• 81
    Soccer Moms

    Soccer Moms

    Follow
    ABC
    Not all housewives are desperate. DeAnne Brooks takes immense pleasure in her perfect home, beautiful family and well-ordered life. Her one guilty pleasure is keeping tabs on her neighbors...but she's not spying, she's being vigilant. At the other end of the neighborhood is DeAnne's polar opposite, Jamie Cane. Jamie's a harried, somewhat cynical single mom trying to make a living as a PI, so housework is simply not a priority. But when DeAnne meets Jamie, they quickly realize that their opposing strengths make them an excellent team. While Jamie is an ex-cop, DeAnne has learned all she knows about private investigation by watching detective shows and movies. Together they discover what the women of Wisteria Lane already know: there are a lot of secrets in the suburbs.moreless
  • 82
    Black-ish

    Black-ish

    Follow
    ABC
    A father living in an upper-middle class neighborhood struggles to raise his children while ensuring they have a sense of cultural identity. Complicating his efforts is the fact that there are constant contradictions coming from his liberal wife, old-school father and his own color-blind kids.moreless
  • 83
    Galavant

    Galavant

    Follow
    ABC
    A musical fairy tale that centers on a Prince named Galavant. It follows his quest for revenge against the king who stole his one true love.
  • 84
    Laverne & Shirley

    Laverne & Shirley

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1983)
    Laverne and Shirley debuted as a mid-season replacement in January of 1976 and was an instant hit ranking number three in the Nielsen ratings for the 1975-1976 season.

    On Happy Days, Laverne De Fazio and Shirley Feeney were two girls who were love interests for Richie Cunningham and Fonzie. Their occasional appearances led to their own series which takes place in the same city as Happy Days: Milwaukee, Wisconsin, during the 1950s and 1960s.

    Laverne and Shirley are lower-society girls who share an apartment and work together at the Shotz Brewery as bottlecappers. Laverne and Shirley are very different people. Laverne is feisty, quick-tempered, and man-hungry while Shirley is more naive and trusting and quite inexperienced when it comes to romance.

    Others in the cast includ Laverne's gruff father, Frank De Fazio, who runs the Pizza Bowl where Laverne and Shirley work on occasion. Edna Babish is the girls' landlady who later marries Frank. Carmine "The Bag Ragu" Ragusa is a singer/dancer who has an on-again, off-again romance with Shirley. The other two main characters of the series are the male counterparts of Laverne and Shirley. Lenny Kosnowski and Andrew "Squiggy" Squiggman live upstairs in the same apartment building as Laverne and Shirley and, also, work at the brewery. They constantly enter the girls' apartment with an annoying "hello."

    In 1980, the series changed scenery. The girls want something new so they decide to move to California. Lenny and Squiggy follow them along with Frank, Edna, and Carmine. The girls want to get into movies while Frank and Edna open a restaurant, Cowboy Bill's. New characters included stuntman and apartment building manager Sonny St. Jacques and neighbor and model Rhonda Lee.

    In 1982, Cindy Williams left the series with her character marrying Walter Meany, a military man who was assigned overseas.

    Main Title Theme Song "Making Our Dreams Come True" - written by Norman Gimbel and Charles Fox; performed by Cyndi Grecco

    ABC Broadcast History January 27, 1976 - July, 1979 ---- Tuesdays ---- 8:30 P.M. August, 1979 - December, 1979 ---- Thursdays ---- 8:00 P.M. December, 1979 - February, 1980 ---- Mondays ---- 8:00 P.M. February, 1980 - May, 1983 ---- Tuesdays ---- 8:30 P.M.

