• 1
    CBS Evening News

    CBS Evening News

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    CBS
    The CBS Evening News is a TV institution, having some of the most well-known journalists in the world anchor it through its many decades on the air. The show was at it's peak when it was hosted by the iconic Walter Cronkite from 1962 to 1981. Dan Rather took over and was the anchor until 2006.

    The show is currently anchored by Katie Couric, who takes over from Bob Schieffer. The half hour show covers both international and domestic news.moreless
  • 2
    The Young and the Restless

    The Young and the Restless

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    CBS
    The Young and the Restless revolves around the rivalries, romances, hopes and fears of the residents of the fictional Midwestern metropolis, Genoa City. The lives and loves of a wide variety of characters mingle through the generations, dominated by the Newman, Abbott and Winters families. When the show premiered in 1973, it revolutionized the daytime drama. It continues to set the standard with strong characters, socially conscious storylines, romance and sensuality. The Young and the Restless premiered on March 26, 1973, and was originally a 30 minute show. It was not until January 1980 that the show had become a one hour show like it is today. The show has ran for years at 12:30 PM on the east coast, and at 11:00 AM on the west coast. Over the years, many things have happened, and there have been many twisted story lines, many stolen husbands, and many people dead. It has also featured character cross-overs with another CBS soap, The Bold and the Beautiful. These include the psychotic Sheila Carter, who began on The Young and the Restless and shown her more psychotic side on The Bold and the Beautiful. The same goes for Lauren Fenmore, who also can be seen on The Bold and the Beautiful occasionally. The Young and the Restless is not like other soaps which convey a surreal way of life. This show, however, is based on the lives of people in a small town called Genoa City, Wisconsin, where the money is plentiful and so are the women. Many times, we wish that we could live in that small, mid-western town, just to see how life would really be like. Sometimes, we put our own problems aside and worry about what will happen next on the show. However, we're very fortunate not to have a world like they do on any soap! The theme song was written by Barry DeVorzon and Perry Botkin, and originally entitled Cotton's Theme from the film Bless the Beasts, but later became known as Nadia's Theme.moreless
  • 3
    The Price is Right

    The Price is Right

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    CBS
    The Price Is Right has long been a staple of daytime and nighttime television. It has seen five incarnations: the 1956-1965 daytime version hosted by Bill Cullen on NBC and ABC, the 1972-1980 nighttime version hosted by Dennis James and Bob Barker, the 1985 nighttime version hosted by Tom Kennedy, the 1994-1995 nighttime version hosted by Doug Davidson, and the current daytime version hosted by Barker and Drew Carey. This guide covers the current daytime version. The object of The Price Is Right is to correctly guess the retail prices of items, without going over, to either win the items themselves or other prizes. At the beginning of each show, the announcer calls out the names of four contestants, imploring each to "come on down!" A prize is announced for which each contestant (one at a time) makes a bid (called the One Bid). After the host announces the actual retail price, the contestant who bid closest without going over is invited on stage to play a pricing game for a larger prize. If a contestant's bid is exactly correct, he/she wins a $500 bonus (on the Armed Forces and $1,000,000 Spectacular Specials, the bonus for an exact bid is $1000). Frequently, during Barker's tenure as host, an animal would be brought out on stage by one of the models during the One Bid prize plugs. Barker would then comment that the pet was available for adoption at an area animal shelter. He also encouraged viewers to visit their local humane society. Pricing game prizes often include cars, trips, rooms of furniture, cash, and various other items. Furs were also given away during the early years, but this practice was dropped per Barker's wishes due to his involvement with animal-rights issues. The episodes that offer furs as prizes will likely never be seen again as Barker continues to fight against their re-airing. There were over 100 total individual pricing games with 72 in the current rotation. Some games involved pricing grocery or small, everyday items. Others involved chance, deduction, skill and/or patience. Many games quickly became very popular. Contestants chomp at the bit to play such entries as Plinko, Ten Chances, Cliff Hangers, Any Number, Grocery Game, Range Game, Race Game, and many others. While each of the pricing games uses only one player, there was one game (known by fans as Bullseye 2) which used two players. This game, which was retired during the first season, had the players alternating bids on a car or boat, and the first to guess the price exactly won. The second contestant was determined by immediately playing another One Bid. Some pricing games have been retired. The reasons include frequent mechanical malfunctions, complicated rules, low odds of winning, and negative responses from viewers. Pictures, audio files, and videos of most of the retired pricing games can be seen on various fan pages on the World Wide Web. After each pricing game is played (except for the final game of the day), one more contestant is called from the audience to "come on down," and another One Bid item is shown for another chance to play a pricing game. Until the fourth season, the two contestants with the highest winnings after all three pricing games had been played went to the Showcase round. Two showcases (prize packages worth several thousand dollars) are shown, one at a time. After the first showcase is revealed, the top winning contestant has the choice to bid on the showcase or pass it to his/her opponent and force him/her to bid. The contestant coming closest to the actual retail price of his/her own showcase without going over wins their showcase. Originally, the contestant could win only his/her showcase. Early in the show's run, a stipulation was added stating that if a contestant's bid came within $100 of his/her showcase's actual retail price, they'd win everything in both showcases. In 1998, the stipulation was modified, and, now, winning contestants who are $250 or less away from the actual retail price of their showcase win both showcases. For the week of November 3-7, 1975 the show expanded from 30 to 60 minutes, following a successful week of experimental hour-long shows the week of September 8-12. A new round called the Showcase Showdown was added. After three contestants have played their pricing games, each has the chance to spin a large wheel called "The Big Wheel." The order of spinning is determined by each contestant's winnings with the player having won the least going first and the player having won the most going last. The Big Wheel contains 20 spaces with numbers in increments of five cents (not in order). Each contestant gets up to two spins in an attempt to get as close to $1.00 without going over. If he/she does not have $1.00 after the first spin, the contestant can choose to spin again to get closer to $1.00 or stop at their current score with the hope that the other contestants will either score lower or go over $1.00. Getting $1.00 exactly earns the contestant a $1000 bonus. Going over $1.00 automatically disqualifies the contestant from going any further. A one-spin spin-off is held if there is a tie between two or all three contestants. If the first two contestants go over $1.00, the third player automatically advances to the Showcase but is still entitled to one spin. After the first Showcase Showdown of each show, three more pricing games are played, followed by the second Showcase Showdown. When the Showcase Showdown was first introduced, during the experimental hour-long week, the wheel spun sideways, and there was no $1000 bonus. When the hour-long show became permanent on November 3, 1975, the $1000 bonus was added, and the current wheel debuted. Beginning in June, 1978, contestants scoring $1.00 were now allowed to spin again in an attempt to win an additional $5000 for hitting one of the green sections above or below the $1.00 space (five and 15 cents) or $10,000 for hitting the $1.00 space. During the prime time specials that first aired in 2002, contestants that hit $1.00 during the bonus spin win $100,000. During the $1,000,000 Spectacular specials airing in 2003, this bonus was increased to one million dollars. The winners of each Showcase Showdown (two per show) advance to the Showcase round. Numerous other changes have taken place through the years, and several prime time specials have aired. The Price Is Right's 5000th episode aired in March, 1998 at which time the studio at CBS's Television City where the show is shot was renamed the Bob Barker Studio. Also, the set and some of the pricing game boards went through numerous minor changes due to inflation or to give it a modern look. The bloopers that have occurred on The Price is Right are among the most celebrated in television history. In early 1976, a woman called to Contestant's Row was in the ladies' room. Her husband had to leave the studio to tell her she'd been called. At the beginning of an episode early in the sixth season, a woman's tube top slipped down as she was running toward Contestant's Row. Also during that season, a woman fainted when she learned she won her showcase ($11,000 in prizes). Other bloopers include cars with malfunctioning brakes and other prizes which give way at the wrong time. Usually, one of the models is often a victim of these unfortunate mishaps (such as Janice Pennington and Rachel Reynolds hitting the wall with the car they are revealing for the Lucky $even pricing game). Many pricing games have malfunctioned at one time or another. Many contestants spinning the Big Wheel spin it so hard that they fall to the floor. There have been a fair share of contestants who claim to or actually don't understand how to play a given game. The most notable is the Check Game (where the contestant writes in an amount that when added to the actual retail price of a prize must total between $5000 and $6000. In addition, one game was victimized by a cheater on the April 4, 2005 playing of Flip Flop (where a contestant is presented a string of two sets of two numbers, representing an incorrect price, and must correct one or both sets to win a prize). The contestant, after receiving input from the audience, pressed the reveal button without making any changes. Barker awarded the contestant the prize anyway, although many fans believe the player should have been disqualified. Some contestants eventually became celebrities - Vanna White in particular. She was called to "come on down" in June, 1980, but did not get out of Contestant's Row. Other future stars include Rick Schroeder and Linda Cardellini. Main Title Theme Song "The Price Is Right Theme" by Edd Kalehoff CBS Broadcast History September 4, 1972 - March 23, 1973 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM March 26, 1973 - August 15, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM August 15, 1975 - November 28, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM November 3, 1975 - March 25, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM 11:00 AM March 28, 1977 - November 4, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30AM - 11:30 AM November 7, 1977 - December 16, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM December 19, 1977 - April 20, 1979 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM April 23, 1979 -present .... Monday - Friday at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Emmy Awards Nominations Outstanding Host in a Game Show or Audience Participation Show 1975 - Bob Barker Outstanding Game Show Host 1979 - Bob Barker 1982 - Bob Barker (winner) 1985 - Bob Barker 1986 - Bob Barker 1987 - Bob Barker (winner) 1990 - Bob Barker (winner) 1991 - Bob Barker (winner) 1992 - Bob Barker (winner) 1993 - Bob Barker 1994 - Bob Barker (winner) 1995 - Bob Barker (winner) 1996 - Bob Barker (winner) 2000 - Bob Barker (winner) 2002 - Bob Barker (winner) 2003 - Bob Barker 2004 - Bob Barker (winner) 2005 - Bob Barker 2007 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show Host/Hostess 1984 - Bob Barker (winner) 1988 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show 1976 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 (winner) 1989 1990 1992 1993 1994 1995 Outstanding Game/Audience Participation Show 2002 2003 2004 (winner) 2005 2007 (winner) 2008 Outstanding Technical Direction/Camera/Video for a Miniseries or a Special 1997 - The Price Is Right 25th Anniversary Primetime Specialmoreless
  • 4
    Gunsmoke

