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    The Bold and the Beautiful

    The Bold and the Beautiful

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    CBS
    They created a dynasty where passion rules, they are the Forresters, the first name in Fashion. The Bold and the Beautiful, a world of fashion, glamor and romance. A place where power, money and success are there for the taking in a city where dreams really do come true. Follow the lives and loves of the Forresters on The Bold and the Beautiful...moreless
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    The Young and the Restless

    The Young and the Restless

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    CBS
    The Young and the Restless revolves around the rivalries, romances, hopes and fears of the residents of the fictional Midwestern metropolis, Genoa City. The lives and loves of a wide variety of characters mingle through the generations, dominated by the Newman, Abbott and Winters families. When the show premiered in 1973, it revolutionized the daytime drama. It continues to set the standard with strong characters, socially conscious storylines, romance and sensuality. The Young and the Restless premiered on March 26, 1973, and was originally a 30 minute show. It was not until January 1980 that the show had become a one hour show like it is today. The show has ran for years at 12:30 PM on the east coast, and at 11:00 AM on the west coast. Over the years, many things have happened, and there have been many twisted story lines, many stolen husbands, and many people dead. It has also featured character cross-overs with another CBS soap, The Bold and the Beautiful. These include the psychotic Sheila Carter, who began on The Young and the Restless and shown her more psychotic side on The Bold and the Beautiful. The same goes for Lauren Fenmore, who also can be seen on The Bold and the Beautiful occasionally. The Young and the Restless is not like other soaps which convey a surreal way of life. This show, however, is based on the lives of people in a small town called Genoa City, Wisconsin, where the money is plentiful and so are the women. Many times, we wish that we could live in that small, mid-western town, just to see how life would really be like. Sometimes, we put our own problems aside and worry about what will happen next on the show. However, we're very fortunate not to have a world like they do on any soap! The theme song was written by Barry DeVorzon and Perry Botkin, and originally entitled Cotton's Theme from the film Bless the Beasts, but later became known as Nadia's Theme.moreless
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    Star Trek: The Next Generation

    Star Trek: The Next Generation

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    CBS (ended 1994)
    "Space... The final frontier... These are the voyages of the Starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: To explore strange new worlds... To seek out new life; new civilisations... To boldly go where no one has gone before!" Monologue of Captain Jean-Luc Picard in the opening credits Star Trek: The Next Generation is a science fiction show with some action and drama, that presents the watcher with a series of adventures from the crew of the USS Enterprise. The Enterprise is an explorer spaceship composed of a mix of different characters, from various races and cultures, whose crew is on a quest to discover the galaxy secrets and specially their inner secrets.moreless
  • 4
    Perry Mason

    Perry Mason

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    There are few actors so closely tied to a persona than Raymond Burr as Perry Mason. This long-running series was built upon Erle Stanley Gardner´s many novels about a brilliant defense lawyer and his staff, that solved many a crime with surprise witnesses and stern cross-examinations. It was the first mystery series to feature chalk or tape outlines to mark the spots where bodies were found. Filmed almost exclusively in the Los Angeles area, Raymond Burr had Gardner's seal of approval in the role. The cases were usually won by way of pivotal confessions of witnesses, solicited by Perry Mason (Burr's) surgeon-like examination or with last-minute, key evidence brought into the courtroom by private investigator Paul Drake (William Hopper). Della Street (Barbara Hale), Perry´s faithful secretary, was always at Perry's side in the courtroom where hapless Hamilton Burger (William Tallman) was the Los Angeles District Attorney who never seemed to win. As to the myth that Perry Mason never lost, there were two episodes where it did occur... but you'll have to watch to find out. The show was revived in 1973-74, with other actors in the familiar roles (Monte Markham as Mason), and then again with the some of the original cast, in a string of feature length TV films from 1985 until Raymond Burr´s death in 1993.moreless
  • 5
    Knots Landing

    Knots Landing

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    CBS (ended 1993)
    Hoping to ride the crest of its success with Dallas, CBS spun off this series featuring the black sheep of the Ewing Family, Gary Ewing. Gary, a reformed alcoholic remarried his wife, Valene, and moved to the Southern California community of Knots Landing. Originally, the series focused on the four married couples who resided in the cul-de-sac of Seaview Circle in the quiet beach town of Knots Landing.

    In addition to being neighbors, their lives intertwined in other ways. Gary worked for Sid Fairgate, owner of Knots Landing Motors, the local c car dealership. Sid and his wife Karen Fairgate had three teenage children: Eric Fairgate, Michael Fairgate, and Diana Fairgate. The other two couples on the cul-de-sac were young recording executive Kenny Ward and his attractive wife, Ginger, and Richard and Laura Avery. Richard was an obnoxious, aggresive, unprincipled attorney who was always lusting after other women and resented Laura's success selling real estate.

    In 1980, Sid's recently divorced sister, Abby Cunningham, moved onto the cul-de-sac with her two kids, Brian and Olivia Cunningham, and immediately began undermining the relationships of her married neighbors, spreading gossip about affairs, and setting her own sights on Richard Avery. Gary, a member of Alcoholics Anonymous, sponsored a new member, Earl Trent, and ended up having an affair with Judy, Earl's passionate wife.

    In the fall of 1981, Sid Fairgate was paralyzed and later died as a result of an auto accident, leaving Karen to run KL Motors with Abby and Gary. Val's mother, Lilimae Clements, came to live with Val to resolve the pain and suffering that she had caused her over the years. Abby started having her sights on Gary, while Val wrote a novel, "Capricorn Crude", that was a thinly disguised chronicle of the manipulations of the Ewing family.

    In 1982-1983, Gary eventually divorced Val, married Abby, and inherited part of Jock Ewing's fortune. Val became quite a celebrity with her book and began dating reporter Ben Gibson. Another plot involved Chip Roberts, who worked for Val's press agent and who was simultaneously having affairs with Diana and Ciji Dunne, a pretty singer. When Ciji got pregnant, Chip killed her, but because of circumstantial evidence, Gary was indicted for the crime. Diana and Chip skipped town together; later she returned alone and moved in with Abby. In the next season, Chip was subsequently caught and convicted of Ciji's murder, escaped from prison, and died in a freak accident at Gary's ranch where he was hiding out with Diana. Meanwhile, Richard's marriage and career were falling apart. Laura wanted to leave him but held off due to her pregnancy and his nervous breakdown. Richard's attempt to open a estaurant, "Daniel", financed by Gary and Abby, was unsuccessful and his philandering with Abby finally caused Laura to divorce him.

    In the 1983-1984 season, Abby continued to build her power base. She had part of KL Motors, was married into Gary Ewing Enterprises, was heavily into the Lotus Point real estate development, and was having another affair- this one with powerful underworld-connected State Senator Gregory Sumner. Sumner was an old friend of Attorney Mack MacKenzie (Karen's new husband), and offered him a job as crime commissioner. When Sumner realized that Mack could be a serious roadblock to his own schemes, he sought to dicredit Mack. Gary began to have an affair with Cathy Geary, who looked exactly like Ciji adn was an excellent singer as well. She was also a convict who was pursued by her ex-husband, Ray. When all cleared up, Cathy lived a normal yet formidible life in Knots Landing.

    The 1984-1985 season brought problems for three of Knots Landing's leading women. Karen was shot by a bullet meant for Gary, and was paralyzed for a period; Abby was taken hostage by St. Claire, whow as eventually killed by Sumner; and Val gave birth to twins (by ex, Gary). The babies were stolen from the hospital and sold in a black market scheme that took an entire season to unravel. Sen. Sumner continued his political machinations, pressuring Mack to drop his investigation of unscrupulous tycoon Paul Galveston (Sumner's father) and trying to force Gary out of the Empire Valley development project. The Senator also made a play for Laura and they were married. Handsome Joshua Rush (son of Lilimae, half brother of Val), entered the scene as a preacher turned successful local TV personality. He wooed Cathy and even proposed to her on the air. Eventually they got married and there were problems from the start.

    In the 1985-1986 season, Cathy was featured regularly on Joshua's show and was receiving more fan mail than Joshua. Joshua had a mental breakdown and was eventually fired from his show. He tried to kill Cathy, but ended up dead himself. Also in this season, young Olivia had a bout with drugs due to all of the stress placed on her by Abby. Val had a rocky marriage to Ben, which ended up with Cathy flirting with him. There were more dirty doings at the Empire Valley project, and Abby's latest trick was Peter Hollinger, an up-and-coming politico who claimed to be Sumner's brother. The season ended with Mack's and Anne Matheson's (who we'll meet in the next season) illegitiate daughter Paige Matheson came to town and Karen getting kidnapped.

