• 1
    M*A*S*H

    M*A*S*H

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1983)
    M*A*S*H was a true ensemble series. Whilst characters such as Kellye, Igor, Rizzo, Goldman and Ginger are listed where they appear as specific characters central to the plot, they also appeared regularly as non-speaking cast members. This is also true of many of the nurses, corpsmen, orderlies and drivers listed as guest stars. Based on the 1968 novel by Richard Hooker and the 1970 20th Century-Fox movie of the same name, M*A*S*H aired on CBS from September 17, 1972 to February 26th, 1983 for 251 episodes, and has become one of the most celebrated television series in the history of the medium. During its initial season, however, M*A*S*H was in danger of being canceled due to low ratings. The show reached the top ten program list the following year, and never fell out of the top twenty rated programs during the remainder of its run. The final episode of M*A*S*H was a two and one half hour special that attracted the largest audience to ever view a single television program episode. In many ways the series set the standard for some of the best programming to appear later. The show used multiple plot lines in a half-hour episodes, usually with at least one story in the comedic vein and another dramatic. Some later versions of this form, e.g. Hooperman (ABC 1987-1989) and The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd (NBC 1987-1989), would be known as the dramady, half-hour programs incorporating elements of both comedy and drama. Other comedies would forgo the more serious aspects of M*A*S*H, but maintain its focus on character and motive. And some dramatic programming, such as St. Elsewhere and Moonlighting would draw on the mixture of elements to distinguish themselves from more conventional television. M*A*S*H was set in Uijeongbu, South Korea, north of Seoul, during the Korean War. The series focused on the group of doctors and nurses whose job was to heal the wounded who arrived at this "Mobile Army Surgical Hospital" by helicopter, ambulance or bus. The hospital compound was isolated from the rest of the world. One road ran through the camp; a mountain blocked one perimeter and a minefield the other. Here the wounded were patched up and sent home--or back to the front. Here, too, the loyal audience came to know and respond to an exceptional ensemble cast of characters. The original cast assumed roles created in Altman's movie. The protagonists were Dr. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce(Alan Alda) and Dr. "Trapper" John McIntyre (Wayne Rogers). Pierce and McIntyre were excellent surgeons who preferred to chase female nurses and drink homemade gin to operating and who had little, if any use for military discipline or authority. As a result, they often ran afoul of two other medical officers, staunch military types, Dr. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) and Senior Nurse, Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit). The camp commander, Lt. Col. Henry Blake (McLean Stevenson), was a genial bumbler whose energies were often directed toward preventing Burns and Houlihan from court martialing Pierce and McIntyre. The camp was actually run by Corporal Walter "Radar" O'Reilly (Gary Burghoff), the company clerk who could spontaneously finish Blake's unspoken sentences and hear incoming helicopters before they were audible to other human ears. Other regulars were Corporal Max Klinger (Jamie Farr) who, in the early seasons, usually dressed in women's clothing in an ongoing attempt to secure a medical (mental) discharge, and Father Francis Mulcahy (William Christopher), the kindly camp priest who looked out for an orphanage. In the course of its eleven years the series experienced many cast changes. McIntyre was "discharged" after the 1974-75 season because of a contract dispute between the producers and Rogers. He was replaced by Dr. B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell), a clean cut family man quite different from Pierce's lecherous doctor. Frank Burns was given a psychiatric discharge in the beginning of the 1977-78 season and was replaced by Dr. Charles Emerson Winchester (David Ogden Stiers), a Boston blue blood who disdained the condition of the camp and tent mates Pierce and Hunnicutt. O'Reilly's departure at the beginning of the 1979-80 season was explained by the death of his fictional uncle, and Klinger took over the company clerk position. Perhaps the most significant change for the group occurred with the leave-taking of Henry Blake. His exit was written into the series in tragic fashion. As his plane was flying home over the Sea of Japan it was shot down and the character killed. Despite the "realism" of this narrative development, public sentiment toward the event was so negative that the producers promised never to have another character depart the same way. Colonel Sherman Potter (Harry Morgan), a doctor with a regular Army experience in the cavalry, replaced Blake as camp commander and became more both more complex and more involved with the other characters than Blake had been. Though the series was set in Korea, M*A*S*H, both the movie and the series, was initially developed as a critique of the Vietnam War. As that war dragged toward conclusion, however, the series focused more on characters than situations--a major development for situation comedy. Characters were given room to learn from their mistakes, to adapt and change. Houlihan became less the rigid military nurse and more a friend to both her subordinates and the doctors. Pierce changed from a gin-guzzling skirt chaser to a more "enlightened" male who cares about women and their issues, a reflection of Alda himself. O'Reilly outgrew his youthful innocence, and Klinger gave up his skirts and wedding dresses to assume more authority. This focus on character rather than character type set M*A*S*H apart from other comedies of the day and the style of the show departed from the norm in many other ways as well, both in terms of its style and its mode of production. While most other contemporary sitcoms took place indoors and were largely produced on videotape in front of a live audience, M*A*S*H was shot on film on location in Southern California, as well as in a closed studio set (studio #9 at 20th Century Fox). Outdoor shooting at times presented problems. While shooting the final episode, for example, forest fires destroyed the set, causing a delay in filming. The series also made innovative uses of the laugh track. In early seasons, the laugh track was employed during the entire episode. As the series developed, the laugh track was removed from scenes that occurred in the operating room. In a few episodes, the laugh track was removed entirely, another departure from sitcom conventions. The most striking technical aspect of the series is found in its aggressively cinematic visual style. Instead of relying on straight cuts and short takes episodes often used long shots with people and vehicles moving between the characters and the camera. Tracking shots moved with action, and changed direction when the story was "handed off" from one group of characters to another. These and other camera movements, wedded to complex editing techniques, enabled the series to explore character psychology in powerful ways, and to assert the preeminence of the ensemble over any single individual. In this way M*A*S*H seemed to be asserting the central fact of war, that individual human beings are caught in the tangled mesh of other lives and there must struggle to retain some sense of humanity and compassion. This approach was grounded in Altman's film style and enabled M*A*S*H to manipulate its multiple story lines and its mixture of comedy and drama with techniques that matched the complex, absurd tragedy of war itself. M*A*S*H was one of the most innovative sitcoms of the 1970s and 1980s. Its stylistic flair and narrative mix drew critical acclaim, while the solid writing and vitally drawn characters helped the series maintain high ratings. The show also made stars of it performers, none more so than Alda, who went on to a successful career in film. The popularity of M*A*S*H was quite evident in the 1978-79 season. CBS aired new episodes during prime time on Monday and programmed reruns of the series in the daytime and on Thursday late night, giving the show a remarkable seven appearances on a single network in a five day period. The series produced one unsuccessful spin-off, AfterMASH, which aired on CBS from 1983-85. The true popularity of M*A*S*H can still be seen, for the series is one of the most widely syndicated series throughout the world. Despite the historical setting, the characters and issues in this series remain fresh, funny and compelling in ways that continue to stand as excellent television. Some of the above info from the article in the Museum Of Broadcast Communications: M*A*S*H page, written by Jeff Shires. M*A*S*H Theme Song - "Suicide Is Painless" Written by Digital Tradition Mirror (Lyrics shortened for television theme) Through early morning fog I see, Visions of the things to be, The pains that are withheld for me, I realize and I can see... That suicide is painless, It brings on many changes, And I can take or leave it if I please. Ratings (Top 30 or Better) – 1972-1973:Not in Top 30 1973-1974:#4 1974-1975:#5 1975-1976:#15 1976-1977:#4 1977-1978:#9 1978-1979:#7 1979-1980:#5 1980-1981:#4 1981-1982:#9 1982-1983:#3 Telecast: CBS September 17, 1972 - September 19, 1983 Broadcast History (all times Eastern): Sep 1972 - Sep 1973, CBS Sun 8:00-8:30 Sep 1973 - Sep 1974, CBS Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1974 - Sep 1975, CBS Tue 8:30-9:00 Sep 1975 - Nov 1975, CBS Fri 8:30-9:00 Dec 1975 - Dec 1977, CBS Tue 9:00-9:30 Jan 1978 - Sep 1983, CBS Mon 9:00-9:30 251 Episodes In Color On Film Repeats air on Hallmark Channel.moreless
  • 2
    The Andy Griffith Show