    Gunsmoke

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    CBS (ended 1975)

    Dodge City, known as the Sodom and Gomorrah of the plains, is a typical frontier city of the late 1800s with typical problems ranging from rumored Indian raids to bank and stage robberies, cattle rustling, and family feuds. All of these must be dealt with within the law and that task falls to Matt Dillon, US Marshal (James Arness).

    Dillon is a man who prefers the use of logic over the use of the gun but the nature of the people passing through Dodge doesn't always leave him that choice. Aided by various assistants and deputies over the years (played by Dennis Weaver, Burt Reynolds, and Ken Curtis), he does his best to keep the lawless element out of his town and his territory. Matt often solves his crimes through keen observation and deduction, an innovative approach for the times.

    Crucial information about cases is often provided by his beautiful companion, Long Branch owner Kitty Russell(Amanda Blake), while they drink beer or whiskey in her establishment. Matt also often exchanges banter or bounces his theories off of the crusty town doctor, Galen Adams (Milburn Stone).moreless
  • 5
    60 Minutes

    60 Minutes

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    CBS
    60 Minutes has been on the air since 1968, beginning on a Tuesday, but spending most of its time on Sundays, where it remains today. This popular news magazine provides both hard hitting investigations, interviews and features, along with people in the news and current events.

    60 Minutes has set unprecedented records in the Nielsen's ratings with a number 1 rating, five times, making it among the most successful t.v. programs in all of television history. This series has won more Emmy awards than any other news program and in 2003, Don Hewitt, the creator (back in 1968), was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Emmy, along with the 60 Minute correspondents. For the 2009 season, correspondents include Steve Kroft, Lesley Stahl, Bob Simon, Scott Pelley, Morley Safer, Katie Couric, Byron Pitts, Lara Logan, Charlie Rose, Anderson Cooper, and Andy Rooney. Added to the 11 Peabody awards, this phenomenally long-lived series has collected 78 awards up to the 2005 season and remains among the viewers top choice for news magazine features.moreless
  • 6
    Perry Mason

    Perry Mason

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    There are few actors so closely tied to a persona than Raymond Burr as Perry Mason. This long-running series was built upon Erle Stanley Gardner´s many novels about a brilliant defense lawyer and his staff, that solved many a crime with surprise witnesses and stern cross-examinations. It was the first mystery series to feature chalk or tape outlines to mark the spots where bodies were found. Filmed almost exclusively in the Los Angeles area, Raymond Burr had Gardner's seal of approval in the role. The cases were usually won by way of pivotal confessions of witnesses, solicited by Perry Mason (Burr's) surgeon-like examination or with last-minute, key evidence brought into the courtroom by private investigator Paul Drake (William Hopper). Della Street (Barbara Hale), Perry´s faithful secretary, was always at Perry's side in the courtroom where hapless Hamilton Burger (William Tallman) was the Los Angeles District Attorney who never seemed to win. As to the myth that Perry Mason never lost, there were two episodes where it did occur... but you'll have to watch to find out. The show was revived in 1973-74, with other actors in the familiar roles (Monte Markham as Mason), and then again with the some of the original cast, in a string of feature length TV films from 1985 until Raymond Burr´s death in 1993.moreless
  • 7
    The Andy Griffith Show

    The Andy Griffith Show

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    CBS (ended 1968)
    The Andy Griffith Show is definitely a TV classic. It ran from 1960 to 1968, producing 249 episodes.

    The main character, Andy (Andy Griffith), was a widowed father of the polite little boy named Opie (Ron Howard) and is a sheriff, who works with nervous and very suspecting Barney Fife (Don Knotts). They all live in the nice southern town of Mayberry. But, Mayberry can get a little dangerous when the town drunk Otis Campbell (Hal Smith) is on the loose. Thelma Lou (Betty Lynn) is Barney's sweetheart, although Andy had to help him describe his feelings to her. Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier) is the very loving and caring, but stern housekeeper for Andy and Opie. Gomer Pyle (Jim Nabors) is the bone-head, thoughtless, but humorous character. He is a gas attendant. Goober Pyle (George Lindsey) is Gomer Pyle's cousin. They are very alike, you could say, and arrives in Mayberry when Gomer decides to enlist in the United States Marine Core. The show had two spin-offs: Gomer Pyle U.S.M.C. and Mayberry R.F.D.

    Top 20 Ratings: 1960-1961 - #4 1961-1962 - #7 1962-1963 - #6 1963-1964 - #5 1964-1965 - #4 1965-1966 - #6 1966-1967 - #3 1967-1968 - #1

    Awards for The Andy Griffith Show: Don Knotts won five Emmy Awards for Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Comedy: 1961, 1962, 1963, 1966, and 1967.

    Frances Bavier won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy in 1967.moreless
  • 8
    Knots Landing

    Knots Landing

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    CBS (ended 1993)
    Hoping to ride the crest of its success with Dallas, CBS spun off this series featuring the black sheep of the Ewing Family, Gary Ewing. Gary, a reformed alcoholic remarried his wife, Valene, and moved to the Southern California community of Knots Landing. Originally, the series focused on the four married couples who resided in the cul-de-sac of Seaview Circle in the quiet beach town of Knots Landing.

    In addition to being neighbors, their lives intertwined in other ways. Gary worked for Sid Fairgate, owner of Knots Landing Motors, the local c car dealership. Sid and his wife Karen Fairgate had three teenage children: Eric Fairgate, Michael Fairgate, and Diana Fairgate. The other two couples on the cul-de-sac were young recording executive Kenny Ward and his attractive wife, Ginger, and Richard and Laura Avery. Richard was an obnoxious, aggresive, unprincipled attorney who was always lusting after other women and resented Laura's success selling real estate.

    In 1980, Sid's recently divorced sister, Abby Cunningham, moved onto the cul-de-sac with her two kids, Brian and Olivia Cunningham, and immediately began undermining the relationships of her married neighbors, spreading gossip about affairs, and setting her own sights on Richard Avery. Gary, a member of Alcoholics Anonymous, sponsored a new member, Earl Trent, and ended up having an affair with Judy, Earl's passionate wife.

