• 161
    Shindig

    Shindig

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    ABC (ended 1966)
    Shindig! was a rock 'n' roll series that ran from September 16, 1964 through January 8, 1966 on the ABC TV network.

    Shindig! was created and produced by Jack Good who had previously produced rock 'n' roll TV shows in his native Britain. With such shows as "Oh Boy!," "Wham!" and "Boy Meets Girls," he perfected his type of fast-paced rock 'n' roll series. In 1962, Good produced a pilot for American TV titled "Young America Swings the World" which was originally ignored, but eventually became one of three Shindig! pilots.

    Shindig! premiered on September 16, 1964. During its first season, Shindig was broadcast Wednesdays at 8:30pm Eastern. Premiering as a half-hour series, it expanded to an hour in January 1965.

    Most of the top American and British rock/pop acts of the mid-1960s appeared onShindig!. The British performers often appeared in segments taped in the U.K.

    Shindig! was different from the rock 'n' roll programs previously seen on American television. Shindig's music appeared to be non-stop, often only interrupted by the commercial breaks. And the performances were live...or so it seemed. In recent years it's been revealed that the backing music and many of the vocals were pre-recorded. The music and vocal tracks were recorded a day or two before the episode was videotaped. To make sure that these "mimed" performances looked live, the performers rehearsed numerous times.

    Shindig! was hosted by Los Angeles disc-jockey Jimmy O'Neill. Other series regulars included The Blossoms, a female group who provided the back-up singing. The Wellingtons were the male back-up singers. (Another male group, the Elgibles, often appeared in place of the Wellingtons.) There were also the Shindig dancers, a troupe made up of 10 (or so) young women who performed choreographed dances.

    Shindig also had a roster of performers who appeared on a semi-regular basis. These included The Righteous Brothers, Glen Campbell, Donna Loren and Bobby Sherman.

    Unlike other shows of the time, Shindig! did not have its own theme song. (The 1965 Shindig! LP begins with a "theme" song, but it's unlikely that it was ever performed on the TV series.) Most of theShindig! episodes began with an opening song or medley performed by the Shindig guests and regulars. The medley consisted of short excerpts from current hits, vintage rock 'n' roll songs, along with gospel, country and folk songs. And the episodes ended with a finale, with a different song performed each week.

    Shindig ignited a (short-lived) trend in television which could probably best be described as "rock 'n' roll...with go-go dancers." In January 1965, NBC introduced Hullabaloo, a variety show featuring rock 'n' roll guests and Shindig-type dancers. A few months later, the syndicated rock shows "Hollywood A Go-Go" and "Shivaree" premiered. And in July 1965, ABC added Where the Action Is to its weekday schedule. While Action's format was different from Shindig, it did feature a troupe of dancers called "The Action Kids." Shindig's influence can also be seen in two theatrical movies: "The T.A.M.I. Show" (recorded in October 1964) and "The Big T-N-T Show" (1966).

    Instead of airing reruns, ABC produced new Shindig episodes for the Summer of 1965.

    The finalShindig! episode produced by Jack Good aired on June 30, 1965. Beginning with the July 7, 1965 show, former Shindig director Dean Whitmore took over as producer.

    For its second season,Shindig!was split into two 30-minutes shows airing Thursdays and Saturdays at 7:30pm. The episodes from 30Sep65 through 30Oct65 featured guest hosts.

    Shindig's cancellation was announced in late October 1965. Dean Whitmore has often been blamed for the downfall of the series. Supposedly, when Whitmore took over, the show lost its pacing. To be fair, most of the episodes that aired from July through October 1965 are actually quite good. Although there were some changes, Whitmore didn't drift too far from Jack Good's original format. It remained a fast-paced show. Even the addition of guest hosts didn't hurt the show too much. Instead of taking over the whole show, the guest hosts usually sang one song and introduced a few of the other acts.

    What probably hurt Shindig's popularity was the large number of rock 'n' roll shows on U.S. television by the Fall of 1965. As mentioned earlier, "Hullabaloo," "Hollywood A Go-Go," "Shivaree" and "Where the Action Is" were on the air. ABC also had the long running "American Bandstand." In September 1964, "The Lloyd Thaxton Show," previously a local Los Angeles series, became nationally syndicated. As if that wasn't enough, almost every large U.S. city had its own local rock 'n' roll TV series.

    Another factor affecting Shindig's ratings had to have been time-shifting by local affiliates. Many ABC affiliates chose not to air Shindig in its regular Thursday/Saturday 7:30pm time slot (opting for syndicated or locally produced programs). These stations usually moved Shindig to non-prime time hours. While some time-shifting occurred during the first season, it became even more wide-spread for Shindig's 2nd season.

