Emmy Award in 1974 for a special two-hour show the previous year titled 'An Easter Story'.

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