    In the fall of 1981, Sid Fairgate was paralyzed and later died as a result of an auto accident, leaving Karen to run KL Motors with Abby and Gary. Val's mother, Lilimae Clements, came to live with Val to resolve the pain and suffering that she had caused her over the years. Abby started having her sights on Gary, while Val wrote a novel, "Capricorn Crude", that was a thinly disguised chronicle of the manipulations of the Ewing family.

    In 1982-1983, Gary eventually divorced Val, married Abby, and inherited part of Jock Ewing's fortune. Val became quite a celebrity with her book and began dating reporter Ben Gibson. Another plot involved Chip Roberts, who worked for Val's press agent and who was simultaneously having affairs with Diana and Ciji Dunne, a pretty singer. When Ciji got pregnant, Chip killed her, but because of circumstantial evidence, Gary was indicted for the crime. Diana and Chip skipped town together; later she returned alone and moved in with Abby. In the next season, Chip was subsequently caught and convicted of Ciji's murder, escaped from prison, and died in a freak accident at Gary's ranch where he was hiding out with Diana. Meanwhile, Richard's marriage and career were falling apart. Laura wanted to leave him but held off due to her pregnancy and his nervous breakdown. Richard's attempt to open a estaurant, "Daniel", financed by Gary and Abby, was unsuccessful and his philandering with Abby finally caused Laura to divorce him.

    In the 1983-1984 season, Abby continued to build her power base. She had part of KL Motors, was married into Gary Ewing Enterprises, was heavily into the Lotus Point real estate development, and was having another affair- this one with powerful underworld-connected State Senator Gregory Sumner. Sumner was an old friend of Attorney Mack MacKenzie (Karen's new husband), and offered him a job as crime commissioner. When Sumner realized that Mack could be a serious roadblock to his own schemes, he sought to dicredit Mack. Gary began to have an affair with Cathy Geary, who looked exactly like Ciji adn was an excellent singer as well. She was also a convict who was pursued by her ex-husband, Ray. When all cleared up, Cathy lived a normal yet formidible life in Knots Landing.

    The 1984-1985 season brought problems for three of Knots Landing's leading women. Karen was shot by a bullet meant for Gary, and was paralyzed for a period; Abby was taken hostage by St. Claire, whow as eventually killed by Sumner; and Val gave birth to twins (by ex, Gary). The babies were stolen from the hospital and sold in a black market scheme that took an entire season to unravel. Sen. Sumner continued his political machinations, pressuring Mack to drop his investigation of unscrupulous tycoon Paul Galveston (Sumner's father) and trying to force Gary out of the Empire Valley development project. The Senator also made a play for Laura and they were married. Handsome Joshua Rush (son of Lilimae, half brother of Val), entered the scene as a preacher turned successful local TV personality. He wooed Cathy and even proposed to her on the air. Eventually they got married and there were problems from the start.

    In the 1985-1986 season, Cathy was featured regularly on Joshua's show and was receiving more fan mail than Joshua. Joshua had a mental breakdown and was eventually fired from his show. He tried to kill Cathy, but ended up dead himself. Also in this season, young Olivia had a bout with drugs due to all of the stress placed on her by Abby. Val had a rocky marriage to Ben, which ended up with Cathy flirting with him. There were more dirty doings at the Empire Valley project, and Abby's latest trick was Peter Hollinger, an up-and-coming politico who claimed to be Sumner's brother. The season ended with Mack's and Anne Matheson's (who we'll meet in the next season) illegitiate daughter Paige Matheson came to town and Karen getting kidnapped.

    Politics was a major focus in 1986-1987, as Gary ran against Peter and for the Senate and lost both the campaign and his wife Abby to his opponent. This was when Gary took up with Jill Bennett, Peter's sister. Val, on the other hand, was trying to make her marriage to Ben work. When it didn't, Ben left for South America. Karen's kidnapper was Phil Harbet, who wanted to get even with Mack. Sexy, young Paige was causing problems for all. Paige began having affairs with Michael Fairgate and Peter. There was also a continuing story about Olivia's drug problem. Peter also tried to seduce Olivia, before he met a violent end at the end of the season.

    When the 1987-1988 season began, there was a serious investigation of Peter's murder. Abby confessed to cover for her daughter Olivia. Soon after, it was dicovered that Paige did it, but Peter's death was ruled as an accident. Abby had by this time divorced Gary and walked away with $2 million in the settlement. She had also rekindles a long-ago romance with Charles Scott and had plans to marry him, but that was scraped totally. Laura had a baby named Meg and she died of a brain tumor. She was mourned in a two-part episode. With her death, Greg gave Meg to Karen and Mack so they can be her legally adopted parents. Laura's home on the cul-de-sac was taken by a black couple Frank and Patricia Williams and their daughter Julie. They were all hiding in the Witness Protection Program to keep safe from a hitman who was out to get them. The other main story of the season was Gary, Abby, and Karen getting involved in the Lotus Point luxury resort development with shady Manny Vasquez. Manny turned out to be an international drug lord who used the marina for his shipments. Gary continued his affair with pesky Jill, who wanted Gary all to herself. She was fed up with Val getting in the way and tried to do something about it. First, she wrote Val letters to make it look like they were coming from Ben, and she tried to kill Val by making her swallow a handful of sleeping pills and make it look like Val killed herself in the season finale cliffhanger.

    In the 1988-1989 season premiere, Manny was killed by his nephew Harold Dyer, Olivia's love interest, in a kidnapping shoot-out in Mexico. Val survived but Jill continued to plot against her. When everyone found out about what she did to Val, she took revenge by bounding and gagging herself, hopping into Gary's trunk of his car, and died there so he can be accused of her murder! Other main stories of this season included Abby's plot to swindle her partners out of Lotus Point and illegally drill for oil, using the phony "Murakame Cooperation" as a front; several murders resulting from the cover-up; Greg's relationship with the younger Paige; his marriage of convenience to Abby as he vainly tried to restart his political career with the help of PR man Ted Melcher; and a computer theft story involving Michael, Ellen, and Johnny. As the season closed, Abby narrowly avoided exposure for her illegal dealings, was appointed to the U.S. Trade Representative job that Greg had been angling for and left for Japan.

    In 1989-1990, dirty deals were afoot. Ted was accused of murder in the Lotus Point scandal and left for Japan, close on Abby's heels. Pension fund fraud at Oakman Industries (Greg's company) grew into a series of murders involving crooked cop Tom Ryan and investigator Mack, Greg's estranged daughter Mary Frances (killed by her boyfriend), and Greg himself, who was shot and then poisoned in the hospital with tainted pesticides from his own company. Things were certainly looking up for Karen when she began a TV talk show named "Open Mike", only to be undercut by producer Dianne and stalked by two maniacal fans, one of whom turned out to be producer Jeff. Eric came back to town and had constant fights with Michael over his wife Linda Fairgate. Tom Ryan had fell in love with Paige and proposed to her. Anne Matheson returned and tried to steal her daughter Paige's inheritance, and poor Val married charming but violent Danny Waleska (whom we met in the last season). Danny had a serious record during his tenure on the show: He raped his former wife Amanda, terrorized the twins Bobby and Betsy, and ran over Pat Williams while drunk.

    In 1990-1991, Tom left Paige at the altar and Val and Gary were slowly getting back together again. Greg, dying from toxic poisoning, was saved by a liver transplant and took up with Paige again. Danny tried to kill Gary and was killed himself by falling in the Williams' swimming pool while tring to rape Julie. Paige's loser mother Anne tried raising cash by sending herself blackmail notes and asking a former lover for the payoff money, leading to an affair with shady Nick Schillace (aka Dimitri Pappas); the plan didn't work and by the end of the season Anne was homeless and on the streets. Greg's estranged sister Claudia Whittaker showed up with her daughter Kate Whittaker and rejected ex-con son Steve Brewer. Good guy Mack got in trouble trying to protect abused teenager Jason Lochner from his violent father Dick. Widower Frank had problems with his wayward daughter Julie. The season ended with Gary and Val suddenly getting remarried.