    It wasn't until after the cancellation was announced that Shindig's quality started to decline.TheShindig!episodes from November 1965 through January 1966 are an odd mixture of programming. While some of these final shows resemble Jack Good's original series, there were others that looked nothing like Shindig and have nothing to do with rock 'n' roll. Examples of this are the episodes spotlighting Louis Armstrong (4Nov65 & 11Nov65); George Maharis (27Nov65) and Johnny Mathis (25Dec65).

    Shindig's cancellation was part of a mid-season reshuffle at ABC, which the network called "The Second Season." The final Shindig aired on January 8, 1966. As if to add insult to injury, many of the songs performed on that final Shindig were presented as sketches saluting the new ABC shows! One of these sketches was a tribute to "Batman," the series that replaced Shindig!

    In the early 1990's Rhino Home Video released twelve Shindig tapes on VHS. These were not complete episodes but compilation tapes with themes such as "Groovy Gals" and "Sixties Superstars."
    Surviving episodes

    --All of the Shindig episodes survive as 16mm kinescopes.

    All but four of the Shindig!episodes were originally shot on videotape. But most of ABC's copies are from 16mm kinescopes, which were made during the show's 1964-66 network run. Kinescopes were a videotape-to-film transfer produced by aiming a 16mm film camera at a TV monitor. The quality of the kinescopes aren't bad but they don't match up to the picture and sound quality of the 2" master videotapes.

    Here is a list of known videotape clips and shows.

    Videotape clips (hopefully, the complete episodes survive on videotape):

    --1964 Pilot: Videotape clips of audience members appear on the home video release of "The Beach Boys: An American Band."
    -- 07Oct64 (Episode #4): Videotape clips of the Beatles' performances and the Karl Denver finale survive.
    -- 23Dec64 (Episode #16): A videotape clip of the Beach Boys performing "Dance, Dance, Dance" appears on "The Beach Boys: An American Band."
    -- 27Jan65 (Episode #21) Videotape clips of Bobby Sherman ("Splish Splash") and Glen Campbell ("Dixieland Rock") were shown on "Good Morning America" in February 1984.
    --26May65 (Episode #37) The Howling Wolf segment survives on videotape.
    -- 30Jun65 (Episode #42) A videotape clip of Jerry Lee Lewis ("Rockin' Pneumonia") was shown on "Good Morning America" in February 1984.

    Complete Episodes:
    -- 4Aug65 (Episode #47) Dixie Cups / Great Scots / Nooney Rickett 4
    -- 11Aug65 (Episode #48) Ronettes / Donovan / Rolling Stones
    -- 08Sep65 (Episode #51) Patty Duke / Guilloteens / Searchers
    --30-Sep-65 (Episode #56) Mickey Rooney / the Turtles / Lesley Gore

    --Note: As mentioned above, all of the Shindig episodes survive as 16mm kinescopes. The above list is an attempt to catalog all of the known surviving 2" network videotapes. It's been reported that some of the above 2" tapes are held by someone other than ABC/Disney, and that this other company may have videotape masters of additional Shindig episodes.

    The four Shindig episodes shot directly on film were the two "Shindig in London" shows and the two "Shindig in Europe" shows. The "Shindig in London," shows, filmed at the Richmond-On-Thames Jazz Festival, aired 04-Dec-1965 & 09-Dec-1965. The "Shindig in Europe" episodes were broadcast on 18-Dec-1965 and 01-Jan-1966.

    Note: This guide is a fan site and is not associated with ABC/Disney. It is edited by Tom Alger.

    Thanks to everyone who's helped with this guide, including: -- Gary Belich - gary558@yahoo.com
    -- Ben Chaput - editor of the RVSP (Rock Video 60s Project) and the RVSP Message Board.
    --Charlie Harvey - editor of the Unchained Melody Collection website.moreless
  • 162
    S.W.A.T.

    S.W.A.T.

