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    The Andy Griffith Show

    The Andy Griffith Show

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    CBS (ended 1968)
    The Andy Griffith Show is definitely a TV classic. It ran from 1960 to 1968, producing 249 episodes.

    The main character, Andy (Andy Griffith), was a widowed father of the polite little boy named Opie (Ron Howard) and is a sheriff, who works with nervous and very suspecting Barney Fife (Don Knotts). They all live in the nice southern town of Mayberry. But, Mayberry can get a little dangerous when the town drunk Otis Campbell (Hal Smith) is on the loose. Thelma Lou (Betty Lynn) is Barney's sweetheart, although Andy had to help him describe his feelings to her. Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier) is the very loving and caring, but stern housekeeper for Andy and Opie. Gomer Pyle (Jim Nabors) is the bone-head, thoughtless, but humorous character. He is a gas attendant. Goober Pyle (George Lindsey) is Gomer Pyle's cousin. They are very alike, you could say, and arrives in Mayberry when Gomer decides to enlist in the United States Marine Core. The show had two spin-offs: Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C. and Mayberry R.F.D.

    Top 20 Ratings: 1960-1961 - #4 1961-1962 - #7 1962-1963 - #6 1963-1964 - #5 1964-1965 - #4 1965-1966 - #6 1966-1967 - #3 1967-1968 - #1

    Awards for The Andy Griffith Show: Don Knotts won five Emmy Awards for Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Comedy: 1961, 1962, 1963, 1966, and 1967.

    Frances Bavier won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy in 1967.moreless
  • 2
    Tom and Jerry

    Tom and Jerry

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    CBS (ended 1980)
    Tom and Jerry was originally the very first, and earliest of the Hanna-Barbera Cartoons. It went through many phases and took place from anywhere from inside a house, to anywhere in outer space. The show was of course, about a cat and a mouse, and several other characters. The two never really talked, even though they do sing, yell, gasp, laugh, count, or say "Aha!!"; and that several other characters spoke more often. They would later end up in several TV series, and also in a few movies, however many would say that they didn't like the way the movies turned out. All of the episodes were distributed by MGM. Here's more info about the show in general: Pilot Episodes: The Pilot Episode was called "Puss Gets The Boot" and was also the first one with Mammy in it. Tom looked very different and was called Jasper. It was produced by Harman-Ising Productions. Fred Quimby: Fred Quimby was the Producer of Tom & Jerry for many years. He is also the Producer of Tex Avery's Cartoons. Tom's fur would eventually become blue. CinemaScope: These cartoons had more people in them. There were narrators, and many conversations between the adults. Lewis Marshall became an Animation Director, and Hanna-Barbera were the Producers. Rembrandt: Only seeing the older Tom & Jerry cartoons, and not having enough information on the show, Ted Pierce, Gene Deich, and William L. Snyder and the rest of the crew had trouble in producing their episodes of Tom & Jerry. Sib Tower 12 Incorporated: One of the last producers of Tom & Jerry, this version has the famous opening with the yellow background and the red letters (except for the 5 letters O and J) where Tom hisses and Jerry waves. The producer was Chuck Jones, and the cartoons look ahead of their time. There were several new characters, including a yellow bulldog, and Tom's Girlfriend, The Shark, Jerry's Dog, and several robots where Tom was a security operator at a cheese mine. Other people that worked on the show were Les Goldman, Maurice Noble, Michael Maltese, Tom Ray, Earl Jonas, Lewis Marshall, Eugene Poddany, Bill Lava, Dean Elliott, Carl Brandt, Mel Blanc, June Foray, Abe Levitow, Ben Washam, Don Foster, and Walter Bien. They would later do several Dr. Seuss cartoons along with Depatie-Freeling Entertainment, the Cricket seties, Duck Dodgers, and many other Award Winning shows. Filmation: Many years later, Filmation attempted to produce Tom & Jerry. It was a TV show called The Tom & Jerry Comedy Show. It seemed to look like all the Tom & Jerry cartoons in the 1950s and 1960s. They also aired and produced some other MGM cartoons, like the ones that are directed by Tex Avery. The episodes of The Tom & Jerry Comedy Show are mentioned here. TV: The New Tom and Jerry Show and The Tom and Jerry Kids Show: HB's TV versions. Neither lasted long, but several people still remember Them. They weren't that violent either. They were about the characters trying to solve everyday problems. Tom & Jerry Kids had other charachers as kids that were also produced by Fred Quimby, Including Tex Avery's Cartoon Characters. Now: Tom & Jerry was recently produced by AOL Time Warner and Turner Home Entertainment. They aren't the best cartoons. Tom and Jerry is currently airing on Cartoon Network! Check your local listings! Every episode of Tom & Jerry can be seen on Cartoon Network and Boomerang for one hour, and also The Sib Tower 12 Inc Cartoons can be seen with The Chuck Jones Show.moreless
  • 3
    Gerald McBoing Boing

