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    The Lawrence Welk Show

    The Lawrence Welk Show

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    ABC (ended 1982)
    Welcome to The Lawrence Welk Show guide at TV.com.

    The Lawrence Welk Show was good old fashioned family entertainment at its best with all kinds of music, particularly from the Big Band Era. The show had a close-knit group of singers, dancers, and musicians known as the "Musical Family."

    The Lawrence Welk Show made its national television debut on July 2, 1955. It was originally filmed in black and white and then it went into color September 18, 1965. The show was on Saturday nights on ABC until 1971 when the network canceled the show; that year, it went into first-run syndication with new episodes being produced until 1982. Reruns began airing until 1983. There were also two Christmas reunion specials, in 1984 and 1985.

    On October 3, 1987, reruns of the The Lawrence Welk Show began airing on PBS, where they continue to air to this day. These shows were hosted by members of the Musical Family until the 2005 season, when Mary Lou Metzger interviewed former members of the Musical Family after each show.

    Below is a list of Lawrence Welk PBS specials: 2001 - Milestones and Memories 2003 - God Bless America 2005 - Precious Memories 2007 - Lawrence Welk's TV Treasuresmoreless
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    American Bandstand

    American Bandstand

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    ABC (ended 1989)
    American Bandstand brought rock 'n' roll music into millions of households and showed Americans how to do the latest dance steps. Dick Clark, "America's Oldest Teenager" hosted the series for most of its run.
    Regular Bandstand segments were "The Spotlight Dance," "Rate-A-Record" and The "American Bandstand" Top 10 Countdown. "The Spotlight Dance" featured 2 or more couples dancing to a softer tune. "Rate-A-Record" had teenage contestants rate and comment on a record played on the show. The "American Bandstand Top Ten" was a countdown of the Top 10 hits of the day.
    American Bandstand began as a local Philadelphia show called Bandstand, which made its debut October 13, 1952 on WFIL-TV Channel 6.
    The series was retitled American Bandstand on August 5, 1957 when ABC began broadcasting it nationwide. For its first 6 seasons, American Bandstand aired Mondays through Fridays.
    Two major changes took place during the 1963-64 season. On September 7, 1963, it became a once-a-week series airing Saturday afternoons. A few months later on February 8, 1964, production of the show moved from Philadelphia, PA to its new home in Los Angeles, CA.
    Despite the changes, American Bandstand's fans remained loyal to the series, as it continued to present the latest music and dances. It even inspired another long-running dance show, Soul Train.
    American Bandstand's long association with ABC ended on September 5, 1987. The series returned 2 weeks later on September 19, 1987 in first-run syndication. On April 8, 1989, American Bandstand made another move, this time to the USA cable network. It also featured a new host, David Hirsch. This version lasted only 6 months with the final show airing on October 7, 1989. In 1995, VH-1 began showing c episodes of American Bandstand. These edited 30-minute reruns featured many of the stars that the show helped make famous.
    Bandstand Air Dates (local Philadelphia show)
    (1) "Bob Horn's Bandstand" (hosted by Bob Horn) October 13, 1952 - July 6, 1956
    (2) "Bandstand" (hosted by Dick Clark) July 9, 1956 - August 2, 1957
    American Bandstand Air Dates
    Weekday Afternoon shows (ABC-TV network, Monday-Friday) August 5, 1957 - August 30, 1963
    Broadcast times:
    August 5-November 15, 1957 - AB aired from 3:00 to 4:30pm.
    November 18, 1957-October 10, 1958 - AB was split into 2 shows airing from 3:00 to 3:30pm and from 4:00 to 5:00pm. AB was split up by the game show Who Do You Trust?
    October 13, 1958-September 29, 1961 - one show airing from 4:00pm to 5:30pm.
    October 2, 1961-September 28, 1962 - from 4:00 to 4:50pm*
    October 1, 1962-August 30, 1963 - from 4:00 to 4:55pm.*
    Note: *From October 2, 1961 through August 30, 1963, AB was followed by "American Newsstand," a current affairs program produced by ABC News.
    Nighttime shows (ABC network, Monday nights 7:30-8:00pm) In addition to the weekday shows, American Bandstand had a 13-week (October 7 - December 30, 1957) Prime-time run. (Note: This shouldn't be confused with The Dick Clark Saturday Night Beechnut Show, which ran from February 15, 1958 to September 10, 1960.)
    Saturday Afternoon shows (abc-TV network) September 7, 1963 - September 6, 1986 During these 23 years, the air times varied anywhere between 12:30 and 2:30pm on Saturdays (sometimes earlier on the West Coast). Most of these shows were an hour long. (Some episodes were shortened for sporting events.)
    On AB's Last Season on ABC-TV, it aired from 12:30 to 1:00pm (from September 13, 1986 through September 5, 1987).
    Syndicated American Bandstand episodes ran from September 19, 1987 to August 27, 1988 (times varied by city). This version was syndicated by LBS Communications. (According to some sources the syndicated series ran through April 1, 1989. But we haven't been able to find any listings past August 27, 1988.)
    USA Cable Network (Saturday afternoons) From April 8 to October 7, 1989, AB aired from 12noon to 1:00pm. David Hirsch was the host of this final version.moreless
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    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
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    CMA Awards