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    ABC (ended 1976)
    The show starring Steve Forrest was a spinoff of The Rookies. The show produced 39 episodes, 2 of which were really episodes of The Rookies that served as the pilot. The show ran from February 1975 until April 1976. Also starring was Robert Urich (who went onto star in Soap in September 1977), and Mark Shera. Thanks to hit programs like Adam-12, the cop show rose to a new level of prominence during the 1970's. There were several badge-flashing action dramas over the course of the decade, but perhaps none as interesting (or controversial) as S.W.A.T., a program inspired by the real-life crime-control units that rose to prominence in the U.S. after the civil disturbances of the late 1960's. Although its brutal level of action ensured that it had short life on television, S.W.A.T. became an impressive success during its short run and continues to be a cult favorite today. S.W.A.T. is an acronym for the 'Special Weapons And Tactics' unit, which was an elite five-man team of police officers who dealt with situations that were too dangerous for the police force to handle. Each had a specific job: Lt. Harrelson called the shots as the group's commanding officer, Sgt. Kay was the group's scout and Officer McCabe was the resident marksman. Each was also a Vietnam veteran, so they all adopted a military style (navy-blue fatigues) and used a combat mentality to deal with the problems they faced. During the show's run, the S.W.A.T. team had no shortage of psychos and crazies to deal with-everything from snipers to Satanists to scuba-diving jewel thieves. S.W.A.T. also had to deal with being the direct targets of these bad guys-Street dated a woman whose last few boyfriends were killed by a sniper in "The Bravo Enigma," and a family of criminals targeted the entire S.W.A.T. team for extinction in "Kill S.W.A.T." No matter who was plotting to kill whom, you could count on plenty of mayhem each week as the S.W.A.T. rolled from destination to destination in their specially-equipped van to dispense justice the hard way. S.W.A.T.'s combination of cool cops and brutal action made it a popular choice when it hit the airwaves in 1975. The show even produced a radio hit when its orchestral-funk theme song, performed by Rhythm Heritage, became a Top-10 smash on pop radio. Everyone loved the show except the critics. Media pundits regularly attacked the show for its high level of violence, the "shoot first, ask questions later" mentality of the heroes, and the fact that its heroes often dealt out more violence than the foes they were dealing with. The controversial but popular show enjoyed a two-season run before quietly disappearing from the television schedule in the summer of 1976. Today, S.W.A.T. periodically pops up in reruns and garners an enthusiastic response from the former kids who grew up on its tales of urban-guerrilla warfare. The show was even remade as an action epic for the movie theaters starring Samuel L. Jackson and Colin Farrell. Whether the remake was a success or not, one thing is certain: S.W.A.T. has earned its place in television history as one of the most memorably intense cop shows of all time. (Extra info courtesy of YesterdayLand)moreless
  • 163
    The Rookies (1972)

    The Rookies (1972)

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    ABC (ended 1976)
    An hour long '70s TV series about a trio of attractive crime-fighters from producer Aaron Spelling - No, it's not the Angels. Before Charlie's Angels, uber-producer Spelling introduced us to the less campy police drama The Rookies. Centered on officers new to the Southern California Police Department and the situations they faced in the line of duty such as kidnapping, teen runaways, gang violence and racism. They may be young and (sometimes) naive but they are always professional. Not only produced by Aaron Spelling but the show also came to us courtesy of Leonard Goldberg, who produced the big-screen version of Charlie's Angels, and also introduced us to future Angel Kate Jackson who plays the show's only female star Nurse Jill Danko.

    Before the series, The Rookies were first introduced in a full-length movie from ABC which served as the pilot. The original movie introduced us to the characters but featured a couple of different actors. The Rookies themselves were the same but in the movie Ryker was originally played by none other than "The Night Stalker" himself Darrin McGavin and Kate Jackson's role as Jill was first played by Jennifer Billingsley, probably best known as the female hoodlum who terrorized Olivia de Havilland in the 1964 shocker Lady in a Cage.

    The movie did well enough that ABC decided to pick it up as a series. When it finally premiered it became so popular that it eventually served as a jumping off point for a lot of great young actors of the time. Besides Kate and Twin Peaks' Micheal Ontkean you could also catch early glimpses of other future stars such as John Travolta, Sissy Spacek, Martin Sheen, Nick Nolte, Tyne Daly and many more.

    Trivia

    William Blinn, the co-creator of the show, also created Starsky and Hutch, another Spelling/Goldberg production.

    The Rookies served as a launching pad for the short-lived spin-off S.W.A.T. starring Robert Urich which is now a big-screen film starring Colin Farrell.

    The opening titles to Charlie's Angels were a little similar to that of The Rookies. In the titles of The Rookies we see the three main characters training at police academy and eventually becoming the Rookies.

    Where are they now?

    Georg Stanford Brown After honing his directorial skills directing episodes of The Rookies Georg went on to direct several more shows. His directing efforts on shows such as Hill Street Blues and Cagney & Lacey earned him an Emmy award and several nominations. He has even directed fellow Rookies cast-member Kate Jackson in several episodes of Charlie's Angels and Gerald S O'Loughlin in Roots: The Next Generation. Acting-wise George has been seen in the massively popular mini-series Roots, the mini-series North and South and most recently starred in the Showtime series Linc's with Pam Grier. Georg has also been spotted guest-starring on The District and Family Law. He's had three daughters with ex-wife and former Cagney & Lacey star Tyne Daly, who appeared in several episodes of The Rookies.

