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  • 201
    Jem

    Jem

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    ABC (ended 1988)
    Showtime, Synergy. Those famous words were spoken by Jem throughout her three year run from 1985-1988. Jem was a beloved 80s rock cartoon that capitalized on the popularity of MTV that perfectly captured the decade's music, fashion and lingo. To this day, Jem is still considered a Truly Outrageous animated series that celebrates the power of love, friendship, ambition and rock 'n roll.

    Jerrica Benton's father left her a very special gift after he died. That gift was Synergy, a holographic computer system that can create realistic holograms of virtually anything. Using special star-shaped earrings, Synergy transforms Jerrica into the glamorous pop singer, Jem. Along with Kimber, Aja and Shana whom are called the Holograms, they have many adventures that take them to places in the US, France, China and Italy.

    Not far behind are their competition, the Misfits, a group led by Pizzazz with her friends Roxy and Stormer. Eventually both groups add a new member to their bands. Raya becomes the new drummer while Shana goes to guitar, and Jetta becomes the new saxophonist for the Misfits. With their additions, both Jem and the Holograms and the Misfits have many new adventures in Mexico, England, Shangri-La and across the U.S.

    The Stingers, a new trio, come to the States and begin to shake things up between Jem and the Holograms and the Misfits. Riot, Rapture and Minx begin to cause problems, all on their own. All three groups have a unique music showcased in the musical videos that appear in every episode.

    Jem originally premiered in 1985 in short segment cartoon inserts between two boys cartoons called Super Saturday/Sunday. Jem ran for three seasons from fall 1985 to spring 1988 with 65 total episodes. The show was then re-aired on the USA Network into early 1990.