    Politics was a major focus in 1986-1987, as Gary ran against Peter and for the Senate and lost both the campaign and his wife Abby to his opponent. This was when Gary took up with Jill Bennett, Peter's sister. Val, on the other hand, was trying to make her marriage to Ben work. When it didn't, Ben left for South America. Karen's kidnapper was Phil Harbet, who wanted to get even with Mack. Sexy, young Paige was causing problems for all. Paige began having affairs with Michael Fairgate and Peter. There was also a continuing story about Olivia's drug problem. Peter also tried to seduce Olivia, before he met a violent end at the end of the season.

    When the 1987-1988 season began, there was a serious investigation of Peter's murder. Abby confessed to cover for her daughter Olivia. Soon after, it was dicovered that Paige did it, but Peter's death was ruled as an accident. Abby had by this time divorced Gary and walked away with $2 million in the settlement. She had also rekindles a long-ago romance with Charles Scott and had plans to marry him, but that was scraped totally. Laura had a baby named Meg and she died of a brain tumor. She was mourned in a two-part episode. With her death, Greg gave Meg to Karen and Mack so they can be her legally adopted parents. Laura's home on the cul-de-sac was taken by a black couple Frank and Patricia Williams and their daughter Julie. They were all hiding in the Witness Protection Program to keep safe from a hitman who was out to get them. The other main story of the season was Gary, Abby, and Karen getting involved in the Lotus Point luxury resort development with shady Manny Vasquez. Manny turned out to be an international drug lord who used the marina for his shipments. Gary continued his affair with pesky Jill, who wanted Gary all to herself. She was fed up with Val getting in the way and tried to do something about it. First, she wrote Val letters to make it look like they were coming from Ben, and she tried to kill Val by making her swallow a handful of sleeping pills and make it look like Val killed herself in the season finale cliffhanger.

    In the 1988-1989 season premiere, Manny was killed by his nephew Harold Dyer, Olivia's love interest, in a kidnapping shoot-out in Mexico. Val survived but Jill continued to plot against her. When everyone found out about what she did to Val, she took revenge by bounding and gagging herself, hopping into Gary's trunk of his car, and died there so he can be accused of her murder! Other main stories of this season included Abby's plot to swindle her partners out of Lotus Point and illegally drill for oil, using the phony "Murakame Cooperation" as a front; several murders resulting from the cover-up; Greg's relationship with the younger Paige; his marriage of convenience to Abby as he vainly tried to restart his political career with the help of PR man Ted Melcher; and a computer theft story involving Michael, Ellen, and Johnny. As the season closed, Abby narrowly avoided exposure for her illegal dealings, was appointed to the U.S. Trade Representative job that Greg had been angling for and left for Japan.

    In 1989-1990, dirty deals were afoot. Ted was accused of murder in the Lotus Point scandal and left for Japan, close on Abby's heels. Pension fund fraud at Oakman Industries (Greg's company) grew into a series of murders involving crooked cop Tom Ryan and investigator Mack, Greg's estranged daughter Mary Frances (killed by her boyfriend), and Greg himself, who was shot and then poisoned in the hospital with tainted pesticides from his own company. Things were certainly looking up for Karen when she began a TV talk show named "Open Mike", only to be undercut by producer Dianne and stalked by two maniacal fans, one of whom turned out to be producer Jeff. Eric came back to town and had constant fights with Michael over his wife Linda Fairgate. Tom Ryan had fell in love with Paige and proposed to her. Anne Matheson returned and tried to steal her daughter Paige's inheritance, and poor Val married charming but violent Danny Waleska (whom we met in the last season). Danny had a serious record during his tenure on the show: He raped his former wife Amanda, terrorized the twins Bobby and Betsy, and ran over Pat Williams while drunk.

    In 1990-1991, Tom left Paige at the altar and Val and Gary were slowly getting back together again. Greg, dying from toxic poisoning, was saved by a liver transplant and took up with Paige again. Danny tried to kill Gary and was killed himself by falling in the Williams' swimming pool while tring to rape Julie. Paige's loser mother Anne tried raising cash by sending herself blackmail notes and asking a former lover for the payoff money, leading to an affair with shady Nick Schillace (aka Dimitri Pappas); the plan didn't work and by the end of the season Anne was homeless and on the streets. Greg's estranged sister Claudia Whittaker showed up with her daughter Kate Whittaker and rejected ex-con son Steve Brewer. Good guy Mack got in trouble trying to protect abused teenager Jason Lochner from his violent father Dick. Widower Frank had problems with his wayward daughter Julie. The season ended with Gary and Val suddenly getting remarried.

    The 1991-1992 season saw Gary teaming up with Joseph Barringer and others in Tidal Energy, a grandiose plan to harness the ocean tides as an energy source. It failed, and Gary lost so much money that he had to sell his beloved ranch. Val began researching a book on Greg Sumner, to the discomfort of many. Linda was murdered and this led to long search for Brian Johnston, who terrorized a number of characters. Homeless Anne worked her way off the streets by posing nude for a men's magazine and eventually launched a successful radio career. Pierce Lawton, another casualty in the Tidal Energy scheme, stalked Greg and other characters in revenge, especially Paige. At the end of the season, Greg startled everyone by giving up the Sumner Group and retiring to a cabin in Montana.

    As the 1992-1993 season began, Gary searched desperately for Val (Joan Van Ark had left the show at this time), who had disappeared while researching Sumner's book. Assuming that she is dead, Gary found solace in Kate's arms. After Greg's departure, the Sumner Group divided up among Claudia, Paige, and Meg. Greg returned from the wood (pursued by Ann, who was trying to use the old false-pregnancy trick to get him to marry her) and plotted to gain control. Another story had Mary Robeson trying to take little Meg away from Mack and Karen. This so unhinged good-guy Mack that he attempted to frame Mary for extortion, then was accused of her murder. As the series ended, a mysterious and murderous man named Nigel Treadwell was trying to wrest control of the Sumner Group. He tried to shoot Greg (unbeknownst to him that Greg was saved by a bullet proof vest he wore under his clothes), and tried to blow up his plane with a hidden bomb.

    The two-hour series finale, which aired May 13, 1993, featured familiar faces that returned to say farewell to the series that had outlasted all the other 1980s soaps. Greg finds out about the bomb and, with the help of Tom and Paige, defuses it at the last second. Val, who had been captured by Treadwell, came back to Knots Landing and into the comfort of Gary, Karen and Mack. Treadwell had also taken Vanessa Hunt as a hostage and his cohort in his power was ABBY! It all ended when Vanessa killed Treadwell when he tried to kill Greg, and Val was free to go back to her old life again. As the show closed, Claudia, Nick and Anne left for Monaco and Abby bought her house on the cul-de-sac. Seeing her for the first time in many years, Val and Karen grabbed their husbands and walked away, thinking that Abby probably hasn't changed!

    To tie up Knots Landing, The cast came back together for a two-part two night reunion movie called "Back to the Cul-De-Sac", which shows how the cast has changed since the final episode. It was a real gathering of sort that really brought an end to an era of primetime soap operas that stood the test of time.

    Spinoff of: Dallas

    First Telecast: December 27, 1979 Last Telecast: May 13, 1993

    Episodes: 344 Color Episodes

    CBS Broadcast History:

    December 27, 1979- March 27, 1980----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    June 5, 1980- March 26, 1981----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    June 4, 1981- March 11, 1982----Thursdays----9:00-10:00 P.M.
    March 25, 1982- March 31, 1983----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    June 3, 1983- June 26, 1986----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    September 18, 1986- November 6, 1986----Thursdays----9:00-10:00 P.M.
    November 13, 1986- March 11, 1993----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    May 13, 1993----Thursday----9:00-11:00 P.M.