    Michael Ontkean Canadian actor Ontkean retired from acting after two seasons on The Rookies before returning in 1977 with the hit Paul Newman film Slap Shot which united his two loves; acting and hockey. He later reunited with "Mrs. Danko" herself Kate Jackson in the controversial 1982 film Making Love in which they played a married couple coping with the fact that Ontkean's character had fallen in love with another man played by Harry Hamlin. After appearing in '80s comedies, such as Maid to Order with Ally Sheedy and The Allnighter with Joan Cusack, he earned one of his most popular roles as Sheriff Harry Truman in David Lynch's creepy-yet-monumental 1990 series Twin Peaks. Since then he has appeared in several TV movies, such as The Stepford Husbands (a sequel to The Stepford Wives), and in the big-screen film Just a Little Harmless Sex (a film by Halloween: Resurrection director Rick Rosenthal and written by Buffy the Vampire Slayer producer/writer Marti Noxon). He is currently married to All the President's Men actress Jamie Smith-Jackson, who also guest starred on a few episodes of The Rookies.

    Sam Melville Sam continued to work in television appearing in shows such The Dukes of Hazzard, T.J. Hooker and The A-Team. He reunited with his TV wife Kate Jackson when he played her ex-husband Joe King in Kate's third popular TV series Scarecrow and Mrs. King. The actor, who co-starred in the original 1968 film version of The Thomas Crown Affair, has done a few movies, such as 1989's The Assassin and the horror Twice Dead, but sadly didn't get to do more. He died in 1989 at the age of 52 as a result of heart failure. You can visit The Official Sam Melville Memorial Website.

    Kate Jackson As if there's someone out there who doesn't already know that after The Rookies this Emmy and Golden Globe nominee went on to star in the '70s trademark series Charlie's Angels. In it she played Sabrina Duncan, the "smart" one of the trio. If you watch the opening titles of Angels you can see her as a police trainee shooting a gun during target practice. Sound familiar? It's exactly the same scene we see during the opening titles of The Rookies. It was Spelling and Jackson's way of saying that now it was her turn to fight crime. As mentioned previously Kate has reteamed with all three of the original Rookies; Brown directed her in episodes of Charlie's Angels, Ontkean played her husband harboring a secret in the 1982 movie Making Love and Melville played her ex-husband Joe King in Scarecrow and Mrs. King. Scarecrow and Mrs. King was Jackson's third attempt at a TV series after Rookies and Angels and it was a successful one as Mrs. King ran for 5 years. Like Georg, Kate decided to take a shot at directing starting with episodes of Scarecrow and Mrs. King. Since then Kate has starred in numerous made-for-tv movies such as The Cold Heart of a Killer which she also produced from a book called "Murder on the Iditarod Trail." Most recently the breast cancer survivor starred in the remake of her own 1973 film Satan's School for Girls along with Spelling outcast Shannen Doherty, both versions were produced by Aaron Spelling.

    Gerald S. O'Loughlin The distinguished actor still continues to work doing everything from television to film. After directing episodes of The Rookies and the 1970's Meredith Baxter series Family (Georg also directed episodes of that show) Gerald appeared in the mini-series Roots: The Next Generation, which reunited him with Georg Stanford Brown. Since then the actor has appeared in many films including 1996's acclaimed Crime of the Century with Isabella Rossellini and Stephen Rea. The film centered on the 1932 abduction of the Lindberg baby. Most recently he has guest-starred on shows such as ER, Chicago Hope, The Division and Judging Amy (reuniting him with Rookies recurring guest star Tyne Daly).

    Bruce Fairbairn Not much is known about Bruce except that after The Rookies he appeared in the campy 1979 film Vampire Hookers with John Carradine, the 1987 sci-fi actioner Cyclone and the made-for-tv movie Do You Know the Muffin Man?, a courtroom drama about sexual abuse supposedly inspired by the McMartin case. You can also look for him in the Charlie's Angels rerun Angel Baby. Aside from that Bruce landed recurring roles in several TV shows; first on Knots Landing as Ray Geary and then as Sheldon Ganz in the popular lawyer drama L.A. Law.

    The first three seasons of The Rookies aired Mondays nights at 8pm on ABC. The final season aired Tuesday nights at 9pm.

    Wardrobe for the show was provided by The Gap

    Automobiles were furnished by Chrysler Corp.

