• 41
    Jesse Stone

    Jesse Stone

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    CBS
    Emmy Award winner Tom Selleck stars as Jesse Stone, a former Los Angeles cop with a drinking problem who has settled into life as the police chief of Paradise, Massachusetts, a small coastal New England town. Jesse has an ex-wife he can't quite let go of, which freqently complicates his romantic and professional lives. As he tries to get back on his feet, he learns that the town of Paradise may have been misnamed. Murder, rape, secrets and lies crop up, and it's up to Chief Stone to put things right.

    The fims are based on the series of novels by Robert B. Parker.moreless
  • 42
    Airwolf

    Airwolf

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    CBS (ended 1987)
    Created by Donald P. Bellisario, who had already had such hits as 'Magnum p.i.' (1980-1988), 'Airwolf' followed the adventures of a hi-tech helicopter and it's reclusive pilot, Stringfellow Hawke. Bellisario developed Airwolf (early working titles: Blackwolf, Lonewolf), from the loose concept of a third season 'Magnum, P.I.' episode he'd previously written, titled 'Two Birds Of A Feather' (1983) - an unsold pilot about a treasure-hunting, adventure-loving ace combat pilot named Sam Houston Hunter (William Lucking). Bellisario had come up with the concept after Lucking played a similar character in a couple of episodes of another Bellisario series, 'Tales Of The Gold Monkey' (1982-3). After the proposed new series wasn't picked up, Bellisario took the bare bones of the concept, and eventually developed the premise into 'Airwolf'. Airwolf itself was a hi-tech attack helicopter, equipped with cutting-edge on-board computer, surveillance and radar systems, able to fly quicker than the fastest jets, and armed with awesome fire-power. Dubbed "The Lady" due to it's slender grace, Airwolf had been constructed by "The Firm", a mysterious, top-secret division of the C.I.A., distinguishable by it's agents all-white dress code. At the start of the Pilot adventure, we see Airwolf on its maiden test flight, piloted by its creator, Dr. Moffet (David Hemmings). But after the successful test flight, the twisted Moffet turns the chopper's lethal fire-power onto the flight tower, causing carnage, before heading off to Libya in the machine. Michael Coldsmith-Briggs III, codename "Archangel" (Alex Cord), the head of the division who built Airwolf, is badly wounded in the assault but not yet out of the game. Now wearing an eye-patch and walking with aid of a cane as a result of his injuries, he calls upon ace combat pilot Stringfellow Hawke (Jan-Michael Vincent) to take the task of bringing back Airwolf from Libya. Hawke is a cello-playing recluse, living in his scenaric cabin in the mountains – with a priceless art collection, and with only his dog Tet for company - ever since his brother St. John went Missing In Action in the Vietnam War, never to be found. Hawke eventually agrees to take the mission, aided by his only close friend, Dominic Santini (Ernest Borgnine). Much Hawke's senior, Dominic was very much his mentor, who was prone to the odd bout of grouchiness, but for the majority of the time was raucously cheerful. He owned Santini Air, a flight company that's main vehicles were decked out in stars and stripes, which specialised in performing arial stunts for films. Hawke and Dominic prised Airwolf back from Moffet's clutches (blowing away it's twisted genius creator in the process), but Hawke wasn't ready to return it back over to the Firm just yet. Hiding it in a hollow mountain in the middle of the desert wilderness, he refused to return the super-chopper until the Firm found solid information about his M.I.A. brother St. John, be he dead or alive. Thus was set the scenario for the series, with Archangel - usually accompanied by assistant Marella (Deborah Pratt) - calling upon Hawke in times of crisis to fly Airwolf on missions of national concern, with the occasional glimmer of hope regarding finding St. John - or at least solid information about his fate - thrown in for good measure. The first season was intelligently written, with a very classy, elegant feel. It was in many ways ahead of it's time, being distinctly dark and dramatic, with heavy religious over-tones and symbolisms, and with stories revolving around cases of international espionage, spying, and such-like, and much talk of "the opposition" - be it taken to be Libyans, the Russians, or whichever assumptions one took. The series did fairly well in the ratings, but CBS wanted to achieve even higher numbers, by "domesticating" the show more – to make stories less dark and symbolic, and to make things more light-hearted to try and win a wider audience. When the second season arrived, it brought with it the most significant and notable change - the introduction of a regular female cast member, created by Bellisario after CBS's insistence. Introduced in the season's opening episode, 'Sweet Britches', Jean Bruce Scott was brought in as feisty Caitlin O'Shannessy, who within the season's first few episodes was set-up as a regular character, working at Santini Air, and before long became the occasional third Airwolf pilot. Also with the new season, The Firm was blended into the background somewhat, to allow more wider-ranging stories, again mostly due to CBS's insistence. Overall the season did well, with much of the dark intrigue still surviving from the first series, mixed with the new slightly lighter-hearted, wider-reaching stories. In the meantime, Bellisario and Deborah Pratt, having met on the show, had married. But by the end of the season, Bellisario had grown increasingly tired of CBS' constant "interfering" with his original vision for the series, and eventually left, taking Pratt with him. The pair left to work on new projects of their own, the biggest and most popular to date being 'Quantum Leap' (with which Airwolf shares much of it's dark, religious over-tones, as well as also using a horde of the same Bellisario-favoured actors and crew). Also behind the scenes, Jan-Michael Vincent's troubled