    Nielsen Ratings - Top 30 Season 1 (1975-1976) #3 (27.5) Season 2 (1976-1977) #2 (30.9) Season 3 (1977-1978) #1 (31.6) Season 4 (1978-1979) #1 (30.5) Season 5 (1979-1980) Not In Top 30 Season 6 (1980-1981) #20 (tie) (20.6) Season 7 (1981-1982) #20 (19.9) Season 8 (1982-1983) #25 (17.8)

    Emmy Awards Nominations Outstanding Costume Design for a Series 1979 - Alfred E. Lehman

    (source: Academy of Television Arts & Sciences)

    Golden Globe Awards Nominations Best Television Series - Musical or Comedy 1977 1978

    Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy 1978 - Cindy Williams 1978 - Penny Marshall 1979 - Penny Marshall 1980 - Penny Marshall

    First Telecast: January 27, 1976 Last Telecast: May 10, 1983 Episodes: 178 color episodes plus one reunion specialmoreless
  • 85
    Growing Pains

    Growing Pains

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1992)
    Growing Pains was sitcom originally aired on ABC from September 1985 to April 1992. It went through seven very succesful seasons with a total of 166 episodes, each special in its own way. Growing Pains was about a family of five, the Seavers, who lived on Long Island, New York. Jason Seaver was the father, a psychiatrist, who had his practice at home. (From the 1st to the 5th season) Maggie, his wife, was a journalist who worked for the Long Island newspaper in the first three seasons of the sitcom. She got a job as the news anchor for channel 19 news and worked there through the middle of the 5th season when she decided to stay at home. Jason moved his practice out of the house to an office. During the last seasons, she worked at home writing a consumer awareness column for the local newspaper.

    Together, Maggie and Jason raised four children. They often worried about "who would stay home with the baby" or would "be there for the kids" and the responsibility was often juggled, even fought over, between the two parents but eventually settled. The youngest, Chrissy, wasn't born until the 4th season and suddenly "grew up" from being a toddler to a five year old between the 5th and 6th seasons. The oldest of the four children was Mike. A dare-devil yet charming, Mike helped Growing Pains ratings shoot sky high and quickly became the 80's pin up boy appearing on cover after cover of teen magazines.

    During the 4th season, Mike moved out of the house but not too far...to the loft above the garage. The 2nd oldest was Carol. Carol was the complete opposite of Mike. She was a straight "A" student, (a "nerd" according to her brothers), struggling with social obstacles at school, just like most teenage girls. From wanting a nose job, to dealing with the death of her boyfriend, (Sandy, played by Matthew Perry) to tolerating her roommate at Columbia University, Carol added a lot of comedy as well as a serious side to the show. Next was little Ben. Ben was a clever "con-artist" in the beginning and a little more naive during his teen years, sometimes being his brother's sidekick and other times his worst nightmare.

    And of course, Mr. Leonardo DiCaprio-- then only 16 years old-- joined the cast during the final season when the show felt their ratings were dropping. The Seavers, reluctantly at first, took in a homeless boy, Luke Brower. Luke was one of Mike's students at the Community Health Clinic and quickly became one of the Seavers. Luke left with his father, George, during the end of the final season to help him open up a truck stop in Tuscon. The sitcom ended before Luke ever came back; Maggie got a job in Washington D.C. which required the family to move. In the last episode, the Seaver family gathered around a picnic blanket on the floor of their empty living room, remembering all their pastimes.

    Theme Song Lyrics

    Show me that smile again, (Oh, show me that smile) Don't waste another minute on your cryin', We're nowhere near the end (We're no where near) The best is ready to begin. As long as we've got each other, We got the world spinnin' right in our hands, Baby you and me, we gotta be, The luckiest dreamers who never keep dreaming. As long as we keep on givin' We can take anything that comes our way Baby, rain or shine All the time We got each other Sharin' the laughter and lovemoreless
  • 86
    Dinosaurs