    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better)

    #30 in the 1979- 1980 Season #28 in the 1980- 1981 Season #20 in the 1982- 1983 Season #11 in the 1983- 1984 Season #9 in the 1984- 1985 Season #17 in the 1985- 1986 Season #26 in the 1986- 1987 Season #27 in the 1988- 1989 Seasonmoreless
  • 6
    Dallas

    Dallas

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    CBS (ended 1991)
    In the ranks of prime-time dramas, this was one of the biggest. Dallas, the saga of the Ewing Family, began as a five part mini-series in 1978. Throughout its thirteen seasons, many actors passed through the gates of Southfork. In the late 1960's, Peyton Place was a nighttime serial drama success-a novelty at the time. But since then, no P.M. show had caught the soap opera crowd's attention… until Dallas. The show first went on the air for a five week run in early 1978, and then fell into a Saturday nighttime slot later that year. Ratings were fair, but they were nothing compared to when the show moved to Friday nights, when the ratings well didn't run dry for a long, long time. The Ewing family lived at the sprawling South Fork ranch, in hoity-toity Braddock County just outside Dallas. Like any good power family, there was a matriarch and patriarch, and three sons- this core group, their extensive romantic relations, and the Barnes clan of rival oilers were all Jacobs needed to create a self-contained histrionic world of intrigue, dysfunction and passion. Borrowing from Romeo and Juliet, the youngest Ewing boy, Bobby, fell for a beautiful Barnes girl. And with a nod to the biblical Cain and Abel, Bobby and older brother J.R. didn't exactly play nice with each other like you might expect brothers to. Whereas J.R. was nearly a hundred percent scoundrel, Bobby had discernable streaks of honesty and integrity…but that patented Ewing viciousness certainly reared its head once in a while. The South Fork ranch housed Jock and Miss Ellie, the king and queen of South Fork, J.R. and long-suffering wife Sue Ellen, and Bobby and Pamela…though why they all lived under one roof demands a little poetic license, because money certainly wasn't a problem, and it wasn't like there was a whole lot of binding inter-family harmony. Here's just a taste of the drama devices that ensued: insane asylums, car accidents, affairs, illegitimate children, gunfights, fistfights, catfights, lies, drinking problems (both real and imagined), poufy 80's hairstyles for the ladies and best of all, notorious season finale cliffhangers. The most famous, of course, came at the end of the 1979-80 season, when a mysterious late-night intruder shot J.R. in the chest while he was toiling away at the office one night. The resulting "Who Shot J.R.?" publicity raced around the globe, because by that time, Dallas was an international hit in just about every developed country in the world. Odds on the shooter's identity were figured, bets were placed, and theories were construed– since there were about fifteen possible candidates, fans and pundits were kept very busy indeed. Don't read the next part of this sentence if you want to remain one of the few of-age humans who doesn't know whodunit… it was Kristin, J.R.'s scorned sister-in-law and recent romantic entanglement. Dallas was conceived as a show that had plenty of sex and romance for the female audiences, and a lot of cowboy posturing and business intrigue for the male viewers. The formula worked, because by the early 1980's, it was one of the most popular shows in TV history. There were magazine covers galore, a spin-off named Knots Landing about Gary, the middle Ewing son who wasn't seen or heard from much during proceedings at South Fork, and primetime serialization imitators like Dynasty and Falcon Crest. So for the show that kicked off the nighttime drama trend that's status quo today, we tip those ten-gallon hats and breathe a secret sigh of relief that J.R. was just a fictional character who couldn't manipulate us in real life. Because let's be honest, that guy could have taken most of us down. CBS Broadcast History: April 2, 1978- April 30, 1978----Sundays----10:00-11:00 P.M. September 23, 1978- October 14, 1978----Saturdays----10:00-11:00 P.M. October 15, 1978- January 14, 1979----Sundays----10:00-11:00 P.M. January 26, 1979- November 27, 1981----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. December 4, 1981- May 17, 1985----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. September 27, 1985- May 16, 1986----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. September 26, 1986- May 13, 1988----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. October 28, 1988- March 9, 1990----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. March 16, 1990- May 11, 1990----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. November 2, 1990- December 21, 1990----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. January 4, 1991- May 3, 1991----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M.moreless
  • 7
    The Waltons

    The Waltons

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    CBS (ended 1981)
    This is the story of the Waltons. The show takes place during the Depression and then during World War II. John & Olivia had eight kids, three girls and five boys. One of the boys died at birth; he was a twin to Jim-Bob. John and Olivia's children names are John-Boy, Jason, Mary Ellen, Erin, Ben, twins Jim-Bob & Joseph, and Elizabeth; Joseph died at birth. John's parents also lived with them - Esther and Zeb. The Waltons was based on the life of the Hamner family. Earl Hamner Jr. was the show's creator and narrator. This show was based on his life growing up.moreless
  • 8
    Hawaii Five-O

    Hawaii Five-O

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    CBS (ended 1980)
    Hawaii Five-O was created by Leonard Freeman as a series that not only featured law and order issues but also presented the beauty of the Hawaiian islands.

    The original cast featured Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett, head of Hawaii Five-0, with James McArthur playing Danny Williams (replacing Tim O'Kelley from the pilot), Zulu as Kono Kalakaua and Kam Fong as Chin Ho Kelly. At the end of the 1971-72 season, Zulu left the series after a disagreement and was replaced by Al Harrington as Ben Kokua. After Leonard Freeman died, Al Harrington was dropped with no reason given, after 10 appearances in the 1974-75 season although his episodes were scattered throughout the year.

    Douglas Mossman helped to replace the 'Ben' role in later episodes as Frank Kemana. By the 1976-77 season, supporting character Duke Lukela, played by Herman Wedemeyer, was so popular that he was given star billing on the show, following Kam Fong. When CBS delayed making a decision on the show's future at the end of the 1978-79 season due to falling ratings and the perception of poorly executed stories, James MacArthur took the opportunity to leave the series after 11 years.

    The 1979-80 season saw major changes in the show. William Smith, as James 'Kimo' Carew, was bought in to replace James MacArthur, and the producers also added a new female Five-0 member, Sharon Farrell as Lori Wilson. Completing the new line-up were existing Five-0 member Duke, and Moe Keale as Truck Kealoha. CBS finished Hawaii Five-0's prime-time run on April 5, 1980

    ===============

    Other Info Pilot (Coccoon) only

    1. Company credits Production Companies * CBS Television * Leonard Freeman Production

    Distributors * CBS Television (original airing) * Paramount Pictures ------- 2. Awards Emmy Awards 1969 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Achievement in Musical Composition -- Morton Stevens (composer) ------ 3. Filming Locations: Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA ------ 4. Release dates: USA -- 20 September 1968

    ======================

    Other Info Series

    1. Company credits Production Companies * CBS Television * Leonard Freeman Production

    Distributors * CBS Television * Independent Television (ITV) * Paramount Television * Viacom

    Other Companies * Ford Motor Company consideration furnisher * Polifroni/Sabba casting ------ 2. Awards American Cinema Editors, USA 1976 -- Nominated -- Best Edited Episode from a Television Series -- Jack Gleason [For episode "Turkey Shoot".] 1974 -- Nominated -- Best Edited Episode from a Television Series -- Jack Gleason [For episode "One Big Happy Family".] Edgar Allan Poe Awards 1974 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Jerome Coopersmith [For episode "Here Today, Gone Tonight".] 1973 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Will Lorin [For episode "Bait Once, Bait Twice".] Emmy Awards 1976 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series -- Helen Hayes [For episode "Retire In Sunny Hawaii... Forever".] 1974 -- Won -- Best Music Composition - For a Series, a Single Program of a Series -- Morton Stevens (composer) [For episode "Hookman".] 1970 -- Won -- Outstanding Achievement in Music Composition - For a Series or a Single Program of a Series (In Its First Year Only) -- Morton Stevens (composer) [For episode "A Thousand Pardons, You're Dead".] ------ 3. Release dates USA -- 26 September 1968 Netherlands -- 19 April 1969 UK -- 19 July 1970 West Germany -- 30 April 1971 France -- 15 July 1973 ------ 4. Filming Locations

    Hawaii Film Studio - 18th Avenue & Diamond Head Road, Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA (studio)

    Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA O`ahu, Hawaii, USA

    ========================

    Literature: Monographic related book: Rhodes, Karen. Booking Hawaii Five-0: An Episode Guide and Critical History of the 1968-1980 Television Detective Series. McFarland & Company, Inc. (Jefferson, North Carolina), 1997, ISBN: 0786401710