    The Andy Griffith Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1968)
    The Andy Griffith Show is definitely a TV classic. It ran from 1960 to 1968, producing 249 episodes.

    The main character, Andy (Andy Griffith), was a widowed father of the polite little boy named Opie (Ron Howard) and is a sheriff, who works with nervous and very suspecting Barney Fife (Don Knotts). They all live in the nice southern town of Mayberry. But, Mayberry can get a little dangerous when the town drunk Otis Campbell (Hal Smith) is on the loose. Thelma Lou (Betty Lynn) is Barney's sweetheart, although Andy had to help him describe his feelings to her. Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier) is the very loving and caring, but stern housekeeper for Andy and Opie. Gomer Pyle (Jim Nabors) is the bone-head, thoughtless, but humorous character. He is a gas attendant. Goober Pyle (George Lindsey) is Gomer Pyle's cousin. They are very alike, you could say, and arrives in Mayberry when Gomer decides to enlist in the United States Marine Core. The show had two spin-offs: Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C. and Mayberry R.F.D.

    Top 20 Ratings: 1960-1961 - #4 1961-1962 - #7 1962-1963 - #6 1963-1964 - #5 1964-1965 - #4 1965-1966 - #6 1966-1967 - #3 1967-1968 - #1

    Awards for The Andy Griffith Show: Don Knotts won five Emmy Awards for Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Comedy: 1961, 1962, 1963, 1966, and 1967.

    Frances Bavier won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy in 1967.moreless
  • 3
    Gilligan's Island

    Gilligan's Island

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1967)
    Gilligan's Island centered around a group of people who were stranded on an uncharted deserted island somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. They all were on a boat tour, which found itself in the middle of a storm leading them to crash on an island! Those stranded include, Gilligan, the Skipper, a millionaire (Thurston Howell III) and his wife (Lovey Howell), a movie star (Ginger Grant), a professor (known as "The Professor"), and Mary Ann. Gilligan was the first mate on the boat, the SS Minnow. Most episodes dealt with the castaways trying to get off the island, but their attempts seemed to always be foiled by Gilligan. Broadcast History- Sept 1964-Sept 1965, CBS Sat 8:30-9:00 Sept 1965-Sept 1966, CBS Thurs 8:00-8:30 Sept 1966-Sept 1967, CBS Mon 7:30-8:00moreless
  • 4
    Tom and Jerry

    Tom and Jerry

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1980)
    Tom and Jerry was originally the very first, and earliest of the Hanna-Barbera Cartoons. It went through many phases and took place from anywhere from inside a house, to anywhere in outer space. The show was of course, about a cat and a mouse, and several other characters. The two never really talked, even though they do sing, yell, gasp, laugh, count, or say "Aha!!"; and that several other characters spoke more often. They would later end up in several TV series, and also in a few movies, however many would say that they didn't like the way the movies turned out. All of the episodes were distributed by MGM. Here's more info about the show in general: Pilot Episodes: The Pilot Episode was called "Puss Gets The Boot" and was also the first one with Mammy in it. Tom looked very different and was called Jasper. It was produced by Harman-Ising Productions. Fred Quimby: Fred Quimby was the Producer of Tom & Jerry for many years. He is also the Producer of Tex Avery's Cartoons. Tom's fur would eventually become blue. CinemaScope: These cartoons had more people in them. There were narrators, and many conversations between the adults. Lewis Marshall became an Animation Director, and Hanna-Barbera were the Producers. Rembrandt: Only seeing the older Tom & Jerry cartoons, and not having enough information on the show, Ted Pierce, Gene Deich, and William L. Snyder and the rest of the crew had trouble in producing their episodes of Tom & Jerry. Sib Tower 12 Incorporated: One of the last producers of Tom & Jerry, this version has the famous opening with the yellow background and the red letters (except for the 5 letters O and J) where Tom hisses and Jerry waves. The producer was Chuck Jones, and the cartoons look ahead of their time. There were several new characters, including a yellow bulldog, and Tom's Girlfriend, The Shark, Jerry's Dog, and several robots where Tom was a security operator at a cheese mine. Other people that worked on the show were Les Goldman, Maurice Noble, Michael Maltese, Tom Ray, Earl Jonas, Lewis Marshall, Eugene Poddany, Bill Lava, Dean Elliott, Carl Brandt, Mel Blanc, June Foray, Abe Levitow, Ben Washam, Don Foster, and Walter Bien. They would later do several Dr. Seuss cartoons along with Depatie-Freeling Entertainment, the Cricket seties, Duck Dodgers, and many other Award Winning shows. Filmation: Many years later, Filmation attempted to produce Tom & Jerry. It was a TV show called The Tom & Jerry Comedy Show. It seemed to look like all the Tom & Jerry cartoons in the 1950s and 1960s. They also aired and produced some other MGM cartoons, like the ones that are directed by Tex Avery. The episodes of The Tom & Jerry Comedy Show are mentioned here. TV: The New Tom and Jerry Show and The Tom and Jerry Kids Show: HB's TV versions. Neither lasted long, but several people still remember Them. They weren't that violent either. They were about the characters trying to solve everyday problems. Tom & Jerry Kids had other charachers as kids that were also produced by Fred Quimby, Including Tex Avery's Cartoon Characters. Now: Tom & Jerry was recently produced by AOL Time Warner and Turner Home Entertainment. They aren't the best cartoons. Tom and Jerry is currently airing on Cartoon Network! Check your local listings! Every episode of Tom & Jerry can be seen on Cartoon Network and Boomerang for one hour, and also The Sib Tower 12 Inc Cartoons can be seen with The Chuck Jones Show.moreless
  • 5
    Hogan's Heroes