    Cast of Characters Jerrica Benton is the owner and CEO of Starlight Music Company and The Starlight Foundation, which is a home to take care of foster girls. Both of these were inherited from her father, Emmet Benton, after he passed away. She grew up around musicians and technicians and is an independent business woman. Jem, Jerrica's singing persona, is the lead singer of the band Jem and the Holograms. Touching her star-shaped earrings and saying Showtime, Synergy or Show's over, Synergy, the Jem holographic image is created or disappears. Only The Holograms know that Jem and Jerrica are the same person. As Jem, Jerrica can let her hair down and let loose. Kimber Benton is Jerrica's younger sister. She is co-owner of Starlight Music Company and The Starlight Foundation. She plays keyboards and is the main songwriter/lyricist for the group. She is often impulsive, falling for the cute or dangerous guys. Aja Leith was the first foster girl to be adopted by Jacqui and Emmett Benton. She plays lead guitar in the Holograms. She is Jerrica's best friend. She is smart and very athletic. She is a jack-of-all trades on knowing how to do anything. Shana Elmsford was the second foster girl adopted by the Benton's. She played the drums until she left to work for a famous designer. She came back after The Talent Search and switched to her guitar. She designs the clothes for the Holograms and Starlight Girls. She has also had her fashions shown in Venice, Italy. Raya Carmen Alonso is the newest member of the Holograms. When Shana left the group, Raya won the Talent Search to be the new drummer. Coming from a Mexican background, Raya's the only girl among three brothers. Her father owns and operates a greenhouse. Synergy is a holographic computer built by Emmett Benton. She is contacted through Jerrica's earrings which project holographic images, sound and light. Synergy is kept at Starlight Mansion. She has all of the Holograms' music stored on file as well as Jacqui Benton's. Rio Pacheco is the road manager/engineer of Jem and the Holograms and Jerrica's boyfriend. He is also interested in Jem but has no clue that she and Jerrica are the same person. He doesn't like liars and deception. Countess Danielle Du Voisin is a very wealthy, renowned fashion designer that lives in Venice. She helps finance some of the Holograms' projects. She knows about fashions from all over the world. She is good friends with Howard Sands. Howard Sands is one of the top movie producers in the world. He helped produce the movie Starbright. Anthony Julian is a music director who is involved with Shana. He also directed the movie Starbright. Danse is a choreographer and naturally gifted dancer that works at a charity house called Haven House. Her real name is Giselle Dvorak. Her mother was a famous prima ballerina in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. She is good friends with Video. Video is an aspiring filmmaker. Her real name is Vivian Montgomery. She is a companion to the Holograms and shoots most of their music videos. Lin-Z Pierce is a Music TV Show Host. She travels to many places and stays on top of the music world. She is good friends with Anthony Julian and Video. The Misfits Pizzazz is the lead singer and plays guitar. Her real name is Phyllis Gabor but she gets easily angered when she is called by it. Her father is very rich and has given her everything that she's ever asked for. She's a spoiled, selfish, rich girl that wants money and fame. She craves her father's attention. She later has an obsession with Riot of the Stingers when they come to town. She uses Roxy and Stormer to her advantage. Roxy plays guitar. Her real name is Roxanne Pelligrini and is originally from Philadelphia, the town where she dropped out of high school. She is a very street wise and tough as nails. She takes credit for things that she did not create and goes to any length to get her way, even if it meant lying, cheating and stealing to do it. Stormer plays keyboard and sometimes guitar. She is the main song writer of the Misfits. Her real name is Mary Phillips. She has a brother, Craig, who dates Aja. Stormer is more sympathetic to causes that the other Misfits oppose. Jetta is the newest member that plays saxophone. Her real name is Sheila Burns and comes from England. She was playing with the Tinkerbellies when the Misfits decided to add her as a new member. With Pizzazz's father's influence and money, she was able to attain her green card. Eric Raymond used to work for Emmett Benton. He inherited half of Starlight Music when Emmet died but lost it when Jem and the Holograms won it back in the Battle of the Bands. He became owner of Misfits Music which later became Stingers Sound. He is a crook in the music business that manipulates, blackmails and embezzles his way through to get what he wants. He also knows the right kind of lawyers to bail him out of any situation. Clash is the Misfits biggest fan. She is constantly trying to join the Misfits but doesn't get her chance. Her real name is Constance Montgomery and she is cousin to Video Montgomery. She tries to make Jem and the Holograms as well as Video's life miserable. The Stingers Riot is the lead singer and has a romantic interest in Jem. His real name is Rory Llewellen, who was once in the army and went AWOL when he joined a rock band, Nivana, in Germany. He has a rocky relationship with his father. He is a master charmer. Rapture plays lead guitar. Her real name is Phoebe Ashe. She is a mischief maker and con-artist who gets anyone to believe what she has to say. Minx is the keyboardist of the group. Her real name is Ingrid Keith and she has a romantic interest in Rio. She is an electronics genius. Toy Line In 1985, Hasbro debuted the Jem doll line starting with 12" dolls such as Jem/Jerrica, Aja, Kimber, Shana, Rio, Pizzazz, Stormer and Roxy. All of the 1st issue dolls came with a flap that their character was on. Each doll came with their own musical instrument and Jem a microphone and Rio a brief case. Each doll, except Jem, had cassette tapes with songs on one side and the instrumental song on the other side. In 1986, the doll line came out with a 2nd generation of the Holograms and the Misfits, though Holograms came in different outfits. Added to the line up were Danse, Video, Raya, Synergy, Glitter 'N Gold Jem/Jerrica, Glitter 'N Gold Rio, Rock 'N Curl Jem, Flash 'N Sizzle Jem/Jerrica, Jetta and Clash. The 2nd and 3rd edition dolls came without a flap on them.
    In 1987, the last of the line came out with only 3 of the Starlight girls: Ashley, Krissie and Banee. It was rumored that a Stingers doll line was suppose to come out also but nothing came of it. Along with a fashionable clothing line, play sets, vehicles, stages, coloring books, reading books, posters, games, lunch boxes, clothes, watches and make-up were also made available.

    VHS and DVD Release
    Family Home Entertainment or f.h.e. released Jem on VHS tapes in 1986 starting with the Full Length Animated Feature Movie Truly Outrageous. There are a lot scenes that either added or expanded on from the original movie showing. Last Resorts, The Music Awards, Hot Time In Hawaii, The Princess and the Singer, Jem Jam, Culture Clash, Glitter 'N Gold and the Talent Search were all released in the 1987 year. Rhino Entertainment picked up a couple of the episodes in 1999 and 2000. They first came out with Passport to Rock Volume 1 featuring The World Hunger Shindig and Adventure In China and Fashion Fiasco Volume 2 with In Stitches and Culture Clash. Harmony Entertainment also came out with a Girls Rule! Volume 1 Featuring Jem and the Holograms with The Beginning and Disaster. Also on the DVD were Lady LovelyLocks with Lake of Reflections and Menace of Mirror Lake and finally with Rainbow Brite's episodes Mom and A Horse of a Different Color Girls Rule! Volume 2 Featuring Popples. Jem starts it off with Kimber's Rebellion, Frame Up and Battle of the Bands then She-Ra: Princess of Power episodes The Anxious Apprentice and A Talent for Trouble and finally with Popples episodes Popples Panic, College Of Popple Knowledge and Treasure of Popple Beach Rhino finally released Jem on DVD March 2004 in a four DVD set including 26 episodes of the first and second seasons. This set includes interviews with Jem speaking voice, Samantha Newark and Jem creator and writer, Christy Marx. Season three, part one was released in Sept. 2004 with 19 episodes that includes an interviews with Jem's singing voice Britta Philips, and commentary by Christy Marx and Writer Roger Slifer.moreless
  • 202
    The F.B.I.

