• 121
    Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space

    Josie and the Pussycats in Outer Space

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    A continuation cartoon of the popular Josie And The Pussycats, this series was about how the gang gets launched (accidentally) into space... and the problems and people they all encounter. The story of how our heroes wound up in outer space (as recounted during the opening credits of every show) is that the band was invited to play at the launch of a new spaceship. They ride to the top of the gantry and pose in front of the open hatch for a photo-op. Alexandra attempts to knock Josie out of the spotlight with a body slam and they all go tumbling into to the open hatch. In a gravity and orientation challenged sequence they fall inside, as she falls, Alexandra grabs the launch lever and pulls it, sending them off.moreless
  • 122
    The Joker's Wild

    The Joker's Wild

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    CBS (ended 1975)
    The Joker's Wild marked the first time the team of Jack Barry and Dan Enright produced a game show since the Quiz Show Scandals of 1958. The game, which was totally clean, proved to be a success and paved the way to greater fortunes for the Barry-Enright empire. Before the show's premiere in 1972, several pilots were produced, several employing a bizzare celebrity format. The Joker's Wild married elements of a Las Vegas slot machine to a general quiz. Two contestants, including a returning champion, competed. Five categories are announced. The players, one at a time, take turns spinning a huge three-reel slot machine, each containing the names of the categories (along with appropriate pictures) and "Joker" cards. The player chose a category depicted on one or more of the reels, with cash values determined as follows: one of a kind, $50; two of a kind, $100; and a natural triple, $200. If the player answered a question correctly, he/she won the cash value; if incorrect, the opponent could win the cash. Any Jokers that appeared could be paired with one of the available categories for $100 or $200, though the player could also go "off the board" for half the value. However, getting three Jokers meant an automatic win for that player, provided he/she answered one question correctly in any of the categories and (if the player was the challenger) held off a last chance run by the champion. The first player to $500 won the game and played a bonus round; however, champions were given one last opportunity to catch up by trying to spin for a question that had enough available to catch the challenger. If he/she answered correctly, the game went on until someone missed. Three different bonus games were played during The Joker's Wild CBS run, as thus: 1. During the first couple of weeks on the air, the reels contained pictures of prizes. The champion spun and could take what he/she saw, or spin again and take what turns up on the second (and final) spin. Initially, if all three prizes were circled, he/she won a new car. This was quickly modified to having just the third reel possibly containing a picture of a car. (This didn't work out too well, namely because the prize packagae rarely amounted to more than $750 (one early package contained $25 in frozen snack foods, a $283 central cleaning system and a $500 color console TV). 2. The champion gets up to three spins of the machine, now loaded with Jokers and a Devil card (note that the Devil's face was patterned after Jack Barry). A prize is announced before each spin, and if three Jokers come up, the player may elect to keep the prize or risk it and spin again for the second prize. At any time, if a Devil card shows up, the game ends and all prizes are lost. The first two prizes were generally worth $100-$500, while the final prize was usually more worth than $1,000 (sometimes, $3,000 or more!). (Initially, the player was given up to four spins, with the final spin played for a car, a boat or even a fur coat; the car was later moved to the Joker Jackpot (see below), though boats and furs were still offered as bonus round prizes). 3. The format that was associated with the 1977-1986 syndicated run. First adopted in 1974, the slot machine is now filled with various dollar amounts ($25/$50/$75/$100/$150/$200) and the Devil. A contestant could stop at any time and keep his/her winnings, but getting $1,000 without revealing a Devil won the cash and a prize package. From 1972-1974, after the bonus round was played, the champion could elect to leave the show with his/her cash and prize winnings, or play again. However, if the champion lost, he/she forfeited their front game cash winnings, which were deposited into a Joker Jackpot. The Joker Jackpot contained a minimum of $2,500, but increased for all the winnings that were deposited therein (up to the CBS $25,000 limit). A three-time champion (during the first few weeks on the air, a four-time winner) claimed the jackpot plus a new car. (Great news: it wasn't always that stripped-beyond-the-bone $2,000 Chevrolet Vega, either; sometimes it was a nicely-equipped Chevrolet Monte Carlo worth about $5,000, a sporty $4,500 Opel Manta, or even a $7,500 Chevrolet Corvette!). Initially, the player retired undefeated upon claiming a Joker Jackpot (the first one was worth more than $15,000!). Later, players could stay on until they reached CBS's then-winnings limit of $25,000. During the Joker Jackpot era, only front-game winnings claimed since winning the last Joker Jackpot could be lost; once a player had a Jackpot, it was theirs to keep. Once the final bonus round was instituted, the Joker Jackpot was shelved, and players won a car after winning five games and retiring only upon winning $25,000. The Joker's Wild was a respectable hit on CBS, enjoying a three year run. The show, which had enjoyed a second run of success in syndicated reruns on a Los Angeles TV station, returned in first-run syndication in September 1977, once again hosted by Jack Barry. Gameplay was nearly identical to the CBS run, with the third version of the bonus round from that version employed as the syndicated version's bonus game. There were several notable changes, as thus: • Some of the categories had special rules to them, many of them involving both players. The outcome of the game, or at least the advantage, could change at any given moment. • A "natural triple" meant the player won a prize package, which had new items added each game until claimed (sort of like The Hollywood Squares' original Secret Square game). • There was no winnings limit, meaning players stayed until their defeat. While nobody reached the impressive totals of Tic Tac Dough all-time champion Thom McKee, there were plenty of big winners. • In the early 1980s, Barry devoted the final minutes of the show to his studio audience. He invited three members of the audience on stage to play against the Devil. Each player took one spin and kept whatever cash amount they received ($30 to $300). The top spinner got to continue spinning the machine, and if he/she reached $1,000 without revealing the Devil, they got a bonus prize. Children had often been invited to play special weeks of the show during the original CBS run and during the first two years of the syndicated series. Thanks to the youthful contestants being themselves and Jack Barry's enthusiasm, these weeks proved so popular that a companion kiddie version, called Joker! Joker! Joker! aired. The once-a-week series – which ran in syndication, usually on Saturday or Sunday afternoons – ran from 1979-1981. As in the CBS version, five-time winners won a new car, as follows: 1977-1979: Buick Skylark 1979-1981: Buick Century 1981-1984: Chevrolet Chevette 1984-1985: AMC Eagle 1985-1986: Madza GLC. Barry died in May 1984, not long after taping had ended for the 1983-1984 season. (One station, WEWS in Cleveland, got off to a late start that season and, by the time all the Barry episodes were aired, WEWS went directly to the new Jeopardy!) Supplanting Jack Barry was ex-Hot Potato host Bill Cullen, who was in the waning years of his legendary game show career. Jim Peck was the substitute host for both Barry and Cullen in their absences. The Joker's Wild, along with its companion Tic Tac Dough, left the air in 1986, only for both to return in 1990. This new version of The Joker's Wild, on which three players (including the returning champion) now competed, employed a number of rules changes, making for a game that many game show fans agreed was too different from the one so fondly remembered. In the bonus game, a player earned spins by answering questions correctly, and could freeze windows in an attempt to win a prize. Getting a triple Joker in one spin won the Joker Jackpot, which started at $5,000 and grew by $500 until claimed. Many people did not like the revised format, or host Pat Finn's hosting style, and the revival lasted one year. Only one contestant shined on that version. Thomas Van Dyke was the biggest winner, collecting $52,000 staying for ten episodes.moreless
  • 123
    Shazam!