    Hogan's Heroes

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1971)
    Set in a prisoner-of-war camp during World War II, Hogan's Heroes is lightly based on the play/film, "Stalag 17." Hogan's Heroes focuses on the exploits of five main prisoners of war (Hogan, LeBeau, Newkirk, Carter & Kinchloe who, while under the cover of being typical prisoners of war, are really secretly doing their best to sabotage the German war effort through whatever means necessary. They communicate regularly with the outside, easily move throughout the camp and outside to town by using numerous tunnels, and have all the munitions, money, and uniforms to do pretty much as they please. While the enemy is often gullible, easily fooled or downright incompetent, the real strength of Hogan's men is the elaborate ruses and sometimes dangerous lengths they will go to in order to complete their missions. These missions included regular sabotage, helping prisoners escape, and aiding the underground opposition. The more elaborate tasks include immobilizing battalions, confusing the German general staff, and kidnapping important scientists. The silly Germans of Stalag 13 are the head Sergeant (Schultz) and the camp Kommandant (Klink). For those who only know the show peripherally, it is dismissed as being produced in poor taste because of the horrors of WWII, but this show takes place in a POW camp run by the German Luftwaffe and not the SS or Gestapo. The exploits of Hogan's heroes were often based on real POW stories from WWII. Leon Askin as General Burkhalter, Howard Caine as Gestapo Officer Major Hochstetter, and Bernard Fox as British Colonel Crittendon appear as recurring characters to cement the show's ensemble cast. Enjoy the show.moreless
  • 6
    The Dukes of Hazzard

    The Dukes of Hazzard

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1985)
    The Duke Family -- cousins Bo ( John Schneider) and Luke (Tom Wopat), assisted by their cousin Daisy ( Catherine Bach) and their uncle, Jesse (Denver Pyle)-- fight the system and root out the corrupt practices of Hazzard County Commissioner Boss Hogg (Sorrell Booke) and his bumbling brother-in-law-Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane (James Best). The show became an instant hit, never failing to win its time slot during its original run on CBS for seven seasons from 1979-1985. The Duke boys, a pair of 'Robin Hood' types complete with bows and Dynamite arrows, are assisted in their adventures by their car, an orange 1969 Dodge Charger named 'The General Lee'. The Dukes of Hazzard is set in Georgia, and the show's southern influence is felt throughout. Country singing superstar Waylon Jennings performed the famous theme song to the show (Good Ol' Boys), and acts as The Balladeer, narrating the adventures of each episode. Furthermore, many of the plots revolved around the Dukes' history as an ex-moon-shining family. The story followed Bo and Luke until season five, because during episodes 87 through 104, their cousins Coy (Byron Cherry)and Vance (Christopher Mayer) replaced the boys while the went on to join NASCAR Circuit. Bo and Luke won, but returned to Hazzard after great season at the NASCAR Circuit. Innocently naive Deputy Enos Strate, though technically a member of the law under Boss Hogg, strives for justice and fairness, while also having a major crush on Daisy. Ace mechanic Cooter Davenport helps the Dukes along the way, and Deputy Cletus Hogg, though not as honest as Enos, subtlety assists the Dukes escape from 'Hogg justice'. The series had an extremely successful run in syndication beginning in 1996 on TNN, the Nashville Network. This led to a resurgence in the popularity of the "Dukes". Two reunion movies, featuring the surviving members of the cast, aired in 1997 and 2000. The show currently airs on CMT (Country Music Television) and in the summer of 2005 experienced another huge revival with the film version, starring Seann William Scott, Johnny Knoxville, Willie Nelson and Jessica Simpson. A Prequel was Made in 2007 and shown in 2 weeks on ABC Family in 2008 during the summer.moreless
  • 7
    The Honeymooners

    The Honeymooners

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    328 Chauncey Street, Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, New York is where the apartment residences of the Kramdens and the Nortons stand. These four people, fifteen years after the depression are still struggling to make ends meet. Ralph Kramden and Alice Gibson married following his acquiring employment as a bus driver with the Gotham Bus Company. Edward Lillywhite Norton, a sewer worker, and his wife, Thelma 'Trixie', live above the Kramdens. The stories depict the sincere attempts of two men attempting to better their lives, and the ensuing frustrations when their schemes to strike it rich inevitably backfire. Although "The Honeymooners" is one of the best remembered comedy highlights of TV's golden age, it was seen for most of its history as a segment within other programs. From 1951-1952, "The Honeymooners" was first seen as a sketch within DuMont's "Cavalcade of Stars", with Pert Kelton originating the role of Alice and with Art Carney's first appearance as a cop. (See season 1). Carney wouldn't appear as Ed Norton until 11/2/1951 along with Elaine Stritch portraying Trixie in her 1 & only appearance. Joyce Randolph would join the cast on 12/7/1951. On 3/30/1952, with Gleason and company departing to CBS in the fall, Gleason, Kelton, & Carney perform a 10 minute "Honeymooners" sketch on Ed Sullivan's "Toast of the Town" (Season 5, Episode 30) titled "The Ring Salesman". This sketch can be found on the "The Honeymooners Lost Episodes" DVD Box Set." On 5/4/1952 Gleason, Kelton, & Carney perform a 10 minute "Honeymooners" sketch on "Toast of the Town" (Season 5, Episode 35) titled "Alice And Ralph Get Dressed For A Date Last Night". This sketch can be found on rare "Best of Ed Sullivan" VHS's, it is not on the DVD box set. In the fall of 1952, Jackie moved his show to CBS and "The Jackie Gleason Show" was born. (See seasons 2, 3, & 4), Audrey Meadows assumes the role of Alice. In 1955 Gleason wanted a respite from the full-hour live weekly variety show. It was decided to film a full season of half-hour Honeymooners shows. All hail "The Classic 39" (see season 5). In 1956, after the less-than-anticipated response to the filmed "Honeymooners", Gleason returned to a regular variety format for 1 additional season (see season 6). In 1957 as part of the final season of "The Jackie Gleason Show", Jackie brought aboard Jerry Bresler & Lyn Duddy to create what is now known as the 1957 - Trip To Europe musical episodes. In 1960, Jackie Gleason brings back Ralph Kramden and Ed Norton in the "Jackie Gleason Special: The Big Sell." Not available on DVD. The Honeymooners sketch that is performed is a take on the classic 39 "Ralph Kramden, Inc." In 1962, after a 5 year hiatus from weekly Television, Jackie returned with "Jackie Gleason and His American Scene Magazine" (see season 6). From 1962 to 1964 this show was from New York. Only 2 "Honeymooners" sketches were performed with Sue Ann Langdon taking on the role of Alice and Patricia Wilson as Trixie. In 1964 Jackie moved his "American Scene Magazine" from NY to Miami, retitled it "The Jackie Gleason Show." To move the entire crew and staff Jackie chartered a train of 14 cars for over 100 passengers and dubbed it "The Great Gleason Express". This would be where the remaining "Honeymooners" would be filmed, though still set in Bensonhurst. In 1966, Audrey Meadows returned for 1 special episode, "The Adoption", a classic Jerry Bresler & Lyn Duddy musical episode featuring Ralph & Alice's attempt to adopt a baby. This would be the last episode filmed in black & white and is a precursor to what is now known as the "Color Honeymooners" over the next 4 seasons. From 1966 to 1970, the majority of these episodes were Jerry Bresler & Lyn Duddy mini-musicals, now known as the "Color Honeymooners". Sheila MacRea would portray Alice and Jane Kean as Trixie. These episodes can be seen on the "American Life TV Network" with all 4 seasons on DVD. On 9/30/1968 Jackie appears uncredited as Ralph Kramden in one of the funniest episodes of "Here's Lucy" titled "Lucy Visits Jack Benny". Jack Benny appears as himself. Tis episode appears on "Here's Lucy" DVD Season 1. On 10/11/1973, Jackie Gleason brought "The Honeymooners" back in a 1 time special that aired on CBS titled "Women's Lib" (see season 12). On 5/22/1974, Jackie Gleason and Julie Andrews portray Ralph Kramden & Ed Norton on the special "Julie & Jackie: How Sweet It Is". This would mark the only time Jackie would portray Ralph alongside anyone else portraying Ed Norton. Jackie always said he could never do Ralph without any other guy other than Art Carney. From 1976 to 1978, the last 4 "Honeymooners" were filmed in Miami and Atlantic City (see season 12). These holiday themed specials that aired on ABC would see the return of Audrey Meadows as Alice and Jane Kean as Trixie. On February 6, 1985 Jackie Gleason holds a press conference at New York's "21 Club" with Audrey Meadows and Joyce Randolph by his side. It is here that Jackie announces that the "The Honeymooners: The Lost Episodes" will make their television debut on Showtime in September 1985. On May 13, 1985 NBC airs "The Honeymooners Reunion" a new special showing numerous clips and scenes of upcoming "Lost Episodes". From May through August 1985 the "Museum of Broadcasting" presents "Discovery: Lost Episodes" airing 17 "Lost Episodes" ready for public viewing. On September 2, 1985 Showtime airs a 3 & 1/2 hour "Lost Episodes Marathon" airing 8 complete "Lost" classics. In September 1986 the "Lost Episodes" made their non-cable debut bumping the total # of "Honeymooners" episodes in syndication from 39 to 118. Thank you Jackie Gleason!! NOTE: This episode guide contains all episodes of "The Honeymooners" that were either sketches as seen on "The Jackie Gleason Show" and "American Scene Magazine" as well as the "Classic 39" and TV specials. All "Honeymooners" specials as well as specials that celebrated Jackie Gleason in which "Honeymooners" clips and sketches aired are in the "Specials" link. A new website maintained by the Gleason estate is now up & fully running at http://www.jackiegleason.com/moreless
  • 8
    Good Times