    ======================

    Series Trivia * Gregory Peck was offered the lead role of McGarrett. He turned it down. * Kam Fong, who played Det. Chin Ho Kelly (1968-78), was an actual officer with the Honolulu Police Department who served from 1946 to his retirement in 1962 to take up a career in real estate. * Other than Wo Fat, other notable adversaries for McGarrett that appeared in more than one episode included mob bosses Henore Vaschon (played by Harold Gould) and Tony Alika (played by Ross Martin), pimp Big Chicken (played by Gavin MacLeod) and the Robin Hood-like Lewis Avery Filer (played by Hume Cronyn). * Jack Lord was the only member of the cast to stay with the series during it's entire 12 year run. Kam Fong (Chin Ho Kelly) left after the 10th season. James MacArthur (Danny Williams) left after the 11th season. * At the end of the episode "A Death In The Family", where Chin Ho Kelly was murdered, Steve McGarrett (Jack Lord) books the suspect himself, saying, "Chin would have liked that." It was the only time during the series that McGarrett personally booked a suspect. * The character of Duke Lukela first appeared as an HPD sergeant before becoming a Hawaii Five-O investigator. * The syndicate that Tony Alika headed was called "Kumu". * McGarrett finally caught Wo Fat in the final episode of the series. However, at the end of the episode, Wo Fat can be seen digging into his boot and taking out a file leaving it open for a possible reunion episode. * "Magnum, P.I." (1980) began production soon after this series wrapped its last episode. In order to keep some sort of continuity, reference to characters from this show were included in early episodes of Magnum. However, a plan to have Jack Lord appear as McGarrett never came to pass. Lord retired from acting after the series went off the air. * Chin Ho Kelly (Kam Fong) was the only member of the cast to be "killed off". He was murdered in the episode "A Death in the Family" while investigating a protection racket. * McGarrett was a Naval Intelligence officer before he became head of Five-O. In fact, he was in the reserves and went on active duty from time to time to assist the Navy on special cases. * In the episode "The Singapore File" McGarrett flies to Singapore to retrieve a witness, and returns to Honolulu. Singapore was actually downtown Honolulu. At the end of the episode, they are at a temple in Manila; they were actually at the Valley of the Temples in Kaneohe, Hawaii. * McGarrett actually caught Wo Fat in one encounter, but was forced to give him up because the Chinese government wanted him back in trade for a downed U2 pilot. * Zulu (Det. Kono) was the first of the regular cast to depart the show. He left in the 4th season. * McGarrett has a sister that lives in California. * Like McGarrett, Jack Lord was in the Navy. He was a public affairs officer, attaining the rank of lieutenant. * Before joining Five-O, Danny attended the University of Hawaii and then transferred to the University of California where he graduated with a degree in Criminology. * McGarrett often referred to Kono as "Big Kanaka". * McGarrett often referred to his secretary, May, as "Love". * McGarrett was a Korean War veteran. * McGarrett supposedly had his office in Iolani Palace, the actual palace used by the last kings and queens of Hawaii. This building was in danger of being leveled for a parking lot, but today it has been restored and can be toured for a $20 fee. It has never been used by the state police. * Besides government intelligence chief Jonathan Kaye, another recurring character was policewoman Sandy Welles. * "Danny" was played by a different actor in the pilot. * Several actors played different roles in various episodes before becoming recurring cast members. * Chin Ho (Kam Fong) smoked a pipe. * Al Harrington and Herman Wedemeyer both appeared in different roles on the show before assuming the roles of Ben and Duke respectively. Wedemeyer was in the very first episode playing Honolulu police Lt. Balta. * Despite the attention that Hawaii Five-0 brought to Hawaiian state law enforcement, Hawaii is the only state that has no state police agency. * The hula dancer in the opening montage is played by Helen Kuoha-Torco, now a professor at Windward Community college.

    =====================

    Continuity Goofs for Series

    *In some earlier episodes, McGarrett can be seen leaving his headquarters in a 1967 Mercury 2 door sedan. When he reaches his destination, he's driving a 1968 Mercury 4 door sedan. *After the original 1968 Mercury was retired, and replaced with a '74 Marquis Brougham 4-door hardtop, some stock footage was used of the '68 passing or in traffic. *From 1970 to 1976, Al Eben played Doc Bergman. In one episode, "A Bullet for McGarrett", his name is Doc Abraham.

    ====================

    Rockford Judged Top TV Detective: 4 July 2000 (StudioBriefing) The Rockford Files (1974) Jim Rockford has topped a TV Guide survey in which readers were asked to name their favorite TV detectives ever. The magazine commented, "The crimes he solved were hardly complex. And his detective work was rudimentary at best. But from the moment he told a client, 'I get 200 dollars-a-day, plus expenses,' you were hooked." Columbo placed second in the survey, but Jessica Fletcher of the long-running Murder, She Wrote did not even make the top 10, coming in at 13. The top ten are: 1. James Garner as Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files (1974) 2. Peter Falk, Columbo 3. Andre Braugher as Frank Pembleton in Homicide: Life on the Street 4. Tyne Daly and Sharon Gless in Cagney and Lacey 5. Telly Savalas, Kojak 6. Tom Selleck, Magnum P.I. 7. Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect 8. Cybil Shepherd and Bruce Willis as Maddie Hayes and David Addison in Moonlighting 9. Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett in Hawaii Five-0 10. Dennis Franz as Andy Sipowicz in NYPD Blue.moreless
  • 9
    Murder, She Wrote

    Murder, She Wrote

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    CBS (ended 1996)
    Murder seems to follow Jessica Fletcher, a former English teacher and a mystery writer full of charm, zest-for-life, and personality; who happens to become "the investigator" when traveling around the country to promote a series of novels. Murder always occurs when she is present. Even in Cabot Cove! Although Angela Lansbury was the only regular character throughout the series entire run, she was frequently joined by a number of recurring and special guest stars, including Tom Bosley as Sheriff Amos Tupper in the early seasons and Ron Masak as Sheriff Mort Metzger in the later seasons, William Windom as Dr. Seth Hazlitt, Michael Horton as her nephew Grady Fletcher (one of her many, many relatives), and from time to time Jerry Orbach would appear as private eye Harry McGraw. Orbach's role later led into a short-lived spin-off, The Law & Harry McGraw. The series aired a total of 263 color episodes from 7 October 1984 through 19 May 1996 and five telemovies (including the pilot movie, which aired in September of 1984). As of the fall of 2009, 10 seasons have been released on DVD, with the 11th season due to be released in early 2010.moreless
  • 10
    Rescue 911

    Rescue 911

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    CBS (ended 1996)
    Rescue 911 was a reality show hosted by William Shatner. It consisted of re-enactments of real life emergency situations and documentaries of hospitals, police, and firefighters. It ran for seven seasons on CBS from 1989 to 1996.moreless
  • 11
    Airwolf