personal life - including battles with drink and drugs, and frequence fights with his wife - were increasingly causing problems during production of the series. Vincent actually broke his arm during one such drunken row with his wife, mid-production of one episode, 'Sins Of The Past', with his right arm visibally hanging limp throughout much of the episode as a result. CBS brought the series back for a third season, now without Bellisario's overseeing (his name on the show survived only as 'Created by' on the opening credits). While still offering up some good episodes, including some very impressive action set pieces (both airborne and otherwise), overall the previous sharp, clever script quality was now somewhat lower, and things were by now noticeably more watered down, with the series now acting as a more all-round "family" action-adventure show. Whilst they still occasionally had their moments, both Hawke's reclusive broodiness, and the whole eerie mysteriousness surrounding The Firm – two key factors in Bellisario's original vision - were by now very toned down. (Incidentally, with the third season, the Firm became spelt as an acronym, "the F.I.R.M.", though what these initials stood for was never explained.) The majority of episode plots were by now a far cry from the original season's dark themes; it's often commented (rightly so in several cases) that, far from the early stories of international emergencies, many of this season's stories seemed to revolve around little more than domestic feuds! But the worst was yet to come... CBS finally called it a day with 'Airwolf' at the end of the third season in 1986 - the last episode being 'Birds Of Paradise', an avarage episode which didn't serve to round to series off in any way. Despite CBS's constant tampering trying to make it an even bigger hit, in the long-run was much the cause of the demise of the show, with ratings gradually dropping mostly as a result of the third season's many more "family friendly" story-lines which lost favour with many fans. Jan-Michael Vincent's ever increasingly troubled personal life had done nothing to ease production of the series, either. However, the rights to the series were brought by a small TV company, Atlantis, for the USA Network, and a new series was commissioned for syndication. The whole of the original cast were written out (no doubt due to cost) – both Hawke and Dominic are killed off in the opening episode (though only Jan-Michael Vincent is actually seen), Archangel is suddenly said to be assigned overseas, and what has become of Caitlin is never mentioned. Taking their place was an all new cast. In the opening episode, 'Blackjack', Hawke's long-missing brother St. John (now seemingly his younger brother, not older, and played by Barry Van Dyke is suddenly located. The original series had several contradictions over St. John, but this new version completely threw any previous continuity out of the window! The Firm was now suddenly, unexplainedly called "The Company" (gone too were the trademark white suits), at which Jason Locke (Anthony Sherwood) is the new contact. He calls upon Major Mike Rivers (Geraint Wyn Davies) to help locate Airwolf – only to find that Dominic's niece, the - previously unmentioned - Jo Santini (Michelle Scarabelli) has already found it, and in it, they set off to rescue St. John. After his rescue began a new season of adventures, often with very little feel of connection to the original series. The new series was filmed on a very low budget in Canada, and much of the aerial footage – including ALL footage of Airwolf in flight, was simply footage recycled from the original three seasons. Other times, very poor model effects of Airwolf were used. Special effects (bar the stock footage) were weak, most of the stories were incredibly dull and wooden, much of the acting was poor - the series was embarrassing at best. There seemed little place for logic, either - the new contact, Locke, clearly knew of Airwolf's location (and often flew it himself!!), yet made no attempt to return it to the Company. In the original, Stringfellow Hawke, and at a push, Dominic or Caitlin, were capable of flying Airwolf – yet suddenly, each of the new characters could pilot it... the whole premise was full of holes. It seems maybe rather amazing (not to mention such a shame) that from the dark, classy, "ahead-of-it's-time" first season, things could end up as this. Understandably, many Airwolf "purists" will refuse to recognise this series as part of the "proper" Airwolf fodder. Suddenly, despite all of the CBS third season's short-comings, fans now found themselves saying "come back third season, all is forgiven", and would have given anything to have the original series, in any of it's versions from the original three seasons, back in place of this crudely produced revamp! Airwolf wasn't the only "super helicopter" on air at the time of it's debut – there was also hi-tech police surveillance chopper 'Blue Thunder' (1984), spun-off from the 1983 movie of the same name; but even with that series having a big-screen film to kick it off, Airwolf generally emerged to be seen as the "ultimate" super-helicopter series, with - at it's peak - it's clever, cathartic scripts paling Blue Thunder's much wider, less serious take. Airwolf itself was a highly modified Bell 222b, with a number of fibreglass and aluminium sections fitted to give it its unique look. In the TV series Airwolf may have been capable of supersonic speeds, but in reality, the numerous additions resulted in only slowing the helicopter's speeds! Sadly, the aircraft used for Airwolf crashed in Germany in 1991 (however, most of the specially built modifications are still in existence in the depths of Universal Studios). Note: This article, as well as episode guest cast lists, synopses and all other material in this guide (unless otherwise contributed) is written by the editor of this show. While it is intended for the reference and enjoyment of fellow fans of the show, please ask permission before using it, be it whole or in part, elsewhere.moreless
  • 43
    Northern Exposure