    The 1991-1992 season saw Gary teaming up with Joseph Barringer and others in Tidal Energy, a grandiose plan to harness the ocean tides as an energy source. It failed, and Gary lost so much money that he had to sell his beloved ranch. Val began researching a book on Greg Sumner, to the discomfort of many. Linda was murdered and this led to long search for Brian Johnston, who terrorized a number of characters. Homeless Anne worked her way off the streets by posing nude for a men's magazine and eventually launched a successful radio career. Pierce Lawton, another casualty in the Tidal Energy scheme, stalked Greg and other characters in revenge, especially Paige. At the end of the season, Greg startled everyone by giving up the Sumner Group and retiring to a cabin in Montana.

    As the 1992-1993 season began, Gary searched desperately for Val (Joan Van Ark had left the show at this time), who had disappeared while researching Sumner's book. Assuming that she is dead, Gary found solace in Kate's arms. After Greg's departure, the Sumner Group divided up among Claudia, Paige, and Meg. Greg returned from the wood (pursued by Ann, who was trying to use the old false-pregnancy trick to get him to marry her) and plotted to gain control. Another story had Mary Robeson trying to take little Meg away from Mack and Karen. This so unhinged good-guy Mack that he attempted to frame Mary for extortion, then was accused of her murder. As the series ended, a mysterious and murderous man named Nigel Treadwell was trying to wrest control of the Sumner Group. He tried to shoot Greg (unbeknownst to him that Greg was saved by a bullet proof vest he wore under his clothes), and tried to blow up his plane with a hidden bomb.

    The two-hour series finale, which aired May 13, 1993, featured familiar faces that returned to say farewell to the series that had outlasted all the other 1980s soaps. Greg finds out about the bomb and, with the help of Tom and Paige, defuses it at the last second. Val, who had been captured by Treadwell, came back to Knots Landing and into the comfort of Gary, Karen and Mack. Treadwell had also taken Vanessa Hunt as a hostage and his cohort in his power was ABBY! It all ended when Vanessa killed Treadwell when he tried to kill Greg, and Val was free to go back to her old life again. As the show closed, Claudia, Nick and Anne left for Monaco and Abby bought her house on the cul-de-sac. Seeing her for the first time in many years, Val and Karen grabbed their husbands and walked away, thinking that Abby probably hasn't changed!

    To tie up Knots Landing, The cast came back together for a two-part two night reunion movie called "Back to the Cul-De-Sac", which shows how the cast has changed since the final episode. It was a real gathering of sort that really brought an end to an era of primetime soap operas that stood the test of time.

    Spinoff of: Dallas

    First Telecast: December 27, 1979 Last Telecast: May 13, 1993

    Episodes: 344 Color Episodes

    CBS Broadcast History:

    December 27, 1979- March 27, 1980----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    June 5, 1980- March 26, 1981----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    June 4, 1981- March 11, 1982----Thursdays----9:00-10:00 P.M.
    March 25, 1982- March 31, 1983----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    June 3, 1983- June 26, 1986----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    September 18, 1986- November 6, 1986----Thursdays----9:00-10:00 P.M.
    November 13, 1986- March 11, 1993----Thursdays----10:00-11:00 P.M.
    May 13, 1993----Thursday----9:00-11:00 P.M.


    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better)

    #30 in the 1979- 1980 Season #28 in the 1980- 1981 Season #20 in the 1982- 1983 Season #11 in the 1983- 1984 Season #9 in the 1984- 1985 Season #17 in the 1985- 1986 Season #26 in the 1986- 1987 Season #27 in the 1988- 1989 Seasonmoreless
  • 9
    Hee-Haw

    Hee-Haw

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    CBS (ended 1992)
    Welcome to Kornfield Kounty & HEE HAW! SA-LUTE! Hee Haw, a country version of Rowan and Martin's Laugh In, was a staple of syndicated television for more than 20 years. It began as a weekly series on CBS in 1969, but the network canceled it in 1971 as part of an attempt to cleanse its schedule of rural-flavored shows (other casualties included The Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres). While much of the shows humor came from its comedy skits and rural jokes, the meat of the show was its country music. Two or three stars – including current superstars and up-and-coming acts, as well as bluegrass and country gospel singers – guested each week. Sometimes, they also participated in the fun. And what do we mean by "fun?" A sampling from a typical episode includes: Comedy Skits: The Cornfield Jokes, Pickin' and Grinnin', Archie's Barbershop, Empty Arms Hotel, KORN Radio, Lulu's Truck Stop, Minnie's School, The Naggers (Gordie Tapp & Roni Stoneman) and much more. The cast also frequently asked Grandpa Jones, "What's For Supper?" And then, there was the comedic Burma-Shave style signs (sometimes used as bumpers between skits or as an outro to a commercial). Song Skits: "Pfft, You Was Gone," "Gloom, Despair and Agony on Me," "Repeating Gossip," "Hee-Haw's All Jug Band" and more. On occasion, serious music segments were featured, such as a singer-songwriter segment (which featured an artist singing one of his biggest hits and then performing a song he wrote that became a hit for someone else). The final segment of each show featured the Hee Haw Gospel Quartet – originally, hosts Owens and Clark, along with Grandpa Jones and Kenny Price – singing a gospel song. Virtually every major country superstar appeared on Hee Haw at one time or another – Charley Pride, George Jones, Conway Twitty, Sonny James, Ernest Tubb, Charlie Rich, Ray Price, Hank Williams Jr., Johnny Cash, Roy Acuff, Barbara Mandrell, Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, Loretta Lynn, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, the Statler Brothers, Alabama, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Travis Tritt, Vince Gill ... and many more. But not all the guests on the show were from country music. Frequently, there were singers from other genres who became popular with country audiences, plus actors and comedians appeared as well. One of the most memorable segments aired in early 1978, when Elvis Presley's father, Vernon Presley, delivered a tribute to his then-recently deceased son. Emotional tributes have also been offered for cast members who had passed away during the series' run. For the 1991-1992 season, the gang left Kornfield Kounty and headed to the city, adopting an urban theme – which included a mall and nightclub – and inviting more pop-oriented country performers in an attempt to draw a younger, more urban audience. The move was none too popular (to put it mildly) with the show's longtime viewers, who saw it as abandoning the traditional country focus that had made the show popular for so long. The revamped format lasted one season. During the 1992-1993 season, Clark hosted a series which featured clips from classic Hee Haw shows, along with new footage. The show was titled Hee Haw Silver. Hee Haw reruns currently air at 8pm Sunday nights, with a second episode airing 4:30pm on Saturday on RFD-TV.moreless
  • 10
    M*A*S*H