    The series was filmed at 20th Century Fox Studiosmoreless
  • 164
    Wipeout

    Wipeout

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    ABC
    Jill Wagner, John Henson, and John Anderson host Wipeout, a show in which 24 contestants compete against each other and the clock in hopes of winning the $50,000 prize. In the Qualifier Round, all 24 contestants must complete a course consisting of four obstacles. The twelve contestants with the fastest times advance to the second round. In this round, the top 12 face the Sweeper. The six who last the longest on the Sweeper, move to the third round and the last person standing receives a $1000 bonus. In the third round, the remaining six contestants face an obstacle, such as the Dreadmill or Dizzy Dummy. Two contestants are eliminated during this round and the remaining four contestants advance to the final round - The Wipeout Zone. The final four must complete four obstacles in the Zone. The contestant with the fastest time wins the $50,000 prize.moreless
  • 165
    Less Than Perfect

    Less Than Perfect

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    ABC (ended 2006)
    Sara Rue stars as Claudia Casey, an enthusiastic assistant who loves her job working for GNB Network news anchor Will Butler, played by Eric Roberts. After two years, Claudia has become more adept at fending off her condescending co-workers, Kipp (Zachary Levi) and Lydia (Andrea Parker), who have been determined to get rid of her to further their own ambitions. Now, while continuing to spar with these snobs, she's being pestered in new ways: Lydia is obsessed with her upcoming wedding to on-air pundit Jeb (Patrick Warburton, new series regular), sharing all the details with everyone at the office -- especially Claudia -- and Kipp needs Claudia's counsel as he struggles with his new job as Jeb's assistant. Fortunately Claudia still has the support of three friends at GNB: the brash and blunt Ramona (Sherri Shepherd), the loyal but idiosyncratic Owen (Andy Dick), and her blowhard next-door neighbor, Carl (Will Sasso), who's also the cafeteria manager.moreless
  • 166
    Pan Am

    Pan Am

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    ABC (ended 2012)
    Set in New York in the 1960s, at the height of the Pan Am Airlines' success, the lifestyles and many secrets of the pilots and flight attendants will be revealed.
  • 167
    The Bionic Woman Classic

    The Bionic Woman Classic

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    ABC (ended 1978)
    In 1975 Lindsay Wagner made a guest appearance on The Six Million Dollar Man as a perfect female companion for Steve Austin - Jaime Sommers. After a tragic skydiving accident, Jaime also received bionic replacements. She and Steve planned to be married, but it came to pass that Jaime's body rejected her new limbs and she died.

    ABC realized how phenomenally successful Lindsay Wagner's portrayal of Jaime Sommers had become. So, they brought her back to life and spun her off into her own series. It debuted in January 1976 and was an immediate hit. The series ran on ABC for two seasons and was picked up by NBC for its final season. In Spanish the title is known La mujer biónica, though in in regions speaking the Catalan dialect, it is called La dona bionica. In Italy it is called La donna bionica. In Portuguese it is called A Mulher Biônica. In French it is called Super Jaimie. In Germany it is called Die Sieben Millionen Dollar Frau ("The Seven Million Dollar Woman"). In Japan it is called Baionikku Jiemi ("Bionic Jaime").moreless
  • 168
    F Troop

    F Troop

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    ABC (ended 1967)
    F Troop was a classic comedy set in the Old West. Fort Courage was the home of the US Army's sorriest band of misfits, led by the well-meaning Captain Parmenter, scion of a distinguished line of military officers, but himself naive, clumsy, bumbling and reliant on the Army manual. The old hand of the fort was Sergeant O'Rourke, who secretly ran O'Rourke Enterprises, a string of profitable but not always upstanding businesses, on the side, including the town saloon and an Indian souvenir company. He was happy when Parmenter was assigned to Fort Courage, a commanding officer who would be easy to hide his shenanigans from. O'Rourke's sidekick was the loyal but not too bright Corporal Agarn. Their business partner was the cranky but affable Wild Eagle, chief of the Hekawi. Completing the circle was Wrangler Jane, the beautiful blonde owner of the general store in town. She was a expert in all things Western, including shooting, horseback riding and lassoing, and fancied the dashing, young captain who was too bashful to return her affections in public. The men of F Troop were a motley lot. Bugler Dobbs had a hard time playing anything but Yankee Doodle, and not well at that. Duffy would often hold forth on how he stood side by side with Davy Crockett at the Alamo. Vanderbilt, who often stood guard duty, was nearly blind and hard of hearing. Duddleson was a slob, sort of F Troop's equivalent of Peanuts' Pigpen. Hoffenmueller spoke no English. The rest were as incompetent as they were undistinguished. A running joke was the guard tower constantly falling down, usually blasted by the balky cannon but sometimes felled by something as simple as an arrow. Aiding and abetting O'Rourke in his numerous moneymaking schemes were the Hekawi, the most cowardly tribe in the country. Lacking the will and skills to fight, they turned to commerce, manufacturing the souvenirs for O'Rourke Enterprises and brewing the whiskey for his saloon. Chief Wild Eagle was helped by his second in command, Crazy Cat. Unlike other military comedies such as McHale's Navy or Gomer Pyle, nobody ever really hated each other, as Captain Binghamton did McHale and Sergeant Carter did Gomer. The show and all its characters were all in good-hearted fun, a family show for all ages. The theme song said it perfectly: "Where Indian fights are colorful sights but nobody takes a licking."moreless
  • 169
    Doogie Howser, M.D.