    Northern Exposure

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    CBS (ended 1995)
    Dr. Joel Fleischman (Rob Morrow) graduated from Columbia University medical school where he attended thanks to a scholarship from the state of Alaska. Though he was slated to work in Anchorage, instead he gets assigned to be the General Practitioner the tiny Alaskan town, Cicely, to pay for his education. The location is remote, the people are weird and quirky, and Joel wants to return to New York. The show thrived on the "will they or won't they" dynamic between Fleischman and Janine Turner's Maggie O'Connell. First air date: July 12, 1990 Last air date: July 26, 1995 Original air time: Monday 10:00:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
  • 44
    Alfred Hitchcock Presents

    Alfred Hitchcock Presents

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    CBS (ended 1962)
    Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a mystery and suspense anthology hosted by the master of suspense Alfred Hitchcock. Each 30 minute episode included opening and closing vignettes featuring Hitchcock who would often explain some aspect of the day's show and would often offer subtle (or not so subtle) jabs at the shows sponsors. The series premiered on CBS on Sunday, October 2, 1955 in the 9:30-10:00 PM timeslot opposite ABC's The Original Amateur Hour and NBC's Alcoa-Goodyear Playhouse. In its sixth season the show moved to NBC and was shown on Tuesday 8:30-9:00 PM. On NBC it served as the lead in for two other anthology shows Thriller and The Dick Powell Show. Alfred Hitchcock Presents featured both original works produced directly for television and adaptations of existing source material. Some authors whose work was adapted for the series include: Alexander Woollcott, Ambrose Bierce, Cornell Woolrich, Frederic Brown, Henry Slesar, H.H. Munro (aka Saki), John Cheever, John Collier, John Wyndham, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, and Robert Bloch. The show also featured work by famous (or later famous) directors Alfred Hitchcock and Robert Altman. It also served as a proving ground for stars and future stars: Charles Bronson, Robert Redford, Steve McQueen, Peter Lorre, Robert Duvall, and Vera Miles. In 1962, Alfred Hitchcock Presents was expanded to one hour and was shown under the title the The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. In 1985, the these shows experienced a revival under the title Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Spinoff: The Alfred Hitchcock Hour Revivals: Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1985) Broadcast History CBS: October 1955-September 1960----Sunday----9:30 p.m.
    NBC: September 1960-June 1962----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #6 in the 1956-1957 Season
    #12 in the 1957-1958 Season
    #24 in the 1958-1959 Season
    #25 in the 1959-1960 Season Emmy Awards and Nominations 1955 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Action or Adventure Series Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Best MC or Program Hose (Male or Female) Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock, "The Case of Mr. Pelham" Best Director (Film Series) Winner: Edward W. Williams, "Breakdown" Best Editing of a Television Film 1956 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Series (Half-Hour or Less) Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Best Male Personality (Continuing Performance) Winner: James P. Cavanagh, "Fog Closes In" Best Teleplay Writing (Half-Hour or Less) 1957 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Anthology Series Winner: Robert Stevens, "The Glass Eye" Best Direction (Half-Hour or Less) 1958 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Series (Less Than One Hour) Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock, "Lamb to the Slaughter" Best Direction of a Single Program of a Dramatic Series (Less Than One Hour) Nominated: Roald Dahl, "Lamb to the Slaughter" Best Writing of a Single Program of a Dramatic Series (Less Than One Hour) 1959 Nominated: John J. Lloyd Outstanding Achievement in Art Direction and Scenic Design Nominated: Edward W. Williams, "Man from the South" Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Television 1960 Nominated: Edward W. Williams, "Incident in a Small Jail" Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Television Other Awards or Nominations The Golden Globe Awards (Voted each year since 1944 by members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association): 1957 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Television Program Look Magazine's Annual Television Awards (Voted initially by poll of TV executives, producers, directors, advertising executives and TV columnists, then, in 1955, via polls taken of TV critics and editors. The Award was Presented annually from 1950 to 1959 by the editors of Look magazine): 1955 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Best Director 1956 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Series (One-Half Hour) 1957 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Series (One-Half Hour) Television Champion Awards (Voted each year since 1949 by polls of the nation's TV critics taken by the publishers of Television Almanac. The awards ceased in 1972): 1955 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Mystery Program 1956 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Mystery Program 1960 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Mystery Program First Telecast: October 2, 1955
    Last Telecast: June 26, 1962
    Unaired Episodes: 1 Episodes: 266 B&W Episodes
    (266 half-hour episodes, 1 three-part episode) moreless
  • 45
    Nash Bridges

    Nash Bridges

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    CBS (ended 2001)
    Nash Bridges (Don Johnson) is a high-action drama about a San Francisco police investigator who deserves his reputation as a topnotch cop, but who's not always so successful when it comes to his personal life. As a member of the elite Special Investigations Unit, Nash relies on his streetwise instincts, keen sense of humor and charm to work his magic on the streets of San Francisco.moreless
  • 46
    As The World Turns

    As The World Turns

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    CBS (ended 2010)
    As the World Turns first premiered on April 2, 1956, and has been a mainstay on CBS daytime ever since. The show takes place in the fictional town of Oakdale, Illinois, and revolves around the lives of it's inhabitants. Originally the central family was the Hughes', however today the stories mostly resolve around the enormous Snyder family. As the World Turns is produced by Proctor and Gamble, the same company that produces Guiding Light, the only show to have a longer on-air tenure than ATWT. This year, ATWT celebrated its 54th Anniversary of being on the air in April 2010, the show will end it's run on Sept 17th 2010.moreless
  • 47
    The Wild Wild West (1969)

    The Wild Wild West (1969)

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    CBS (ended 1969)
    The Wild Wild West ran for four seasons, and featured the adventures of two Secret Service Agents working for President Ulysses S. Grant. The two men were James West, former Union soldier and current man-of-action, gunman, and womanizer. His partner was Artemus Gordon, a former con man and master of disguise and invention. Together, the two fought various menaces aimed at the United States and President Grant, as well as investigating other Federal crimes. Riding on the post-James Bond spy craze of the 60's, WWW featured not only all of the typical "spy gimmicks" like boot knives, miniature explosives, and spike-firing grapple guns, but featured a variety of criminal masterminds wielding high-tech items (for 1880) like robot squids, cyborgs, exo-skeletons, steam-powered giant puppets, earthquake machines, hallucinogenic drugs, shrinking potions, and much much more. Their major nemesis, the diminutive Dr. Miguelito Loveless, was a master of such gadgets and gizmos. The show's producers and writers mixed all of these with typical Western movie conventions, a nod to the old movie serials, and some modern-day stylings as well to produce a unique series that has rarely been seen since. (pictured l to r: Ross Martin, Robert Conrad)moreless
  • 48
    Wanted: Dead or Alive

    Wanted: Dead or Alive

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    CBS (ended 1961)
    Welcome to the Wanted: Dead or Alive guide at tv.com.

    Wanted: Dead or Alive originally aired in Black and white on CBS. The pilot aired on the series "Trackdown" in March 1958.
    Bounty hunter Josh Randall was unlike any bounty hunter, he usually gave half or all of his reward money to good causes. He was a gentlemen and very respectful of the elderly. He was a man of few words and seemed to lack emotion but he was adept at using his gun, not an ordinary gun but a .44-.40 sawed-off 1892 Winchester carbine which he had on his "Mare's Leig", BUT the cartridges in his belt were .45-.70! His catch phrase in almost every episode was "Let's Go" which he spoke softly and sounded more like les goo. A treasure one not to be missed, especially to see Mr. Cool himself, Steve McQueen.