    The F.B.I.

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    The F.B.I. was Quinn Martin Productions's longest running series. It was unique as its stories were loosely supervised by at the time, current FBI director J. Edgar Hoover himself who watched over the presentation of proper bureau procedure.

    After each week's episode, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. would step from behind the part of Inspector Erskine and directly address the audience, asking for help to catch real criminals that were on the run.

    The show was sponsored by the Ford company which provided numerous vintage cars for chasing, crashing, and, occasionally, simple transportation.

    After the Watergate scandal, the public's perception of the American government and its institutions was tarnished and changed forever. In 1974, The F.B.I. was cancelled after 9 years and 240 episodes.moreless
  • 203
    Here Come the Brides

    Here Come the Brides

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The Bolt Brothers bring 100 prospective brides to Seattle in order to avoid losing their logging crew. Production Companies * Screen Gems Television Distributors * American Broadcasting Company (ABC) (original airing) * Columbia TriStar Domestic Television (2001) * Sony Pictures Television (2002-) -------------------------- Filming Location Columbia/Warner Bros. Ranch, Burbank, California, USA -------------------------- CREW: Directed by Bob Claver Irving J. Moore E.W. Swackhamer Writing credits (in alphabetical order) Larry Brody writer Jo Heims writer N. Richard Nash writer John O'Dea writer Jay Simms writer Skip Webster writer Produced by Robert Jon Carlson .... associate producer Bob Claver .... executive producer Paul Junger Witt .... producer Stan Schwimmer .... producer Original Music by Warren Barker Jack Keller (song "Seattle") Hugo Montenegro (song "Seattle") Ernie Sheldon (song "Seattle") Cinematography by Fred Jackman Jr. Film Editing by Asa Boyd Clark Stunts David Cass Jr. .... stunts David S. Cass Sr. .... stunts Gary Epper .... stunts Whitey Hughes .... stunts George Orrison .... stunts Alan Tomason .... stunts Jesse Wayne .... stunts Henry Wills .... stunts Other crew Carl Boles .... gaffer Stephen Lodge .... set costumer Scotty McEwin .... camera operator Pat McGrath .... key costumer Randall Robinson .... second assistant camera -----------------------------------moreless
  • 204
    Life On Mars

    Life On Mars

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    ABC (ended 2009)
    ABC Studios, 20th Century Fox Television, and Kudos Film and Television co-produced the remake of BBC drama Life on Mars. Executive producers are Jane Featherstone, Steven Garrett, Josh Appelbaum, André Nemec, and Scott Rosenberg. After being hit by a car while apprehending a murder suspect in 2008, Det. Sam Tyler (Jason O'Mara) regains consciousness to find himself working as a detective in the 1970s. ABC aired the first seven episodes of Life on Mars on Thursday night in 2008, then moved the series to Wednesday night in January 2009, airing the final ten episodes. The show finished its run on April 1, 2009. ABC decided not to continue the show and allow the producers to give it a proper ending.moreless
  • 205
    The Invaders

    The Invaders

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    ABC (ended 1968)
    "The Invaders, alien beings from a dying planet. Their destination: the Earth. Their purpose: to make it "their" world. David Vincent has seen them, for him it began one lost night on a lonely country road, looking for a short cut that he never found. It began with a closed deserted diner, and a man too long without sleep to continue his journey. It began with the landing of a craft from another galaxy. Now, David Vincent knows that the Invaders are here, that they have taken human form. Somehow he must convince a disbelieving world that the nightmare has "already" begun."moreless
  • 206
    The Deep End

    The Deep End

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    ABC (ended 2010)
    This dramatic comedy follows four young new lawyers who enter one of the most prestigious law firms in Los Angeles, Sterling Law. The lucky four consists of Dylan, Addy, Beth and Liam everyone of them come from very different backgrounds. Their boss is Cliff Huddle aka The Prince of Darkness, a senior partner at the firm. But when Hart Sterling, returns after a long hiatus, he's ready to shake thing up. This series combines a complex personal and professional lives with the greedy world of Law. From executive producer David Hemingson, from How I Met Your Mother and 20th Century Fox Television.moreless
  • 207
    China Beach

    China Beach

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    ABC (ended 1991)
    China Beach was a popular show that aired from April 26, 1988 to July 22, 1991. The show was about a group of nurses just trying to do their jobs in Vietnam. The theme for the series was "Reflections", a hit from 1968 by Diana Ross and the Supremes.moreless
  • 208
    Stephen King's Kingdom Hospital