    Doogie Howser, M.D.

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    ABC (ended 1993)
    Doogie Howser showed the coming of age of a teenage genius who was a board-certified surgeon by the time he was 16. At that tender age, Doogie (a childhood nickname for "Douglas") has to balance life with his parents and contemporaries and the demands of a career that's stressful even for adults. He has help and support from understanding parents Katherine and David Howser, the latter also a doctor, co-workers at the hospital who respect him despite his age, best friend Vinnie, and girlfriend Wanda. Doogie Howser, despite having a relatively short four year run, was popular among young adults of the early 1990s. The show catapulted star Neil Patrick Harris to fame.moreless
  • 170
    Don't Trust the B---- in Apartment 23

    Don't Trust the B---- in Apartment 23

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    ABC (ended 2013)
    A young woman named June Colburn moves to New York City for her dream job. Her work goes under and June ends up with a troublemaker for a roommate named Chloe. She now works at a coffee shop and is friends with Chloe's best friend who happens to be James Van Der Beek from Dawson's Creek.moreless
  • 171
    Blind Justice

    Blind Justice

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    ABC (ended 2005)
    From Steven Bochco Productions comes an innovative take on the modern police drama. The lead character, New York Detective Jim Dunbar, was blinded in a shootout when his partner failed to cover him. He could have retired with a full pension after his injury, but instead fought to remain on the job, determined to prove he still has what it takes and be an asset. Now, following his reinstatement, he is assigned to a new precinct where he intends to take on cases with the help of his guide dog, Hank. On his first day back on the job, he meets Detectives Tom Selway (Reno Wilson) and Marty Russo (Frank Grillo), both hardboiled New York cops. Russo is especially skeptical at the outset, bent on humiliating Dunbar and seeing him fail. In addition, there's Karen Bettancourt (Marisol Nichols), a Homicide detective who's been working with Selway and Russo for eight months on a serial murder case. Though all the detectives are impressed by Dunbar's heroism, demonstrated during the events that led to his being blinded, they are angry he has returned and incredulous at his belief that he can still work the streets and carry a loaded gun. Bettancourt in particular has reservations, which are compounded by the knowledge of Dunbar's past affair with her friend. As a result, when Lieutenant Fisk (Michael Gaston) - who reluctantly agreed to give Dunbar a chance to prove himself - partners him with Bettancourt, she is furious. Dunbar's wife, Christie (Rena Sofer) has stuck by him throughout his debilitating ordeal and supports him in his moment of need. However she has doubts about their marriage based on Dunbar's past infidelities, and begins to question why she stays, noting his tendency to take her for granted.moreless
  • 172
    A Pup Named Scooby-Doo