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  • 49
    The Incredible Hulk

    The Incredible Hulk

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    CBS (ended 1982)
    Dr. David Banner was a research scientist trying to find a way to tap into the hidden strength that all humans possess. Then, one night in his labratory, an experiment went wrong, causing him to be overexposed to gamma radiation. Now, whenever angered or distressed, the mild-mannered scientist finds himself transforming into a powerful seven-foot green creature known as The Incredible Hulk. The creature is guided by David's personality, dealing with whatever distresses David. But unfortunately, David has no control over the creature's actions. Nor can he remember what he had done during his Hulkish states. He travels around the country in search of a cure, while taking various odd jobs under different aliases. During this odyssey, he tries to avoid the pursuit of investigative reporter Jack McGee, who suspects the Hulk of murder, and who is determined to discover the creature's true identity.moreless
  • 50
    Joan of Arcadia

    Joan of Arcadia

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    CBS (ended 2005)
    Joan of Arcadia is a drama that follows a typical family facing atypical situations, not the least of which is their teenage daughter's conversations with God. A tough but soft-hearted police detective in Arcadia, Will Girardi (Joe Mantegna) dreams of providing a safe haven for his family and community. An outbreak of serious crime in his idyllic new town has challenged Girardi's desire for order, as have the ups and downs he faces with his family. Daughter Joan (Amber Tamblyn), an average teenager, has been acting a little strange. Most don't know that it has to do with the unusual way various people keep popping up, introducing themselves as God and then giving her specific directions to do things, such as get a job, join the debate team or volunteer with children. The appearances are hard for her to believe, even more so as she never knows who's going to turn up next. One minute it's a cute boy her own age, the next it's the lunch lady or a little girl. She'd been keeping it a secret from everyone, though she has finally revealed it to her artistic and generally sensitive boyfriend, Adam (Christopher Marquette), who believes she's been experiencing hallucinations. Rounding out the Girardi family are her art-teacher mother, Helen (Mary Steenburgen); her 16-year-old science-geek brother, Luke (Michael Welch), and her older, newspaper-writer brother, Kevin (Jason Ritter), a former high-school sports star who is in a wheelchair as a result of a car accident. Joan's unlikely new best friend is her publicly caustic and rebellious, but privately insightful and supportive classmate, Grace (Becky Wahlstrom). Unsure of what God wants--if God exists--and if she's even sane, Joan tentatively follows God's cryptic directives, all the while trying to retain a normal teenaged existence. Theme Song: "One of Us" Performed by Joan Osborne CBS Broadcast History: September 2003 - May 2005 --- Friday 8:00 pm Awards and Nominations: 2003 - Won - People's Choice Awards - Favorite New Dramatic Series 2003 - Won - American Film Institute - Top 10 TV Programs of the Year 2004 - Nominated - Golden Globes - Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series (Drama): Amber Tamblyn 2004 - Nominated - Golden Satellite Awards - Best Performance by an Actress in a Series (Drama): Amber Tamblyn 2004 - Won - Golden Satellite Awards - Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series (Drama): Mary Steenburgen 2004 - Won - Saturn Awards - Best Actress on TV: Amber Tamblyn 2004 - Nominated - SyFy Genre Awards - Best Young Actor: Amber Tamblyn and Michael Welch 2004 - Won - The Humanitas Prize - 60 Minute TV Category: Pilot episode 2004 - Nominated - The Humanitas Prize - 60 Minute TV Category: The Uncertainty Principle episode 2004 - Nominated - Television Critics Assn. - Outstanding New Program 2004 - Nominated - Teen Choice Awards - Best TV Show: Drama, TV Actress Drama: Amber Tamblyn, and Choice Fresh Face: Amber Tamblyn 2004 - Nominated - Emmy - Outstanding Drama Series; Outstanding Lead Actress in Drama Series: Amber Tamblyn; Outstanding Guest Actress in Drama Series: Louis Fletcher (Do The Math episode) 2004 - Nominated - Artios Awards - Dramatic Pilot Casting: Vicki Rosenberg 2004 - Won - The Family Television Awards - Best Drama Series and TV Actress: Amber Tamblynmoreless
  • 51
    Route 66

    Route 66

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    CBS (ended 1964)
    (NEW SHOW SUMMARY COMING SOON) Two young men drive around the US working at odd jobs, helping people, and searching for adventure. Ironically, the show was filmed on location all across the USA, but rarely near the real Route 66.moreless
  • 52
    Falcon Crest