    Good Times

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1979)
    Good Times first aired in February 1974 as a mid-season replacement and went on for six years. This spinoff of the TV series, Maude, centered on the Evans family. In Maude Esther Rolle had portrayed Florida Evans, the black housekeeper, but in Good Times Florida and her family were struggling to survive in a South Side ghetto in Chicago. Florida was married to James Evans (in Maude his name was Henry) and they had three children, J.J., Thelma and Michael. The Evans family also had a next door neighbor, Willona Woods who was also a main character. At the beginning of 1976-1977 season, John Amos, who portrayed James, left the series. The writers decided to kill him off in a car accident, leaving Florida to run the household by herself. But then a year later, Esther Rolle decided to leave. She was not happy with the direction of the series. Especially the direction the character, J.J. had taken. In the 1977-1978 season, with both John Amos and Esther Rolle gone, stories centered around Willona and J.J. In this season, Willona adopted an abused girl, Penny Gordon. Also, the character of Nathan Bookman became a more prominent member of the cast. Bookman was the building superintendent. In the final season, Esther Rolle returned to the role of Florida. Also that season, Thelma married Keith Anderson and where expecting a child by the final episode. Spinoff of: Maude NOTE: Good Times debuted on February 8, 1974. Some resources mistakenly list it as having debuted on February 1, 1974. CBS seemed to leave 3 episode unaired. CBS Broadcast History February-September 1974----Fridays----8:30 p.m. September 1974-March 1976----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. March-August 1976----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m. September 1976-January 1978----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January-May 1978----Mondays----8:00 p.m. June-September 1978----Mondays----8:30 p.m. September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. December 1978-January 1979----Wednesdays----8:30 p.m. May-August 1979----Wednesdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #17 in the 1973-1974 Season #7 in the 1974-1975 Season #24 in the 1975-1976 Season #26 in the 1976-1977 Season First Telecast: February 8, 1974 Last Telecast: August 1, 1979 Episodes: 133 Color Episodes Theme Song: "Good Times" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Grusin Sung by: Jim Gilstrap and Blinky Williams Theme Song: "Good Times" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Grusin Sung by: Jim Gilstrap and Blinky Williams Good Times. Any time you meet a payment. Good Times. Any time you need a friend. Good Times. Any time you're out from under. Not getting hassled, not getting hustled. Keepin' your head above water, making a wave when you can. Temporary lay offs. Good Times. Easy credit rip offs. Good Times. Scratchin' and surviving. Good Times. Hangin in a chow line. Good Times. Ain't we lucky we got 'em. Good Times.moreless
  • 9
    The Ed Sullivan Show

    The Ed Sullivan Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1971)
    This long-running variety series premiered on June 20, 1948 with the title Toast of the Town. (The Toast of the Town link covers the first 8 seasons of Ed Sullivan.)

    The series was re-titled The Ed Sullivan Show on September 25, 1955 (the beginning of the 9th season). Although the name had changed, it remained the same variety show with "something for everyone." There continued to be a diverse guest line-up which included singers, musicians, actors, dancers, comedians, circus acts, plate spinners and acrobats.

    But now there was now a new type of guest: the rock 'n' roll performer. While Ed booked a few rock 'n' roll acts on "Toast of the Town," these performers became even more prominent on "The Ed Sullivan Show."

    One of the most famous rock 'n' roll acts was, of course, Elvis Presley. Ed had at first scoffed at the idea of booking Elvis, who had already appeared on "Stage Show," "The Milton Berle Show" and "The Steve Allen Show" amid much controversy. But as Elvis' popularity grew, Ed relented and booked him for three appearances.

    Then there were the famous Beatles appearances. Legend has it that Ed booked the Beatles without hearing even a note of their music. While visiting England, Sullivan happened to be at Heathrow Airport on October 31, 1963 when the Beatles' plane arrived. The British press and hundreds of fans were there to greet them. Upon seeing all the frenzy, Ed signed the band to appear on his show. Beatlemania was already in full swing when the Beatles arrived at New York's JFK airport on February 7, 1964. On February 9, the Beatles made their "Ed Sullivan" debut. The Beatles' three 1964 Sullivan appearances were among the highest rated TV programs of the 1960's.

    In 1967, Ed's NYC studio, Studio 50, was officially re-titled "The Ed Sullivan Theater." The ratings of The Ed Sullivan Show began to drop in 1968. CBS cancelled the series in 1971. The final new show aired on March 28, 1971 which was followed by several weeks of reruns. The series' network run ended on June 6, 1971 (which was a repeat of the February 7, 1971 show). At the time of the cancellation, CBS did not give The Ed Sullivan Show the sendoff that it deserved. Instead of ending with a tribute show focusing on all the great moments of the past 23 years, the show quietly went off the air. But in the 33 years since the series was cancelled, CBS has aired numerous tribute shows giving the series the recognition it deserves.

    Syndicated, cable TV and PBS repeats:

    In 1980, a "Best of Sullivan" series hosted by John Byner appeared in syndication. Each episode was an edited 30-minute version of the original 1-hour shows. This version has not been broadcast since the 1980's.

    Around 1992, a new 30-minute "Ed Sullivan" series was syndicated. These were edited versions of the original shows (but often clips from other episodes were added). This version later appeared on the TV Land cable network (1996-1998).