    Dinosaurs

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1994)
    The show was conceived by the Muppet masters at Jim Henson Productions, who wanted to do a sitcom-style show with puppets using the animatronics processes the company had developed. The brain trust settled on the idea of doing a straightforward show about a family that happened to be composed of dinosaurs. Henson Productions offshoot The Creature Shop developed huge, lifelike puppets that could be operated from inside by puppeteers, and Brian Henson, Jim's son, devised a process called ‘audio animatronics' to bring the facial expressions of these puppets to life. The shows premise mixed elements of The Flintstones and The Simpsons, focusing on a blue-collar family of dinosaurs. Earl, the father, worked for the Wesayso Corporation and leveled trees to make way for tract homes. His blustery qualities were balanced out by his even-tempered wife Fran. The Dino clan had three children: rebellious teen Robbie, shopaholic preteen Charlene, and Baby, a smart-alecky infant. Rounding out the family was Grandma Ethyl, who always seemed to be locked in a battle of wills with Earl. Other characters included B. P. Richfield, Earl's fearsome boss, and Roy Hess, a prehistoric swinger buddy of Earl's. Dinosaurs depicted dinosaur life as being very close to human life: they watched television, shopped at supermarkets, and held down nine-to-five jobs. This allowed the show to tackle relevant social concerns in their stories. For instance, in Steroids To Heaven Robbie tried to overcome feelings of inadequacy by building up his body with an artificial growth hormone called ‘thornoids.' You didn't expect a very special episode of Dinosaurs, now did you? In making the dinosaurs human-like, the show allowed itself a unique opportunity to comment on our foibles as human beings. Much like modern homo sapiens, the shows prehistoric protagonists wasted their precious resources and allowed themselves to stay bound to outmoded ways of thinking when they could turn things around by trying out more progressive ways of thinking. The latter concern was usually voiced by Robbie, who questioned many of his dinosaur family's customs. Dinosaurs managed to rack up 65 episodes before being cancelled in July of 1994. It is a memorable entry in the sitcom canon, not only for its use of technology but also for the social messages it passed on to its viewers...through a group of animatronic dinosaurs (who knew?).moreless
  • 87
    Doogie Howser, M.D.

    Doogie Howser, M.D.

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1993)
    Doogie Howser showed the coming of age of a teenage genius who was a board-certified surgeon by the time he was 16. At that tender age, Doogie (a childhood nickname for "Douglas") has to balance life with his parents and contemporaries and the demands of a career that's stressful even for adults. He has help and support from understanding parents Katherine and David Howser, the latter also a doctor, co-workers at the hospital who respect him despite his age, best friend Vinnie, and girlfriend Wanda. Doogie Howser, despite having a relatively short four year run, was popular among young adults of the early 1990s. The show catapulted star Neil Patrick Harris to fame.moreless
  • 88
    That Girl (1966)

    That Girl (1966)

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1971)
    Talented, young, and beautiful, and hoping to make a career as an actress, Ann Marie leaves her home in Brewster, New York and moves to Manhattan,where she acquires Apartment 4-D at 344 West 78th Street. Stories tenderly depict her world of joys and sorrows as she struggles to further a dream, supporting herself by taking various part-time jobs, cope with parents who don't understand her, and share the interests of her boyfriend, Don Hollinger, a reporter for Newsview magazine. Ann shared a romance with Don for five seasons and finally got engaged in the final season. Before they can could get married, the show was cancelled. Broadcast History: Sept. 8, 1966-Apr. 6, 1967, ABC Thursday at 9:30-10:00pm Apr. 13, 1967-Jan. 30, 1969, ABC Thursday at 9:00-9:30pm Feb. 6, 1969-Sept. 10, 1970, ABC Thursday at 8:00-8:30pm Sept. 25, 1970-Sept. 10, 1971, ABC Friday at 9:00-9:30pm The show never broke into the top 30 in the Nielsen ratings.moreless
  • 89
    McHale's Navy

    McHale's Navy

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1966)
    A Lively, Light-Hearted Romp Through The Pacific Theater Of Operations –