    Gerald McBoing Boing

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    CBS (ended 2005)
    Gerald McBoing Boing tells the adventures of a six-year-old boy who doesn't speak with words but rather he speaks through sound effects. Gerald shows the world that sometimes he can say more through his sounds than if he had all the words in a dictionary. Based on the Dr. Seuss book.moreless
  • 4
    Charlie Brown

    Charlie Brown

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    CBS
    Charles Schulz's classic comic strip Peanuts started in 1950. Fifteen years later, A Charlie Brown Christmas debuted. When The Little Christmas Special that Could proved to be an unexpected success, the stage was set for successive television specials. To date, over forty have been made. The Charlie Brown specials focus on one round-headed kid, his goofy but intelligent beagle, and their vast array of friends. Each has distinctive qualities: Lucy, the crabby, self-proclaimed psychiatrist; Linus, the blanket-toting theologian; Schroeder, the Beethoven worshiper whose black piano keys are only painted on; Peppermint Patty, the tomboy whose affections toward "Chuck" are only outweighed by her sports abilities; and so on. The wit, the charm, the pleasantness of these specials make them appropriate not just for children, but for the whole family.moreless
  • 5
    Dennis the Menace

    Dennis the Menace

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    CBS (ended 1963)
    This is the 1959 CBS live-action situation comedy based on the comic strip by Hank Ketcham. Dennis is portrayed as the helpful menace that always seemed to cause chaos. Dennis Mitchell lived at 627 Elm Street with his parents, Henry and Alice. Next door was his best friend, Mr. Wilson (though the feeling was, certainly, not mutual). Dennis always was around to help Mr. Wilson whether he wanted the help or not. The allure of the series was to see how Dennis would unintentionally mess things up for Mr. Wilson. The series lasted four seasons, but, perhaps, could have lasted longer. Joseph Kearns, the actor who portrayed Mr. George Wilson, died during the show's third season. This left a huge void that even veteran actor Gale Gordon (Mr. John Wilson) couldn't fill. He was introduced toward the end of the third season, and the series was cancelled the following year. Main Title Theme Song "Dennis the Menace" by Irving Friedman CBS Broadcast History October 4, 1959 - September 22, 1963 ---- Sundays ---- 7:30 - 8:00 P.M. Nielsen Ratings - Top 30 Season 1 (1959-60) 16 (26.0) Season 2 (1960-61) 11 (26.1) Season 3 (1961-62) 17 (23.8) Season 4 (1962-63) Not In Top 30 First Telecast: October 4, 1959 Last Telecast: July 7, 1963 Episodes: 146 black-and-white episodesmoreless
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    Lassie

    Lassie

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    CBS (ended 1973)
    Lassie currently airs on Discovery Kids @ 12:00/12:30 P.M. and 4:00/4:30 A.M. weekdays. Awards & Nominations 1959 - Emmy Awards - Nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role (Continuing Character) in a Dramatic Series - to June Lockhart 1956 - Emmy Awards - Won Best Children's Series 1955 - Emmy Awards - Won Best Children's Seriesmoreless
  • 7
    The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour

    The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour

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    CBS (ended 1969)
    Spun-off from ABC's prime time series The Bugs Bunny Show and the CBS Saturday morning series The Road Runner Show.The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was the most succesful and popular attempt to bring the classic Looney Tunes cartoons to Saturday morning television where they became a mainstay for more than three decades. The series presented popular animated shorts which were originally produced for the silver screen, where they would appear right before a major motion picture, but here they were introduced by new segments as well as new title cards not shown in the original theatrical versions. Also included were Road Runner cartoons originally shown on the The Road Runner Show. Many people who grew up watching this show will most likely remember it by the opening theme "This Is It" performed by Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck which was shown in black & white when it was created for The Bugs Bunny Show but then shown in color and remodified specifically for this Saturday morning series. In the late '70s The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour eventually became The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show when CBS decided to add an additional 30 minutes to each episode.moreless
  • 8
    The Perils of Penelope Pitstop

