• 41
    Naked City

    Naked City

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    A police drama filmed entirely in New York City. The show was initially 30 minutes long during the first season (1958-1959). The second season didn't start until 1960, when it was expanded to an hour. The series was famous for their signature closing of every episode, "There are 8 million stories in the Naked City, this has been one of them"moreless
  • 42
    The F.B.I.

    The F.B.I.

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    The F.B.I. was Quinn Martin Productions's longest running series. It was unique as its stories were loosely supervised by at the time, current FBI director J. Edgar Hoover himself who watched over the presentation of proper bureau procedure.

    After each week's episode, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. would step from behind the part of Inspector Erskine and directly address the audience, asking for help to catch real criminals that were on the run.

    The show was sponsored by the Ford company which provided numerous vintage cars for chasing, crashing, and, occasionally, simple transportation.

    After the Watergate scandal, the public's perception of the American government and its institutions was tarnished and changed forever. In 1974, The F.B.I. was cancelled after 9 years and 240 episodes.moreless
  • 43
    Here Come the Brides

    Here Come the Brides

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The Bolt Brothers bring 100 prospective brides to Seattle in order to avoid losing their logging crew. Production Companies * Screen Gems Television Distributors * American Broadcasting Company (ABC) (original airing) * Columbia TriStar Domestic Television (2001) * Sony Pictures Television (2002-) -------------------------- Filming Location Columbia/Warner Bros. Ranch, Burbank, California, USA -------------------------- CREW: Directed by Bob Claver Irving J. Moore E.W. Swackhamer Writing credits (in alphabetical order) Larry Brody writer Jo Heims writer N. Richard Nash writer John O'Dea writer Jay Simms writer Skip Webster writer Produced by Robert Jon Carlson .... associate producer Bob Claver .... executive producer Paul Junger Witt .... producer Stan Schwimmer .... producer Original Music by Warren Barker Jack Keller (song "Seattle") Hugo Montenegro (song "Seattle") Ernie Sheldon (song "Seattle") Cinematography by Fred Jackman Jr. Film Editing by Asa Boyd Clark Stunts David Cass Jr. .... stunts David S. Cass Sr. .... stunts Gary Epper .... stunts Whitey Hughes .... stunts George Orrison .... stunts Alan Tomason .... stunts Jesse Wayne .... stunts Henry Wills .... stunts Other crew Carl Boles .... gaffer Stephen Lodge .... set costumer Scotty McEwin .... camera operator Pat McGrath .... key costumer Randall Robinson .... second assistant camera -----------------------------------moreless
  • 44
    The Invaders

    The Invaders

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    ABC (ended 1968)
    "The Invaders, alien beings from a dying planet. Their destination: the Earth. Their purpose: to make it "their" world. David Vincent has seen them, for him it began one lost night on a lonely country road, looking for a short cut that he never found. It began with a closed deserted diner, and a man too long without sleep to continue his journey. It began with the landing of a craft from another galaxy. Now, David Vincent knows that the Invaders are here, that they have taken human form. Somehow he must convince a disbelieving world that the nightmare has "already" begun."moreless
  • 45
    Supermarket Sweep

    Supermarket Sweep

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    ABC (ended 2003)
    "Hey, the next time you're at the checkout counter and you hear the beep, think of all the fun you can have on, Supermarket Sweep! Following many years of waiting in the check out lines at local supermarkets Al Howard, with his wife, Alice, wondered what it would be like if just once the manager came to him and asked, "How would you like to run wild through the market and grab everything you can get your hands on and it won't cost you a cent!?" The idea of Supermarket Sweep was born. But, Al realized that he needed more than just 'running through a market' to make a successful game show, so he came up with other features, all relating to products we typically find in a market. Than he took his new show to ABC-TV and soon the show was viewed all across America, five days-a-week at 11 a.m. Eventually, Sweep went off ABC-TV but over the years, the TV audience never forgot the show that looked entirely different from any other game show. After all, what other show allows you to grab a supermarket shopping cart and act out your fantasy! Lifetime TV put the show back on in 1990. This time, Al created an exciting new element: the "Bonus Round." $5000 in cash was hidden somewhere in the market and a contestant team was given 60 seconds to find it. They had to solve 3 clues in that amount of time and if they did, their reward was the $5000 in cash! Have contestants been successful in finding the big money? Well, the record shows that up to this point in time, Supermarket Sweep has given away close to two million dollars in cash! (Yes, that's $2,000,000.00) The program used to be seen on PAX TV, but the show is no longer seen as of right now. But since PAX is famous for being America's "Family Network," the show is a perfect fit for them. After all, going to the supermarket is a family experience!moreless
  • 46
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 47
    Spider-Man (1967)