    From 2001 through 2004, PBS stations across the U.S. aired edited versions of The Ed Sullivan Show (usually airing two 30-minute programs back-to-back). These were produced by WQED Multimedia in Pittsburgh. --The first PBS season (2001-02) consisted of the 1990s shows that were edited for commercial TV. To fill in the commercial breaks, WQED added new intros by Shirley Jones. --For the 2002-03 PBS season, WQED publicized a new package of 76 Sullivan shows. (These do not have Shirley Jones.) Ten of these shows have not been seen since their original broadcasts. The other 66 were previously shown in the 1990s but were slightly re-edited with a few "missing" performances restored. This group of Sullivan shows continued into the 2003-04 season.

    A different series, titled "Ed Sullivan's Rock 'N' Roll Classics," first appeared in the 1990's on VH1 (in the US). This version features rock and pop music clips taken from various Ed Sullivan episodes. This series is currently available on VHS and DVD.

    For information about The Ed Sullivan Show and Toast of the Town, contact: SOFA Entertainment 9121 W. Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 Fax: 310-276-0242 greg.vines@sofaent.com www.sofaentertainment.com Sofa Home Entertainment SOFA Entertainment owns the right to every Ed Sullivan Show and Toast of the Town.

    And thanks to Historic Films for their on-line database. Their website has been very helpful in verifing guest lists and other information.moreless
  • 10
    Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!

    Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1972)
    Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! premiered on September 13, 1969. This cartoon introduced four kids and a dog named Scooby-Doo. These kids were Daphne Blake, Freddy Jones, Velma Dinkley, Norville "Shaggy" Rogers, and their mascot. They traveled around in a green van known as "The Mystery Machine" and solved many scary mysteries along the way. In 1972, this show became The New Scooby-Doo Movies, which were hour-long episodes in which the gang teamed up with famous animated stars and celebrites to solve mysteries. This format aired until 1973. Scooby-Doo was so popular to Hanna-Barbara that it spawned many different cartoon series throughout the 1970's and the early 1980's. These shows were as follows: The Scooby-Doo Show, a revamped format of this show, Scooby and Scrappy-Doo, which introduced the character Scrappy-Doo, The 13 Ghosts of Scooby-Doo, and the last incarnation, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo, which featured the cast as kids. After more than a decade-long absence of original weekly shows, a new series, What's New Scooby-Doo?, began airing in September 2002. Theme Song Lyrics Scooby-Dooby-Doo, where are you? We got some work to do now, Scooby-Dooby-Doo, where are you? We need some help from you now. Come on, Scooby-Doo, I see you Pretending you've got a sliver, But you're not foolin' me, 'Cuz I can see The way you shake and shiver! You know we got a mystery to solve So Scooby-Doo, be ready for your act! (Scooby: Uh uh!) Don't hold back! And Scooby-Doo, if you come through You're gonna have yourself a Scooby Snack! That's a fact! Scooby-Dooby-Doo, here are you, You're ready and you're willing! If we can count on you, Scooby-Doo I know you'll catch that villian! Show Times Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! airs repeats every Monday-Thursday on Boomerang at 9:00 AM and 5:00 PM, it also technically airs Tuesday-Friday early mornings at 1:00 AM. It also airs on Cartoon Network Saturday early mornings at 4:30 AM. Scooby-Doo Where Are You? released 9 movies currently in 1999 - present. Scooby-Doo On Zombie Island Scooby-Doo And The Witch's Ghost Scooby-Doo And The Alien Invaders Scooby-Doo And The Cyber Chase Scooby-Doo And The Monster Of Mexico Scooby-Doo And The Loch Ness Monster Scooby-Doo And The Legend Of The Vampire Aloha Scooby-Doo Scooby-Doo in Where's Your Mummy? The show also lead to a current 10th series Shaggy And Scooby-Doo Get A Clue due to start this fall on CW. There were two live action Scooby-Doo Movies recently released in 2002 and 2004. Character Bios: Scooby "Scoobert" Doo: (Don Messick) Scooby-Doo is a great, "Great Dane". Though he's supposed to help the gang for sniffing out the clues, he's always the one running away from them. His very best friend is Shaggy! (Original name: Too Much) Freddy Jones: (Frank Welker) Freddy is the leader of the gang, he makes sure everything is going right! He usually pairs up with Daphne or Velma when looking for clues. (Original names: Geoff, Ronnie) Daphne Blake: (Heather North) Blinded by her beautiful looks, Daphne is also very ditzy at times. She is the one always finding the clues but not on purpose. She's also the one who gets kidnapped a lot and held for randsom. She should have her very own randsom note! (Original name: Kelly) Norville "Shaggy" Rogers: (Casey Kasem) Shaggy is a scaredy-cat just like Scooby. Only problem is neither one of Scooby or Shaggy is cats and they still got that nickname! Shaggy's best friend and dog is Scooby-Doo! (Original name: W.W.) Velma Dinkley: (Nicole Jaffe) Velma is the smartie of the bunch. She comes in handy when the gang doesnt know the name of something or needs help... Literally! (Original name: Linda) FAQ What is the investigating club that Scooby and the gang belong to? Mystery, Inc. What type of dog is Scooby-Doo? A Great Dane. What is Scooby-Doo's real name? Scoobert-Doo. How many classic Scooby-Doo episodes are there? 310 episodes comprising 230 half-hours.moreless
  • 11
    The Carol Burnett Show

    The Carol Burnett Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    The Carol Burnett Show is one of Televisions greatest show's in history. Lasting 11 successful years starting in 1967 and ending in 1978 not without winning 25 Emmy Awards, 8 Golden Globe Awards and 3 People's Choice Awards. CBS Broadcast History
    September 1967-May 1971......Monday 10:00-11:00
    September 1971-November 1972......Wednesday 8:00-9:00
    December 1972-December 1977......Saturday 10:00-11:00
    December 1977-March 1978......Sunday 10:00-11:00
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or better) #24 in the 1968-1969 Season
    #13 in the 1969-1970 Season
    #25 in the 1970-1971 Season
    #23 in the 1971-1972 Season
    #22 in the 1972-1973 Season
    moreless
  • 12
    Maude

    Maude

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    Maude was one of the most popular shows during the 70s. Not only was it one of the most popular, it was one of the most controversial. The show was real and told it like it is - much like the show that first introduced us to Maude, All in the Family.

    Maude was outspoken and stong-willed... which lead her to many interesting and controversial situations. Maude wasted no time becoming one of the most controversial shows ever when she, at age 47, became pregnant and decided to get an abortion (the first show to ever have the lead character get an abortion). By the end of the show Maude was heading to Congress, ready to take on a new world. And it seemed we would get to see Congresswoman Maude, but Bea Arthur decided to leave the show. Maude remains as part of TV history and has since become a true c.

    Others in the cast include, Maude's fourth husband, Walter, and her divorced daughter, Carol from her first marriage. Arthur was the next door neighbor who later married Maude's best friend, Vivian and Phillip was Carol's son.

    Maude had a spin-off, Good Times, which centered around the life of the Findlay housekeeper, Florida. Mrs. Naugatuck become the new housekeeper in 1974. She would later marry her boyfriend, Bert Beasley.