    A Pup Named Scooby-Doo

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    ABC (ended 1991)
    For more than a decade, it looked as if this would be the final weekly Scooby Doo series. Following the unsuccessful run of The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo, the creators went back to the drawing board and turned the original "Mystery Inc." characters into small children, who now worked under the title of "The Scooby Doo Detective Agency." Gone were the days of a pup named Scrappy-Doo, this series ushered in the age of a pup named Scooby-Doo! Although they would have been this age in the '50s or '60s, the kids were far more like kids of the '80s, with computers, skateboards, and gadgets that were popularized far later. As in the original series, the villains of this series were always bad guys in rubber masks, a concept that they had gotten away from when Scrappy entered the show and the ghosts became real. More cartoonish than the rest of the shows, the characters seemed to nod back to the old Warner Bros. cartoons -- complete with bugging eyes, gaping jaws, and a myriad of hijinks and sound effects that were unlike previous Scooby-Doo entries. One of the biggest running gags dealt with Freddy's nemesis, Red Herring, who was always accused of committing the crime, though he was never the perpetrator (except once). Other gags included Velma's catch-phrase "Jinkies" -- every time she uttered that phrase, it meant she had found a clue. Daphne became far more of a spoiled brat, whose butler, Jenkins, would come to her rescue anytime she called (which was often). Every episode had a chase scene that was underscored with a new song (much like the second season of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, during which time the stars would usually stop for a moment to dance. And episodes always wrapped with someone saying the villain would've gotten away with it if it weren't for "You lousy kids and a Pup Named Scooby-Doo!" It also started Freddie's phrase, "Let's split up gang". The show played for a few years on ABC's Saturday morning schedule and then vanished without a trace until it surfaced several years later on Cartoon Network, where it's had a home ever since. Theme Song Lyrics: (Scooby-Dooby, Scooby-Dooby-Doo! Scooby-Dooby, Scooby-Dooby-Doo!) There's a mystery in town, So call the coolest pup around, Call Scooby, A pup named Scooby-Doo! (Scooby-Doobity-Doo, Scooby-Doo!) Join Shaggy, and the crew, Daphne, Freddie, Velma too! And Scooby! A pup named Scooby-Doo! (Scooby-Doobity-Doo, Scooby-Doo!) When the ghostly ghoul attacks, Scooby eats a Scooby Snack! Scooby-Dooby-Doo! (Jinkies!) (Scooby-Dooby, Scooby-Dooby-Doo! Scooby-Dooby, Scooby-Dooby-Doo!) So come on, it's mystery time, You can help us solve the crime, With Scooby, a pup named Scooby, Scooby, a pup named Scooby-Doo! (Scooby-Doobity-Doo, Scooby-Doo!) Scooby-Doo, where are you? Scooby-Doo!moreless
  • 173
    CMA Awards

    CMA Awards

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    ABC
    Since their inception in 1967, the CMA Awards have been country music's most anticipated night of the year. The hottest stars in America's most popular music genre turn out annually to see who will be named the top talent in categories such as Entertainer of the Year, Vocal Group of the Year, Album of the Year, Song of Year, Musical Event of the Year and many more. Outstanding performances and top notch entertainment make this awards show a not-to-be-missed tradition for the country music follower.moreless
  • 174
    The Academy Awards

    The Academy Awards

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    ABC
    Since its inception in 1929, The Academy Awards has become the event of the year for film followers worldwide. A celebration of all things cinematic, the presentation of the iconic gold Oscar statuettes to members of the film community for excellence during the year represents the highest honor in filmmaking. The Oscars is one of the only awards ceremonies that've never been cancelled.moreless
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    ABC World News with Diane Sawyer

    ABC World News with Diane Sawyer

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    ABC
    World News Tonight is a nightly news program that airs on ABC.

    History:

    Harry Reasoner and Howard K. Smith had co-anchored the ABC Evening News from December 1970. In 1975, Reasoner assumed sole anchor responsibilities until his pairing with Barbara Walters, the first female network anchor, in Oct. 1976. Ratings for the nightly news broadcast declined shortly thereafter.

    On July 10, 1978, Roone Arledge, head of ABC's news and sports divisions, launched World News Tonight with a trio of anchors. From Washington D.C., the late Frank Reynolds assumed primary anchor responsiblities, while Peter Jennings (from London) and the late Max Robinson (from Chicago) - the first African-American network news anchor - provided secondary duties.

    From 1983 to 2005, the program as anchored by Peter Jennings. Following Jennings' death, the program was renamed on August 15, 2005, from World News Tonight with Peter Jennings to World News Tonight. Elizabeth Vargas and Bob Woodruff were named as co-anchors. Woodruff was severely wounded in January 2006 while reporting from Iraq. Vargas stepped down for maternity leave in May 2006 and Charles Gibson was named as permanent anchor.moreless
  • 176
    Mary-Kate and Ashley in Action

    Mary-Kate and Ashley in Action

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    ABC (ended 2002)
    We get to see two of the biggest teen stars in the world comment on their "film" adventures and then, with the power of animation, we join them -- at the premiere -- to watch their on-screen Super Teen Agent identities fight the good fight and save the world from evil. These girls go right from the pre-show interview in real life straight to exotic locations like the Great Wall of China as animated Special Agents.moreless
  • 177
    Dirty Sexy Money

    Dirty Sexy Money

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    ABC (ended 2009)
    When idealistic attorney Nick George's father dies, he ends up taking his father's clients, the Darlings, led by patriarch Tripp. It's not always easy for Nick handling both legal and sometimes illegal matters. Nick George goes through each episode trying to solve and correct the problems of each of the Darling family members. From fighting siblings to a dishonest husband to dealing with Tripp himself; Nick George certainly has his hands full in Dirty Sexy Money. The hour-long pilot was penned by Craig Wright and will be executive produced by Wright, Bryan Singer, and Greg Berlanti. The pilot is produced by ABC Television Studio in association with Berlanti Television.moreless
  • 178
    Life As We Know It