    Falcon Crest

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    CBS (ended 1990)
    Airing in the time slot following CBS' immensely popular Dallas, Falcon Crest sought to hold on to the soap opera addicts with yet another saga of the rich and greedy fighting for power and sex. The setting was the ficticious Tuscany Valley, located in the beautiful Napa Valley Region outside San Francisco, and the industry around which the action centered was wine-making. Angela Channing, the matriarch and principal empire-builder on Falcon Crest was powerful and respected and feared by almost everyone whose lives she touched. Angela ran the Falcon Crest winery with an iron hand and tried to manipulate everyone to suit her purposes. When the series began, her nephew Chase Gioberti had just inherited 50 acres of vineyards from his recently deceased father, Jason Gioberti, Angela's brother. Angela was convinced that the land should be hers, but Chase brought his wife Maggie and two children, Cole and Victoria, from New York to live in the valley and manage his land. And it all goes downhill from here. From the get-go, Angela and Chase got into many scrapes over that land. Angela first tried to ruin Chase by stopping a necessary bank loan; then tried to ruin his relationship with beloved son Cole by saying that he might someday inherit Falcon Crest. When those plans didn't work, she tried to get others' vineyards, and this is where Lance Cumson comes into play. Lance was the typical playboy who wanted money and power from his grandmother, but was too lazy to work for it. Lance was tied to Angela because of the power she had over him. Angela even pressured Lance to marry Melissa Agretti, the Agrettis' daughter, who had plenty of ambition and greed in her own right, in order to consolidate the large Agretti and Falcon Crest wineries under her control. He did marry Melissa, but he still fooled around with other women, and Melissa also had an affair with Cole, which resulted in her getting pregnant. The first season ended with Angela losing control of Falcon Crest to Chase after the real cause of death of his father was revealed: Emma Channing accidentally pushed him, causing him to fall to his death. In the 1982-1983 season, it seemed as though no one could be nasty to Angela until Richard Channing came to town. He arrived in San Francisco to run "The Globe", a newspaper that had been owned by his late father, and Angela's ex-husband Douglas Channing. Richard inherited 50 percent, and the rest was shared by Julia Cumson, Angela's daughter and Lance's mother, and crazy Emma. Meanwhile, Angela, determined to battle Richard, attempted to buy out the remaining 20 percent of minority shareholders, using funds from the Falcon Crest winery to do so! Chase discovered her plan and threatened legal action. Richard was assisted by Jacqueline Perrault, whom he was later told was his mother, to fight Angela, and connived with Julia, who was easily manipulated by his charm. The plan backfired but he then fought for, and won, a permit to build a race track in the Tuscany Valley that could destroy the area's entire wine industry. Richard's plans for the Tuscany Downs race-track enraged Angela and Chase when he announced part of the Falcon Crest vineyards would be bulldozed to build it. Richard was confronted by an underhanded underworld figure called Henri Denault, and after a struggle with Richard on a bridge, Denault accidentally fell to his death. Angela's psychotic daughter, Julia, prompted by a twisted desire to protect her mother, shot Melissa's father, Carlo Agretti. It was later revealed Julia had also had a relationship with Carlo and was tired of his indiscretions with other women. Cole was tried for the murder of Carlo, but was found not guilty. In the second season's cliff-hanger, Chase and Jacqueline were both shot by the unbalanced Julia, after she was convicted of the murder of Carlo Agretti and the attempted murders of Cole, Maggie and Chase. The 1983-84 season opened with the news that Jacqueline's gunshot wound proved fatal, while Chase was left paralyzed. Julia was sentenced to a long prison term and later to a mental institution. Jacqueline's will stipulated her fortune go to her grandson, Cole, provided that he acknowledged that only Chase was his father. Jacqueline's nephew, Dr. Michael Ranson, a neurosurgeon arrived to help Chase recover from paralysis. Chase was not pleased to hear his wife, Maggie, had accepted an offer from Richard to join his newspaper staff as a reporter. Maggie's sister, Terry Hartford, who secretly worked as a high-priced call girl, moved to town. She quickly fell in love with Dr. Ranson and later moved in and married him. Julia was committed to a mental institution after being driven further to insanity by her time in prison. She escaped from the mental institution and, vowing revenge on her mother, abducted Melissa's baby, Joseph. She released Joseph but was presumed dead after being trapped in a cabin that went up in flames. The third season closed with Julia's final request that the Channings and Giobertis board a plane for Italy, which plummeted toward a crash landing. The 1984-85 season revealed that Angela's shrewd lawyer and husband, Phillip Erikson, and Dr. Michael Ranson died in the crash. The Cartel, a shadowy international syndicate headed by an exceptionally vicious man named Gustav Riebmann, were the masterminds behind the crash and made waves in the Tuscany Valley. The Cartel had been co-founded by the late Jacqueline together with Gustav's father, Johann Riebmann, and surfaced in the valley because it believed a large fortune once belonging to the Nazis had been buried on the Falcon Crest estate. Before the crime ring was destroyed, residents endured a series of plane crashes, bombings, and buggings. Angela finally got revenge against Richard by taking over The New Globe. Her first course of action was to appoint Lance editor. Richard retaliated by framing Lance for the attempted murder of Angela, but Lance was cleared of all charges. Richard also acquired one-third of Falcon Crest from Angela's half-sister, Francesca Gioberti. Julia returned after her presumed death in the spring house, while Melissa divorced Lance, married Cole, and then constantly fought with him. Cassandra Wilder arrived in Falcon Crest and began a vendetta against Angela for wrongs Angela supposedly inflicted on her family, headed by Anna Rossini. By season's end, Cassandra had succeeded in causing the financial ruin of both Angela and Richard. Angela turned to her former lover in the 1985-86 season with wealthy shipping magnate Peter Stavros for assistance. Before he was able to help Angela, he was abducted by his daughter Sophia and her French husband, Philippe Hubbert, who wanted to take over the Stavros Industries empire. Once Peter was freed