My Three Sons

Season 4 Episode 20

The Chaperone

0
Aired Unknown Jan 30, 1964 on ABC
7.9
out of 10
User Rating
4 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
The Chaperone
AIRED:
Bub is appointed chaperone to Robbie and his friends when they decide to have a costume party. Robbie feels it will dampen the party as Bub doesn't see eye to eye with them on the little matter of correct behaviour.

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Sunday
No results found.
Monday
No results found.
Tuesday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
  • W/Steve out of town,Robbie elects Bub to be a chaperone for a party for him and his friends.Despite Bub's initial rough handling of a situation,Bub ends up being a big party booster in the end.moreless

    10
    This another great black and white m3s eps.which imo the b&w eps.are the best w/few exceptions.This eps.clearly shows as many others do how important Bill Frawley's contributions to the show as Bub were.He comes across great in his interactions w/Robbie and his friends.The dream sequence is also great w/Mike trying to race Robbie in the horse and buggy.Watching these eps.makes one feel sad over the fact that Bub and later Mike would no longer be part of the fun.The show was never the same w/o these 2.Back in the 80's Camp Nickelodeon aired a very unusual print of this eps.The beginning credits show William Frawley as Bub while the announcer mentions and as Uncle Charley William Demarest.No doubt in trying to prepare new prints for syndication,the studio was forced to use whatever elements they had available to complete the show and didn't pay much attn.to matching up the right narration w/the right opening forcing them to hastily prepare a print for broadcast..The entire end credits for their print is also odd as it's completely w/o any sound or background musi till it comes to the ending viacon logo.This would be a an interesting item for Sons video collectors to check out.moreless
Meredith MacRae

Meredith MacRae

Sally Ann Morrison Douglas (1963-65)

Barry Livingston

Barry Livingston

Ernie Thompson Douglas (1963-72)

William Frawley

William Frawley

William Michael Francis 'Bub' O'Casey (1960-65)

Fred MacMurray

Fred MacMurray

Steve Douglas (1960-72)

Tim Considine

Tim Considine

Mike Douglas (1960-65)

Don Grady

Don Grady

Robbie Douglas (1960-71)

Quinn O'Hara

Quinn O'Hara

Betty McIver

Guest Star

Gale Gerber

Gale Gerber

Ethel Bigsby

Guest Star

Viola Harris

Viola Harris

Mrs. McIver

Guest Star

Hank Jones

Hank Jones

Jimmy Burns

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (0)

  • NOTES (5)

    • As Editor of this guide I was delighted to receive from Hank Jones in 2006 a copy of his latest literary exploit "Memories", chronicling the show business portion of his life. Hank and I have kept in periodical contact over the past five or so years and I am so grateful to receive a small credit in his book. For further details why, see Episode # 172.

    • As in Episode # 121 earlier in this season its a real revelation to see blonde haired actress Ronne Troup as an uncredited extra. Ronne appears in the background as one of the girls at Robbie's friend's costume party. For the non-initiated, the actress would become a series regular and end up playing Chip's future wife in the eleventh season of the show, which at this particular point was about seven years away.

    • Actor Hank Jones makes the first of seven appearances on the series as a school friend of Robbie's. Hank emailed me and was gracious in recalling incidents from his vast memory bank, which I am happy to put in the notes section of the shows he appeared in. He says that "In 1963, I was commuting between the San Francisco bay area and Hollywood (I was still going to Stanford University at the time). I drove eight hours in one direction and then back every weekend. I think my first MTS was to be filmed the day John F. Kennedy was shot, November 22, and I still had to make the trip and we carried on with the filming. My 'saving grace' on the program was dear "Dell" (Adell Sliff the show's Dialogue director). She showed me the ropes, as the show was my first real acting job. Dell showed me how important it was remembering just where my hands
      were and what I was wearing and all that stuff so that all the shots would match when it was edited into the final product".
      The former actor who retired from acting in 1981, is now a highly respected genealogist, a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists and the author of a number Genealogy books, the most recent being 'Psychic Roots: Serendipity and Intuition in Genealogy'. His roots to genealogy date back quite a while. As to his 'other life', apart from genealogical research, Hank had been in the entertainment field since he began his career as co-star of the old daytime "Tennessee Ernie Ford" TV show on ABC, logging 400 appearances on the program ("I heard the song 'Sixteen Tons' until it came out my ears!" he says); and during this period, he also recorded albums on RCA and Capitol Records. Hank then began a twenty year career as an actor in films and television. He was a featured player in many of the Walt Disney films of the 1960's and 1970's, which still come back to haunt him on television and Video today! However, his recollection of working on this TV series gives full due to the 'MacMurray Method'; his scenes acting with Fred MacMurray were often actually his 'reacting' to lines of dialogue as spoken off-camera by the aforementioned script girl, Adell Sliff! Fred was very rarely there. Close ups and two-shots of actors often being achieved after Fred's work was completed! The producers also had a hard and firm rule that MacMurray should only ever be in scenes with his own boys. Other boys or bit part actors could not be relied upon to come back months later and look the same as scenes that had already been shot. Don Grady was once quoted as saying that many times, the crew would hold a mop on a stick to approximate where the kids should be looking if MacMurray wasn't actually speaking to them in the scene which he would be inserted into at a later date. They even joked by calling the prop "Fred MacMop!"

      In addition Hank says that when he was first taken to meet Producer Ed Hartmann, he was outside Hartmann's office on the Desilu lot with his agent Elliott Wax of the William Morris agency. Up walked actor Robert Young, another client of Elliott's. Hank then recalls that Elliott said to him "Hank I'd like you to meet Robert..." and I jumped right in and blurted out: "Oh, I'd know Mr. Taylor anywhere!" Elliott turned green and Young just laughed, but Hank was absolutely mortified. Finally, he remembers that William Frawley seemed very old on this episode. "I remember him being almost 'led' around the set by the chief extra on the show and gently put on his mark."

      For further information regarding the extraordinary work and career of Hank Jones, please feel free to go to his website, www.hankjones.com

    • This episode is important for the first appearance of incidental background music by Frank DeVol, that would soon become almost as famous (and hummable) as the show's original theme - the music that underscores the opening shot of the Douglas house that will be used literally hundreds of more times on upcoming episodes in different variations - from the next Season and well into the Color Years of the show.


    • Not to be confused with the Season Eight episode of the (near) identical title.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

More
Less