    Spider-Man (1967)

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The primary signature character for Marvel Comics, "Spider-Man," is the alter-ego of Peter Parker, science student at a New York City university. While witnessing a radiology experiment on one fateful day, Peter is bitten on his hand by a spider exposed to the radioactive field generated by the experiment and later finds that he has acquired the spider's wall-scaling, leaping, and extra-sensory abilities, in addition to increased endurance and strength. Peter knits for himself a red-and-blue costume and mask and produces a web-spinning fluid enabling him to swing from building to building above the streets of Manhattan. Peter's Uncle Ben is murdered by a burglar, a criminal who earlier ran past Peter at a television studio to which Peter had come to exhibit his spider-abilities. Peter selfishly declined to help the police to stop the fleeing malefactor and is to a significant extent responsible for the death of his uncle. Peter, in his Spiderman guise, finds, punches, and webs the murderer. Now aware that he has received his powers for a higher purpose than exhibition for monetary gain, Peter accepts his duty as a costumed fighter of crime, a responsibility that he vows never again to fail. To financially support his Aunt May, Ben's widow, Peter becomes a freelance photographer for the Daily Bugle newspaper as an aside to his continued studies and his responsibility as Spiderman to the good people of New York City. Peter does not allow anyone, not even his aunt, to know that he is Spiderman. The Daily Bugle publisher, a cigar-smoking, self-righteous, blustery chauvinist named J. Jonah Jameson, has a jaundiced view of Spiderman's heroism and wields considerable influence with the city government and police force. So, Spidey must constantly be wary of the police whom he is helping, usually retaining the villains that he catches in a web for police to apprehend after he has left the capture scene, and attaching a note with an appropriate pun in regard to the crook and which says that the capture was courtesy of "Your Friendly Neighborhood Spiderman". Peter often uses his intimate involvement with his alter-ego's pursuit of villains to obtain exclusive photographs of the criminals, their evil deeds, and their capture, and provides the photographs to an incredulous Jameson, who, though he prints the pictures, usually manages to negatively spin-doctor Spiderman's involvement and magnify his own importance, much to Spidey's good-natured annoyance and the objection of Spidey's admirer and Peter's friend, Betty Brant, Jameson's feisty secretary. Meanwhile, in Peter's continued university life, he encounters eccentric professors whose unauthorized, dangerous experiments result in calamity that only Spiderman can remedy, and he experiences frustration with girl-friends who accuse him of cowardice every time that he must leave them in the midst of a dire situation so that he can privately change into Spiderman. Spiderman is the creation of Marvel Comics' founder Stan Lee and one of the earliest super-heroes to be featured in graphically illustrated magazines, or comic books, under the Marvel Comics name. Perhaps the most famous aspect to the 1967-1970 Spiderman is its opening and closing theme song, which was performed by a vocal group to lyrics written by Paul Francis Webster and quick-tempo instrumentals performed by Bob Harris, published by Buddah Music, Inc.. In May 2002, a live-action Spider-Man movie was released starring Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man, and the villian The Green Goblin. Due out in 2004, Spider-Man 2's villains include Doctor Octopus and The Lizard. Some information from: http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/kmccorry/spidey.html