    M*A*S*H

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    CBS (ended 1983)
    M*A*S*H was a true ensemble series. Whilst characters such as Kellye, Igor, Rizzo, Goldman and Ginger are listed where they appear as specific characters central to the plot, they also appeared regularly as non-speaking cast members. This is also true of many of the nurses, corpsmen, orderlies and drivers listed as guest stars. Based on the 1968 novel by Richard Hooker and the 1970 20th Century-Fox movie of the same name, M*A*S*H aired on CBS from September 17, 1972 to February 26th, 1983 for 251 episodes, and has become one of the most celebrated television series in the history of the medium. During its initial season, however, M*A*S*H was in danger of being canceled due to low ratings. The show reached the top ten program list the following year, and never fell out of the top twenty rated programs during the remainder of its run. The final episode of M*A*S*H was a two and one half hour special that attracted the largest audience to ever view a single television program episode. In many ways the series set the standard for some of the best programming to appear later. The show used multiple plot lines in a half-hour episodes, usually with at least one story in the comedic vein and another dramatic. Some later versions of this form, e.g. Hooperman (ABC 1987-1989) and The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd (NBC 1987-1989), would be known as the dramady, half-hour programs incorporating elements of both comedy and drama. Other comedies would forgo the more serious aspects of M*A*S*H, but maintain its focus on character and motive. And some dramatic programming, such as St. Elsewhere and Moonlighting would draw on the mixture of elements to distinguish themselves from more conventional television. M*A*S*H was set in Uijeongbu, South Korea, north of Seoul, during the Korean War. The series focused on the group of doctors and nurses whose job was to heal the wounded who arrived at this "Mobile Army Surgical Hospital" by helicopter, ambulance or bus. The hospital compound was isolated from the rest of the world. One road ran through the camp; a mountain blocked one perimeter and a minefield the other. Here the wounded were patched up and sent home--or back to the front. Here, too, the loyal audience came to know and respond to an exceptional ensemble cast of characters. The original cast assumed roles created in Altman's movie. The protagonists were Dr. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce(Alan Alda) and Dr. "Trapper" John McIntyre (Wayne Rogers). Pierce and McIntyre were excellent surgeons who preferred to chase female nurses and drink homemade gin to operating and who had little, if any use for military discipline or authority. As a result, they often ran afoul of two other medical officers, staunch military types, Dr. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) and Senior Nurse, Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit). The camp commander, Lt. Col. Henry Blake (McLean Stevenson), was a genial bumbler whose energies were often directed toward preventing Burns and Houlihan from court martialing Pierce and McIntyre. The camp was actually run by Corporal Walter "Radar" O'Reilly (Gary Burghoff), the company clerk who could spontaneously finish Blake's unspoken sentences and hear incoming helicopters before they were audible to other human ears. Other regulars were Corporal Max Klinger (Jamie Farr) who, in the early seasons, usually dressed in women's clothing in an ongoing attempt to secure a medical (mental) discharge, and Father Francis Mulcahy (William Christopher), the kindly camp priest who looked out for an orphanage. In the course of its eleven years the series experienced many cast changes. McIntyre was "discharged" after the 1974-75 season because of a contract dispute between the producers and Rogers. He was replaced by Dr. B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell), a clean cut family man quite different from Pierce's lecherous doctor. Frank Burns was given a psychiatric discharge in the beginning of the 1977-78 season and was replaced by Dr. Charles Emerson Winchester (David Ogden Stiers), a Boston blue blood who disdained the condition of the camp and tent mates Pierce and Hunnicutt. O'Reilly's departure at the beginning of the 1979-80 season was explained by the death of his fictional uncle, and Klinger took over the company clerk position. Perhaps the most significant change for the group occurred with the leave-taking of Henry Blake. His exit was written into the series in tragic fashion. As his plane was flying home over the Sea of Japan it was shot down and the character killed. Despite the "realism" of this narrative development, public sentiment toward the event was so negative that the producers promised never to have another character depart the same way. Colonel Sherman Potter (Harry Morgan), a doctor with a regular Army experience in the cavalry, replaced Blake as camp commander and became more both more complex and more involved with the other characters than Blake had been. Though the series was set in Korea, M*A*S*H, both the movie and the series, was initially developed as a critique of the Vietnam War. As that war dragged toward conclusion, however, the series focused more on characters than situations--a major development for situation comedy. Characters were given room to learn from their mistakes, to adapt and change. Houlihan became less the rigid military nurse and more a friend to both her subordinates and the doctors. Pierce changed from a gin-guzzling skirt chaser to a more "enlightened" male who cares about women and their issues, a reflection of Alda himself. O'Reilly outgrew his youthful innocence, and Klinger gave up his skirts and wedding dresses to assume more authority. This focus on character rather than character type set M*A*S*H apart from other comedies of the day and the style of the show departed from the norm in many other ways as well, both in terms of its style and its mode of production. While most other contemporary sitcoms took place indoors and were largely produced on videotape in front of a live audience, M*A*S*H was shot on film on location in Southern California, as well as in a closed studio set (studio #9 at 20th Century Fox). Outdoor shooting at times presented problems. While shooting the final episode, for example, forest fires destroyed the set, causing a delay in filming. The series also made innovative uses of the laugh track. In early seasons, the laugh track was employed during the entire episode. As the series developed, the laugh track was removed from scenes that occurred in the operating room. In a few episodes, the laugh track was removed entirely, another departure from sitcom conventions. The most striking technical aspect of the series is found in its aggressively cinematic visual style. Instead of relying on straight cuts and short takes episodes often used long shots with people and vehicles moving between the characters and the camera. Tracking shots moved with action, and changed direction when the story was "handed off" from one group of characters to another. These and other camera movements, wedded to complex editing techniques, enabled the series to explore character psychology in powerful ways, and to assert the preeminence of the ensemble over any single individual. In this way M*A*S*H seemed to be asserting the central fact of war, that individual human beings are caught in the tangled mesh of other lives and there must struggle to retain some sense of humanity and compassion. This approach was grounded in Altman's film style and enabled M*A*S*H to manipulate its multiple story lines and its mixture of comedy and drama with techniques that matched the complex, absurd tragedy of war itself. M*A*S*H was one of the most innovative sitcoms of the 1970s and 1980s. Its stylistic flair and narrative mix drew critical acclaim, while the solid writing and vitally drawn characters helped the series maintain high ratings. The show also made stars of it performers, none more so than Alda, who went on to a successful career in film. The popularity of M*A*S*H was quite evident in the 1978-79 season. CBS aired new episodes during prime time on Monday and programmed reruns of the series in the daytime and on Thursday late night, giving the show a remarkable seven appearances on a single network in a five day period. The series produced one unsuccessful spin-off, AfterMASH, which aired on CBS from 1983-85. The true popularity of M*A*S*H can still be seen, for the series is one of the most widely syndicated series throughout the world. Despite the historical setting, the characters and issues in this series remain fresh, funny and compelling in ways that continue to stand as excellent television. Some of the above info from the article in the Museum Of Broadcast Communications: M*A*S*H page, written by Jeff Shires. M*A*S*H Theme Song - "Suicide Is Painless" Written by Digital Tradition Mirror (Lyrics shortened for television theme) Through early morning fog I see, Visions of the things to be, The pains that are withheld for me, I realize and I can see... That suicide is painless, It brings on many changes, And I can take or leave it if I please. Ratings (Top 30 or Better) – 1972-1973:Not in Top 30 1973-1974:#4 1974-1975:#5 1975-1976:#15 1976-1977:#4 1977-1978:#9 1978-1979:#7 1979-1980:#5 1980-1981:#4 1981-1982:#9 1982-1983:#3 Telecast: CBS September 17, 1972 - September 19, 1983 Broadcast History (all times Eastern): Sep 1972 - Sep 1973, CBS Sun 8:00-8:30 Sep 1973 - Sep 1974, CBS Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1974 - Sep 1975, CBS Tue 8:30-9:00 Sep 1975 - Nov 1975, CBS Fri 8:30-9:00 Dec 1975 - Dec 1977, CBS Tue 9:00-9:30 Jan 1978 - Sep 1983, CBS Mon 9:00-9:30 251 Episodes In Color On Film Repeats air on Hallmark Channel.moreless
  • 11
    The Beverly Hillbillies

    The Beverly Hillbillies

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Jed Clampett and kin, a poor Ozark Hillbilly family, were barely surviving until one lucky day. Jed while hunting for food in his swamp missed his target and struck the ground with his shot. Up through the ground came a bubblin' crude, Oil that is, Black Gold, Texas Tea.

    After selling his swamp to the OK Oil Company for $25 Million, Cousin Pearl convinces Jed he should move his family to Beverly Hills. So Jed, along with his gorgeous daughter Elly May, feisty mother-in-law Granny, and half-witted nephew Jethro, all head to this new land inhabited by movie stars and the well-off.