    Airwolf

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    CBS (ended 1987)
    Created by Donald P. Bellisario, who had already had such hits as 'Magnum p.i.' (1980-1988), 'Airwolf' followed the adventures of a hi-tech helicopter and it's reclusive pilot, Stringfellow Hawke. Bellisario developed Airwolf (early working titles: Blackwolf, Lonewolf), from the loose concept of a third season 'Magnum, P.I.' episode he'd previously written, titled 'Two Birds Of A Feather' (1983) - an unsold pilot about a treasure-hunting, adventure-loving ace combat pilot named Sam Houston Hunter (William Lucking). Bellisario had come up with the concept after Lucking played a similar character in a couple of episodes of another Bellisario series, 'Tales Of The Gold Monkey' (1982-3). After the proposed new series wasn't picked up, Bellisario took the bare bones of the concept, and eventually developed the premise into 'Airwolf'. Airwolf itself was a hi-tech attack helicopter, equipped with cutting-edge on-board computer, surveillance and radar systems, able to fly quicker than the fastest jets, and armed with awesome fire-power. Dubbed "The Lady" due to it's slender grace, Airwolf had been constructed by "The Firm", a mysterious, top-secret division of the C.I.A., distinguishable by it's agents all-white dress code. At the start of the Pilot adventure, we see Airwolf on its maiden test flight, piloted by its creator, Dr. Moffet (David Hemmings). But after the successful test flight, the twisted Moffet turns the chopper's lethal fire-power onto the flight tower, causing carnage, before heading off to Libya in the machine. Michael Coldsmith-Briggs III, codename "Archangel" (Alex Cord), the head of the division who built Airwolf, is badly wounded in the assault but not yet out of the game. Now wearing an eye-patch and walking with aid of a cane as a result of his injuries, he calls upon ace combat pilot Stringfellow Hawke (Jan-Michael Vincent) to take the task of bringing back Airwolf from Libya. Hawke is a cello-playing recluse, living in his scenaric cabin in the mountains – with a priceless art collection, and with only his dog Tet for company - ever since his brother St. John went Missing In Action in the Vietnam War, never to be found. Hawke eventually agrees to take the mission, aided by his only close friend, Dominic Santini (Ernest Borgnine). Much Hawke's senior, Dominic was very much his mentor, who was prone to the odd bout of grouchiness, but for the majority of the time was raucously cheerful. He owned Santini Air, a flight company that's main vehicles were decked out in stars and stripes, which specialised in performing arial stunts for films. Hawke and Dominic prised Airwolf back from Moffet's clutches (blowing away it's twisted genius creator in the process), but Hawke wasn't ready to return it back over to the Firm just yet. Hiding it in a hollow mountain in the middle of the desert wilderness, he refused to return the super-chopper until the Firm found solid information about his M.I.A. brother St. John, be he dead or alive. Thus was set the scenario for the series, with Archangel - usually accompanied by assistant Marella (Deborah Pratt) - calling upon Hawke in times of crisis to fly Airwolf on missions of national concern, with the occasional glimmer of hope regarding finding St. John - or at least solid information about his fate - thrown in for good measure. The first season was intelligently written, with a very classy, elegant feel. It was in many ways ahead of it's time, being distinctly dark and dramatic, with heavy religious over-tones and symbolisms, and with stories revolving around cases of international espionage, spying, and such-like, and much talk of "the opposition" - be it taken to be Libyans, the Russians, or whichever assumptions one took. The series did fairly well in the ratings, but CBS wanted to achieve even higher numbers, by "domesticating" the show more – to make stories less dark and symbolic, and to make things more light-hearted to try and win a wider audience. When the second season arrived, it brought with it the most significant and notable change - the introduction of a regular female cast member, created by Bellisario after CBS's insistence. Introduced in the season's opening episode, 'Sweet Britches', Jean Bruce Scott was brought in as feisty Caitlin O'Shannessy, who within the season's first few episodes was set-up as a regular character, working at Santini Air, and before long became the occasional third Airwolf pilot. Also with the new season, The Firm was blended into the background somewhat, to allow more wider-ranging stories, again mostly due to CBS's insistence. Overall the season did well, with much of the dark intrigue still surviving from the first series, mixed with the new slightly lighter-hearted, wider-reaching stories. In the meantime, Bellisario and Deborah Pratt, having met on the show, had married. But by the end of the season, Bellisario had grown increasingly tired of CBS' constant "interfering" with his original vision for the series, and eventually left, taking Pratt with him. The pair left to work on new projects of their own, the biggest and most popular to date being 'Quantum Leap' (with which Airwolf shares much of it's dark, religious over-tones, as well as also using a horde of the same Bellisario-favoured actors and crew). Also behind the scenes, Jan-Michael Vincent's troubled personal life - including battles with drink and drugs, and frequence fights with his wife - were increasingly causing problems during production of the series. Vincent actually broke his arm during one such drunken row with his wife, mid-production of one episode, 'Sins Of The Past', with his right arm visibally hanging limp throughout much of the episode as a result. CBS brought the series back for a third season, now without Bellisario's overseeing (his name on the show survived only as 'Created by' on the opening credits). While still offering up some good episodes, including some very impressive action set pieces (both airborne and otherwise), overall the previous sharp, clever script quality was now somewhat lower, and things were by now noticeably more watered down, with the series now acting as a more all-round "family" action-adventure show. Whilst they still occasionally had their moments, both Hawke's reclusive broodiness, and the whole eerie mysteriousness surrounding The Firm – two key factors in Bellisario's original vision - were by now very toned down. (Incidentally, with the third season, the Firm became spelt as an acronym, "the F.I.R.M.", though what these initials stood for was never explained.) The majority of episode plots were by now a far cry from the original season's dark themes; it's often commented (rightly so in several cases) that, far from the early stories of international emergencies, many of this season's stories seemed to revolve around little more than domestic feuds! But the worst was yet to come... CBS finally called it a day with 'Airwolf' at the end of the third season in 1986 - the last episode being 'Birds Of Paradise', an avarage episode which didn't serve to round to series off in any way. Despite CBS's constant tampering trying to make it an even bigger hit, in the long-run was much the cause of the demise of the show, with ratings gradually dropping mostly as a result of the third season's many more "family friendly" story-lines which lost favour with many fans. Jan-Michael Vincent's ever increasingly troubled personal life had done nothing to ease production of the series, either. However, the rights to the series were brought by a small TV company, Atlantis, for the USA Network, and a new series was commissioned for syndication. The whole of the original cast were written out (no doubt due to cost) – both Hawke and Dominic are killed off in the opening episode (though only Jan-Michael Vincent is actually seen), Archangel is suddenly said to be assigned overseas, and what has become of Caitlin is never mentioned. Taking their place was an all new cast. In the opening episode, 'Blackjack', Hawke's long-missing brother St. John (now seemingly his younger brother, not older, and played by Barry Van Dyke is suddenly located. The original series had several contradictions over St. John, but this new version completely threw any previous continuity out of the window! The Firm was now suddenly, unexplainedly called "The Company" (gone too were the trademark white suits), at which Jason Locke (Anthony Sherwood) is the new contact. He calls upon Major Mike Rivers (Geraint Wyn Davies) to help locate Airwolf – only to find that Dominic's niece, the - previously unmentioned - Jo Santini (Michelle Scarabelli) has already found it, and in it, they set off to rescue St. John. After his rescue began a new season of adventures, often with very little feel of connection to the original series. The new series was filmed on a very low budget in Canada, and much of the aerial footage – including ALL footage of Airwolf in flight, was simply footage recycled from the original three seasons. Other times, very poor model effects of Airwolf were used. Special effects (bar the stock footage) were weak, most of the stories were incredibly dull and wooden, much of the acting was poor - the series was embarrassing at best. There seemed little place for logic, either - the new contact, Locke, clearly knew of Airwolf's location (and often flew it himself!!), yet made no attempt to return it to the Company. In the original, Stringfellow Hawke, and at a push, Dominic or Caitlin, were capable of flying Airwolf – yet suddenly, each of the new characters could pilot it... the whole premise was full of holes. It seems maybe rather amazing (not to mention such a shame) that from the dark, classy, "ahead-of-it's-time" first season, things could end up as this. Understandably, many Airwolf "purists" will refuse to recognise this series as part of the "proper" Airwolf fodder. Suddenly, despite all of the CBS third season's short-comings, fans now found themselves saying "come back third season, all is forgiven", and would have given anything to have the original series, in any of it's versions from the original three seasons, back in place of this crudely produced revamp! Airwolf wasn't the only "super helicopter" on air at the time of it's debut – there was also hi-tech police surveillance chopper 'Blue Thunder' (1984), spun-off from the 1983 movie of the same name; but even with that series having a big-screen film to kick it off, Airwolf generally emerged to be seen as the "ultimate" super-helicopter series, with - at it's peak - it's clever, cathartic scripts paling Blue Thunder's much wider, less serious take. Airwolf itself was a highly modified Bell 222b, with a number of fibreglass and aluminium sections fitted to give it its unique look. In the TV series Airwolf may have been capable of supersonic speeds, but in reality, the numerous additions resulted in only slowing the helicopter's speeds! Sadly, the aircraft used for Airwolf crashed in Germany in 1991 (however, most of the specially built modifications are still in existence in the depths of Universal Studios). Note: This article, as well as episode guest cast lists, synopses and all other material in this guide (unless otherwise contributed) is written by the editor of this show. While it is intended for the reference and enjoyment of fellow fans of the show, please ask permission before using it, be it whole or in part, elsewhere.moreless
  • 12
    As The World Turns

    As The World Turns

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    CBS (ended 2010)
    As the World Turns first premiered on April 2, 1956, and has been a mainstay on CBS daytime ever since. The show takes place in the fictional town of Oakdale, Illinois, and revolves around the lives of it's inhabitants. Originally the central family was the Hughes', however today the stories mostly resolve around the enormous Snyder family. As the World Turns is produced by Proctor and Gamble, the same company that produces Guiding Light, the only show to have a longer on-air tenure than ATWT. This year, ATWT celebrated its 54th Anniversary of being on the air in April 2010, the show will end it's run on Sept 17th 2010.moreless
  • 13
    The Incredible Hulk

    The Incredible Hulk

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    CBS (ended 1982)
    Dr. David Banner was a research scientist trying to find a way to tap into the hidden strength that all humans possess. Then, one night in his labratory, an experiment went wrong, causing him to be overexposed to gamma radiation. Now, whenever angered or distressed, the mild-mannered scientist finds himself transforming into a powerful seven-foot green creature known as The Incredible Hulk. The creature is guided by David's personality, dealing with whatever distresses David. But unfortunately, David has no control over the creature's actions. Nor can he remember what he had done during his Hulkish states. He travels around the country in search of a cure, while taking various odd jobs under different aliases. During this odyssey, he tries to avoid the pursuit of investigative reporter Jack McGee, who suspects the Hulk of murder, and who is determined to discover the creature's true identity.moreless
  • 14
    Falcon Crest