    An experienced South Pacific sea dog, by the name of Quinton McHale, was commissioned as a Lieutenant Commander into the U.S. Navy Reserve, at the start of World War II, and made the Skipper of the Torpedo Patrol (PT) Boat #73, stationed at the U.S. Naval Installation on the island of Taratupa, in the Southwest Pacific. Assigned to his command were 6 free-spirited, good-hearted Swabbies who loved to have fun, but who – Though they usually ignored Navy regulations – Did their jobs, and did them well, when duty called. The 73 'Family' included, among others, a con man and amateur Magician, a womanizing hunk, a dedicated Family man, a guitar-picking, moonshine-making Tennessee good ol' boy, and even a deserter from the Japanese Navy, who was an excellent cook. Second in command, was Ensign Charles Parker, a young spit-and-polish, by-the-book Officer from Chagrin Falls Ohio, who was somewhat of a klutz, but who always managed to come out on top of a situation, usually with the help of McHale and The Crew.

    McHale and his men were under the command of Base Commander Captain Wallace B. Binghamton (Known as 'Old Leadbottom' to McHale and his men), in whose side, McHale and his Crew were a constant thorn. Most episodes centered around Binghamton's trying to find way to get rid of McHale and his rule-bending 'Pirates' (One would be hard-pressed to see an episode of this series without the military term 'Court Martial' being mentioned, at least once), with McHale and his fun-loving 'Eightballs' scheming to keep Binghamton from doing so, their exemplary performance in battle, more times than not, getting them out troublesome situations.

    McHale's Navy was first presented a straight action drama, on ABC's Alcoa Premiere anthology series, in April of 1962. The pilot episode – Entitled Seven Against The Sea – Found enough of an audience that it was converted to a comedy series, which premiered on the ABC Television Network on the evening of Thursday, October 11th 1962, at 9:30 p.m. EST. It got off to somewhat of a slow start, opposite NBC's popular Hazel, but held it's own, and gained a small following. It cracked the top 25 in it's 2nd season ('63/'64), on Tuesday nights, in the 8:30 time-slot, with a strong lead-in from ABC's Combat, landing at #23, with a Nielsen rating of 22.8. But, from that point on, it was all uphill for McHale. In it's 3rd ('64/'65) & 4th ('65/'66) seasons, in a losing battle with CBS's powerhouse Red Skelton Hour, it was soon on it's way out. An attempt to boost it's sagging ratings, by moving McHale, his Crew, and Captain Binghamton to a base in Italy, in it's 4th and final season, proved to do more harm than good, and resulted in the cancellation of the series, in 1966.

    The series was popular enough with the public to prompt the production of two full-length theatrical-release motion pictures, during it's run. McHale's Navy, released by Universal Pictures in June of 1964, featured all the regular cast members from the series, and McHale's Navy Joins The Air Force, in July of '65, this one sans Borgnine. Both were 90-minute extended episodes of the series, and mildly popular, at best. A 1997 big-budget movie, based on the series, and with Tom Arnold as McHale, was a total flop. All three are available on VHS or DVD.

    Lately, it's been tough to catch McHale's Navy on TV. Programming Managers don't seem to realize just how many loyal fans the show still has, and just how many new fans the show would doubtless make, were more people allowed to experience it. However – McHale fans, rejoice! – Shout! Factory came to the rescue, and began releasing McHale's Navy, on DVD, in boxed sets, beginning on March 20th, 2007, with Season 1. Season 2 was released on September 11th, 2007, Season 3, on March 18th, 2008, and Season 4, on November 18th, '08.

    With a highly talented cast including Academy Award® winner Ernest Borgnine, comic genius Tim Conway, the one-of-a-kind comic talent of Joe Flynn, and a solid supporting cast, McHale's Navy was – And is – TV comedy at it's very finest.moreless
  • 90
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 91
    Darkwing Duck

    Darkwing Duck

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1992)
    The city of St. Canard is terrorized by thousands of criminals and supervillians, but the city has a protector, a phantom, who's evil's worst nightmare. His name is Darkwing Duck.