    Life As We Know It

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    ABC (ended 2005)
    "Life As We Know It" was a show about high school life in Seattle, shown through the eyes of three teenage boys. Dino is the jock with secret sensitivity; Jonathan is an artist who sees life through a camera lens; and Ben is the A-student who will still never make his parents happy. The three are fast friends, and always talk about their favorite subject: girls and sex with girls. The series was based on British author Melvin Burgess' controversial novel "Doing It".moreless
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    Hawaiian Eye

    Hawaiian Eye

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    Hawaiian Eye is about a couple of private detectives based in the exotic Hawaiian Islands. This was the first and most successful 77 Sunset Strip clone. One could even make it a case of calling it a spin-off series since Strip detective Stuart Bailey appeared in the very first episode. Also, Tom Lopaka and Tracy Steele would visit the Strip on occasion. The WB Private Eye universe was later completed by Surfside Six and Bourbon Street Beat.moreless
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    The Hollywood Palace

    The Hollywood Palace

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Palace guide at tv.com.
    The Hollywood Palace was an hour-long variety show that ran on the ABC-TV network from January 4, 1964 to February 7, 1970. Instead of a permanent host, guest hosts were used. Bing Crosby, a frequent guest host, hosted the first and last Hollywood Palace shows. Four of Bing's Christmas specials, featuring his wife Kathryn and their 3 children, were actually Hollywood Palace shows.
    The Hollywood Palace was a mid-season replacement for "The Jerry Lewis Show." ABC originally had high hopes for Lewis' live, two-hour variety series. They signed the comedian to a 5-year contract for a reported $35 million. The network also purchased the El Capitan Theater in Los Angeles and re-christened it "The Jerry Lewis Theater." "The Jerry Lewis Show" premiered on September 21, 1963, but by Thanksgiving 1963 it was apparent that the show was a failure. ABC decided to replace it with a variety show. The network hired Nick Vanoff to produce the new show. Vanoff, in turn, hired William O. Harbach and Otto Harback to help him develop the series. They hurriedly came up with the concept of Hollywood Palace.

    The final "Jerry Lewis Show" aired on December 21, 1963, and The Hollywood Palace premiered on January 4, 1964. (ABC aired a special on 12/28/63.) The Hollywood Palace took over the first hour of Lewis' old time slot. The second hour was given to the local affiliates for their own local and syndicated programming. The old "El Capitan Theater" was once again re-named, this time as "The Hollywood Palace."

    The Hollywood Palace resembled a Vaudeville show. Raquel Welch, who was just a few years away from international stardom, was a regular on the 1964 shows. Welch appeared as the "billboard girl," who changed the large cards that introduced the guests. The first 2 seasons of The Hollywood Palace were in black and white.

    The Hollywood Palace switched to color at the start of its third season. The first color episode was broadcast on September 18, 1965. The "Hollywood Palace" theater became ABC's first color videotape studio. It was also the home of "The Lawrence Welk Show," which switched to color in the same month.

    Collectors of this series may notice that black and white copies of the color episodes are available on VHS. These copies were mastered from B&W 16mm kinescopes. (Kinescopes were a videotape-to-film transfer produced by aiming a 16mm film camera at a TV monitor.) The original color videotapes do exist but they are not as accessible as the b/w kinescopes. These 16mm kinescopes were originally used by local U.S. stations and by the AFRTS. In the 1960's, many local stations in smaller markets carried more than one network. And often it was the ABC programs that were bumped to other time slots. Instead of purchasing the then-expensive video tape recorders for time-shifting purposes, the stations opted to use 16mm kinescopes provided by the network. Kinescopes were also used by the AFRTS which operates TV stations on overseas military bases. The AFRTS prints usually do not have the original network commercials.
    Thanks to everyone who's helped on this guide, including:
    -- Gary Belich - gary558@yahoo.com
    -- Ben Chaput - editor of the RVSP (Rock Video 60s Project) website and the RVSP Message Board
    The Hollywood Palace Broadcast days/times Seasons 1 through 4 - Saturdays 9:30pm Eastern Season 5 (1967-68) Tuesdays 10:00pm Eastern (through 2-Jan-68) Season 5 - Saturdays 9:30pm Eastern (13-Jan-68 through end of season) Seasons 6 & 7 - Saturdays 9:30pm Easternmoreless
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