    Shazam!

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    Welcome to the Shazam! guide at TV.com. A teenager named Billy Batson and his adult companion, Mentor, travel around in an RV helping people in need. Billy has been given the power to turn into Captain Marvel by the elders, Solomon, Hercules, Atlas, Zeus, Achillese and Mercury. Every episode, the elders would contact Billy and give him a cryptic warning about something he will encounter. Billy would ultimately realize the meaning of the elder's advice and transform into Captain Marvel to help someone in need. Oh Elders, fleet and strong and wise, appear before my seeking eyes.moreless
  • 124
    The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show

    The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show

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    CBS (ended 1972)
    Welcome to The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show guide at TV.com. One of the better and more memorable spin-offs of The Flintstones, The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show follows the teen hijinks of Pebbles Flintstone and Bamm-Bamm Rubble. Bypassing several important growth stages, Bedrock's favorite tots are now teenagers attending Bedrock High where, not surprisingly, they become embroiled in a variety of misadventures along with their pals Wiggy, Penny, and teen inventor Moonrock. Other characters include Fred and Wilma Flintstone, Barney and Betty Rubble, Pebbles' rival Cindy with her sidekick Fabian, a motorcycle gang called the Bronto Bunch, and Bad-luck Schleprock. The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show is definitely dated with signs of the times -- drag-racing, "groovy" lingo, mini-skirts, cave buggies, brontoburger hangouts, motorcycle gangs, teen music idols, etc. Pebbles -- much like her father Fred -- is always coming up with "brilliant ideas" that end up getting the gang into some sort of trouble -- and making Bamm-Bamm cringe. The series ran for one season as The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show, then was combined with four new episodes, vignettes, and a dance of the week to expand into The Flintstone Comedy Hour (1972-1973) and The Flintstones Show (1973-1974). From 1974-1976, The Pebbles & Bamm-Bamm Show returned to its original 30-minute format -- repeating the same episodes. **Series information, episode guide and images courtesy of Webrock - The Flintstones & Hanna-Barbera Page and T.R. Adams' The Flintstones - A Modern Stone Age Phenomenon from Turner Publishing.moreless
  • 125
    The Good Guys (1970)