    The Perils of Penelope Pitstop

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    CBS (ended 1970)
    The Perils of Penelope Pitstop was one of the two spin-offs of Wacky Races. (The other being Dastardly & Muttley in their Flying Machines.) Every episode, The Ant Hill Mob (Clyde, Dum Dum, Softy, Yuk Yuk, Snoozy, Zippy & Pockets) must protect Penelope from 'The Hooded Claw' and his henchmen, The Bully Brothers. 'The Hooded Claw' is really Penelope's guardian (Sylvester Sneekley) in disguise and wants to wipe out Penelope so that he can have her inheritence. This is one of those cartoons in the late 60s and early 70s that were short-lived, but was one of the best spin-offs created by Hanna-Barbera.moreless
  • 9
    Frosty the Snowman

    Frosty the Snowman

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    CBS
    Frosty the Snowman is the classic tale about a snowman who comes to life when wearing a silk hat. He brings joy to the neighborhood kids until he is threatened by the warm sun as winter slips away.moreless
  • 10
    Huckleberry Hound

    Huckleberry Hound

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    CBS (ended 1962)
    Huckleberry Hound is a blue-haired Southern dog with a fondness for the song, "My Darling, Clementine", and is a jack-of-all-trades cartoon star, appearing as a scientist (trying to neutralize a gigantic, thinking potato), a Scotland Yard detective (chasing Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in Victorian London or investigating reports of a mad scientist's Frankenstein-like weiner monster in early-1900s rural England), a Foreign Legion soldier (foiling a renegade Frenchman-turned-Arab), or a modern policeman (trying to subdue an impish ape named Wee Willie). Episodes of this television series begin and end with a Huckleberry cartoon. Sandwiched between them is a cartoon with two mischievous mice, Pixie and Dixie and a cantankerous cat named Mr. Jinks. Sometimes appearing in their stead in the middle cartoon was a free-spirited Hokey Wolf or the "smarter than the average" Yogi Bear.moreless
  • 11
    Quick Draw MCGraw

    Quick Draw MCGraw

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    Quick Draw was usually depicted in his shorts (which were set in the American Old West) as a sheriff. Quick Draw was often accompanied by his deputy, a Mexican burro with a stereotypical Spanish accent named Baba Looey, who was also voiced by Butler. Quick Draw was depicted as a satire of the westerns that were popular among the American public at the time. His personality was well intentioned, but somewhat dim; oftentimes, Baba Looey would make a more accurate assessment of the problem at hand than Quick Draw would. Whenever that happened, Quick Draw would often utter his catchphrase: "Now hoooooold on thar, Baba Looey! I'll do the thinnin' [thinking] around here, and doooon't you forget it!" Quick Draw also spoke with a heavy drawl, as shown by his catchphrase. Although Quick Draw was himself a horse, this did not stop the show's producers from depicting him riding into town on a "real" horse, or, as seen in the show's opening credits, driving a stagecoach pulled by "real" horses into a town. This aspect was made light of in the 1980s made-for-television film The Good, the Bad, and Huckleberry Hound, which featured Quick Draw. In a series of episodes, Quick Draw would also assume the identity of the masked vigilante, "El Kabong" (a parody of Zorro). As El Kabong, Quick Draw would attack his foes by swooping down on a rope and hitting them on the head with an acoustic guitar, producing a distinctive kabong sound and destroying the guitar in the process. Quick Draw McGraw's supporting characters in The Quick Draw McGraw Show's two other segments were Augie Doggie and Doggie Daddy, a father-and-son pair of dogs, and Snooper and Blabber, a pair of detectives who were a cat and a mouse.moreless
  • 12
    Tennesse Tuxedo & His Tales

    Tennesse Tuxedo & His Tales

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales was created by Total Television and animated in Mexico by the Gamma studios. It was created in response to FCC chairman Newton R. Minow's charge that television was a "vast wasteland," so inserted into the cartoon frivolity was a bit of education. Tennessee, a penguin, and his walrus pal Chumley, always sought ways to better themselves by trying to do things man could do, but it would usually if not always backfire, much to the chagrin of Megapolis Zoo keeper Stanley Livingstone. Faced with a dilemma, Tennesse and Chumley would break out of the zoo and visit Phineas J. Whoopee, an inventor who with his three-dimensional blackboard would draw out and explain a variety of different things, such as the invention of the light bulb and the telephone, how cars operate, how TV cameras work, or how suits of armor were first used. Don Adams, TV's Maxwell Smart (and later Inspector Gadget) gave voice to Tennessee. Larry Storch (F Troop) was Mr. Whoopee, and Bradley Bolke as Chumley. Also included in the show were repeats from Tooter Turtle and The King & Odie. After its run on CBS, Tennessee Tuxedo & His Tales moved to ABC where it aired Sunday afternoons starting in 1966. In 1967, it was paired with The Beagles, which aired on CBS the year before.moreless
  • 13
    The Archie Show