    Darkwing Duck Broadcast History Season 1 - first run syndication Seasons 2 and 3 - ABC Note: Seasons 1 and 2 aired simultaneously in the fall of 1991. All episodes, even the ABC-aired ones were included in the syndicated reruns after ABC stopped airing the series in December 1992. Darkwing Duck syndication history The first 65 episodes were released in first run syndication as part of the Disney Afternoon block of shows. After the series original run was finished, it remained in syndicated re-runs until 1994, and then returned from 1996-1997. Darkwing Duck commercially available episodes 8 episodes were release on VHS by Disney Home Video, but are currently out of print. See episode guide for which episodes were included on the videos.

    It should also be noted that the order the episodes (with the obvious exception of the pilot episode, "Darkly Dawns the Duck") originally aired is completely off from the timeline of events (For instance, "Just Us, Justice Ducks" aired before many of the heroes/villains involved are introduced).

    Darkwing Duck Awards and Award Nominations 1992 - Nominated for Young Artist Award for Outstanding New Animation Series

    Episodes:91 color episodes. Production Company:Disneymoreless
  • 92
    Malibu Country

    Malibu Country

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2013)
    A spurned country singer who moves to Los Angeles to jumpstart her career.
  • 93
    The Real McCoys

    The Real McCoys

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1963)
    The McCoy family moves from the mountains of West Virginia to California's San Fernando Valley. The leader of the clan is Grampa--a cranky old geezer with a distinctive voice and gait--but underneath it all, he has a heart of gold. Living with him are his grandson, Luke, and Luke's bride, Kate. Due to the death of Luke's parents, these three adults are raising Luke's teenage sister, Hassie, and his younger brother, Little Luke.moreless
  • 94
    Life As We Know It

    Life As We Know It

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2005)
    "Life As We Know It" was a show about high school life in Seattle, shown through the eyes of three teenage boys. Dino is the jock with secret sensitivity; Jonathan is an artist who sees life through a camera lens; and Ben is the A-student who will still never make his parents happy. The three are fast friends, and always talk about their favorite subject: girls and sex with girls. The series was based on British author Melvin Burgess' controversial novel "Doing It".moreless
  • 95
    Jem

    Jem

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1988)
    Showtime, Synergy. Those famous words were spoken by Jem throughout her three year run from 1985-1988. Jem was a beloved 80s rock cartoon that capitalized on the popularity of MTV that perfectly captured the decade's music, fashion and lingo. To this day, Jem is still considered a Truly Outrageous animated series that celebrates the power of love, friendship, ambition and rock 'n roll.

    Jerrica Benton's father left her a very special gift after he died. That gift was Synergy, a holographic computer system that can create realistic holograms of virtually anything. Using special star-shaped earrings, Synergy transforms Jerrica into the glamorous pop singer, Jem. Along with Kimber, Aja and Shana whom are called the Holograms, they have many adventures that take them to places in the US, France, China and Italy.

    Not far behind are their competition, the Misfits, a group led by Pizzazz with her friends Roxy and Stormer. Eventually both groups add a new member to their bands. Raya becomes the new drummer while Shana goes to guitar, and Jetta becomes the new saxophonist for the Misfits. With their additions, both Jem and the Holograms and the Misfits have many new adventures in Mexico, England, Shangri-La and across the U.S.

    The Stingers, a new trio, come to the States and begin to shake things up between Jem and the Holograms and the Misfits. Riot, Rapture and Minx begin to cause problems, all on their own. All three groups have a unique music showcased in the musical videos that appear in every episode.

    Jem originally premiered in 1985 in short segment cartoon inserts between two boys cartoons called Super Saturday/Sunday. Jem ran for three seasons from fall 1985 to spring 1988 with 65 total episodes. The show was then re-aired on the USA Network into early 1990.