    "Spiderman. Spiderman. Does whatever a spider can. Spins a web, any size. Catches thieves- just like flies. Look out! Here comes the Spiderman! Is he strong? Listen, bud. He's got radioactive blood. Can he swing, from a thread? Take a look overhead. Hey, there! There goes the Spiderman! In the chill of night, at the scene of a crime. Like a streak of light, he arrives just in time! Spiderman. Spiderman. Friendly Neighborhood Spiderman. Wealth and fame? He's ignored. Action is his reward. To him, life is a great big bang-up. Wherever there's a hang-up, you'll find the Spiderman!" moreless
  • 48
    One Step Beyond

    One Step Beyond

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    ABC (ended 1961)
    Outside the known is irreality, and one step beyond that is Surrealism. John Newland introduces reported cases of supernatural phenomena, whose poetry is revealed in magnificent and almost brutally compressed dramatizations. One Step Beyond was mainly filmed at M-G-M Studios, Hollywood, and partly at M-G-M British Studios, Borehamwood, Herts. It premiered nine months before The Twilight Zone, and was also known as Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond. All episodes are directed by Newland himself, a dab hand whose trademark is subtle, balletic camera work. This series fed the nation's growing interest in paranormal suspense in a different way. Rather than creating fictional stories with supernatural twists and turns, this program sought out 'real' stories of the supernatural, including ghosts, disappearances, monsters, etc., and re-creating them for each episode. No solutions to these mysteries were ever found, and viewers could only scratch their heads and wonder, "what if it's real?"moreless
  • 49
    Tournament of Roses Parade

    Tournament of Roses Parade

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    ABC
    From Pasadena California the parade nicknamed "The Granddaddy of Them All" features many floats made up entirely of organic material most which are flowers.
  • 50
    That Girl (1966)

    That Girl (1966)

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    ABC (ended 1971)
    Talented, young, and beautiful, and hoping to make a career as an actress, Ann Marie leaves her home in Brewster, New York and moves to Manhattan,where she acquires Apartment 4-D at 344 West 78th Street. Stories tenderly depict her world of joys and sorrows as she struggles to further a dream, supporting herself by taking various part-time jobs, cope with parents who don't understand her, and share the interests of her boyfriend, Don Hollinger, a reporter for Newsview magazine. Ann shared a romance with Don for five seasons and finally got engaged in the final season. Before they can could get married, the show was cancelled. Broadcast History: Sept. 8, 1966-Apr. 6, 1967, ABC Thursday at 9:30-10:00pm Apr. 13, 1967-Jan. 30, 1969, ABC Thursday at 9:00-9:30pm Feb. 6, 1969-Sept. 10, 1970, ABC Thursday at 8:00-8:30pm Sept. 25, 1970-Sept. 10, 1971, ABC Friday at 9:00-9:30pm The show never broke into the top 30 in the Nielsen ratings.moreless
  • 51
    Bachelor Father

    Bachelor Father

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    ABC (ended 1962)
    Bachelor Father debuted in the fall of 1957 on CBS and centered around the life of the wealthy attorney and bachelor, Bentley Gregg who lives in Beverly Hills, California. Bentley Gregg lived with his niece, Kelly, whose parents had died in a car accident. He would later legally adopt her as his own. Also living with Bentley and Kelly was Peter Tong, the Oriental houseboy who kept the Gregg household in shape. Jasper was the family dog. The stories often revolved around Bentley's endless goal of finding the right woman to settle down with, as well as Kelly's growing up and going through high school. At the end of the fourth season, Kelly graduated high school and the next season began college. Other recurring characters included, Ginger, Kelly's best friend who had three different last name changes over the years, Howard was Kelly's on-again, off-again boyfriend, who was later replaced by Warren. NOTE: This series has the distinction of having aired on each of the three major networks during in 1957-1962 run. First Telecast: September 15, 1957 Last Telecast: September 25, 1962 Episodes: 157 B&W Episodes CBS Broadcast History September 1957-June 1959----Sundays----7:30 p.m. (Alternating weekly with The Jack Benny Show)
    NBC Broadcast History June 1959-September 1961----Thursdays----9:00 p.m.
    ABC Broadcast History October 1961-September 1962----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m.
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) Never ranked above 25moreless
  • 52
    Burke's Law