    The Archie Show

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    CBS (ended 1969)
    Dan Goldwater's famous red-headed teen from the comics comes to animated life in this series, via the Filmation cartoon studio. Some graphic liberties are taken, but for the most part, it was quite faithful to the comics.

    Two Archie cartoons are featured (in which Jughead gains a pet, a big, white sheepdog named Hot Dog). In between was a dance instruction segment (featuring movements no human could do without sustaining a traumatizing injury) followed by a song by the Archies. The show would beget a hit single in 1968, "Bang Shang-A-Lang," released by musical supervisor Don Kirschner on his self-labeled record company. Two bumpers featuring blackouts starring Jughead were also featured.

    The Archie show was so popular the first year that it would spawn a number of new versions, including The Archie Comedy Hour, Archie's Funhouse, Archie's TV Funnies and U.S. Of Archie.moreless
  • 14
    Video Village Junior

    Video Village Junior

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    CBS (ended 1962)
    Video Village Junior was the Saturday morning kiddie version of the popular game show for adults. As in the daytime version, two players (ages 6 to 10), each of them chaperoned by a second (in this case, a parent or other family member), competed to reach the end of a large on-stage game board before his/her opponent did. The game itself was laid out like a village (hence the name, Video Village Junior), with each player needing to navigate three streets to win. Each player's partner, in turn, rolled a "Chuck-A-Luck" cage, which contained a large die. After the "town crier" (announcer Williams) called out the roll, the player advanced that many steps. While some spaces went without consequence, there were plenty of spaces on the board which had special rules. Some were good (Advance Three Spaces and $50 Treasure were examples), while others weren't (e.g., Lose-A-Turn and Go to Jail, the latter requiring the player to answer a question to be "bailed out"); others required the player to complete a stunt to win cash (an amount like $50) or a small prize. On occasion, a player landing on an "Ask the Council" space was posed a simple open-ended question. If the "council" (i.e., the audience) liked the answer, the player kept his spot on the board plus won a small cash prize. Both contestants kept what they won, with all cash converted into a savings bond, which matured on their 18th birthday. And, the player who reached the Finish Line first won a large prize (worth about $1,000). moreless
  • 15
    Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids

    Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids

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    CBS (ended 1984)
    Live action bumpers featuring Bill Cosby were set around animated episodes of Fat Albert and The Cosby Kids, a series about a group of urban adolescents growing up in a Philadelphia neighborhood. The show was based on Cosby's '60s stand up comedy monologues about his childhood. The episodes revolved around the daily life lessons learned by Albert and his friends. Topics ranged from social issues to personal introspection and were blended with humor and music. Among the many great characters that inhabited Fat Albert's world were Rudy, Mushmouth, Donald, Bill, Weird Harold and Russell. In 1979 the show was re-titled The New Fat Albert Show and featured a new segment called The Brown Hornet, a send-up of superhero cartoons starring a larger-than-life African-American crime fighter in outer space. In 1984, the show was syndicated and renamed The Adventures of Fat Albert and the Cosby kids. It ended the same year. Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids enjoyed one of the longest careers in Saturday morning cartoon history. There are plans to release the whole series on DVD over the course of 2005. Theme song "Hey, hey, hey! It's Fat Albert!" And I'm gonna sing a song for you And Bill's gonna show you a thing or two You'll have some fun now with me and all the gang Learning from each other While we do our thing Nah, nah, nah -- gonna have a good time (hey, hey, hey!) Nah, nah, nah -- gonna have a good time "This is Bill Cosby coming atcha with music and fun And if you're not careful, you may learn something before it's done! (1984 version: So get ready) Hey, hey, hey!" Nah, nah, nah -- gonna have a good time Nah, nah, nah -- gonna have a good time Nah, nah, nah -- gonna have a good timemoreless
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