    Spin-off of: All in the Family Spin-offs: Good Times

    CBS Broadcast History

    September 1972-September 1974----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. September 1974-September 1975----Mondays----9:00 p.m. September 1975-September 1976----Mondays----9:30 p.m. September 1976-September 1977----Mondays----9:00 p.m. September-November 1977----Mondays----9:30 p.m. December 1977-January 1978----Mondays----9:00 p.m. January-April 1978----Saturdays----9:30 p.m.

    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better)

    #4 in the 1972-1973 Season #6 in the 1973-1974 Season #9 in the 1974-1975 Season #4 in the 1975-1976 Season

    Theme Song: "And Then There's Maude" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Shire Sung by: Donny Hathaway

    Lady Godiva was a freedom rider She didn't care if the whole world looked. Joan of Arc with the Lord to guide her She was a sister who really cooked.

    Isadora was the first bra burner Ain't you glad she showed up. (Oh yeah) And when the country was falling apart Betsy Ross got it all sewed up.

    And then there's Maude.(And then there's Maude.) And then there's Maude.(And then there's Maude.) And then there's Maude.(And then there's Maude.) And then there's ...

    That old uncompromisin', enterprisin', anything but tranquilizing, Right on Maude.moreless
  • 13
    Match Game '73

    Match Game '73

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1979)
    This is the classic version of the ultimate classic game show that most people came to know and love. Originally intended to be simply an expanded CBS-TV remake of the popular 1962-1969 NBC-TV game show called The Star-Studded Big Money Match Game 73 (and it's annual updates) soon grew into a bonafide, no-holds-barred comedy fest, full of innuendos, double-entendres, pouting celebrities and much more debuts including one as the show's return on June 25-29, 1973 on CBS-TV. Host Gene Rayburn played straight man to the antics of the 6-star panel but frequently aided the fun. The game itself was straightforward. 2 contestants that's including a returning champion are competed. The challenger chose 1 of the questions (marked "A" & "B") in 2 rounds (marked "1" & "2") for which Rayburn read the question. While the questions were rather pedestrian early in the run (e.g., "Name a foreign car"), the questions quickly grew wild and wacky. Frequently, the questions involved a recurring list of characters such as Dumb Donald, Weird Willie and Old Man Periwinkle (the latter brilliantly portrayed by Rayburn); celebrities, politicians and news events of the time were also the butt of many of the questions. For example: "Wendy the waitress really likes it if you give her good tips. Give her a $10 bill, she'll put a sliced cherry in your drink. Don't tip her and she'll put in a _____." It was that blank that the six(6) celebrities separately wrote in on index cards. The contestant then was asked for his/her answer. One by one, Rayburn – who frequently critiqued the contestant's answer (he or she might say "cherry bomb" or "cyanide," which would be the definitive answer, while "dirt" would be a rotten answer) – then the audience critized each celebrity for his or her answer. The player scored 1 point for every match. Two rounds were player with the challenger going 1st in the second round of questions (or the champion if the challenger matched all 6 stars); celebrities who matched a player in the first round didn't participate in the second-round question for that contestant. The player in the lead after two rounds wins the game and $100 and played the Big Money Super Match. A tie-breaker round was played if necessary with gameplay like as before. If the tie wasn't broken after two(2) tie-breaker rounds, then a sudden-death fill-in-the-blank tiebreaker was played. A fill-in-the-blank phrase (e.g., _____ Bunny) was shown; each player wrote their response and the celebrities were polled from the audience for their answers. The first to match won the game. In the highly unlikely event that both players provided the same answer or there still was not a match, then (after a typical Rayburn comment like, "Gee, we're really doing well, aren't we?") the sudden-death tie-breaker was played again until there was a match. The sudden-death format was used right away for ties in the weekly syndicated Match Game PM (because of time constraints) that started in the 1975-1976 season only regulars Richard Dawson, Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly played. The Super Match was played in 2 parts. In the 1st part (dubbed Audience Match), Rayburn read a fill-in-the-blank phrase in which had been given to a previous studio audience of 100 people (e.g., Cookie ______). The contestant asked 3 celebrities 1 at a time for suggested answers after which he or she could choose one or come up with one of his or her own. The three top answers were listed, with the No. 3 choice worth $100, the second-most popular worth $250 and the top choice worth $500. If the champion matched one of the top 3 answers, he/she won that amount of money and played the Head-to-Head Match for 10 times their winnings (equals ergo: $1000, $2500 or $5000). The player chose a celebrity, who was given another fill-in-the-blank phrase as before. If there was an exact match, the champion wins the Big Money. Even if the player didn't match, the champion kept his/her Audience Match winnings and faced a new challenger. Players returned until defeated or surpassing CBS's $25,000 winnings limit (done just once in March 1979). Richard Dawson was initially the only regular Match Game 73 celebrity; Charles Nelson Reilly and Brett Somers became regulars in September 1973. Dawson was far and away the most popular Head-to-Head Match celebrity partner (one history of the show reported he was responsibile for greater than $1 million in the champion's winnings). In 1976 as the show then called Match Game 76 Dawson parlayed his success in the highly-successful ABC-TV run of Family Feud. On June 28, 1978...The Star Wheel was added to the Super Match on Match Game 78 which the contestant spun to determine his or her celebrity partner. If the wheel stopped on certain areas of the wheel called the gold star area (designated "double"), the player played for 20 times their Audience Match cash (up to $10,000 on the CBS-TV show; $20,000 on Match Game PM); otherwise, they played for their regular jackpot. Some fans of the show believe the addition of the Star Wheel hastened Dawson's departure from the show on August 23, 1978 and though that's purely speculation. Match Game 73 as fans came to know, had many classic moments during its 7 Season run on CBS-TV (too many to list here). The show also spawned a successful syndicated entry (the once-a-week Match Game PM, which offered even higher cash prizes). After the CBS-TV show (and then called Match Game 79) ended its run on April 20, 1979. 5 Months later it continued its life as a 5-day-a-week entry on September 10-14, 1979 that series continued through September 10, 1982. A short-lived pairing with The Hollywood Squares in 1983-1984 on NBC-TV plus 2 self-contained revivals (ABC-TV in 1990-1991 and Syndicated TV in 1998-1999), soon followed. None managed to recapture the audience (or particularly in the latter version, the magic) of the one-of-a-kind original. Reruns of the classic Match Game 73 have perpetually been among the highest-rated shows on Game Show Network (now GSN). THE BROADCAST HISTORY of MATCH GAME 73: June 25-December 31, 1973 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 74: January 2-December 31, 1974 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 75: January 2-August 15, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV August 18-November 28, 1975 at 3:00-3:30pm on CBS-TV December 1-31, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 76: January 2-December 31, 1976 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 77: January 3-November 4, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV November 7-December 9, 1977 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV December 12, 1977-January 3, 1978 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 78 : January 4, 1978-January 2, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 79 : January 3-April 20, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. Syndicated on every TV Market from September 10, 1979 to September 10, 1982 and Distributed By JIM VICTORY TELEVISION, INC. "MATCH GAME 73-79" is A MARK GOODSON-BILL TODMAN PRODUCTION in association with The CBS-TV Network.moreless
  • 14
    Petticoat Junction

