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    Supermarket Sweep

    Supermarket Sweep

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    ABC (ended 2003)
    "Hey, the next time you're at the checkout counter and you hear the beep, think of all the fun you can have on, Supermarket Sweep! Following many years of waiting in the check out lines at local supermarkets Al Howard, with his wife, Alice, wondered what it would be like if just once the manager came to him and asked, "How would you like to run wild through the market and grab everything you can get your hands on and it won't cost you a cent!?" The idea of Supermarket Sweep was born. But, Al realized that he needed more than just 'running through a market' to make a successful game show, so he came up with other features, all relating to products we typically find in a market. Than he took his new show to ABC-TV and soon the show was viewed all across America, five days-a-week at 11 a.m. Eventually, Sweep went off ABC-TV but over the years, the TV audience never forgot the show that looked entirely different from any other game show. After all, what other show allows you to grab a supermarket shopping cart and act out your fantasy! Lifetime TV put the show back on in 1990. This time, Al created an exciting new element: the "Bonus Round." $5000 in cash was hidden somewhere in the market and a contestant team was given 60 seconds to find it. They had to solve 3 clues in that amount of time and if they did, their reward was the $5000 in cash! Have contestants been successful in finding the big money? Well, the record shows that up to this point in time, Supermarket Sweep has given away close to two million dollars in cash! (Yes, that's $2,000,000.00) The program used to be seen on PAX TV, but the show is no longer seen as of right now. But since PAX is famous for being America's "Family Network," the show is a perfect fit for them. After all, going to the supermarket is a family experience!moreless
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    The Newlywed Game

    The Newlywed Game

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    "Once upon a time, there was this nice, family TV game show on CBS called Password, wherein teams of two tried to guess words using just one word. It did very well in the ratings, and was quite educational, too. "Then, one day – July 11, 1966, to be exact – a CBS News special report about Robert McNamara reporting on the Vietnam War pre-empted Password. That didn't make people very happy. So, they turned the station to see what else was on. "Some people saw a game unlike what they had ever seen before. There was this handsome young man asking four newlywed couples questions about their marriages. Sometimes, you saw just the beautiful young ladies; and other times, the good-looking men were on, but they always got back together to talk about their marriages. "Sometimes, the couples kissed each other. Other times, they pouted and made a scene. And sometimes, they shared information that was quite intimate (can you say "intimate," kiddies). "The audience on TV laughed and laughed, and the handsome young host did everything to help make the audience laugh. The people couldn't believe what they were seeing on the TV. But they became curious and decided to watch this new show when it came on the next day ... and the next day ... and the next day ... forgetting all about Password wondering if the newlywed couples would or could live happily ever after." That, in a nutshell, tells the story of the classic game show The Newlywed Game, the tell-all game show where four couples – all married less than two years – answered questions about their relationship to win a prize. The game was played in two rounds, each with two parts (though never referred to as such). In the first part, the wives were secluded off-stage (when the show first aired, the husbands were secluded off-stage) while host Eubanks posed a series of three questions to the husbands – usually multiple choice or fill-in-the blank, sometimes with more than one answer required. After the questions were asked, the wives were brought back onstage to answer the same questions. A correct match earned the newlywed couple 5 points, but the real fun came when there was not a match. Usually, not matching meant an argument, with the spouses each (shall we say) strongly defending their answer. And yes, Eubanks did everything to make the situation worse (often using one spouses words against him/her, or even relaying what the spouse said while the other was off-stage); and of course the audience played right along, loving every moment. In the second round, the husbands were taken to the sound-proof room (when the show first aired, the wives were secluded off stage) while the wives were posed the questions, the fourth being a special 25-point bonus question. Correct matches at this point were worth 10 points (for the first 3 questions). The special 25-point bonus question – usually general enough so as not to cause an argument, unless that too was incorrect – often determined the day's winner. The winner after all the questions were asked (or a tie-breaker was played, if necessary, by the couple predicting their point total) "won a special bonus prize, chosen especially for" them. Usually, this prize was kitchen appliances; rooms of furniture; stereo/TV equipment; things for the game room (such as a pinball machine or a pool table) a boat, motorcycle or trailer; a piano; or a trip (with the requisite luggage and camera thrown in). And yes, couples who wanted a specific prize competed for it on that day's show. Special episodes were frequently dedicated toward expectant couples ("maternity day") and couples who had previously appeared on the show but, even though they didn't win, they had won the audience over (refered to as "Alumni Day"). During the ABC run, during the Christmas season, couples donated their gifts to charity. Thousands of couples let all of their secrets out of the bag during The Newlywed Game's four lives. In addition to the 1966-1974 ABC and 1996-2000 syndicated versions, the most often remembered versions (and most-reran on Game Show Network [GSN]) came with the 1977-1980 (1 Night a week) and 1985-1989 5-Day-a-week syndicated incarnations. The rules for The Newlywed Game were modified for the 1988-1989 season, with host Paul Rodriguez; and again when the series resurfaced as a new entry in the 1996-1997 season, with Gary Kroeger as host. Neither of the "modified" versions sat well with fans (like any version did with some), but the alterations basically involved converting the scoring into dollars and rules to how the questions were asked and how the awards were paid out. Bob Eubanks would return to helm the 1996 version during its second and third seasons (1997-1999), and that along with reverting to the original rules made for a welcome reception from long-time (and new) fans. The only difference was that the grand prize each time was a "second honeymoon" (remember, before, it could also be furniture, electronics or transportation). The 4th and Last Season (1999-2000) is a repeat of the previous season. As one might expect on a show like this, there were countless classic moments during the history of The Newlywed Game. None was more infamous than one such moment that occurred early in the 1977-1980 syndicated run. During a maternity week episode, Eubanks had asked the question, "Where, specifically, is the weeeeeiirdest place that you have ever gotten the urge the make whoopee?" The husband gave a pedestrian reply: "The freeway." His wife's answer was, to put it mildly, not: "Is it (bleep)?" (you fill in the blank, but it made for uproarious laughter). Needless to say, the young woman clearly misunderstood the question.moreless
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    The Dating Game