    Falcon Crest

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    CBS (ended 1990)
    Airing in the time slot following CBS' immensely popular Dallas, Falcon Crest sought to hold on to the soap opera addicts with yet another saga of the rich and greedy fighting for power and sex. The setting was the ficticious Tuscany Valley, located in the beautiful Napa Valley Region outside San Francisco, and the industry around which the action centered was wine-making. Angela Channing, the matriarch and principal empire-builder on Falcon Crest was powerful and respected and feared by almost everyone whose lives she touched. Angela ran the Falcon Crest winery with an iron hand and tried to manipulate everyone to suit her purposes. When the series began, her nephew Chase Gioberti had just inherited 50 acres of vineyards from his recently deceased father, Jason Gioberti, Angela's brother. Angela was convinced that the land should be hers, but Chase brought his wife Maggie and two children, Cole and Victoria, from New York to live in the valley and manage his land. And it all goes downhill from here. From the get-go, Angela and Chase got into many scrapes over that land. Angela first tried to ruin Chase by stopping a necessary bank loan; then tried to ruin his relationship with beloved son Cole by saying that he might someday inherit Falcon Crest. When those plans didn't work, she tried to get others' vineyards, and this is where Lance Cumson comes into play. Lance was the typical playboy who wanted money and power from his grandmother, but was too lazy to work for it. Lance was tied to Angela because of the power she had over him. Angela even pressured Lance to marry Melissa Agretti, the Agrettis' daughter, who had plenty of ambition and greed in her own right, in order to consolidate the large Agretti and Falcon Crest wineries under her control. He did marry Melissa, but he still fooled around with other women, and Melissa also had an affair with Cole, which resulted in her getting pregnant. The first season ended with Angela losing control of Falcon Crest to Chase after the real cause of death of his father was revealed: Emma Channing accidentally pushed him, causing him to fall to his death. In the 1982-1983 season, it seemed as though no one could be nasty to Angela until Richard Channing came to town. He arrived in San Francisco to run "The Globe", a newspaper that had been owned by his late father, and Angela's ex-husband Douglas Channing. Richard inherited 50 percent, and the rest was shared by Julia Cumson, Angela's daughter and Lance's mother, and crazy Emma. Meanwhile, Angela, determined to battle Richard, attempted to buy out the remaining 20 percent of minority shareholders, using funds from the Falcon Crest winery to do so! Chase discovered her plan and threatened legal action. Richard was assisted by Jacqueline Perrault, whom he was later told was his mother, to fight Angela, and connived with Julia, who was easily manipulated by his charm. The plan backfired but he then fought for, and won, a permit to build a race track in the Tuscany Valley that could destroy the area's entire wine industry. Richard's plans for the Tuscany Downs race-track enraged Angela and Chase when he announced part of the Falcon Crest vineyards would be bulldozed to build it. Richard was confronted by an underhanded underworld figure called Henri Denault, and after a struggle with Richard on a bridge, Denault accidentally fell to his death. Angela's psychotic daughter, Julia, prompted by a twisted desire to protect her mother, shot Melissa's father, Carlo Agretti. It was later revealed Julia had also had a relationship with Carlo and was tired of his indiscretions with other women. Cole was tried for the murder of Carlo, but was found not guilty. In the second season's cliff-hanger, Chase and Jacqueline were both shot by the unbalanced Julia, after she was convicted of the murder of Carlo Agretti and the attempted murders of Cole, Maggie and Chase. The 1983-84 season opened with the news that Jacqueline's gunshot wound proved fatal, while Chase was left paralyzed. Julia was sentenced to a long prison term and later to a mental institution. Jacqueline's will stipulated her fortune go to her grandson, Cole, provided that he acknowledged that only Chase was his father. Jacqueline's nephew, Dr. Michael Ranson, a neurosurgeon arrived to help Chase recover from paralysis. Chase was not pleased to hear his wife, Maggie, had accepted an offer from Richard to join his newspaper staff as a reporter. Maggie's sister, Terry Hartford, who secretly worked as a high-priced call girl, moved to town. She quickly fell in love with Dr. Ranson and later moved in and married him. Julia was committed to a mental institution after being driven further to insanity by her time in prison. She escaped from the mental institution and, vowing revenge on her mother, abducted Melissa's baby, Joseph. She released Joseph but was presumed dead after being trapped in a cabin that went up in flames. The third season closed with Julia's final request that the Channings and Giobertis board a plane for Italy, which plummeted toward a crash landing. The 1984-85 season revealed that Angela's shrewd lawyer and husband, Phillip Erikson, and Dr. Michael Ranson died in the crash. The Cartel, a shadowy international syndicate headed by an exceptionally vicious man named Gustav Riebmann, were the masterminds behind the crash and made waves in the Tuscany Valley. The Cartel had been co-founded by the late Jacqueline together with Gustav's father, Johann Riebmann, and surfaced in the valley because it believed a large fortune once belonging to the Nazis had been buried on the Falcon Crest estate. Before the crime ring was destroyed, residents endured a series of plane crashes, bombings, and buggings. Angela finally got revenge against Richard by taking over The New Globe. Her first course of action was to appoint Lance editor. Richard retaliated by framing Lance for the attempted murder of Angela, but Lance was cleared of all charges. Richard also acquired one-third of Falcon Crest from Angela's half-sister, Francesca Gioberti. Julia returned after her presumed death in the spring house, while Melissa divorced Lance, married Cole, and then constantly fought with him. Cassandra Wilder arrived in Falcon Crest and began a vendetta against Angela for wrongs Angela supposedly inflicted on her family, headed by Anna Rossini. By season's end, Cassandra had succeeded in causing the financial ruin of both Angela and Richard. Angela turned to her former lover in the 1985-86 season with wealthy shipping magnate Peter Stavros for assistance. Before he was able to help Angela, he was abducted by his daughter Sophia and her French husband, Philippe Hubbert, who wanted to take over the Stavros Industries empire. Once Peter was freed by Lance, he proposed to Angela. Angela realized that she could become Peter's wife or allow him to be her landlord, and accepted his proposal. Peter's son, Eric followed his father to Tuscany Valley. Richard managed to rebuild his own financial empire by siphoning money from the Tuscany Downs racetrack. Terry found out and blackmailed him into marriage. Richard's new lawyer, Jordan Roberts, suffered from a split personality, and became Monica, a professional hooker by night. Maggie suffered from amnesia after an explosion and through her fog wrote a thinly veiled, fictional expose about the residents of Tuscany Valley. After her book was published, her publisher assigned an aspiring novelist and book publicist named Jeff Wainright to help her sell her book. While on tour together, Jeff became obsessed with Maggie and kidnapped her. He then raped her but Maggie was rescued. Unable to have another baby together, Melissa and Cole hired a surrogate mother, Robin, who seduced Cole and then kept the baby. Emma fell in love with a trucker named Dwayne Cooley and Lance fell for rock singer Apollonia Kotero. The season ended with the escape of Jeff Wainright and a major earthquake hitting Tuscany Valley. The aftermath of the earthquake left the valley in turmoil, with Emma's fiancée, Dwayne, and Maggie's sister Terry, not surviving. Criminal activities were at the forefront of the 1986-87 season. After Jeff Wainright's escape, he kidnapped Vickie and then Maggie. Richard hired a private investigator named Erin Jones to help him get information on business rivals. Jones framed Richard for attempted murder, tried to kill Chase and was responsible for the death of Jeff Wainright. As Wainright drove across a rigged bridge, he was blown up. Soon after Richard had Miss Jones imprisoned in Borneo, her sister Meredith surfaced in Tuscany Valley seeking revenge against him. Emma's life became even more bizarre when she got involved with a con artist named Vince Karlotti who claimed to be a spiritualist in touch with the late Dwayne's spirit. Meanwhile, Melissa pursued a singing career and Eric Stavros and Vickie Gioberti married. Julia, who was blinded in the earthquake, was granted a new trial and all charges were dropped for her past sins after it was determined she was no longer psychologically unbalanced. She decided to leave Falcon Crest and joined a convent. A woman claiming to be Peter's long-lost daughter, Skylar, turned out to be an impostor of many disguises named Kit Marlowe, who was running from a devious Eastern billionaire, Roland Saunders. His life came to an end when Kit offered him a poisoned cigar moments before Peter fatally struck him on the head with a wrench. Dan Fixx showed up on Angela's doorstep claiming to be a relative. Angela gladly accepted him into the family fold, but this caused Lance to be insecure about his status. The season closed with many surprises. The Richard-Angela infighting continued, but the squabbling wine moguls had more in common than they realised. Peter decided to return to Greece and amicably divorced Angela. Before leaving town, he left Angela with the news that the child she was told was still born forty-five years prior had in fact been given to Jacqueline Perrault by Angela's husband, Douglas Channing. Angela's stolen child was her arch-enemy, Richard. A distraught Emma attempted to jump off the Falcon Crest roof, and