    Stephen King's Kingdom Hospital

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    ABC (ended 2004)
    Using the Danish miniseries "Riget" (a.k.a. "The Kingdom") as a point of inspiration, master of horror Stephen King gives Kingdom Hospital a unique and menacing American touch. Kingdom is a hospital whose bizarre population includes a brilliant surgeon who lives in the basement, a nearly blind security guard and a nurse who regularly faints at the sight of blood. But when patients and staff hear the voice of a girl crying through the halls and a patient destined for life as a paraplegic miraculously recovers, they are dismissive of any suggestion of mysticism or unseen powers at their own peril. Andrew McCarthy (plays Dr. Hook, a surgeon who lives in the hospital basement. Oscar nominee Diane Ladd (Alice) is Mrs. Druse, a hypochondriac whose psychic abilities lead her to the hospital. Fellow Oscar nominee Bruce Davison (The Practice & X-Men) will play Dr. Stegman, an arrogant, but inept physician. The series is set up to play out like a book. The episode you watch picks up right where the last episode left off. Not in the sense of 24 that goes hour by hour, but more to the form of chapter by chapter. King himself was quoted as saying "Remember that Kingdom Hospital is a "novelization for television". Like a novel, it will pay back dividends but you will have to give it a little bit of time." King himself describes the show as a mix of ER and The Shining. Main Theme "Worry About You" by Ivy Bye, Bye, Baby Don't Be Long I Worry About You While You're Gone I think of you in my dreams You never know, just what you mean, to me To me Doo ba badda Doo ba badda I think of you night and day I never know just what you meant, to say To say Doo ba badda Doo ba badda ABC Broadcast History: March 3, 2004 - March 31, 2004 --- Wednesday 10:00 PM April 8, 2004 - July 15, 2004 --- Thursday 9:00 PMmoreless
  • 209
    Supermarket Sweep

    Supermarket Sweep

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    ABC (ended 2003)
    "Hey, the next time you're at the checkout counter and you hear the beep, think of all the fun you can have on, Supermarket Sweep! Following many years of waiting in the check out lines at local supermarkets Al Howard, with his wife, Alice, wondered what it would be like if just once the manager came to him and asked, "How would you like to run wild through the market and grab everything you can get your hands on and it won't cost you a cent!?" The idea of Supermarket Sweep was born. But, Al realized that he needed more than just 'running through a market' to make a successful game show, so he came up with other features, all relating to products we typically find in a market. Than he took his new show to ABC-TV and soon the show was viewed all across America, five days-a-week at 11 a.m. Eventually, Sweep went off ABC-TV but over the years, the TV audience never forgot the show that looked entirely different from any other game show. After all, what other show allows you to grab a supermarket shopping cart and act out your fantasy! Lifetime TV put the show back on in 1990. This time, Al created an exciting new element: the "Bonus Round." $5000 in cash was hidden somewhere in the market and a contestant team was given 60 seconds to find it. They had to solve 3 clues in that amount of time and if they did, their reward was the $5000 in cash! Have contestants been successful in finding the big money? Well, the record shows that up to this point in time, Supermarket Sweep has given away close to two million dollars in cash! (Yes, that's $2,000,000.00) The program used to be seen on PAX TV, but the show is no longer seen as of right now. But since PAX is famous for being America's "Family Network," the show is a perfect fit for them. After all, going to the supermarket is a family experience!moreless
  • 210
    Alias Smith and Jones

    Alias Smith and Jones

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    ABC (ended 1973)
    Hannibal Heyes and Kid Curry, two successful and popular outlaw cousins in the old West, decide it´s time to go straight. The problem is that the governor just can´t give them amnesty right away, they have to prove that they deserve it. And in the meantime they will still be wanted. Hunting them is everybody, from sheriffs to bounty hunters, to posses and ordinary people. Hannibal Heyes/Joshua Smith is the thinker, the poker player and the optimist, while Kid Curry/Thaddeus Jones is the quick-drawing worrier who sometimes is a bit slow. Together they are Smith and Jones... Other regular characters include "Big Mac" McCreedy, a wealthy ranch owner, who´s feuding with his next door neighbour, senor Armendariz. Harry Briscoe is an agent with Bannerman detective agency, who´s perhaps not the brightest man around. Clementine Hale is a woman with an enormous zest for life. She owns the only picture of Heyes and the Kid and often uses it to get them to get her out of trouble. This show contained both humour and drama, as well as gunplay, poker games, and chases. It is said to be in part inspired by the movie Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), but it owes equally to TV series Maverick. (Peter Duel's appearance in most of the first season's episodes, with the black hat and his hair combed back, looks very similar to James Garner as Maverick.) On New Year's Eve, 1971, Peter Duel died from a gunshot wound to the head. The death was officially ruled suicide. Duel was fighting an alcohol addiction (he had been convicted of DWI), had been drinking that night, and was depressed over his legal problems and the state of his career, feeling that Alias Smith and Jones was hardly his best work. The runaway success of Alias Smith abd Jones led to a grueling schedule for the actors, as cast and crew worked overtime to produce more episodes to keep up with public demand, and this may also have played a part. The role of Hannibal Heyes was filled within only a few hours by Roger Davis, who had originally done the voice-overs in the opening credits, but the show´s popularity sank steadily - as did the interest for Western shows in general, and the series was canceled in January 1973.moreless
  • 211
    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries

    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries

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    ABC (ended 1979)
    The Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew Mysteries recount the adventures of the famous teenage sleuths, based on the two series of juvenile mystery novels by the Edward Stratemeyer syndicate under the names Franklin W. Dixon and Carolyn Keene. Frank and Joe Hardy are the sons of a private detective, and Nancy Drew is the daughter of a criminal attorney.

    In the first season, stories alternated week by week between the two families, but in the second season the independent Nancy Drew adventures were phased out so that all were working as a team. In the third season, Nancy Drew was eliminated completely and the Hardys became more involved in cases of international intrigue.

    also see The Hardy Boys Mysteriesmoreless
  • 212
    Primetime: What Would You Do?

    Primetime: What Would You Do?

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    ABC
    What would you do if you saw an act of injustice? How would you react to something so outrageous or tragic that it compels you to do something about it? Primetime: What Would You Do? sets up elaborate realistic scenarios with actors testing real controversial subjects to see what ordinary people would do when pushed to act, or if they act at all. What these ordinary people don't know, is that Johnm Quinones is recording and listening to every word. Based on the popular segments on ABC's 20/20, John delves into the implicit and overt actions prompted in real-life controversial situations. Psychologists are often given the chance to explaint the theories behind the action or inaction. The show was intended to be a limited series, however the popularity of the show continues to push production with more scenarios that involve everyday people. Only a limited number of episodes have been produced over the past few years.moreless
  • 213
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 214
    Spider-Man (1967)

    Spider-Man (1967)

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The primary signature character for Marvel Comics, "Spider-Man," is the alter-ego of Peter Parker, science student at a New York City university. While witnessing a radiology experiment on one fateful day, Peter is bitten on his hand by a spider exposed to the radioactive field generated by the experiment and later finds that he has acquired the spider's wall-scaling, leaping, and extra-sensory abilities, in addition to increased endurance and strength. Peter knits for himself a red-and-blue costume and mask and produces a web-spinning fluid enabling him to swing from building to building above the streets of Manhattan. Peter's Uncle Ben is murdered by a burglar, a criminal who earlier ran past Peter at a television studio to which Peter had come to exhibit his spider-abilities. Peter selfishly declined to help the police to stop the fleeing malefactor and is to a significant extent responsible for the death of his uncle. Peter, in his Spiderman guise, finds, punches, and webs the murderer. Now aware that he has received his powers for a higher purpose than exhibition for monetary gain, Peter accepts his duty as a costumed fighter of crime, a responsibility that he vows never again to fail. To financially support his Aunt May, Ben's widow, Peter becomes a freelance photographer for the Daily Bugle newspaper as an aside to his continued studies and his responsibility as Spiderman to the good people of New York City. Peter does not allow anyone, not even his aunt, to know that he is Spiderman. The Daily Bugle publisher, a cigar-smoking, self-righteous, blustery chauvinist named J. Jonah Jameson, has a jaundiced view of Spiderman's heroism and wields considerable influence with the city government and police force. So, Spidey must constantly be wary of the police whom he is helping, usually retaining the villains that he catches in a web for police to apprehend after he has left the capture scene, and attaching a note with an appropriate pun in regard to the crook and which says that the capture was courtesy of "Your Friendly Neighborhood Spiderman". Peter often uses his intimate involvement with his alter-ego's pursuit of villains to obtain exclusive photographs of the criminals, their evil deeds, and their capture, and provides the photographs to an incredulous Jameson, who, though he prints the pictures, usually manages to negatively spin-doctor Spiderman's involvement and magnify his own importance, much to Spidey's good-natured annoyance and the objection of Spidey's admirer and Peter's friend, Betty Brant, Jameson's feisty secretary. Meanwhile, in Peter's continued university life, he encounters eccentric professors whose unauthorized, dangerous experiments result in calamity that only Spiderman can remedy, and he experiences frustration with girl-friends who accuse him of cowardice every time that he must leave them in the midst of a dire situation so that he can privately change into Spiderman. Spiderman is the creation of Marvel Comics' founder Stan Lee and one of the earliest super-heroes to be featured in graphically illustrated magazines, or comic books, under the Marvel Comics name. Perhaps the most famous aspect to the 1967-1970 Spiderman is its opening and closing theme song, which was performed by a vocal group to lyrics written by Paul Francis Webster and quick-tempo instrumentals performed by Bob Harris, published by Buddah Music, Inc.. In May 2002, a live-action Spider-Man movie was released starring Tobey Maguire as Spider-Man, and the villian The Green Goblin. Due out in 2004, Spider-Man 2's villains include Doctor Octopus and The Lizard. Some information from: http://personal.nbnet.nb.ca/kmccorry/spidey.html