    Jed and his family get to Beverly Hills, and their money goes into the Commerce Bank of Beverly Hills, with President Mr. Drysdale. For the nine years the clan is in Beverly Hills, all kinds of things happen. They try to get their beautiful daughter Elly May married. Their nephew Jethro gets a high education, highest in the family - he completes school through the sixth grade. Granny has her fights with Mrs. Drysdale and gets romanced by various men. And Jed takes hold of a movie studio. They travel to New York, Washington, and England. They make silent movies. And they make a few good friends.moreless
  • 12
    The Primetime Emmy Awards

    The Primetime Emmy Awards

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    CBS
    Once a year, television's royalty gathers together for a ceremony honoring the best of the best of primetime TV. Shows, actors, and writers are all given a chance to take home a coveted Emmy statue--but in order to win, they must pass the mysterious and rigorous selection process of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Millions of people tune in to watch each year's ceremony and find out if their favorite shows and actors have been recognized or ignored, and the results can often make or break a series or career. The Emmy statue, depicting a winged woman holding an atom, was developed in 1948 by Louis McManus. The statue is meant to signify the arts, through the female figure, and the sciences, through the atom. The name for the award is taken from "Immy," a slang term for "image orthicon tube," an ingredient of many early television cameras. Since the figure is female, "Emmy" seemed more suitable to the Academy.moreless
  • 13
    Gilligan's Island

    Gilligan's Island

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    CBS (ended 1967)
    Gilligan's Island centered around a group of people who were stranded on an uncharted deserted island somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. They all were on a boat tour, which found itself in the middle of a storm leading them to crash on an island! Those stranded include, Gilligan, the Skipper, a millionaire (Thurston Howell III) and his wife (Lovey Howell), a movie star (Ginger Grant), a professor (known as "The Professor"), and Mary Ann. Gilligan was the first mate on the boat, the SS Minnow. Most episodes dealt with the castaways trying to get off the island, but their attempts seemed to always be foiled by Gilligan. Broadcast History- Sept 1964-Sept 1965, CBS Sat 8:30-9:00 Sept 1965-Sept 1966, CBS Thurs 8:00-8:30 Sept 1966-Sept 1967, CBS Mon 7:30-8:00moreless
  • 14
    Dallas

    Dallas

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    CBS (ended 1991)
    In the ranks of prime-time dramas, this was one of the biggest. Dallas, the saga of the Ewing Family, began as a five part mini-series in 1978. Throughout its thirteen seasons, many actors passed through the gates of Southfork. In the late 1960's, Peyton Place was a nighttime serial drama success-a novelty at the time. But since then, no P.M. show had caught the soap opera crowd's attention… until Dallas. The show first went on the air for a five week run in early 1978, and then fell into a Saturday nighttime slot later that year. Ratings were fair, but they were nothing compared to when the show moved to Friday nights, when the ratings well didn't run dry for a long, long time. The Ewing family lived at the sprawling South Fork ranch, in hoity-toity Braddock County just outside Dallas. Like any good power family, there was a matriarch and patriarch, and three sons- this core group, their extensive romantic relations, and the Barnes clan of rival oilers were all Jacobs needed to create a self-contained histrionic world of intrigue, dysfunction and passion. Borrowing from Romeo and Juliet, the youngest Ewing boy, Bobby, fell for a beautiful Barnes girl. And with a nod to the biblical Cain and Abel, Bobby and older brother J.R. didn't exactly play nice with each other like you might expect brothers to. Whereas J.R. was nearly a hundred percent scoundrel, Bobby had discernable streaks of honesty and integrity…but that patented Ewing viciousness certainly reared its head once in a while. The South Fork ranch housed Jock and Miss Ellie, the king and queen of South Fork, J.R. and long-suffering wife Sue Ellen, and Bobby and Pamela…though why they all lived under one roof demands a little poetic license, because money certainly wasn't a problem, and it wasn't like there was a whole lot of binding inter-family harmony. Here's just a taste of the drama devices that ensued: insane asylums, car accidents, affairs, illegitimate children, gunfights, fistfights, catfights, lies, drinking problems (both real and imagined), poufy 80's hairstyles for the ladies and best of all, notorious season finale cliffhangers. The most famous, of course, came at the end of the 1979-80 season, when a mysterious late-night intruder shot J.R. in the chest while he was toiling away at the office one night. The resulting "Who Shot J.R.?" publicity raced around the globe, because by that time, Dallas was an international hit in just about every developed country in the world. Odds on the shooter's identity were figured, bets were placed, and theories were construed– since there were about fifteen possible candidates, fans and pundits were kept very busy indeed. Don't read the next part of this sentence if you want to remain one of the few of-age humans who doesn't know whodunit… it was Kristin, J.R.'s scorned sister-in-law and recent romantic entanglement. Dallas was conceived as a show that had plenty of sex and romance for the female audiences, and a lot of cowboy posturing and business intrigue for the male viewers. The formula worked, because by the early 1980's, it was one of the most popular shows in TV history. There were magazine covers galore, a spin-off named Knots Landing about Gary, the middle Ewing son who wasn't seen or heard from much during proceedings at South Fork, and primetime serialization imitators like Dynasty and Falcon Crest. So for the show that kicked off the nighttime drama trend that's status quo today, we tip those ten-gallon hats and breathe a secret sigh of relief that J.R. was just a fictional character who couldn't manipulate us in real life. Because let's be honest, that guy could have taken most of us down. CBS Broadcast History: April 2, 1978- April 30, 1978----Sundays----10:00-11:00 P.M. September 23, 1978- October 14, 1978----Saturdays----10:00-11:00 P.M. October 15, 1978- January 14, 1979----Sundays----10:00-11:00 P.M. January 26, 1979- November 27, 1981----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. December 4, 1981- May 17, 1985----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. September 27, 1985- May 16, 1986----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. September 26, 1986- May 13, 1988----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. October 28, 1988- March 9, 1990----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. March 16, 1990- May 11, 1990----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. November 2, 1990- December 21, 1990----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. January 4, 1991- May 3, 1991----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M.moreless
  • 15
    The Waltons

    The Waltons

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    CBS (ended 1981)
    This is the story of the Waltons. The show takes place during the Depression and then during World War II. John & Olivia had eight kids, three girls and five boys. One of the boys died at birth; he was a twin to Jim-Bob. John and Olivia's children names are John-Boy, Jason, Mary Ellen, Erin, Ben, twins Jim-Bob & Joseph, and Elizabeth; Joseph died at birth. John's parents also lived with them - Esther and Zeb. The Waltons was based on the life of the Hamner family. Earl Hamner Jr. was the show's creator and narrator. This show was based on his life growing up.moreless
  • 16
    Hawaii Five-O

    Hawaii Five-O

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    CBS (ended 1980)
    Hawaii Five-O was created by Leonard Freeman as a series that not only featured law and order issues but also presented the beauty of the Hawaiian islands.

    The original cast featured Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett, head of Hawaii Five-0, with James McArthur playing Danny Williams (replacing Tim O'Kelley from the pilot), Zulu as Kono Kalakaua and Kam Fong as Chin Ho Kelly. At the end of the 1971-72 season, Zulu left the series after a disagreement and was replaced by Al Harrington as Ben Kokua. After Leonard Freeman died, Al Harrington was dropped with no reason given, after 10 appearances in the 1974-75 season although his episodes were scattered throughout the year.

    Douglas Mossman helped to replace the 'Ben' role in later episodes as Frank Kemana. By the 1976-77 season, supporting character Duke Lukela, played by Herman Wedemeyer, was so popular that he was given star billing on the show, following Kam Fong. When CBS delayed making a decision on the show's future at the end of the 1978-79 season due to falling ratings and the perception of poorly executed stories, James MacArthur took the opportunity to leave the series after 11 years.

    The 1979-80 season saw major changes in the show. William Smith, as James 'Kimo' Carew, was bought in to replace James MacArthur, and the producers also added a new female Five-0 member, Sharon Farrell as Lori Wilson. Completing the new line-up were existing Five-0 member Duke, and Moe Keale as Truck Kealoha. CBS finished Hawaii Five-0's prime-time run on April 5, 1980

    ===============

    Other Info Pilot (Coccoon) only

    1. Company credits Production Companies * CBS Television * Leonard Freeman Production

    Distributors * CBS Television (original airing) * Paramount Pictures ------- 2. Awards Emmy Awards 1969 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Achievement in Musical Composition -- Morton Stevens (composer) ------ 3. Filming Locations: Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA ------ 4. Release dates: USA -- 20 September 1968

    ======================

    Other Info Series

    1. Company credits Production Companies * CBS Television * Leonard Freeman Production

    Distributors * CBS Television * Independent Television (ITV) * Paramount Television * Viacom