Chao-Li, running to tell Angela of Emma's peril, fell down the stairs unconscious. The unstable Melissa kidnapped Chase and Maggie's new-born baby Kevin. With Chase, Dan, Richard and Maggie in pursuit, Melissa drove into the San Francisco Bay. The 1987-88 season began with the news that Kevin, Richard, Melissa and Dan were rescued, but Chase was missing, presumed dead. Lance rescued Emma from the roof and Chao-Li was found to have cancer, but later recovered. After Chase was declared legally dead, the executor to his estate, John Remick, a mercenary who knew Chase in Vietnam, appeared and insinuated Richard had a hand in Chase's disappearance. Richard, romancing Maggie at the time, contacted a sinister group of businessmen known as The Thirteen to fund the North African junta Remick was fighting in before he came to Tuscany, to get Remick out of the picture. Word surfaced later than Remick was missing in action. Maggie was worried about Richard's shady dealings and escaped an explosion in her home. Disappointed by Dan's romantic involvement with Melissa, Angela successfully lured a despondent Lance back into her clutches. Angela decided Melissa was a threat and schemed to drive her insane. Eric Stavros, a compulsive gambler, left for Monte Carlo with wife Vickie in tow. When Eric lost to a powerful poker player, Vickie was kidnapped and sent to Yugoslavia as part of a white slave trade. Richard contacted The Thirteen again for help in freeing Vickie. Richard proposed to Maggie and she accepted. Chase's will stipulated that the second of three codicils be read in the event of the couple's marriage. Richard and Maggie wed and the codicil left Chase and Maggie's Falcon Crest acreage to Angela. Richard agreed to join The Thirteen in an attempt to stop Angela gaining Maggie's land. The third codicil from Chase's will left Melissa a key which he said would destroy long time foe Angela. Melissa headed to the Gold Rush town of Hobart and, after climbing through an underground tunnel with Lance while looking for the safety deposit box that the key matched, was trapped by a cave-in. While trapped Melissa discovered a deed to Falcon Crest made out to the Agretti family, which apparently won the winery from the Giobertis in a poker match. After Lance and Melissa were rescued from the cave-in, Melissa had the deed proven legal and ousted Angela and her family from their land. Lance and Melissa's uncle, Frank Agretti, disowned her. Upon hearing of Richard's dealings, Maggie left him and moved into Falcon Crest and had a bout with alcoholism. Richard, devastated by his separation from Maggie told the FBI of his dealings with The Thirteen, but had no proof. Richard agreed to testify before a Senate committee. The Thirteen attempted to murder Angela, and upon her rescue by Richard, a reconciliation between the long-time rivals took place. Richard agreed to offer his life to The Thirteen in exchange for the safety of his family. Eric was brainwashed by The Thirteen and shot Richard. Tuscany Valley residents mourned his loss at a family burial. Angela secretly met with a bearded man sitting in a church pew and asked him, "Haven't you waited long enough? When are you going to tell Maggie you are alive?". It was uncertain if it was Richard or the presumed dead Chase. The 1988-89 season began with the revelation that Richard had staged his death, in order to escape The Thirteen, who had been assassinated. After initially rejecting him, Maggie reconciled with Richard. Melissa couldn't run Falcon Crest and was lonely by herself. She had a breakdown, doused Falcon Crest in gasoline and torched it. She later died in hospital from smoke inhalation, leaving her uncle Frank's son, Nick, executor of her estate. Angela battled to regain her birthright from Nick and eventually won back the vineyard with a false deed and rebuilt the mansion. It was later revealed that the original deed Melissa held was won when the Agretti's had cheated in the poker match. Lance renewed his relationship with Pilar Ortega, daughter of the Falcon Crest foreman, Cesar. It was revealed the two had a daughter, Lisa, ten years ago and the two subsequently married, to Angela's disgust. After unsuccessfully trying to reclaim their daughter from Pilar's Aunt Mercedes who had fled with Lisa, Lance and Pilar were resigned to not seeing their daughter in the near future. Emma married reclusive mystery writer R. D. Young who Emma was later told comitted suicide. Pilar allied with Richard in a scheme to industrialise the valley under the cover of a Hispanic-improvement group called the "consortium". Angela discovered it was Richard behind the ploy and told Maggie, who divorced him. Richard used Maggie's history of alcoholism to win custody of their sons. He then kidnapped Angela and brought a dead ringer for Melissa, Samantha Ross, onto the scene. Samantha helped Angela escape, but when Angela told her doubting family about the look-a-like, Richard organised for his mother to be declared mentally incompetent. Angela quickly arranged to marry Frank Agretti so that Frank, and not Richard, would be appointed conservator of her affairs. Samantha showed up on Angela's doorstep to gain revenge on Richard and testified against him. When the news of Richard's dealings hit the stock market, Richard, and Pilar and Lance, who had shares in the consortium, stood to lose millions of dollars as the trade price of the shares fell. Richard was convicted of stock fraud and kidnapping, and as the season ended, was sent to prison. Falcon Crest's final season in 1989-90 began with Maggie ((the first of Susan Sullivan's final 2 appearances)), receiving a four-carat diamond ring from an imprisoned Richard, and the two subsequently reconciled. Richard was determined to get released from prison to be with his family and testified against mogul (and second-cousin) Michael Sharpe in exchange for his release. While Michael and Kevin were playing with Richard's treasured toy soldiers, Kevin knocked them into the swimming pool. On attempting to recover them from the bottom of the pool, Maggie caught the ring she received from Richard in the drain and drowned. Richard was devastated. Michael responded by getting Richard's children taken away to foster parents, his sister Lauren Daniels and her husband Walker. Emma fell in love with the charming - and violent - Charley St. James, who tried to suffocate Angela, sending her into a coma. Charley married an unsuspecting Emma, who was then declared conservator of Angela's affairs. Charley and his equally violent brother, Ian, took control of the winery and talked Emma into selling it to Michael Sharpe for 14 million dollars. The two decided to kill Emma and Ian's wife, Sydney, but Sydney ended up stabbing Ian to death and Emma shot Charley, who escaped. Emma and Sydney were not charged as they acted in self-defence. Emma learned that Ian and Charley had her late husband, R.D. Young, killed prior to their arrival in the Tuscany Valley. Richard was released and fell in love with his children's foster mother, Lauren. When her husband Walker realised, he blew himself up. Pilar and Lance's marriage was tested when Pilar allowed herself to be blackmailed for sex by Lance's business associate, Ned Vogel. Frank Agretti's late wife Renee's sister Genele Ericson came to the Valley and began blackmailing Frank who had helped Genele cover-up her murder of Renee. Frank attempted to go to the police to tell of the murder, but was charged with the murder instead. Genele hooked up with Michael in an unholy alliance. Michael's son Danny arrived in the Tuscany Valley to work for his farther, and fell in love with Sydney. Angered that Sydney double-crossed him in a business deal favouring Richard Channing, Michael arranged to have her killed. Unfortunately, his son became the victim and almost died. As Danny recovered, Michael's ex-wife and Danny's mother, Anne Bowen learned that Michael was responsible for her son's accident. Disgusted by this information, she told Michael that she'd had an affair with Richard Channing and that Richard was Danny's real father. Richard regained control of Falcon Crest by blackmailing Michael about the accident. Angela recovered from her coma and joined forces with Michael to destroy Richard's plans for a happy life running Falcon Crest with Lauren. Danny learned from Lauren that Richard was his father. Richard was unwilling to accept Danny as his son. Richard proposed marriage to Lauren and she accepted. In a desperate attempt to stop the fighting between Michael and Richard, Danny threatened to jump off a roof, but was rescued by both Michael and Richard. Angela was delighted when Richard finally turned Falcon Crest over to her after Lauren pressured him to make peace with his mother. Lance and Pilar discovered they were expecting another baby and decided to leave the Valley, but Angela promised to give Lance 10 per cent of Falcon Crest and another 40 per cent in her will, on the condition that Lance and Pilar stay and Lance serve as vineyard manager. The remainder was to go the Richard's children. The series concluded at Lauren's wedding where Michael attempted to reconcile with Danny by revealing he was responsible for Danny's accident. Danny responded by slugging Michael, but the two men later embraced. Old hatreds and jealousies died as Michael walked Lauren down the aisle. While the family celebrated at a lavish reception at Falcon Crest, Angela stepped outside and, upon looking out at the vineyards, remembered the people who had passed through the valley, and safe with the knowledge that Emma would be returning with her new-born daughter, Angela, the fact that Julia was safe and happy in the convent, and the news that Frank Agretti was soon to be released from prison, Angela gave a private toast to Falcon Crest, where she'd always belonged: "A toast to you, Falcon Crest, and long may you live". First Telecast: December 4, 1981 Last Telecast: May 18, 1990 Episodes: 227 Color Episodes Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #13 in the 1981- 1982 Season #8 in the 1982- 1983 Season #7 in the 1983- 1984 Season #10 in the 1984- 1985 Season #25 in the 1985- 1986 Season #23 in the 1986- 1987 Seasonmoreless
  • 15
    Guiding Light