    Burke's Law

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    ABC (ended 1965)
    Burke's Law was an Aaron Spelling-produced detective series that starred Gene Barry as Amos Burke, Los Angeles' millionaire chief of detectives. The jet-setting, swinging Burke was chauffeured to crime scenes in his Rolls-Royce and had a penchant for dropping professorial axioms ("Never ask a question unless you already know the answer. Burke's law!") Gary Conway and Regis Toomey played Burke's supporting detectives, and Leon Lontoc played Henry, Burke's chauffeur. This tongue-in-cheek mystery aired from 1963 to 1965 on ABC. For the 1965-1966 season, the show was retooled as Amos Burke, Secret Agent and changed to a spy show. The new Burke lasted only 17 episodes. In 1994, Barry returned as Burke in a brief revival of the show that aired on CBS along with Diagnosis Murder. The new series kept much of the style of the original (elaborate crimes and big-name guest stars) but lasted only 13 episodes.moreless
  • 53
    Where The Action Is

    Where The Action Is

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    ABC (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the Where The Action Is guide at tv.com.
    In 1963, AMERICAN BANDSTAND left the weekday shift for Saturday afternoons. Two years later (1965), Dick Clark created a new spin-off for ABC called Where The Action Is, a half-hour rock 'n' roll show featuring the hits of the day.
    Where The Action Is took viewers to various locations across the US. In addition to Stateside locations, segments were also taped in Canada, Britain and Japan. One frequent location was Malibu Beach in Malibu, CA, where many of the summer shows were shot. Bear Mountain Ski Resort in Bear Mountain, CA was the frequent site for the the winter and holiday shows.
    Steve Alaimo and Linda Scott were the original hosts. By 1966, Paul Revere and the Raiders, the house band, took over the hosting duties. Other series regulars included Keith Allison, Tina Mason and Jimmy Hubbard. The Action Kids was the series' dance troupe.
    Where The Action Is was in black and white during its original ABC run. It was followed by two short-lived remakes (in 1973 and 1985). In 1987, CBS-TV aired "Keep on Cruisin'," another series following in the footsteps of "Action".
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    The Broadcast History:
    June 28, 1965-September 24, 1965, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:30pm on ABC-TV
    September 27, 1965-March 31, 1967, Monday-Friday at 4:30-5:00pm on ABC-TV.moreless
  • 54
    The Mod Squad

    The Mod Squad

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    ABC (ended 1973)
    The Mod Squad involved three hipper-than-hip undercover cops with a touch of menace and plenty of attitude. Younger looking than they were, these three police officers were able to earn the confidence of the bad guys, infiltrate their domain, and then bust their backsides while still looking good. Miami Vice was still a decade away. The Mod Squad paved the way for hip and happening PO-lice on TV!moreless
  • 55
    The Gallant Men

    The Gallant Men

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    The Gallant Men tells the story of an American infantry company as it fights its way up the boot of Italy during World War II, led by determined young captain Jim Benedict. The action is seen through the eyes of a war correspondent, which makes this show unique in the genre. Made by the production company that had previously been successful with westerns like Cheyenne and Maverick, and private eye shows like 77 Sunset Strip and Hawaiian Eye, the show suffered in comparison with the similar war series Combat!, which aired on the same network and outlasted it by four years.moreless
  • 56
    Hootenanny