    Petticoat Junction

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1970)
    Petticoat Junction centered around Kate Bradley, who ran the Shady Rest Hotel, located directly between the farming valley of Hooterville and its only slightly more "evolved" neighbor of Pixley. The only way to reach the place was by the Hooterville Cannonball, an old train which made regular stops along the way, though never adhered to a strict schedule so as to better assist those living along the rail line. Kate, an expert cook and ever hospitable, had three beautiful daughters, Billie Jo (the eldest, blonde and generally boy-crazy), Bobbie Jo (the brunette, astute and literate) and Betty Jo (the redheaded, a tomboy). Also living at the hotel was Uncle Joe Carson, a genial old gentleman who fancied himself the hotel's "General Manager", though when work was to be done, would find any way of getting out of it. In 1965, the series was changed to color and also marked the change to a different actress playing Billie Jo and Bobbie Jo. A year later, another actress took over the role of Billie Jo. Then in 1967, Bea Benaderet fell ill from cancer complications, and Kate Bradley was then seen only occasionally until her death in 1968. At that point, Uncle Joe took over running the Shady Rest (though still managed to get out of work) and June Lockhart was introduced as a lady doctor whose office was located right in the lobby. Other characters included Charlie & Floyd who were the engineer and conductor of the Cannonball. Steve was the former Air Force pilot turned crop duster who eventually won the heart of Betty Jo in 1967. They eventually wed and had a daughter, Kathy Jo. Sam Drucker ran the General Store in town. Homer Bedloe was the recurring "villain", who worked for the C&FW Railroad, and incessively attempted to shutdown the Cannonball. Petticoat Junction was one of a number of rural comedies to emerge in the 1960's. It came about due to Paul Henning's success with The Beverly Hillbillies. He was essentially given carte blanche with making a "sister" series for the show, not even needing to shoot a pilot. Paul intended to make the series a vehicle for Bea Benaderet, who had been playing the recurring role of Cousin Pearl on "Hillbillies". He also loosely based it upon his wife's youth living in a hotel in the midwest. First Telecast: September 24, 1963 Last Telecast: September 12, 1970 Episodes: 222 Episodes (74 B&W and 148 Color) Spinoff: Green Acres CBS Broadcast History September 1963-September 1964----Tuesdays----9:00 p.m. September 1964-August 1967----Tuesdays----9:30 p.m. September 1967-September 1970----Saturdays----9:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #4 in the 1963-1964 Season #15 in the 1964-1965 Season #21 in the 1965-1966 Season #23 in the 1966-1967 Seasonmoreless
  • 15
    All in the Family

    All in the Family

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1979)
    All in the Family was first seen in January of 1971 and immediately changed the face of television. Not only was this the number one television series from 1971 through 1976, but it also signified an avalanche of other situation comedies that dealt with controversial subjects in realistic ways. Including, Chico & the Man, The Jeffersons, Maude, Good Times and Sanford & Son.

    The series centered around the Bunker family who lived in a home located at 704 Houser Street in Queens, New York. Archie Bunker was the main character, and what a character he was. He was televisons most famous bigot, crass and down right rude. Yet he was loveable, with a soft side just beneath the surface. Edith Bunker was his somewhat dizzy wife whom he called "Dingbat". Edith put up with Archie and had qualities about her that made her one of television's most unforgetable characters. Also living in the Bunker household were Archie and Edith's daughter, Gloria, and her husband Mike, or "Meathead" as Archie called him.

    The stories revolved around many controversial topics including, rape, sex, homosexuality, death, and other topics that were relevant to the 1970's, especially political strife and inflation. Archie Bunker was probably the first character in a situation comedy to use racist remarks referring to blacks and other minorities, yet another first for television.

    Other frequent cast members include, the black neighbors, the Jeffersons, who got their own series, The Jeffersons in 1975. The Lorenzos were also neighbors. In 1975, Gloria had a son, Joey, and three years later in 1978, Gloria, Mike and Joey moved away to California, leaving Edith and Archie alone. Not for long, however. Soon they took in a niece, Stephanie Mills, who had been abandoned by her father.

    The original format ended in 1979 which was when the series was renamed Archie Bunker's Place. The new format centered around Archie running his local tavern which he bought in 1977.

    CBS Broadcast History

    Jan 1971-Jul 1971 Tuesdays 9:30 p.m. Sep 1971-Sep 1975 Saturdays 8:00 p.m. Sep 1975-Sep 1976 Mondays 9:00 p.m. Sep 1976-Oct 1976 Wednesdays 9:00 p.m. Nov 1976-Sep 1977 Saturdays 9:00 p.m. Oct 1977-Oct 1978 Sundays 9:00 p.m. Oct 1978-Sep 1979 Sundays 8:00 p.m.

    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better)

    #1 1971-1972 Season #1 1972-1973 Season #1 1973-1974 Season #1 1974-1975 Season #1 1975-1976 Season #12 1976-1977 Season #5 1977-1978 Season #10 1978-1979 Seasonmoreless
  • 16
    Rhoda

    Rhoda

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    Rhoda which began in the fall of 1974, began each episode (at least the 1st season) with Valerie Harper stating: "My name is Rhoda Morgenstern. I was born in the Bronx, New York in December, 1941. I've always felt responsible for World War II. The first thing I remember liking that liked me back was food. I had a bad puberty, it lasted 17 years. I'm a high school graduate, I went to art school. My entrance exam was on a book of matches. I decided to move out of the house when I was 24, my mother still refers to this as the time I ran away from home. Eventually I ran to Minneapolis where it's cold, and I figured I'd keep better. Now I'm back in Manhattan. New York, this is your last chance!" Rhoda is the successful spin-off to the classic The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Rhoda returns to New York where she eventually marries Joe Gerard, and later divorces him. She finds comfort from her sister, Brenda (Julie Kavner). Her biggest problem is her mother, Ida (Nancy Walker). In 1978, after 110 episodes, Rhoda went off the air. It being the second most successful spin-off from The Mary Tyler Moore Show - the first being Lou Grant. During its short run Rhoda earned two Emmys (one for Valerie Harper in 1975, and one for Julie Kavner in 1978) and two Golden Globes (one for Harper and one for the series itself, both in 1975). All together it earned 11 Emmy nominations and 7 Golden Globe nominations. The series has since earned itself a reputation as a classic in its own right. NOTE: CBS left four episodes unaired. Spinoff of: The Mary Tyler Moore Show First Telecast: September 9, 1974
    Last Telecast: December 9, 1978
    Episodes: 110 Color Episodes CBS Broadcast History September 1974-September 1975----Mondays----9:30 p.m.
    September 1975-January 1977----Mondays----8:00 p.m.
    January 1977-September 1978----Sundays----8:00 p.m.
    September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m.
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #6 in the 1974-1975 Season
    #8 in the 1975-1976 Season
    #25 in the 1977-1978 Season
    moreless
  • 17
    The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

    The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1963)
    The life and loves of a young dreamer as he progresses from high school to a stint in the army and then college. Stories related Dobie's continual thoughts about the future, his running battle with his father over the prospect of acquiring work, his relationship with his "good buddy", slacker Maynard G. Krebs, and his endless romantic heartaches, most of which center around Thalia Menniger, a beautiful, but greedy and self-centered young woman who struggles to improve Dobie and find him the job that will enable him to make "oodles and oodles of money" though not for her, the last hope her family has, but for her family, a sixty-year-old father with a kidney condition, a mother who isn't getting any younger, a sister who married a loafer, and a brother who is becoming a public charge. Season three related Dobie and Maynard's experiences as army privates. In season four, after completing their military service, and still undecided about life, Dobie and Maynard enrolled in college.moreless
  • 18
    The Jeffersons