by Lance, he proposed to Angela. Angela realized that she could become Peter's wife or allow him to be her landlord, and accepted his proposal. Peter's son, Eric followed his father to Tuscany Valley. Richard managed to rebuild his own financial empire by siphoning money from the Tuscany Downs racetrack. Terry found out and blackmailed him into marriage. Richard's new lawyer, Jordan Roberts, suffered from a split personality, and became Monica, a professional hooker by night. Maggie suffered from amnesia after an explosion and through her fog wrote a thinly veiled, fictional expose about the residents of Tuscany Valley. After her book was published, her publisher assigned an aspiring novelist and book publicist named Jeff Wainright to help her sell her book. While on tour together, Jeff became obsessed with Maggie and kidnapped her. He then raped her but Maggie was rescued. Unable to have another baby together, Melissa and Cole hired a surrogate mother, Robin, who seduced Cole and then kept the baby. Emma fell in love with a trucker named Dwayne Cooley and Lance fell for rock singer Apollonia Kotero. The season ended with the escape of Jeff Wainright and a major earthquake hitting Tuscany Valley. The aftermath of the earthquake left the valley in turmoil, with Emma's fiancée, Dwayne, and Maggie's sister Terry, not surviving. Criminal activities were at the forefront of the 1986-87 season. After Jeff Wainright's escape, he kidnapped Vickie and then Maggie. Richard hired a private investigator named Erin Jones to help him get information on business rivals. Jones framed Richard for attempted murder, tried to kill Chase and was responsible for the death of Jeff Wainright. As Wainright drove across a rigged bridge, he was blown up. Soon after Richard had Miss Jones imprisoned in Borneo, her sister Meredith surfaced in Tuscany Valley seeking revenge against him. Emma's life became even more bizarre when she got involved with a con artist named Vince Karlotti who claimed to be a spiritualist in touch with the late Dwayne's spirit. Meanwhile, Melissa pursued a singing career and Eric Stavros and Vickie Gioberti married. Julia, who was blinded in the earthquake, was granted a new trial and all charges were dropped for her past sins after it was determined she was no longer psychologically unbalanced. She decided to leave Falcon Crest and joined a convent. A woman claiming to be Peter's long-lost daughter, Skylar, turned out to be an impostor of many disguises named Kit Marlowe, who was running from a devious Eastern billionaire, Roland Saunders. His life came to an end when Kit offered him a poisoned cigar moments before Peter fatally struck him on the head with a wrench. Dan Fixx showed up on Angela's doorstep claiming to be a relative. Angela gladly accepted him into the family fold, but this caused Lance to be insecure about his status. The season closed with many surprises. The Richard-Angela infighting continued, but the squabbling wine moguls had more in common than they realised. Peter decided to return to Greece and amicably divorced Angela. Before leaving town, he left Angela with the news that the child she was told was still born forty-five years prior had in fact been given to Jacqueline Perrault by Angela's husband, Douglas Channing. Angela's stolen child was her arch-enemy, Richard. A distraught Emma attempted to jump off the Falcon Crest roof, and Chao-Li, running to tell Angela of Emma's peril, fell down the stairs unconscious. The unstable Melissa kidnapped Chase and Maggie's new-born baby Kevin. With Chase, Dan, Richard and Maggie in pursuit, Melissa drove into the San Francisco Bay. The 1987-88 season began with the news that Kevin, Richard, Melissa and Dan were rescued, but Chase was missing, presumed dead. Lance rescued Emma from the roof and Chao-Li was found to have cancer, but later recovered. After Chase was declared legally dead, the executor to his estate, John Remick, a mercenary who knew Chase in Vietnam, appeared and insinuated Richard had a hand in Chase's disappearance. Richard, romancing Maggie at the time, contacted a sinister group of businessmen known as The Thirteen to fund the North African junta Remick was fighting in before he came to Tuscany, to get Remick out of the picture. Word surfaced later than Remick was missing in action. Maggie was worried about Richard's shady dealings and escaped an explosion in her home. Disappointed by Dan's romantic involvement with Melissa, Angela successfully lured a despondent Lance back into her clutches. Angela decided Melissa was a threat and schemed to drive her insane. Eric Stavros, a compulsive gambler, left for Monte Carlo with wife Vickie in tow. When Eric lost to a powerful poker player, Vickie was kidnapped and sent to Yugoslavia as part of a white slave trade. Richard contacted The Thirteen again for help in freeing Vickie. Richard proposed to Maggie and she accepted. Chase's will stipulated that the second of three codicils be read in the event of the couple's marriage. Richard and Maggie wed and the codicil left Chase and Maggie's Falcon Crest acreage to Angela. Richard agreed to join The Thirteen in an attempt to stop Angela gaining Maggie's land. The third codicil from Chase's will left Melissa a key which he said would destroy long time foe Angela. Melissa headed to the Gold Rush town of Hobart and, after climbing through an underground tunnel with Lance while looking for the safety deposit box that the key matched, was trapped by a cave-in. While trapped Melissa discovered a deed to Falcon Crest made out to the Agretti family, which apparently won the winery from the Giobertis in a poker match. After Lance and Melissa were rescued from the cave-in, Melissa had the deed proven legal and ousted Angela and her family from their land. Lance and Melissa's uncle, Frank Agretti, disowned her. Upon hearing of Richard's dealings, Maggie left him and moved into Falcon Crest and had a bout with alcoholism. Richard, devastated by his separation from Maggie told the FBI of his dealings with The Thirteen, but had no proof. Richard agreed to testify before a Senate committee. The Thirteen attempted to murder Angela, and upon her rescue by Richard, a reconciliation between the long-time rivals took place. Richard agreed to offer his life to The Thirteen in exchange for the safety of his family. Eric was brainwashed by The Thirteen and shot Richard. Tuscany Valley residents mourned his loss at a family burial. Angela secretly met with a bearded man sitting in a church pew and asked him, "Haven't you waited long enough? When are you going to tell Maggie you are alive?". It was uncertain if it was Richard or the presumed dead Chase. The 1988-89 season began with the revelation that Richard had staged his death, in order to escape The Thirteen, who had been assassinated. After initially