    Hootenanny

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    ABC (ended 1964)
    Hootenanny was presented as a traveling folk music jamboree. Taped at various college campuses, it debuted in the Spring of 1963 as a 30-minute show (8:30pm EST, Saturday) for 13 weeks. The program was not without controversy and is remembered today as the show that blacklisted Pete Seeger (along with other members of Seeger's group The Weavers), for alleged communist affiliations. For this reason, several of the genre's most prominent acts - The Kingston Trio, Bob Dylan, Joan Baez and Peter, Paul & Mary, among others - refused to appear. Nevertheless, folk music was then at its commercial peak and Hootenanny was a ratings success. To its credit, the program did strive for a balance between commercial folk groups (The Limeliters, The New Christy Minstrels) and ethnic folk performers (Theodore Bikel, Addis & Crofut, Josh White). Topical songs were not avoided either - the Chad Mitchell Trio, who appeared nine times, sang the satiric "John Birch Society," Tom Paxton's "What Did You Learn in School Today?" and Dylan's "Blowin' in the Wind." The otherwise well-scrubbed Goodtime Singers covered Phil Ochs' "Freedom Calling (What's That I Hear?)." And while Seeger and the Weavers were barred, their music was not: The Simon Sisters performed Seeger's "Turn, Turn, Turn" and The Chad Mitchell Trio performed his "Where Have All The Flowers Gone?" (a hit for the boycotting Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul & Mary); Bikel sang Weaver Fred Hellerman's anti-war song "Come Away, Melinda." In the Fall of 1963, Hootenanny was expanded to 60 minutes (7:30pm EST, Saturday) and scheduled against Jackie Gleason on CBS. Although not the time slot winner, Hootenanny scored well enough to keep Gleason out of the top 30, and by Christmas there was talk that it would continue for another season. But less than two months later, everything changed: Beatlemania had come to America and the popularity of folk music began a rapid decline. In fact, many performers who appeared on Hootenanny as folk singers (John Phillips, Cass Elliot, Gene Clark, Carly Simon) would find greater success in rock 'n' roll. In 1964, ABC cancelled Hootenanny in favor of a new music program: Shindig!moreless
  • 57
    The Frank Sinatra Show

    The Frank Sinatra Show

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    ABC (ended 1958)
    The Frank Sinatra Show was Sinatra's second attempt at a weekly TV show. The first was on CBS and ran for two years, 1950 to 1952. For this version ABC reportedly paid Sinatra $3,000,000. The show was to be a mixture of musical and dramatic programming, sometimes with Sinatra, other times he was to host episodes that he didn't appear in. The musical shows were recorded at The El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood. A survey of TV listings for the program shows that episodes were often changed at the last minute with dramatic shows being bumped for musical episodes. After it became clear the show was a ratings fiasco the show became more of a standard variety show. Sinatra often appeared opposite some of the best musical talent of the era but it didn't help much. Perhaps Sinatra was simply being spread too thin-he was still appearing in movies and making his classic albums for Capitol, in addition to appearing on other TV shows. After a break, for the 1959-1960 season Sinatra headlined a series of four specials for ABC under the umbrella title The Frank Sinatra Timex Show. In 2002 PBS aired a special "Sinatra: The Classic Duets" that included many excerpts from his 1957/58 show. In August 2003 another special "Vintage Sinatra," consisting of Sinatra solos from his show, aired on PBS stations. Both specials are available on home video & DVD. In September 2003 the Christmas show with Bing Crosby was also released on home video & DVD.moreless
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    Alcoa Premiere

    Alcoa Premiere

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    Hosted by Fred Astaire this series was also known as Fred Astaire presents. The series boasted a variety of episodes from comedy to drama and music. Running for two seasons this classic anthology series hosted a large number of well known actors and writers and directors. Classic series with high production values.moreless
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    Pat Boone Chevy Showroom

    Pat Boone Chevy Showroom

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    ABC (ended 1959)
    Pat Boone Chevy Showroom was a "Cooga Mooga Production" which gave Fifties pop music star Pat Boone a chance to host this "Rock 'n Roll" variety show sponsored by Chevrolet. His success on the charts and the movies brought this charming, clean cut, wholesome image a whole new generation of admirers.moreless
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    The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet

    The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet

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    ABC (ended 1966)
    Welcome to The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet guide at TV.com. The real-life Nelson family - Ozzie, his wife Harriet and their sons David and Ricky - played themselves in this long-running sitcom, where Ricky got his start as a teen idol. When the Nelson boys grew up and married their sweethearts, Kris and June, their real-life wives played their TV wives. The series began as a radio program in 1944. At that time David and Ricky were played by actors. It wasn't until 1949, when radio personality Bing Crosby's sons began to play themselves on Bing's show that the real David and Ricky decided to join the Nelson family radio show. The "adventures" the family experienced every week involved very little conflict or friction. Problems and misunderstandings were solved quickly and with a shared laugh over the silliness of it all.moreless
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