    The Jeffersons

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1985)
    The Jeffersons first aired in January of 1975 on CBS as a mid-season replacement. The series was a spinoff ofAll in the Family in which the Jeffersons were Archie and Edith Bunker's next door neighbors. In 1975, The Jeffersons moved on up when George found success in a dry cleaning business. This allowed him and his wife, Louise and their son Lionel to "move on up" into a spacious high rise apartment. At the beginning of the series, Lionel was attending college and graduated in February 1976. He married Jenny Willis in December of the same year and they had a daughter in 1979, Jessica Jefferson. Other members of the cast include, Tom and Helen Willis were upstairs neighbors and also Jenny's parents. Florence Johnston was the Jefferson's sassy maid who was hired as a part-time maid in the first episode but in October 1976 moved in and became a full-time maid. Mother Jefferson was George's fiesty mother who forever put Louise down but deep down loved her. Harry Bentley was the handsome British, next door neighbor. Besides being quite eccentric and forever borrowing things from the Jeffersons, Bentley worked as a translator at the United Nations. In 1981, Bentley was written out as being transferred to Russia, but returned in 1983. Ralph was the building doorman who forever begged for tips from George and the other tennents in the building. Tom and Helen Willis were controversial characters since they were most likely TV's first interracial couple. Helen was Louise's best friend and they ran a Help Center which opened in 1977. As for Tom and George, it took the entire run of the series to develop their love/hate friendship. The series was unceremoniously pulled from the air with no warning, so the cast, bitter that they never got to shoot an appropriate finale episode, later reunited for a theatrical stage play. Sherman and Isabel also reprised their roles as George and Louise Jefferson on a couple episodes of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air in the mid-90's and have most recently reprised their roles on Denny's commercials. Spinoff of: All in the Family Spinoffs: Checking In CBS Broadcast History January-August 1975----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. September 1975-October 1976----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. November 1976-January 1977----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January 1977-August 1977----Mondays----8:00 p.m. September 1977-March 1978----Saturdays----9:00 p.m. April-May 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June-September 1978----Mondays----8:00 p.m. September 1978-January 1979----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January-March 1979----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. March-June 1979----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. June 1979-September 1982----Sundays----9:30 p.m. September 1982-December 1984----Sundays----9:00 p.m. January-March 1985----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. June-July 1985----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #4 in the 1974-1975 Season #21 in the 1975-1976 Season #24 in the 1976-1977 Season #8 in the 1979-1980 Season #6 in the 1980-1981 Season #3 in the 1981-1982 Season #12 in the 1982-1983 Season #19 in the 1983-1984 Season #56 in the 1984-1985 Season Never hit the top 30 First Telecast: January 18, 1975 Last Telecast: July 23, 1985 Episodes: 253 Color Episodes Theme Song: "Movin' On Up" Written by: Jeff Barry and Ja'net DuBois Sung by: Ja'net DuBois Well we're movin on up,to the east side. To a deluxe apartment in the sky. Movin on up, to the east side. We finally got a piece of the pie. Fish don't fry in the kitchen; Beans don't burn on the grill. Took a whole lotta tryin', just to get up that hill. Now we're up in the big leagues, gettin' our turn at bat. As long as we live, it's you and me baby, and there ain't nothin' wrong with that. Well we're movin on up, to the east side. To a deluxe apartment in the sky. Movin on up, to the east side. We finally got a piece of the pie.moreless
  • 19
    The Mary Tyler Moore Show

    The Mary Tyler Moore Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1977)
    The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in September of 1970 and was a breakthrough of sorts with women's liberation. The Mary Tyler Moore ran for seven years on CBS and was one of the most popular and acclaimed sitcoms of the seventies.
    The show centered around Mary Richards, who moved to Minneapolis after a breakup with her fiancee and got a job as associate producer at a TV station, WJM-TV.
    Production Company: MTM Productions, Inc. (Copyright currently held by 20th Century Fox Film Corporation)
    Spinoffs: Rhoda Phyllis Lou Grant
    CBS Broadcast History September 1970-December 1971 – Saturday 9:30 December 1971-September 1972 – Saturday 8:30 September 1972-November 1976 – Saturday 9:00 November 1976-September 1977 – Saturday 8:00 Nielsen Ratings #22 in the 1970-1971 Season #10 in the 1971-1972 Season #7 in the 1972-1973 Season #9 in the 1973-1974 Season #11 in the 1974-1975 Season #19 in the 1975-1976 Season #39 in the 1976-1977 Seasonmoreless
  • 20
    Green Acres

    Green Acres

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1971)
    Successful New York lawyer Oliver Wendell Douglas gives up the rat race to fulfill his dream: living the life of the traditional American farmer. Fighting the move to rural life is his glamorous, boa-wearing, city-loving wife, Lisa. This quaint premise, however, doesn't begin to capture the screwball absurdity of Green Acres. After a few episodes that were somewhat rooted in reality, the series' true oddness started to bloom. The characters see the opening credits as they appear on screen (or on chicken eggs); they talk with baseball-playing pigs who become movie stars; fife music accompanies Oliver's patriotic speeches and is heard by everyone but him; a full-sized Eiffel tower is built on the Douglases' lawn. Hooterville is clearly operating in its own bizarre universe where Oliver is the only normal, reasonable person--and that's questionable at times. The tiny town revolves around Sam Drucker's General Store, where Sam acts as shopkeeper, postmaster, justice of the peace and publisher of the "Hooterville World Guardian". He's one of the more level-headed residents of the valley, but that's relative. The other locals are considerable more bizarre and are a constant frustration to Oliver. Hank Kimball, the county agricultural agent, is a prime example. His short-term memory is so poor he regularly forgets what he's talking about mid-sentence. Fellow farmer Fred Ziffel is an elderly overalls-wearing man who, with his wife Doris, treats their pig Arnold like an actual child. Arnold attends school, reads, writes, skates, and speaks several languages (though they all sound like oinking). Con man Eustace Haney, who sold Oliver his dump of a farm, is always trying to fleece someone out of their cash. Apparently possessing ESP, he shows up outside of Oliver's door with whatever he and Lisa have just been discussing. The Douglases' farmhand, Eb, lives in their barn and considers Oliver and Lisa to be his parents. Lisa, a stylish Hungarian woman who Oliver met during the war, is hardly cut out for domestic life. Wearing ostrich feathers and diamonds around the farm, she can only cook "hotscakes" (badly) and her mangling of the English language is impressive. Matt Groening once accurately described Green Acres as "Oliver Douglas in hell". All he wants to do is farm, but the constant interruptions from the loony locals, the endless double-talk, the ambitious pig all conspire to make it impossible. Oliver earns his reputation as a "hothead" as his face turns red and he bellows about the latest aggravation.
    Green Acres
    began when CBS handed Paul Henning, the very successful producer of The Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junctionmoreless
  • < 1 2 3 4