    "Spiderman. Spiderman. Does whatever a spider can. Spins a web, any size. Catches thieves- just like flies. Look out! Here comes the Spiderman! Is he strong? Listen, bud. He's got radioactive blood. Can he swing, from a thread? Take a look overhead. Hey, there! There goes the Spiderman! In the chill of night, at the scene of a crime. Like a streak of light, he arrives just in time! Spiderman. Spiderman. Friendly Neighborhood Spiderman. Wealth and fame? He's ignored. Action is his reward. To him, life is a great big bang-up. Wherever there's a hang-up, you'll find the Spiderman!" moreless
  • 215
    School House Rock!

    School House Rock!

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    ABC (ended 1996)
    Release history:
    The soundtrack to Multiplication Rock was released on LP (Capitol 11174) in 1973 and on CD (Capitol 91253) in 1989. The discs are in stereo, but missing some foley from the broadcast versions. (see also reissues and covers) Filmstrips and 16mm films of Multiplication Rock, Grammar Rock, America Rock and Science Rock (hereafter The Big Four) were available to schools and libraries from Xerox Films. The film prints (and possibly the filmstrips) came with teachers' aides which included lyrics, questions for students and activities. In 1987 The Big Four were released by Golden Book Video on four VHS tapes. Cloris Leachman and "a group of young friends" sang and danced to new between-segment songs not produced by the original team. The tapes were missing The Good Eleven, Little Twelvetoes, and Three-Ring Government and America Rock was renamed History Rock. The videos were re-released on VHS (Aug. 8, 1995) and laserdisc (Dec. 13, 1995) by Capital Cities/ABC Video Publishers, restoring the missing segments and removing Ms. Leachman and friends. CD-ROMs and at least two music folios were released in 1996. Released Apr. 9, 1996 School House Rock! Rocks featured new versions of SHR songs performed by contemporary rock stars. School House Rock, the Box Set was released June 18, 1996 and featured 41 songs on 4 CDs. Disc 1 featured the stereo versions of Multiplication Rock plus a bonus track, My Hero, Zero by The Lemonheads. Discs 2-4 featured mono versions of the songs (probably directly from film) except The Preamble which is in stereo, and Verb which has an extremely small amount of separation. Episodes made in the 1990s were made in stereo and are presented in stereo in the box. The four discs were released separately, minus The Lemonheads track, on Apr. 1, 1997. Another tribute album, School House Rocks the Vote was released Aug. 18, 1998. It featured various artists covering School House Rock songs. Among the artists were Grady Tate singing Messin' with My Bill of Rights!, I'm Just a Bill by Joan Osborne and South Park's Isaac Hayes, and The Campaign Trail by Bob Dorough. A sampler CD, The Best of School House Rock was released Nov. 3, 1998, featuring songs by the original artists. I Got Six was named Best Picture of 1973 by ASIF-East, a chapter of the International Animated Film Association. Multiplication Rock received honors from Action for Children's Television. Bob Dorough received an Grammy nomination in 1974 for the Multiplication Rock LP, probably for Best Recording for Children (the winner was Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too). Most impressive was SHR's 4 Emmys, beating out shows like Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood Each discipline has been given its own season. Years of first airing are listed below as original airdates are likely lost forever. 1973 Multiplication Rock (season 1) (premiered 06-Jan-73) 1973-1977 Grammar Rock (season 2) (premiered 08-Sep-73) 1975-1979 America Rock (season 3) 1978-1979 Science Rock (season 4) (premiered 11-Mar-78) 1983-1984 Scooter Computer & Mr. Chips (season 5) (premiered 08-Jan-83) (last show 31-Aug-85) 1995-1996 Money Rock (season 6) Years of first broadcast for each episode are given in the production code field. moreless
  • 216
    SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show

    SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show

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    ABC (ended 1984)
    Although short SuperFriends episodes were produced by Hanna-Barbera from 1980-1983, SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show was the first new format SuperFriends series since 1979's The World's Greatest SuperFriends. Continuing the previous three years' policy of producing short stories, this series' format was two stories per half hour, so all the separate stories were ten minutes long each. Also, in spite of appearing in the opening credits, Aquaman doesn't make an appearance in any single episode of this series. Unlike previous series, this one was produced as a toyline tie-in (which was just becoming a very popular practice at the time). The toys were produced by Kenner, and the general story as detailed in the mini-comics that accompanied the figures and the mini-series published by D.C. themselves was that the major heroes of Earth had teamed up to fight Darkseid and his villains. This series followed that storyline, and so was more in line with the very popular Challenge Of The SuperFriends series, which also featured actual super-villains from the comics as regular adversaries. One of the most obvious tie-ins was the character of Brainiac, who had been given a radically different look for his toy (despite him appearing in his original form in the opening credits). His look on the show was similarly updated. Being produced to promote toys, there were a few departures from past SuperFriends series in order for the series to appear more modern and have a higher profile in a more competitive television market. The most notable change was the addition of Adam West to the voice cast, who was chosen to return to his most famous role by voicing Batman instead of Olan Soule, who had done Batman's voice for previous SuperFriends episodes and Scooby-Doo guest appearances.moreless
  • 217
    T.J. Hooker

    T.J. Hooker

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    ABC (ended 1986)
    After his partner was murdered, veteran plain clothes Detective T.J. Hooker (William Shatner) had reverted back to his former role as Sergeant, and returned to the beat to rid the streets of the type of scum that was responsible for his partner's death. Back in uniform, Hooker was assigned to train the academy recruits, and was partnered with brash, sometimes hot-headed young rookie Vince Romano (Adrian Zmed). With Romano much his junior, Hooker acted as his trainer and mentor on both a professional and social level. The age difference generally being the key hook of the partnership, the pair quickly became good friends and a good team. Hooker's tough, no-nonsense ways saw him often clashing with station Captain Sheridan (Richard Herd), but he always got the job done and was highly respected as a result. Seen in the short first season, mostly on desk duty, was Officer Vicky Taylor (April Clough). Introduced at the start of the second season was attractive Officer Stacy Sheridan (Heather Locklear), the daughter of Captain Sheridan. Initially brought in to fill Vicky's shoes, by the end of the season she had progressed to patroling with Jim Corrigan (James Darren), another veteran cop much in the mould of Hooker. In the show's generally most recognised span, Hooker & Romano (Unit 4-Adam-30), and Sheridan & Corrigan (4-Adam-16) usually worked closely together to tackle cases. The addition Corrigan & Stacy's partnership added an extra dimension to the show, sometimes with whole plots revolving around one or both of them. Outside of his work, Hooker was divorced as a result of his work putting strain on his marriage, but was still friendly with his ex-wife, nurse Fran (Lee Bryant). Hooker was always one for the ladies, but was still trying to adjust to being single once again. (Lee Bryant was the original actress to portray Fran; the part was reprised by a different actress late on). For the final season, the series moved from ABC to a late-night slot on CBS. Along with the move, Adrian Zmed chose to leave the series to pursue other projects, leaving Hooker to patrol alone and to generally work as more of a trio with Stacy and Jim. Occasionally unintentionally hilarious, largely thanks to Shatner's so-straight-it's-camp performance of moral speeches to young offenders or Romano, the series never-the-less was a hit; and in it's prime, with it's blend of good humour mixed in with "on the streets" gritiness, followed in the footsteps of 'Starsky & Hutch' and the like to become the popular cop shop of the time.. A note of trivia: very seldom given away, Hooker's initials actually stand for Thomas Jefferson (incidentally, T.J. is the reverse of J.T., the initials of Shatner's most famous role, as Captain Kirk in 'Star Trek'). Also, while never actually given away in the series, LCPD is actually said to stand for Lake City Police Department.moreless
  • 218
    Super Friends

    Super Friends

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    ABC (ended 1973)
    SuperFriends was an animated series that premiered on ABC on September 8, 1973. The series was executive produced by the creative team of William Hanna and Joseph Barbera. The series featured the adventures of DC Comics book heroes Superman, Batman, Robin, Wonder Woman, and Aquaman. These five superheroes along with superheroes in training Wendy, Marvin, and Wonder Dog focused their abilities on putting away criminals, saving lives, and stopping terrible disasters after getting messages from their computer, the "TroubAlert."

    Each episode of the SuperFriends was geared to present, not only action, but also some lesson of educational value. In the short run of the series, a number of other famous DC comic book heroes appeared: Plastic Man, The Flash, and Green Arrow.