rejecting him, Maggie reconciled with Richard. Melissa couldn't run Falcon Crest and was lonely by herself. She had a breakdown, doused Falcon Crest in gasoline and torched it. She later died in hospital from smoke inhalation, leaving her uncle Frank's son, Nick, executor of her estate. Angela battled to regain her birthright from Nick and eventually won back the vineyard with a false deed and rebuilt the mansion. It was later revealed that the original deed Melissa held was won when the Agretti's had cheated in the poker match. Lance renewed his relationship with Pilar Ortega, daughter of the Falcon Crest foreman, Cesar. It was revealed the two had a daughter, Lisa, ten years ago and the two subsequently married, to Angela's disgust. After unsuccessfully trying to reclaim their daughter from Pilar's Aunt Mercedes who had fled with Lisa, Lance and Pilar were resigned to not seeing their daughter in the near future. Emma married reclusive mystery writer R. D. Young who Emma was later told comitted suicide. Pilar allied with Richard in a scheme to industrialise the valley under the cover of a Hispanic-improvement group called the "consortium". Angela discovered it was Richard behind the ploy and told Maggie, who divorced him. Richard used Maggie's history of alcoholism to win custody of their sons. He then kidnapped Angela and brought a dead ringer for Melissa, Samantha Ross, onto the scene. Samantha helped Angela escape, but when Angela told her doubting family about the look-a-like, Richard organised for his mother to be declared mentally incompetent. Angela quickly arranged to marry Frank Agretti so that Frank, and not Richard, would be appointed conservator of her affairs. Samantha showed up on Angela's doorstep to gain revenge on Richard and testified against him. When the news of Richard's dealings hit the stock market, Richard, and Pilar and Lance, who had shares in the consortium, stood to lose millions of dollars as the trade price of the shares fell. Richard was convicted of stock fraud and kidnapping, and as the season ended, was sent to prison. Falcon Crest's final season in 1989-90 began with Maggie ((the first of Susan Sullivan's final 2 appearances)), receiving a four-carat diamond ring from an imprisoned Richard, and the two subsequently reconciled. Richard was determined to get released from prison to be with his family and testified against mogul (and second-cousin) Michael Sharpe in exchange for his release. While Michael and Kevin were playing with Richard's treasured toy soldiers, Kevin knocked them into the swimming pool. On attempting to recover them from the bottom of the pool, Maggie caught the ring she received from Richard in the drain and drowned. Richard was devastated. Michael responded by getting Richard's children taken away to foster parents, his sister Lauren Daniels and her husband Walker. Emma fell in love with the charming - and violent - Charley St. James, who tried to suffocate Angela, sending her into a coma. Charley married an unsuspecting Emma, who was then declared conservator of Angela's affairs. Charley and his equally violent brother, Ian, took control of the winery and talked Emma into selling it to Michael Sharpe for 14 million dollars. The two decided to kill Emma and Ian's wife, Sydney, but Sydney ended up stabbing Ian to death and Emma shot Charley, who escaped. Emma and Sydney were not charged as they acted in self-defence. Emma learned that Ian and Charley had her late husband, R.D. Young, killed prior to their arrival in the Tuscany Valley. Richard was released and fell in love with his children's foster mother, Lauren. When her husband Walker realised, he blew himself up. Pilar and Lance's marriage was tested when Pilar allowed herself to be blackmailed for sex by Lance's business associate, Ned Vogel. Frank Agretti's late wife Renee's sister Genele Ericson came to the Valley and began blackmailing Frank who had helped Genele cover-up her murder of Renee. Frank attempted to go to the police to tell of the murder, but was charged with the murder instead. Genele hooked up with Michael in an unholy alliance. Michael's son Danny arrived in the Tuscany Valley to work for his farther, and fell in love with Sydney. Angered that Sydney double-crossed him in a business deal favouring Richard Channing, Michael arranged to have her killed. Unfortunately, his son became the victim and almost died. As Danny recovered, Michael's ex-wife and Danny's mother, Anne Bowen learned that Michael was responsible for her son's accident. Disgusted by this information, she told Michael that she'd had an affair with Richard Channing and that Richard was Danny's real father. Richard regained control of Falcon Crest by blackmailing Michael about the accident. Angela recovered from her coma and joined forces with Michael to destroy Richard's plans for a happy life running Falcon Crest with Lauren. Danny learned from Lauren that Richard was his father. Richard was unwilling to accept Danny as his son. Richard proposed marriage to Lauren and she accepted. In a desperate attempt to stop the fighting between Michael and Richard, Danny threatened to jump off a roof, but was rescued by both Michael and Richard. Angela was delighted when Richard finally turned Falcon Crest over to her after Lauren pressured him to make peace with his mother. Lance and Pilar discovered they were expecting another baby and decided to leave the Valley, but Angela promised to give Lance 10 per cent of Falcon Crest and another 40 per cent in her will, on the condition that Lance and Pilar stay and Lance serve as vineyard manager. The remainder was to go the Richard's children. The series concluded at Lauren's wedding where Michael attempted to reconcile with Danny by revealing he was responsible for Danny's accident. Danny responded by slugging Michael, but the two men later embraced. Old hatreds and jealousies died as Michael walked Lauren down the aisle. While the family celebrated at a lavish reception at Falcon Crest, Angela stepped outside and, upon looking out at the vineyards, remembered the people who had passed through the valley, and safe with the knowledge that Emma would be returning with her new-born daughter, Angela, the fact that Julia was safe and happy in the convent, and the news that Frank Agretti was soon to be released from prison, Angela gave a private toast to Falcon Crest, where she'd always belonged: "A toast to you, Falcon Crest, and long may you live". First Telecast: December 4, 1981 Last Telecast: May 18, 1990 Episodes: 227 Color Episodes Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #13 in the 1981- 1982 Season #8 in the 1982- 1983 Season #7 in the 1983- 1984 Season #10 in the 1984- 1985 Season #25 in the 1985- 1986 Season #23 in the 1986- 1987 Seasonmoreless
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    Threshold