    Cast of Characters Jerrica Benton is the owner and CEO of Starlight Music Company and The Starlight Foundation, which is a home to take care of foster girls. Both of these were inherited from her father, Emmet Benton, after he passed away. She grew up around musicians and technicians and is an independent business woman. Jem, Jerrica's singing persona, is the lead singer of the band Jem and the Holograms. Touching her star-shaped earrings and saying Showtime, Synergy or Show's over, Synergy, the Jem holographic image is created or disappears. Only The Holograms know that Jem and Jerrica are the same person. As Jem, Jerrica can let her hair down and let loose. Kimber Benton is Jerrica's younger sister. She is co-owner of Starlight Music Company and The Starlight Foundation. She plays keyboards and is the main songwriter/lyricist for the group. She is often impulsive, falling for the cute or dangerous guys. Aja Leith was the first foster girl to be adopted by Jacqui and Emmett Benton. She plays lead guitar in the Holograms. She is Jerrica's best friend. She is smart and very athletic. She is a jack-of-all trades on knowing how to do anything. Shana Elmsford was the second foster girl adopted by the Benton's. She played the drums until she left to work for a famous designer. She came back after The Talent Search and switched to her guitar. She designs the clothes for the Holograms and Starlight Girls. She has also had her fashions shown in Venice, Italy. Raya Carmen Alonso is the newest member of the Holograms. When Shana left the group, Raya won the Talent Search to be the new drummer. Coming from a Mexican background, Raya's the only girl among three brothers. Her father owns and operates a greenhouse. Synergy is a holographic computer built by Emmett Benton. She is contacted through Jerrica's earrings which project holographic images, sound and light. Synergy is kept at Starlight Mansion. She has all of the Holograms' music stored on file as well as Jacqui Benton's. Rio Pacheco is the road manager/engineer of Jem and the Holograms and Jerrica's boyfriend. He is also interested in Jem but has no clue that she and Jerrica are the same person. He doesn't like liars and deception. Countess Danielle Du Voisin is a very wealthy, renowned fashion designer that lives in Venice. She helps finance some of the Holograms' projects. She knows about fashions from all over the world. She is good friends with Howard Sands. Howard Sands is one of the top movie producers in the world. He helped produce the movie Starbright. Anthony Julian is a music director who is involved with Shana. He also directed the movie Starbright. Danse is a choreographer and naturally gifted dancer that works at a charity house called Haven House. Her real name is Giselle Dvorak. Her mother was a famous prima ballerina in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. She is good friends with Video. Video is an aspiring filmmaker. Her real name is Vivian Montgomery. She is a companion to the Holograms and shoots most of their music videos. Lin-Z Pierce is a Music TV Show Host. She travels to many places and stays on top of the music world. She is good friends with Anthony Julian and Video. The Misfits Pizzazz is the lead singer and plays guitar. Her real name is Phyllis Gabor but she gets easily angered when she is called by it. Her father is very rich and has given her everything that she's ever asked for. She's a spoiled, selfish, rich girl that wants money and fame. She craves her father's attention. She later has an obsession with Riot of the Stingers when they come to town. She uses Roxy and Stormer to her advantage. Roxy plays guitar. Her real name is Roxanne Pelligrini and is originally from Philadelphia, the town where she dropped out of high school. She is a very street wise and tough as nails. She takes credit for things that she did not create and goes to any length to get her way, even if it meant lying, cheating and stealing to do it. Stormer plays keyboard and sometimes guitar. She is the main song writer of the Misfits. Her real name is Mary Phillips. She has a brother, Craig, who dates Aja. Stormer is more sympathetic to causes that the other Misfits oppose. Jetta is the newest member that plays saxophone. Her real name is Sheila Burns and comes from England. She was playing with the Tinkerbellies when the Misfits decided to add her as a new member. With Pizzazz's father's influence and money, she was able to attain her green card. Eric Raymond used to work for Emmett Benton. He inherited half of Starlight Music when Emmet died but lost it when Jem and the Holograms won it back in the Battle of the Bands. He became owner of Misfits Music which later became Stingers Sound. He is a crook in the music business that manipulates, blackmails and embezzles his way through to get what he wants. He also knows the right kind of lawyers to bail him out of any situation. Clash is the Misfits biggest fan. She is constantly trying to join the Misfits but doesn't get her chance. Her real name is Constance Montgomery and she is cousin to Video Montgomery. She tries to make Jem and the Holograms as well as Video's life miserable. The Stingers Riot is the lead singer and has a romantic interest in Jem. His real name is Rory Llewellen, who was once in the army and went AWOL when he joined a rock band, Nivana, in Germany. He has a rocky relationship with his father. He is a master charmer. Rapture plays lead guitar. Her real name is Phoebe Ashe. She is a mischief maker and con-artist who gets anyone to believe what she has to say. Minx is the keyboardist of the group. Her real name is Ingrid Keith and she has a romantic interest in Rio. She is an electronics genius. Toy Line In 1985, Hasbro debuted the Jem doll line starting with 12" dolls such as Jem/Jerrica, Aja, Kimber, Shana, Rio, Pizzazz, Stormer and Roxy. All of the 1st issue dolls came with a flap that their character was on. Each doll came with their own musical instrument and Jem a microphone and Rio a brief case. Each doll, except Jem, had cassette tapes with songs on one side and the instrumental song on the other side. In 1986, the doll line came out with a 2nd generation of the Holograms and the Misfits, though Holograms came in different outfits. Added to the line up were Danse, Video, Raya, Synergy, Glitter 'N Gold Jem/Jerrica, Glitter 'N Gold Rio, Rock 'N Curl Jem, Flash 'N Sizzle Jem/Jerrica, Jetta and Clash. The 2nd and 3rd edition dolls came without a flap on them.
    In 1987, the last of the line came out with only 3 of the Starlight girls: Ashley, Krissie and Banee. It was rumored that a Stingers doll line was suppose to come out also but nothing came of it. Along with a fashionable clothing line, play sets, vehicles, stages, coloring books, reading books, posters, games, lunch boxes, clothes, watches and make-up were also made available.