    Guiding Light

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    CBS (ended 2009)
    The late soap journalist Christopher Schemering once wrote that soap operas are not just dramas; "they're little pockets of American history." So it's only fitting to consider that at one time, The Guiding Light,-the longest running program in broadcast history, spanning 71 years-- brought fifteen-minute bits of escapism to war-weary housewives, as their men trudged off to fight the indignities of WWII. It brought social awareness to a nation that began to think about the big picture beyond their picket fences and suburban streets. Soap opera is a truly dynamic genre that reflects life as it is lived, the quintessential American art form. Although berated and belittled, the soap opera has an illustrious lineage, with no less than the books of Charles Dickens as an inspiration. Created by the legendary, if not iron-fisted Irna Phillips, The Guiding Light began its life on January 25, 1937. Originally, the show focused on the Chicagoan suburb of Five Points, a bustling enclave of German-Jewish immigrants hoping to find their own piece of the American dream. Giving them the hope and inspiration they needed was a kindly minister named Reverend John Ruthledge (voiced by Arthur Peterson of Soap fame). The Reverend's sermons of hope and forgiveness made such an impression that a bestselling book was published of his most popular homilies. The Reverend's message could be summed up by his favorite mantra from Edwin Markum "There is a destiny that makes us brothers, none goes his way alone, all that we send into the lives of others, comes back into our own." On the desk near his window, the minister placed an old lantern, a "guiding light" to those parishioners passing in the cold, hopeless night. In the 1940's the Reverend Ruthledge enrolled as a chaplain to do his part of the war effort. However, when the production of the show moved to the west coast, Peterson refused to join them, so Irna Phillips had the minister die when his plane was shot down overseas. His "friendship lamp" went too with the production move to the town of Selby Flats, California. Reverend Matthews took over for the late Rev. Ruthledge as the center of hope and inspiration. However, by the time that the show was slated to move to television, the religious undertones of the show were virtually gone and the focus was moved yet again to the family Bauer. * Guiding Light was cancelled on April 1, 2009 and the last episode aired on September 18, 2009.moreless
  • 16
    Tour of Duty

    Tour of Duty

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    CBS (ended 1990)
    As the first television drama series about the Vietnam War, Tour of Duty focuses on a single platoon of young U.S. soldiers through their one-year tour of combat duty in Vietnam during the late 1960's. While their own country is rocked by a massive anti-war movement, these young men find themselves thrown into combat in Southeast Asia, where they face enemy troops they can not see and sometimes can not kill. They also face their own fears, as they struggle in a hostile environment just to keep themselves and their fellow soldiers alive. Terence Knox, Kevin Conroy, Stephen Caffrey, Joshua Maurer, Steve Akahoshi, Tony Becker, Eric Bruskotter, Stan Foster, Ramon Franco and Miguel A. Nunez, Jr. star as the infantrymen who represent diverse racial, cultural and philosophical backgrounds but must ultimately depend on one another to get through the war alive. Tour of Duty takes place in 1967, when the war in Vietnam has escalated to terrifying heights. Four hundred seventy-five thousand U.S. troops are stationed in South Vietnam. Like most fighting units "in country," Company B is a diverse mixture of young men, mostly teenagers, from across the United States. Its base is a remote firecamp, composed of sandbagged bunkers and surrounded by mine fields and the scorched remains of once-lush forests. The enemy they encounter is the well-trained and well-supplied regulars of the North Vietnamese Army. Company B's driving force is Sgt. Zeke Anderson (Knox), an amiable and popular sergeant, already on his third tour of duty in Vietnam and determined to keep himself and his men alive. He shares a mutual respect with Capt. Rusty Wallace (Conroy), the company commander and a patient leader, tolerant of the young soldiers for whom he is responsible. Lt. Myron Goldman (Caffrey) is a newly arrived officer, anxious to assert leadership despite his inexperience. Others are Pri. Roger Horn (Maurer), "Doc" Randy Matsuda (Akahoshi), Cpl. Danny Percell (Becker), Pri. Alberto Ruiz (Franco) and Pri. Marcus Taylor (Nunez). Tour of Duty goes beyond the massive political turmoil caused by the Vietnam War and attempts to portray the human side of the conflict. Nearly three million American servicemen were sent overseas, and more than 57,000 of them never came back. It is only recently that Americans look anew at the war and remember the men of all races and backgrounds who served there at such tremendous personal sacrifice. In the UK the series was shown regionally on the ITV network, differing nights at times between 11:30pm and 1:30am.moreless
  • 17
    Simon & Simon

    Simon & Simon

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    CBS (ended 1988)
    Simon & Simon is a show based on two brothers who just happen to be private investigators. They live and work in San Diego where once a week, for eight seasons, the series revealed the loyality and love they had for one another. "They're more than brothers, they're best of friends." The show was cancelled midway into the eighth season, and it was only in re-runs that the final episodes were ever aired.

    The original theme song for the show was performed by The Thrasher Brothers. Later seasons featured a more contemporary instrumental theme, but used the same music as the original.moreless
  • 18
    Designing Women

    Designing Women

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    CBS (ended 1993)
    Julia Sugarbaker (Dixie Carter), Mary Jo Shively (Annie Potts), Charlene Frazier-Stillfield (Jean Smart) and Suzanne Sugarbaker (Delta Burke) are associates at their design firm, Sugarbaker and Associates. Julia Sugarbaker is the owner of Sugarbaker and Associates and is very outspoken and strong-willed. Mary Jo Shively is a divorced single-parent who is just as strong-willed as Julia, but isn't as self-confident. Charlene is the naive and trusting farm girl from Poplar Bluff, Missouri. Suzanne Sugarbaker is the self-centered ex-beauty queen who has a number of wealthy ex-husbands. At the end of Season 5 Delta Burke was fired from the series and Jean Smart left to pursue other goals. Two new characters were introduced: Allison Sugarbaker (Julia Duffy) and Carlene Frazier Dobber (Jan Hooks). Soon, Julia Duffy was taken out of the series and a final cast change brought in Bonnie Jean "B.J." Poteet (Judith Ivey). The series was very successful for CBS, lasting 7 seasons (163 episodes). Reruns from the series continue to air on Lifetime. In 1995, Delta Burke reconciled with the series creators and reprised her role of Suzanne Sugarbaker for the far less successful spin-off Women of the House, which co-starred Teri Garr and Patricia Heaton. Carter, Burke, and Bloodworth-Thomason had all previously worked together on the 1982-83 sitcom Filthy Rich, from which a lot of dialogue in Designing Women was recycled. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #23 in the 1989- 1990 Season
    #11 in the 1990- 1991 Season
    #6 in the 1991- 1992 Season
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  • 19
    The White Shadow

    The White Shadow

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    CBS (ended 1981)
    A knee injury forced Chicago Bulls forward Ken Reeves into retirement and he was talked into a coaching career by his old friend and teammate Jim Willis. That was the premise behind TV's White Shadow. Jim was a principal at Los Angeles' Carver High School, nestled right inside an inner-city, working-class neighborhood…and though Reeves was new to the world of clipboards and de facto paternal responsibilities, coaching soon appeared to be his true calling. The White Shadow was created by TV producer (and big basketball fan) Bruce Paltrow. It was about the sport, of course, but it was also about a growing up in a tough neighborhood at a tough time. The kids on the team had to face drugs, gangs, race hostility, learning disabilities, financial hardship, and more-so it wasn't all towel rattail fights in the locker room. Whatever the dilemma, Coach Reeves figured into the solution, be it through good advice or hands-on intervention. His players trusted him, and given the general mistrust they had for people older than them, that was really saying something. In the 1979-80 season, b-baller Curtis Jackson was shot while standing in a liquor store that was being held up. That was also the year that a load of players "graduated" from high school and moved on…and a new batch of actors came in to take their place. In its third season, the show lightened up--there were less episodes that dealt with serious topics, but the season still had it's moments, such as teacher burnout ("Burnout") and unfair treatment by law enforcement ("Cops"). On the court or off, the young men on the Carver High basketball team were a funny and eclectic group, and their coach, their "white shadow," was always there to lend an assist.moreless
  • 20
    Kojak

    Kojak

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    CBS (ended 1990)
    An independent-minded police detective solves crimes on the streets of New York City. Lt. Theo Kojak is a bald, lollipop-sucking detective also known for his trademark catch-phrase, "Who Loves Ya, Baby?" His boss is Capt. Frank McNeil, with whom Kojak has a lot in common, who was later promoted to Chief of Detectives. His most trusted assistants are Det. Bobby Crocker and Det. Stavros.moreless
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