    CMA Awards

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    ABC
    Since their inception in 1967, the CMA Awards have been country music's most anticipated night of the year. The hottest stars in America's most popular music genre turn out annually to see who will be named the top talent in categories such as Entertainer of the Year, Vocal Group of the Year, Album of the Year, Song of Year, Musical Event of the Year and many more. Outstanding performances and top notch entertainment make this awards show a not-to-be-missed tradition for the country music follower.moreless
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    Hootenanny

    Hootenanny

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    ABC (ended 1964)
    Hootenanny was presented as a traveling folk music jamboree. Taped at various college campuses, it debuted in the Spring of 1963 as a 30-minute show (8:30pm EST, Saturday) for 13 weeks. The program was not without controversy and is remembered today as the show that blacklisted Pete Seeger (along with other members of Seeger's group The Weavers), for alleged communist affiliations. For this reason, several of the genre's most prominent acts - The Kingston Trio, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Peter, Paul & Mary, among others - refused to appear. Nevertheless, folk music was then at its commercial peak and Hootenanny was a ratings success. To its credit, the program did strive for a balance between commercial folk groups (The Limeliters, The New Christy Minstrels) and ethnic folk performers (Theodore Bikel, Addis & Crofut, Josh White). Topical songs were not avoided either - the Chad Mitchell Trio, who appeared nine times, sang the satiric "John Birch Society," Tom Paxton's "What Did You Learn in School Today?" and Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind." The otherwise well-scrubbed Goodtime Singers covered Phil Ochs' "Freedom Calling (What's That I Hear?)." And while Seeger and the Weavers were barred, their music was not: The Simon Sisters performed Seeger's "Turn, Turn, Turn" and The Chad Mitchell Trio performed his "Where Have All The Flowers Gone?" (a hit for the boycotting Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul & Mary); Bikel sang Weaver Fred Hellerman's anti-war song "Come Away, Melinda." In the Fall of 1963, Hootenanny was expanded to 60 minutes (7:30pm EST, Saturday) and scheduled against Jackie Gleason on CBS. Although not the time slot winner, Hootenanny scored well enough to keep Gleason out of the top 30, and by Christmas there was talk that it would continue for another season. But less than two months later, everything changed: Beatlemania had come to America and the popularity of folk music began a rapid decline. In fact, many performers who appeared on Hootenanny as folk singers (John Phillips, Cass Elliot, Gene Clark, Carly Simon) would find greater success in rock 'n' roll. In 1964, ABC cancelled Hootenanny in favor of a new music program: Shindig!moreless
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    The Beatles

    The Beatles

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    ABC (ended 1969)
    On Saturday September 25, 1965 at 10:30 a.m. (EST) on ABC, America was introduced to the Beatles Cartoons. The first cartoon series to ever feature a rock and roll group, it immediately became a hit with a 13 score and a 52 per cent share in ratings. Based loosely on the characters of the Beatles as portrayed in their film, A Hard Day's Night, each half hour program consisted of two cartoons (each approximately 8-10 minutes long) and two singalong segments stuck in-between the two episodes. Though the Beatles never took part in the creation and production of the show, save for the fact that their original music was used, the series still remains a favorite among fans who can remember getting up and eating a bowl of cereal while watching it. And thanks to MTV, Disney (who both aired the show sometime around the late 80's early 90's) and bootlegged copies, the show is continuing to enjoy an ever growing number of fans. A King Features Production. Color. 39 Half-hour episodes. Syndicated. Original ABC Schedule: Season 1: 10:30 a.m. EST Saturdays - 26 new episodes Season 2: 10:30 a.m. EST Saturdays - Only 7 new episodes, remainder were reruns Season 3: 12:00 p.m. EST Saturdays - Only 6 new episodes, remainder were reruns Season 4: 9:30 a.m. EST Sundays - No new episodes - reruns only Original Sponsors: A.C. Gilbert Company Quaker Oats Company Mars Candy Company Original Licensed Merchandise: The Beatles Cartoon Kit- Colorforms Candy Sticks- World Candies, Inc. Inflatable Dolls- manufacturer unknown Songs From A Music Adventure Cartoon Series- Hansen Publications, Inc. Original Premium Giveaways: Nestle's Quik- inflatable dolls Lux Soap- inflatable dolls Theme Song You tell me that you've got everything you want And your bird can sing But you don't get me, you don't get me You say you've seen seven wonders and your bird is green But you can't see me, you can't see me When your prized possessions start to wear you down Look in my direction, I'll be round, I'll be round When your bird is broken will it bring you down You may be awoken, I'll be round, I'll be round You tell me that you've heard every sound there is And your bird can swing But you can't hear me, you can't hear memoreless
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    The Engelbert Humperdinck Show

    The Engelbert Humperdinck Show

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The Engelbert Humperdinck Show was a British variety series an ATV production, executive produced by Gordon Mills. For American release the show aired on ABC and the guests were a combination British and American performers. The Jack Parnell Orchestra and the Irving Davies Dancers provided the background talent for Engelbert's variety musical program. Airing only 17 episodes the guests were the big names in entertainment field.moreless
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    The Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Show

    The Roy Rogers-Dale Evans Show

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    ABC (ended 1962)