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    Who Wants to Be a Millionaire

    Who Wants to Be a Millionaire

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    ABC (ended 2002)
    From the four corners of the continent, people with dreams of instant riches are flown to New York City, to seize the day when they, with courage and wisdom, gain the opportunity to change the course of their lives in one short day. This is the world's greatest game show..... Who Wants to Be a Millionaire!!! Based upon the British program of the same title, this show offers a maximum prize of $1,000,000 for correctly answering a series of multiple choice questions. Originally, as in the UK edition, contestants were required to correctly answer 15 questions of increasing difficulty, but in 2010, the format was modified so that the contestants are now faced with 14 questions of random difficulty. This show has endured as one of the longest-running and most popular variants in the global Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? franchise. The original hour-long prime-time version of the show was broadcast on ABC from August 16, 1999 to June 27, 2002, and was hosted by Regis Philbin, a famed media personality, actor, and singer with a career going back to the 1960s, who is most widely known for hosting a "live" morning talk show. ABC's overexposure of the program led audiences to tire of it, and grilled the show to cancellation. However, not all hope was lost for the property: the production team reincarnated the show as a half-hour syndicated series, which premiered on September 16, 2002. The syndicated Millionaire's original host was Meredith Vieira, a news anchor and journalist who, at the time of the show's debut, was chiefly known as the moderator of ABC's daytime talk show The View, then later co-hosted NBC's Today Show from 2006 through 2011, and is now set to become the host of a syndicated talk show that will premiere in the coming year. Vieira remained Millionaire's host through eleven seasons, hosting over 1,800 episodes and giving away over $70,000,000 to a vast multitude of contestants, before deciding to abandon her then-current career and pursue new opportunities. Subsequently, Cedric Kyles, an actor, director and (as his stage name implies) an entertainer, signed on to become the show's new host, and his run is set to begin in September 2013. The game play of the Millionaire show has been changed substantially since the program's introduction to American airwaves. Originally contestants were required to call the phone number 800-433-8321 and play a telephone game wherein they had to answer three questions correctly, then get selected into a random drawing, then compete for ten spots on the show and subsequently play a preliminary "Fastest Finger" round before finally advancing to the Hot Seat to begin their journeys for $1,000,000. Now potential contestants take a written test, participate in an interview, and advance to the syndicated program, where they are simply called onstage after the preceding contestant's game ends. The show originally adhered to the same format as the British version, but in 2008 the formula began to deviate substantially from the original, with the addition of a clock that would time contestants' questions, and the use of experts who would contact the contestant for answers via a face-to-face Skype connection. The format was given its biggest overhaul yet in Fall 2010, with the introduction of question randomization and the retirement of all the lifelines (with the exception of "Ask the Audience") in favor of "jumps" that would allow contestants to skip the question and move on to the next level automatically. ABC has occasionally brought back the prime-time version for special editions. In 2004, the production team created Who Wants to Be a Super Millionaire, which was aired on a more limited basis, and which featured a top prize of $10,000,000, more money than anyone else has ever won in television history to date. Then 2009 saw a special 10th Anniversary Celebration which celebrated the milestone of the program's debut with a number of special celebrity guests, including a "Mystery Guest" revealed to be Vieira, who would turn the tables on Philbin himself - and invite the remaining "Fastest Finger" contestants to compete on the syndicated show. There were also a number of special events and gameplay twists on the mainstream program's run. A progressive jackpot was briefly used on the primetime show, increasing by $10,000 for each episode wherein the top prize was not won, and celebrity editions have also been conducted, with notable individuals from various fields playing for charitable organizations of their choice. The U.S. version of Millionaire has been credited with single-handedly reviving - and even breaking new ground for - the game show genre. It revolutionized the look and feel of game shows with its unique lighting system, dramatic music cues, and futuristic set, and became one of the highest-rated shows in the history of American television. It paved the way for the genre of reality programming, and made catchphrases out of such lines as "Is that your final answer?"moreless
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    Supermarket Sweep

    Supermarket Sweep

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    ABC (ended 2003)
    "Hey, the next time you're at the checkout counter and you hear the beep, think of all the fun you can have on, Supermarket Sweep! Following many years of waiting in the check out lines at local supermarkets Al Howard, with his wife, Alice, wondered what it would be like if just once the manager came to him and asked, "How would you like to run wild through the market and grab everything you can get your hands on and it won't cost you a cent!?" The idea of Supermarket Sweep was born. But, Al realized that he needed more than just 'running through a market' to make a successful game show, so he came up with other features, all relating to products we typically find in a market. Than he took his new show to ABC-TV and soon the show was viewed all across America, five days-a-week at 11 a.m. Eventually, Sweep went off ABC-TV but over the years, the TV audience never forgot the show that looked entirely different from any other game show. After all, what other show allows you to grab a supermarket shopping cart and act out your fantasy! Lifetime TV put the show back on in 1990. This time, Al created an exciting new element: the "Bonus Round." $5000 in cash was hidden somewhere in the market and a contestant team was given 60 seconds to find it. They had to solve 3 clues in that amount of time and if they did, their reward was the $5000 in cash! Have contestants been successful in finding the big money? Well, the record shows that up to this point in time, Supermarket Sweep has given away close to two million dollars in cash! (Yes, that's $2,000,000.00) The program used to be seen on PAX TV, but the show is no longer seen as of right now. But since PAX is famous for being America's "Family Network," the show is a perfect fit for them. After all, going to the supermarket is a family experience!moreless
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    Monopoly

    Monopoly

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Merv Griffin got the rights from Parker Brothers to produce this memorable short-lived prime time summer series, produced in stereo for ABC.

    Three contestants competed (red/gold/green) in this crossword clue game. The first round had contestants earning properties by correctly guessing the crossword clue (if no one guessed, another toss-up was asked & the price of the property was slashed in half IE: North Carolina Ave. for $150). Then if two or all three owned a different property, it would be fought out until one player has a monopoly! Eight properties were settled.

    During commercial, the landlords (contestants) placed houses & hotels ($50 each no matter what area, but must build evenly) on their property(ies).

    Round two had the hostess toss the dice as they went around the board. When landing on a property, the owner gets a crack to answer the question. If not, the opponents could steal that rent.

    Besides the Community Chest & Chance, there was...

    RAILROADS: Whoever answers the toss-up gets to go to an opponent's monopoly. There they must answer three (or two) clues correctly to take over that monopoly. A miss would cost them the rent (IE: Hotel on Pennsylvania; $1,400).

    UTILITIES: Toss up question played for 10x the throw of the dice.

    INCOME TAX: 10% of cash on hand.

    JAIL: Hostess locked contestants up (NO!). Just pay the $50.

    FREE PARKING: A toss-up for money in Free Parking (starts @ $500, can be added through Luxury Tax, Income Tax & Jail).

    After time expired, the hotels (& houses) were cashed in & the contestant with the most money won the game!

    The bonus round had the contestant throw the dice. Before the round started, the player placed 4 GO TO JAIL squares (one on any square from St. Charles Place-New York Avenue, another one on any square from Kentucky-Marvin Gardens, & two on any square from Pacific Ave.-Boardwalk). The contestant had 4 rolls to go around the block (doubles earned an extra roll). For each square pass is $100. Players can take the money or hope to roll a good number. Landing on GO TO JAIL made the player lose any bonus winnings. If the player passed GO, s/he collects $25,000! If they exactly land on GO, it paid $50,000 (which never happened).moreless