    Other Companies * Ford Motor Company consideration furnisher * Polifroni/Sabba casting ------ 2. Awards American Cinema Editors, USA 1976 -- Nominated -- Best Edited Episode from a Television Series -- Jack Gleason [For episode "Turkey Shoot".] 1974 -- Nominated -- Best Edited Episode from a Television Series -- Jack Gleason [For episode "One Big Happy Family".] Edgar Allan Poe Awards 1974 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Jerome Coopersmith [For episode "Here Today, Gone Tonight".] 1973 -- Nominated -- Best Television Episode -- Will Lorin [For episode "Bait Once, Bait Twice".] Emmy Awards 1976 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series -- Helen Hayes [For episode "Retire In Sunny Hawaii... Forever".] 1974 -- Won -- Best Music Composition - For a Series, a Single Program of a Series -- Morton Stevens (composer) [For episode "Hookman".] 1970 -- Won -- Outstanding Achievement in Music Composition - For a Series or a Single Program of a Series (In Its First Year Only) -- Morton Stevens (composer) [For episode "A Thousand Pardons, You're Dead".] ------ 3. Release dates USA -- 26 September 1968 Netherlands -- 19 April 1969 UK -- 19 July 1970 West Germany -- 30 April 1971 France -- 15 July 1973 ------ 4. Filming Locations

    Hawaii Film Studio - 18th Avenue & Diamond Head Road, Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA (studio)

    Honolulu, O'ahu, Hawaii, USA O`ahu, Hawaii, USA

    ========================

    Literature: Monographic related book: Rhodes, Karen. Booking Hawaii Five-0: An Episode Guide and Critical History of the 1968-1980 Television Detective Series. McFarland & Company, Inc. (Jefferson, North Carolina), 1997, ISBN: 0786401710

    ======================

    Series Trivia * Gregory Peck was offered the lead role of McGarrett. He turned it down. * Kam Fong, who played Det. Chin Ho Kelly (1968-78), was an actual officer with the Honolulu Police Department who served from 1946 to his retirement in 1962 to take up a career in real estate. * Other than Wo Fat, other notable adversaries for McGarrett that appeared in more than one episode included mob bosses Henore Vaschon (played by Harold Gould) and Tony Alika (played by Ross Martin), pimp Big Chicken (played by Gavin MacLeod) and the Robin Hood-like Lewis Avery Filer (played by Hume Cronyn). * Jack Lord was the only member of the cast to stay with the series during it's entire 12 year run. Kam Fong (Chin Ho Kelly) left after the 10th season. James MacArthur (Danny Williams) left after the 11th season. * At the end of the episode "A Death In The Family", where Chin Ho Kelly was murdered, Steve McGarrett (Jack Lord) books the suspect himself, saying, "Chin would have liked that." It was the only time during the series that McGarrett personally booked a suspect. * The character of Duke Lukela first appeared as an HPD sergeant before becoming a Hawaii Five-O investigator. * The syndicate that Tony Alika headed was called "Kumu". * McGarrett finally caught Wo Fat in the final episode of the series. However, at the end of the episode, Wo Fat can be seen digging into his boot and taking out a file leaving it open for a possible reunion episode. * "Magnum, P.I." (1980) began production soon after this series wrapped its last episode. In order to keep some sort of continuity, reference to characters from this show were included in early episodes of Magnum. However, a plan to have Jack Lord appear as McGarrett never came to pass. Lord retired from acting after the series went off the air. * Chin Ho Kelly (Kam Fong) was the only member of the cast to be "killed off". He was murdered in the episode "A Death in the Family" while investigating a protection racket. * McGarrett was a Naval Intelligence officer before he became head of Five-O. In fact, he was in the reserves and went on active duty from time to time to assist the Navy on special cases. * In the episode "The Singapore File" McGarrett flies to Singapore to retrieve a witness, and returns to Honolulu. Singapore was actually downtown Honolulu. At the end of the episode, they are at a temple in Manila; they were actually at the Valley of the Temples in Kaneohe, Hawaii. * McGarrett actually caught Wo Fat in one encounter, but was forced to give him up because the Chinese government wanted him back in trade for a downed U2 pilot. * Zulu (Det. Kono) was the first of the regular cast to depart the show. He left in the 4th season. * McGarrett has a sister that lives in California. * Like McGarrett, Jack Lord was in the Navy. He was a public affairs officer, attaining the rank of lieutenant. * Before joining Five-O, Danny attended the University of Hawaii and then transferred to the University of California where he graduated with a degree in Criminology. * McGarrett often referred to Kono as "Big Kanaka". * McGarrett often referred to his secretary, May, as "Love". * McGarrett was a Korean War veteran. * McGarrett supposedly had his office in Iolani Palace, the actual palace used by the last kings and queens of Hawaii. This building was in danger of being leveled for a parking lot, but today it has been restored and can be toured for a $20 fee. It has never been used by the state police. * Besides government intelligence chief Jonathan Kaye, another recurring character was policewoman Sandy Welles. * "Danny" was played by a different actor in the pilot. * Several actors played different roles in various episodes before becoming recurring cast members. * Chin Ho (Kam Fong) smoked a pipe. * Al Harrington and Herman Wedemeyer both appeared in different roles on the show before assuming the roles of Ben and Duke respectively. Wedemeyer was in the very first episode playing Honolulu police Lt. Balta. * Despite the attention that Hawaii Five-0 brought to Hawaiian state law enforcement, Hawaii is the only state that has no state police agency. * The hula dancer in the opening montage is played by Helen Kuoha-Torco, now a professor at Windward Community college.

    =====================

    Continuity Goofs for Series

    *In some earlier episodes, McGarrett can be seen leaving his headquarters in a 1967 Mercury 2 door sedan. When he reaches his destination, he's driving a 1968 Mercury 4 door sedan. *After the original 1968 Mercury was retired, and replaced with a '74 Marquis Brougham 4-door hardtop, some stock footage was used of the '68 passing or in traffic. *From 1970 to 1976, Al Eben played Doc Bergman. In one episode, "A Bullet for McGarrett", his name is Doc Abraham.

    ====================

    Rockford Judged Top TV Detective: 4 July 2000 (StudioBriefing) The Rockford Files (1974) Jim Rockford has topped a TV Guide survey in which readers were asked to name their favorite TV detectives ever. The magazine commented, "The crimes he solved were hardly complex. And his detective work was rudimentary at best. But from the moment he told a client, 'I get 200 dollars-a-day, plus expenses,' you were hooked." Columbo placed second in the survey, but Jessica Fletcher of the long-running Murder, She Wrote did not even make the top 10, coming in at 13. The top ten are: 1. James Garner as Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files (1974) 2. Peter Falk, Columbo 3. Andre Braugher as Frank Pembleton in Homicide: Life on the Street 4. Tyne Daly and Sharon Gless in Cagney and Lacey 5. Telly Savalas, Kojak 6. Tom Selleck, Magnum P.I. 7. Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison in Prime Suspect 8. Cybil Shepherd and Bruce Willis as Maddie Hayes and David Addison in Moonlighting 9. Jack Lord as Steve McGarrett in Hawaii Five-0 10. Dennis Franz as Andy Sipowicz in NYPD Blue.moreless
  • 17
    All in the Family

    All in the Family

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    CBS (ended 1979)
    All in the Family was first seen in January of 1971 and immediately changed the face of television. Not only was this the number one television series from 1971 through 1976, but it also signified an avalanche of other situation comedies that dealt with controversial subjects in realistic ways. Including, Chico & the Man, The Jeffersons, Maude, Good Times and Sanford & Son.

    The series centered around the Bunker family who lived in a home located at 704 Houser Street in Queens, New York. Archie Bunker was the main character, and what a character he was. He was televisons most famous bigot, crass and down right rude. Yet he was loveable, with a soft side just beneath the surface. Edith Bunker was his somewhat dizzy wife whom he called "Dingbat". Edith put up with Archie and had qualities about her that made her one of television's most unforgetable characters. Also living in the Bunker household were Archie and Edith's daughter, Gloria, and her husband Mike, or "Meathead" as Archie called him.

    The stories revolved around many controversial topics including, rape, sex, homosexuality, death, and other topics that were relevant to the 1970's, especially political strife and inflation. Archie Bunker was probably the first character in a situation comedy to use racist remarks referring to blacks and other minorities, yet another first for television.

    Other frequent cast members include, the black neighbors, the Jeffersons, who got their own series, The Jeffersons in 1975. The Lorenzos were also neighbors. In 1975, Gloria had a son, Joey, and three years later in 1978, Gloria, Mike and Joey moved away to California, leaving Edith and Archie alone. Not for long, however. Soon they took in a niece, Stephanie Mills, who had been abandoned by her father.