    VHS and DVD Release
    Family Home Entertainment or f.h.e. released Jem on VHS tapes in 1986 starting with the Full Length Animated Feature Movie Truly Outrageous. There are a lot scenes that either added or expanded on from the original movie showing. Last Resorts, The Music Awards, Hot Time In Hawaii, The Princess and the Singer, Jem Jam, Culture Clash, Glitter 'N Gold and the Talent Search were all released in the 1987 year. Rhino Entertainment picked up a couple of the episodes in 1999 and 2000. They first came out with Passport to Rock Volume 1 featuring The World Hunger Shindig and Adventure In China and Fashion Fiasco Volume 2 with In Stitches and Culture Clash. Harmony Entertainment also came out with a Girls Rule! Volume 1 Featuring Jem and the Holograms with The Beginning and Disaster. Also on the DVD were Lady LovelyLocks with Lake of Reflections and Menace of Mirror Lake and finally with Rainbow Brite's episodes Mom and A Horse of a Different Color Girls Rule! Volume 2 Featuring Popples. Jem starts it off with Kimber's Rebellion, Frame Up and Battle of the Bands then She-Ra: Princess of Power episodes The Anxious Apprentice and A Talent for Trouble and finally with Popples episodes Popples Panic, College Of Popple Knowledge and Treasure of Popple Beach Rhino finally released Jem on DVD March 2004 in a four DVD set including 26 episodes of the first and second seasons. This set includes interviews with Jem speaking voice, Samantha Newark and Jem creator and writer, Christy Marx. Season three, part one was released in Sept. 2004 with 19 episodes that includes an interviews with Jem's singing voice Britta Philips, and commentary by Christy Marx and Writer Roger Slifer.moreless
  • 96
    Mr. Belvedere