    The Dating Game

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    ABC (ended 2000)
    THE DATING GAME was and still is by all accounts, the premiere game show for singles. It was the forerunner for many imitators such as "Love Connection", MTV's "Singled Out" and numerous others. But they all have the same influence: Chuck Barris, the creator of the one that started it all! "THE DATING GAME" first premiered on December 20-24, 1965 on abc-TV and remained a fixture on the network in both daytime and nighttime incarnations through the rest of the 1960s and well into the 1970s. Jim Lange, fresh from his announcing duties with Tennessee Ernie Ford stepped through the flower-speckled rotating partitions for the first of many, many times shortly before Christmas 1965. The game play was simple. On one side you had 3 bachelors answering questions from a girl on the other side of the partition (each not being able to see the other). The girl was given a certain amount of time to ask as many questions as she could to the 3 bachelors. More often than not the questions would be of a quirky nature. (E.G.: "If we were marooned on a desert island, what would be the first thing you'd do and why?"). During a commercial break, the girl would think about which bachelor she'd select. When the show returned, Jim would have her announce her choice. After meeting the 2 boys she didn't select, she's meet her date at which point Jim would tell them where they were going for their dream date. On less frequent occasions, the roles were reversed. To wit, the game would feature a boy selecting 1 from the 3 Bachelorettes. The show became an enormous hit with young viewers. (In fact, in light of its success, Baskin-Robbins named an ice cream flavor in honor of the show.) And over the years, the show featured many stars of the day (Burt Reynolds, Paul Petersen and even Dick Clark showed up) as well as newcomers who would in later years become big stars in their own right (John Ritter, Teri Garr, Tom Selleck and Farrah Fawcett were among these.) The show left abc-TV on July 2-6, 1973, but stayed in syndication for another year (1973-1974) before leaving the airwaves altogether. Creator Chuck Barris brought the show back again 4 years later with Lange as host from 1978 to 1980. Along with an updated version of "The Newlywed Game" and 2 new shows, ("The Gong Show" and "The $1.98 Beauty Show") "The Dating Game" returned to syndicated in 1978, only this time with a more adult-oriented borderline dialogue format--perhaps in an effort to recapture the same audience that had grown up watching THE DATING GAME in the 1960s. The newer version- along with Jim Lange's gaudy red tuxedo- lasted for 2 years until local stations finally got tired of the protesting phone calls. Once again, the show featured both present-day and future stars such as Jaye P. Morgan, Bob Saget and Murray "The Unknown Comic" Langston. THE DATING GAME was all but forgotten until the mid-80s, when Barris decided to do it yet again. An all new 80s update of "The Dating Game (The All-New DATING GAME)" premiered on syndicated on September 8-12, 1986, but this time the hosting duties were handled by Elaine Joyce (Lange was busy at the time hosting "The $1,000,000 Chance Of A Lifetime"). This version lasted for three years with Joyce hosting the 1st season and Jeff McGregor hosting the last 2 Seasons and again as in the previous 2 incarnations, the show featured present and future stars. (Among the future stars was Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding, Jr.!) The Program Demised on September 8, 1989. Now... as for the NINETIES update? Well... I don't know terribly much about it except for the following: By the time the 90s rolled around, Chuck Barris sold the rights to all his shows to Columbia-Tristar Television. A newer, corporate-whitewashed version of the DATING GAME was released on September 9-13, 1996 and packaged with another updated version of "The Newlywed Game", this time with Chuck ("Love Connection") Woolery (1st Host is Whose Line is it Anyway (US) Brad Sherwood for the 1st Season for the difference) and outside of the quizzer and the respective suitors & suitorettes not being able to see one another, the rules were almost completely overhauled and all ended the show on September 15, 2000. But if you're a game show retrophile like me, you would have to agree that there's just no Dating Game without Jim Lange with or without the awful tux. And now you don't have to suffer from Lange withdrawal because Game Show Network has some episodes to show you... And HEEEEEEEE-RE THEY ARRRRRRRR-RE! Now you can see the classic Jim Lange episodes of the original DATING GAME on The Game Show Network- in particular, the ones that featured present-day and future superstars. You can see them Saturday and Sunday nights at 11:30pm on GSN. Enjoy them if you can... and if you can't stay up that late, TAPE THEM... LIKE ME!! (Dates with celebrities are always subject to their availability.) THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE DATING GAME: December 20, 1965-March 31, 1967 at 11:30am-12Noon on ABC-TV April 3, 1967-July 12, 1968 at 4:00-4:30pm on ABC-TV July 15, 1968-July 6, 1973 at 2:30-3:00pm on ABC-TV. On 1st Run Syndicated from September 10, 1973-September 15, 2000.moreless
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    The Baby Game