    The original format ended in 1979 which was when the series was renamed Archie Bunker's Place. The new format centered around Archie running his local tavern which he bought in 1977.

    CBS Broadcast History

    Jan 1971-Jul 1971 Tuesdays 9:30 p.m. Sep 1971-Sep 1975 Saturdays 8:00 p.m. Sep 1975-Sep 1976 Mondays 9:00 p.m. Sep 1976-Oct 1976 Wednesdays 9:00 p.m. Nov 1976-Sep 1977 Saturdays 9:00 p.m. Oct 1977-Oct 1978 Sundays 9:00 p.m. Oct 1978-Sep 1979 Sundays 8:00 p.m.

    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better)

    #1 1971-1972 Season #1 1972-1973 Season #1 1973-1974 Season #1 1974-1975 Season #1 1975-1976 Season #12 1976-1977 Season #5 1977-1978 Season #10 1978-1979 Seasonmoreless
  • 18
    The Ed Sullivan Show

    The Ed Sullivan Show

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    This long-running variety series premiered on June 20, 1948 with the title Toast of the Town. (The Toast of the Town link covers the first 8 seasons of Ed Sullivan.)

    The series was re-titled The Ed Sullivan Show on September 25, 1955 (the beginning of the 9th season). Although the name had changed, it remained the same variety show with "something for everyone." There continued to be a diverse guest line-up which included singers, musicians, actors, dancers, comedians, circus acts, plate spinners and acrobats.

    But now there was now a new type of guest: the rock 'n' roll performer. While Ed booked a few rock 'n' roll acts on "Toast of the Town," these performers became even more prominent on "The Ed Sullivan Show."

    One of the most famous rock 'n' roll acts was, of course, Elvis Presley. Ed had at first scoffed at the idea of booking Elvis, who had already appeared on "Stage Show," "The Milton Berle Show" and "The Steve Allen Show" amid much controversy. But as Elvis' popularity grew, Ed relented and booked him for three appearances.

    Then there were the famous Beatles appearances. Legend has it that Ed booked the Beatles without hearing even a note of their music. While visiting England, Sullivan happened to be at Heathrow Airport on October 31, 1963 when the Beatles' plane arrived. The British press and hundreds of fans were there to greet them. Upon seeing all the frenzy, Ed signed the band to appear on his show. Beatlemania was already in full swing when the Beatles arrived at New York's JFK airport on February 7, 1964. On February 9, the Beatles made their "Ed Sullivan" debut. The Beatles' three 1964 Sullivan appearances were among the highest rated TV programs of the 1960's.

    In 1967, Ed's NYC studio, Studio 50, was officially re-titled "The Ed Sullivan Theater." The ratings of The Ed Sullivan Show began to drop in 1968. CBS cancelled the series in 1971. The final new show aired on March 28, 1971 which was followed by several weeks of reruns. The series' network run ended on June 6, 1971 (which was a repeat of the February 7, 1971 show). At the time of the cancellation, CBS did not give The Ed Sullivan Show the sendoff that it deserved. Instead of ending with a tribute show focusing on all the great moments of the past 23 years, the show quietly went off the air. But in the 33 years since the series was cancelled, CBS has aired numerous tribute shows giving the series the recognition it deserves.

    Syndicated, cable TV and PBS repeats:

    In 1980, a "Best of Sullivan" series hosted by John Byner appeared in syndication. Each episode was an edited 30-minute version of the original 1-hour shows. This version has not been broadcast since the 1980's.

    Around 1992, a new 30-minute "Ed Sullivan" series was syndicated. These were edited versions of the original shows (but often clips from other episodes were added). This version later appeared on the TV Land cable network (1996-1998).

    From 2001 through 2004, PBS stations across the U.S. aired edited versions of The Ed Sullivan Show (usually airing two 30-minute programs back-to-back). These were produced by WQED Multimedia in Pittsburgh. --The first PBS season (2001-02) consisted of the 1990s shows that were edited for commercial TV. To fill in the commercial breaks, WQED added new intros by Shirley Jones. --For the 2002-03 PBS season, WQED publicized a new package of 76 Sullivan shows. (These do not have Shirley Jones.) Ten of these shows have not been seen since their original broadcasts. The other 66 were previously shown in the 1990s but were slightly re-edited with a few "missing" performances restored. This group of Sullivan shows continued into the 2003-04 season.

    A different series, titled "Ed Sullivan's Rock 'N' Roll Classics," first appeared in the 1990's on VH1 (in the US). This version features rock and pop music clips taken from various Ed Sullivan episodes. This series is currently available on VHS and DVD.

    For information about The Ed Sullivan Show and Toast of the Town, contact: SOFA Entertainment 9121 W. Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 Fax: 310-276-0242 greg.vines@sofaent.com www.sofaentertainment.com Sofa Home Entertainment SOFA Entertainment owns the right to every Ed Sullivan Show and Toast of the Town.

    And thanks to Historic Films for their on-line database. Their website has been very helpful in verifing guest lists and other information.moreless
  • 19
    Mission: Impossible

    Mission: Impossible

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    CBS (ended 1973)
    This 7-year series chronicled the adventures of the Impossible Missions Force (IMF), a team of government spies and specialists who were offered "impossible missions" (should they decide to accept them) by the unseen "Secretary". Although the cast varied over the years, the main characters included The Team Leader (Dan Briggs the first season, then Jim Phelps the other six), The Techno-Wizard (Barney Collier), The Strongman (Willy Armitage), The Master of Disguise (first Rollin Hand, then The Amazing Paris), and The Femme Fatale (Cinnamon Carter, Dana Lambert, Casey, Mimi Davis). The series is best known for its standard (but not invariable) opening mission contact (conducted by a pre-recorded message), the theme composed by Lalo Schifrin, the leader's selection of mission agents from a dossier, the opening briefing, the intricate use of disguises and a typical "mask pulloff" scene near the end of most episodes, and the relative lack of characterization of the characters.moreless
  • 20
    The Dukes of Hazzard

    The Dukes of Hazzard

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    CBS (ended 1985)
    The Duke Family -- cousins Bo ( John Schneider) and Luke (Tom Wopat), assisted by their cousin Daisy ( Catherine Bach) and their uncle, Jesse (Denver Pyle)-- fight the system and root out the corrupt practices of Hazzard County Commissioner Boss Hogg (Sorrell Booke) and his bumbling brother-in-law-Sheriff Rosco P. Coltrane (James Best). The show became an instant hit, never failing to win its time slot during its original run on CBS for seven seasons from 1979-1985. The Duke boys, a pair of 'Robin Hood' types complete with bows and Dynamite arrows, are assisted in their adventures by their car, an orange 1969 Dodge Charger named 'The General Lee'. The Dukes of Hazzard is set in Georgia, and the show's southern influence is felt throughout. Country singing superstar Waylon Jennings performed the famous theme song to the show (Good Ol' Boys), and acts as The Balladeer, narrating the adventures of each episode. Furthermore, many of the plots revolved around the Dukes' history as an ex-moon-shining family. The story followed Bo and Luke until season five, because during episodes 87 through 104, their cousins Coy (Byron Cherry)and Vance (Christopher Mayer) replaced the boys while the went on to join NASCAR Circuit. Bo and Luke won, but returned to Hazzard after great season at the NASCAR Circuit. Innocently naive Deputy Enos Strate, though technically a member of the law under Boss Hogg, strives for justice and fairness, while also having a major crush on Daisy. Ace mechanic Cooter Davenport helps the Dukes along the way, and Deputy Cletus Hogg, though not as honest as Enos, subtlety assists the Dukes escape from 'Hogg justice'. The series had an extremely successful run in syndication beginning in 1996 on TNN, the Nashville Network. This led to a resurgence in the popularity of the "Dukes". Two reunion movies, featuring the surviving members of the cast, aired in 1997 and 2000. The show currently airs on CMT (Country Music Television) and in the summer of 2005 experienced another huge revival with the film version, starring Seann William Scott, Johnny Knoxville, Willie Nelson and Jessica Simpson. A Prequel was Made in 2007 and shown in 2 weeks on ABC Family in 2008 during the summer.moreless
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