    Mr. Belvedere

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1990)
    Mr. Belvedere began in March of 1985 and aired on ABC. It was a spring replacement series and yet another family sitcoms from the 80's joining the ranks of The Cosby Show, Family Ties and Who's the Boss?. Mr. Belvedere centered around the Owens family who lived in suburban Pittsburgh. George Owens was a sports writer and his wife, Marsha was a homemaker/law-student. They had three children, 16 year old Kevin, 14 year old Heather and 8 year old Wesley. The series began when it got to the point where Marsha couldn't handle the household anymore with her studying so she placed an ad for a housekeeper. This is where Mr. Lynn Belvedere steps in. Mr. Belvedere was an English housekeeper whose previous employers include Winston Churchill. Although hesitant, George and Marsha hired him and he instantly becomes one of the family, even giving the kids advice on how to solve their problems when they need it. At the end of each episode, Belvedere would write an entry in his journal concerning the situations that occurred in each episode. The series lasted five years and was even canceled in 1987 only to be renewed by ABC. The series followed Marsha through law school and into her first job as a lawyer, Kevin through high-school and into college and Heather and Wesley through puberty. In 1990, the series was canceled and in the finale, Mr. Belvedere leaves the Owens household after getting married. The series was based on the novel Belvedere written by Gwen Davenport which was later turned into three movies of the late 40's and early 50's, in which Clifton Webb portrayed Mr. Belvedere. ABC Broadcast History March-April 1985----Fridays----8:30 p.m. August 1985-March 1987----Fridays----8:30 p.m. May-September 1987----Fridays----8:30 p.m. October 1987-January 1988----Fridays----9:00 p.m. January-February 1988----Fridays----8:30 p.m. March 1988-July 1989----Fridays----9:00 p.m. August-September 1989----Fridays----8:30 p.m. September-December 1989----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. July 1990----Sundays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 35 or Better) #37 in the 1984-1985 Season First Telecast: March 15, 1985 Last Telecast: July 8, 1990 Episodes: 117 Color Episodes Theme Song: "According to Our New Arrivals" Written by: Judy Hart Angelo and Gary Portnoy Sung by: Leon Redbone Streaks on the china, never mattered before, who cares. When you dropped kicked your jacket, as you came through the door, no one glared. But sometimes things get turned around and no one spared. All hands look out below. There's a change in the status quo. Gonna need all the help that we can get. According to our new arrival, Life is more than mere survival, and we just might live the good life yet.moreless
  • 97
    I Survived a Japanese Game Show

    I Survived a Japanese Game Show

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2009)
    Reality goes abroad in this ABC project that sends American contestants overseas to Japan to compete in challenges in a foreign culture. Whoever adapts best to Japanese culture and each episode's challenges wins $250,000.moreless
  • 98
    Just For Laughs

    Just For Laughs

    Follow
    ABC
    Just For Laughs will tickle everyone's funny bone with its hilarious practical jokes, hidden camera pranks, and other creative hijinks.
  • 99
    Mr. Sunshine

    Mr. Sunshine

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2011)
    Matthew Perry stars as Ben Donovan, the self-involved manager of a second-rate San Diego sports arena who begins to re-evaluate his life on his 40th birthday. Working alongside him is his boss and arena owner, Crystal-attractive, powerful and highly erratic; Alice-the cute, tomboyish marketing director and Ben's friend with benefits; Alonzo-a former basketball player, handsome and unbelievably happy; Ben's assistant, Heather-pretty, sweet, but terrifying because she once lit a boyfriend on fire; Crystal's son, Roman-sweet-faced, clueless and Ben's newest employee; and a hapless operations crew whom Ben refers to collectively as the "Steves."moreless
  • 100
    Grace Under Fire

    Grace Under Fire

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1998)
    After divorcing her abusive, alcoholic husband and recovering from her own alcoholism, Grace tries to rebuild her life and protect her children from making the same mistakes. Against this serious backdrop, this show is actually a comedy, finding humor in the relationships between Grace and her co-workers at the oil refinery, her neighbors Wade and Nadine, Russell Norton, the bachelor pharmacist, and her ex-husband Jimmy and his odd-ball family. In Germany, the show is known simply as Grace.moreless
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10