    Threshold

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    CBS (ended 2005)
    Molly Anne Caffrey (Carla Gugino) is a government contingency agent whose job is to create response plans for any possible worse-case scenario. One of her plans - THRESHOLD - is enacted by J.T. Baylock when the U.S. Navy realizes an "extra terrestrial craft" has landed in the mid-Atlantic ocean. Caffrey must hand-select a team of scientists - consisting of Dr. Nigel Fenway (Brent Spiner) - a NASA microbiologist, Lucas Pegg (Rob Benedict) - a neurotic physicist, Arthur Ramsey (Peter Dinklage) - an expert linguist and mathematician, and Sean Cavennaugh (Brian Van Holt) - a highly trained covert operative with a puzzling past. Threshold stems from the minds of producers David Heyman, David Goyer, and Brannon Braga.moreless
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    The Guardian

    The Guardian

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    CBS (ended 2004)
    The theme song to The Guardian is The Empire In My Mind as performed by Jakob Dylan of The Wallflowers.
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    Guiding Light

    Guiding Light

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    CBS (ended 2009)
    The late soap journalist Christopher Schemering once wrote that soap operas are not just dramas; "they're little pockets of American history." So it's only fitting to consider that at one time, The Guiding Light,-the longest running program in broadcast history, spanning 71 years-- brought fifteen-minute bits of escapism to war-weary housewives, as their men trudged off to fight the indignities of WWII. It brought social awareness to a nation that began to think about the big picture beyond their picket fences and suburban streets. Soap opera is a truly dynamic genre that reflects life as it is lived, the quintessential American art form. Although berated and belittled, the soap opera has an illustrious lineage, with no less than the books of Charles Dickens as an inspiration. Created by the legendary, if not iron-fisted Irna Phillips, The Guiding Light began its life on January 25, 1937. Originally, the show focused on the Chicagoan suburb of Five Points, a bustling enclave of German-Jewish immigrants hoping to find their own piece of the American dream. Giving them the hope and inspiration they needed was a kindly minister named Reverend John Ruthledge (voiced by Arthur Peterson of Soap fame). The Reverend's sermons of hope and forgiveness made such an impression that a bestselling book was published of his most popular homilies. The Reverend's message could be summed up by his favorite mantra from Edwin Markum "There is a destiny that makes us brothers, none goes his way alone, all that we send into the lives of others, comes back into our own." On the desk near his window, the minister placed an old lantern, a "guiding light" to those parishioners passing in the cold, hopeless night. In the 1940's the Reverend Ruthledge enrolled as a chaplain to do his part of the war effort. However, when the production of the show moved to the west coast, Peterson refused to join them, so Irna Phillips had the minister die when his plane was shot down overseas. His "friendship lamp" went too with the production move to the town of Selby Flats, California. Reverend Matthews took over for the late Rev. Ruthledge as the center of hope and inspiration. However, by the time that the show was slated to move to television, the religious undertones of the show were virtually gone and the focus was moved yet again to the family Bauer. * Guiding Light was cancelled on April 1, 2009 and the last episode aired on September 18, 2009.moreless
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    Harper's Island

    Harper's Island

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    CBS (ended 2009)
    Harper's island is a murder mystery show where a group of people go a secluded island for a wedding- and for death. It turns into a struggle for survival, where every episode someone is killed and every person is a suspect. At the end of the 13 episodes, all questions are answered and only a few survive.moreless
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    Cannon

    Cannon

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    Frank Cannon lives in a penthouse on the Sunset Strip, where his passion is gourmet cuisine prepared by himself. In between meals he hires out as a private investigator to select clients in need of top-drawer work from a professional trained in the ways of the world. George McCowan's work on this series sets a new standard by treating television as simply a more mobile cinema. He registers the descendance of television from film, not merely radio. After creating Marshal Dillon in Gunsmoke on radio, and a great deal of film work, Cannon is the great achievement of William Conrad's career as an actor: genial, witty and acute.moreless
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    A Gifted Man

    A Gifted Man

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    CBS (ended 2012)
    A gifted surgeon, played by Patrick Wilson, suddenly has his life changed when his ex-wife (Jennifer Ehle) dies and goes on to teach him about life from the beyond the grave.moreless
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    Tour of Duty

    Tour of Duty

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    CBS (ended 1990)
    As the first television drama series about the Vietnam War, Tour of Duty focuses on a single platoon of young U.S. soldiers through their one-year tour of combat duty in Vietnam during the late 1960's. While their own country is rocked by a massive anti-war movement, these young men find themselves thrown into combat in Southeast Asia, where they face enemy troops they can not see and sometimes can not kill. They also face their own fears, as they struggle in a hostile environment just to keep themselves and their fellow soldiers alive. Terence Knox, Kevin Conroy, Stephen Caffrey, Joshua Maurer, Steve Akahoshi, Tony Becker, Eric Bruskotter, Stan Foster, Ramon Franco and Miguel A. Nunez, Jr. star as the infantrymen who represent diverse racial, cultural and philosophical backgrounds but must ultimately depend on one another to get through the war alive. Tour of Duty takes place in 1967, when the war in Vietnam has escalated to terrifying heights. Four hundred seventy-five thousand U.S. troops are stationed in South Vietnam. Like most fighting units "in country," Company B is a diverse mixture of young men, mostly teenagers, from across the United States. Its base is a remote firecamp, composed of sandbagged bunkers and surrounded by mine fields and the scorched remains of once-lush forests. The enemy they encounter is the well-trained and well-supplied regulars of the North Vietnamese Army. Company B's driving force is Sgt. Zeke Anderson (Knox), an amiable and popular sergeant, already on his third tour of duty in Vietnam and determined to keep himself and his men alive. He shares a mutual respect with Capt. Rusty Wallace (Conroy), the company commander and a patient leader, tolerant of the young soldiers for whom he is responsible. Lt. Myron Goldman (Caffrey) is a newly arrived officer, anxious to assert leadership despite his inexperience. Others are Pri. Roger Horn (Maurer), "Doc" Randy Matsuda (Akahoshi), Cpl. Danny Percell (Becker), Pri. Alberto Ruiz (Franco) and Pri. Marcus Taylor (Nunez). Tour of Duty goes beyond the massive political turmoil caused by the Vietnam War and attempts to portray the human side of the conflict. Nearly three million American servicemen were sent overseas, and more than 57,000 of them never came back. It is only recently that Americans look anew at the war and remember the men of all races and backgrounds who served there at such tremendous personal sacrifice. In the UK the series was shown regionally on the ITV network, differing nights at times between 11:30pm and 1:30am.moreless
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    Promised Land

    Promised Land

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    CBS (ended 1999)
    When Russell Greene loses his job, he decides to go on the road with his family. So he gathers his family including his wife Claire, his son Josh, his daughter Dinah his mother, Hattie, and his nephew Nathaniel and hits the road. With only an old Suburban, a trailer, and a dream, Russell and his family are now traveling across the country in search of adventure and helping many people along the way. Promised Land was a spinoff of the series Touched By An Angel and had several crossover episodes with that series, as well as one with Diagnosis Murder. The series was filmed entirely on location in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.moreless
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