    The Baby Game

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    ABC (ended 1968)
    On this game show, three couples were asked to predict children's behavior in various situations.
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    100 Grand

    100 Grand

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    Prime-time game show that lasted only three weeks.
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    Seven Keys

    Seven Keys

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    ABC (ended 1964)
    Seven Keys had a single contestant vying for one of seven keys that would open a lock containing valuable prizes.

    To obtain a key, he/she played a general knowledge game facing a board of 70 windows, laid out in seven rows of ten windows. To start, the player presses the button marked "Steps", and the board advances the number of steps (1 to 10) shown on a wheel corresponding to the buttons. He/she must correctly answer or identify the subject shown. To win, he/she must make all 70 squares in fifteen chances.

    If a player answers incorrectly, he/she must go back to the first square in the row. If he she lands on a "Penalty" window, he/she must press the "Penalty" button and go back the number shown. If the player lands on a "Bonus," he/she presses the "Bonus" button and goes ahead the number shown. If a player lands on a "Safety", he/she presses the "Steps" button as usual and loses no chances. Chances are not lost for incorrect answers, Bonus windows or Penalty windows.

    A player completing the board may select a key which will open one of seven lock containing prizes, one of them a grand prize. The contestant may also return the next show to play for more keys, with seven wins automatically winning everything. If a player fails to complete the board at any point, he/she forfeits any keys won and departs with some nice parting gifts.moreless
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    The Object Is

    The Object Is

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    ABC (ended 1964)
    Showing that imitation is truly the sincerest form of television, The Object Is was a hybrid of CBS's Password and NBC's You Don't Say!. It was Dick Clark's first gig as a game show host.

    Two celebrities and two contestants and split into teams, and the object is to convey a famous name using inanimate objects as clues. It can be one or two-word clues, no proper names or hyphenated words. The first clue is worth 10 points, the second 7, the third 5, and the fourth and last clue 3 points.

    First team to 15 points wins the game, and two games wins the match. The winning player here pairs with the celebrity and rattling off as many items relating to an object shown to them in 30 seconds. Each item is worth $5.

    The Object Is was canceled on March 27, 1964 and replaced by Goodson-Todman's Missing Links, which had moved from NBC (to make room for a little show called--you may have heard of it--Jeopardy!). Clark would host Missing Links as its NBC host, Ed McMahon, contractually bound to NBC.moreless