    The last new episode of the series entitled "The Watermen" was broadcast on December 22, 1973. The show continued in reruns until it was taken off the air on August 30, 1974. Two years later, however, the series was rebroadcast from February 7, 1976 to September 3, 1977. In an enduring testament to the popularity of the SuperFriends characters, they were later featured in a number of spin-offs and revivals.

    In 1977, the Hanna-Barbera produced sixty-two cartoon featuring the Superfriends. These cartoons were shown on ABC as part of The All-New SuperFriends Hour. Each hour long episode featured four cartoons (one half-hour cartoon and three seven minute shorts). The hour-long show featured adventures of the original fives superheroes from SuperFriends. Wendy, Marvin, and Wonder Dog, however, did not appear. They were replaced by the shape-shifting Wondertwins Zan and Jayna and their space-monkey Gleek. The All-New SuperFriends Hour ran from September 10, 1977 to September 2, 1978 and was replaced in the next season by Challenge of the SuperFriends and SuperFriends (1978).

    Challenge of the SuperFriends was one of the most popular incarnations of SuperFriends that featured the Justice League of America against the Legion of Doom. This half-hour series ran for sixteen episodes from September 9, 1978 to September 15, 1979. It was accompanied in its run by SuperFriends (1978) which also presented sixteen half-hour episodes from September 9, 1978 to September 15, 1979. These episodes featured the same characters as The All-New SuperFriends Hour in further adventures.

    In 1979, Hanna-Barbera discontinued Challenge of the SuperFriends. Reruns of old SuperFriends episodes were mixed with eight new episodes and were presented under the new title The World's Greatest SuperFriends. The World's Greatest Superfriends was a hour long series that ran from September 22,1 979 to September 27, 1980.

    In the 1980's, SuperFriends continued in a number of incarnations. From September 1980 to September 1984, Hanna-Barbara produced sixty-six seven minute shorts (see Superfriends (1980)). Twenty-Four of these shorts were shown in the 1980-1981 season, accompanied by SuperFriend's reruns, under the title The Superfriends Hour. In the 1981-1982 season, sixteen new shorts were presented as a part of the half-hour long Superfriends. These new shorts were, of course, accompanied by reruns. The 1982-1983 season, however, was all reruns. Although Hanna-Barbara produced twenty-four new SuperFriends shorts, ABC decided to show only reruns of the SuperFriends in a thirty minute program entitled The Best of SuperFriends. Most of the unaired shorts (called by some "The Lost Episodes"), however, would later air in syndication.

    The 1984-1985 season, new half-hour SuperFriends episodes would return to ABC under the title SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show. SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show was a half-hour sixteen episode cartoon that featured Superman, Batman, Robin, Wonder Woman, and the Teen Titans Firestorm and Cyborg. In the 1985-1986 season, these same characters would appear along with Aquaman, Flash, Green Lantern, Hawkman, and Samurai in the half-hour The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians. This final incarnation of Hanna-Barbara's SuperFriends offered ten new episodes. On September 30, 1986 with the end of the last episode of The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians, Hanna-Barbara's twelve year run of original SuperFriends episodes was over. The SuperFriends, however, would continue to live on in syndication.

    First Telecast: September 8, 1973 Last Telecast: December 22, 1973

    Episodes: 16 Color Episodes (16 one-hour episodes)

    Follow-up Shows: The All-New SuperFriends Hour, SuperFriends (1978), Challenge of the SuperFriends, The World's Greatest SuperFriends, SuperFriends (1980), SuperFriends: The Legendary Super Powers Show, and The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians.moreless
  • 219
    One Step Beyond

    One Step Beyond

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    ABC (ended 1961)
    Outside the known is irreality, and one step beyond that is Surrealism. John Newland introduces reported cases of supernatural phenomena, whose poetry is revealed in magnificent and almost brutally compressed dramatizations. One Step Beyond was mainly filmed at M-G-M Studios, Hollywood, and partly at M-G-M British Studios, Borehamwood, Herts. It premiered nine months before The Twilight Zone, and was also known as Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond. All episodes are directed by Newland himself, a dab hand whose trademark is subtle, balletic camera work. This series fed the nation's growing interest in paranormal suspense in a different way. Rather than creating fictional stories with supernatural twists and turns, this program sought out 'real' stories of the supernatural, including ghosts, disappearances, monsters, etc., and re-creating them for each episode. No solutions to these mysteries were ever found, and viewers could only scratch their heads and wonder, "what if it's real?"moreless
  • 220
    Extreme Weight Loss

    Extreme Weight Loss

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    ABC
    ABC's latest unscripted project is from the forces behind The Biggest Loser. The goal for each contestant will be to lose 50% of their body fat.
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