    The Good Guys (1970)

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    CBS (ended 1970)
    The Good Guys is a television show that ran from 1968-1970. It is about a taxi cab driver named Rufus Butterworth, who is best friends with Bert Gramus. Bert is the owner of the local diner named Bert's Place. Bert and Rufus have been friends since they were kids. They are always trying to make it rich and Rufus always thinks of schemes, but unfortunately they never work out. Claudia is Bert's wife who is a school teacher and sometimes helps out at the diner. Regulars to the diner included Mr Bender and Hal Dawson,. Big Tom was a truck driver who visited the diner a couple of times. Henry Arsdale was Claudia's father. Show Facts: First Telecast: September 25, 1968 Last Telecast: January 23, 1970 Number Of Episodes: 42 Number of Seasons: 2 Type Of Show: Situation Comedy Nielsen Ratings (Top 30 Or Better) Never finished in the top 30 CBS Prime-time Schedules Wednesday: September 1968 - September 1969 7:30-8:30 Daktari 8:30-9:00 The Good Guys 9:00-9:30 The Beverly Hillbillies 9:30-10:00 Green Acres 10:00-11:00 The Jonathan Winters Show Friday: September 1969 - January 1970 7:30-8:00 Get Smart 8:00-8:30 The Good Guys 8:30-9:00 Hogan's Heroes 9:00-11:00 CBS Friday Night Movie DVD Voting Vote for The Good Guys to be on DVD here at TVShowsOnDVD.com We now have 32 votes for The Good Guys to be on DVD. Scheduled Times As far a I know, The Good Guys is not airing anywhere in The United States. I am not sure if it ever has since 1970. According to Bob Denver's Book "Gilligan, Maynard, and Me" The Good Guys was once broadcast in South America. As of right now though I don't think its still on down there. The episodes that did air in South America were not in great quality. Supposedly in May of 1998 TV Land was going to air an episode or two of The Good Guys on there weekend line up. As the story goes TV Land did not air any episodes like they said they were going to, and they aired episodes from another rare series called He & She. This was probably the most recent occasion of The Good Guys almost airing. To bad they did not air it. The E! True Hollywood Story of Gilligan's Island airs occasionally on E! It features a scene from Let 'Em Eat Rolls, and an interview with Leonard Stern. The Good Guys in TV Guide Bob Denver and Herb Edelman made the cover of TV Guide magazine in the November 16-22 1968 edition. For a look at the cover click here. Bob Denver also make the cover of TV Magazine of the Sunday Herald Traveler in the September 29-5 of October. To see what the cover looked like click here. Bob Denver, Herb Edelman, and Joyce Van Patten all made the cover of TV Magazine for the St Louis Tribune. To see what the cover looked like click here. Joyce Van Patten did an interview with TV Guide for the June 6-11 1969 issue talking about The Good Guys. The Theme Song The music to The Good Guys wad done by Jerry Fielding who also did many other shows music. Some series he did the music for are The Bionic Woman, Hogan's Heroes, He & She, Barnaby Jones and many other shows. After The Good Guys he would continue with music in TV and movies. During his career he was nominated for 3 Oscars and he won and Emmy Award. Season 1 We're the Good Guys who never let a friend down Friends forever, ask anyone in this town When you're in a tussle, need some muscle I'll be there at your side And if hung yourself I will see that your soon untied If you want my shirt, I will give it with pride When you're up the creek, I'll swim out And then will paddle up when you shout I will saddle up Like I know, and I know you'll reciprocate Head to toe, because we're Two Good Guys ................................................................ Season 2 I'm a good guy Hey your another one too Like a brother Each to the other one true blue When there's trouble We're a double Sticking out a double nut chin But when our ship comes in Then we're going to be fat Not thin Even if it's just by The teeth of our skin When you think of Those hero's who Gives a shout about Good guys here While you read about Very few had a magic That slides right And that just puts faith in you 'Cause you're a good guy too. The Titles to the Episodes We now have almost every title to The Good Guys episodes. We are now only missing eight episode titles. Also the air dates I have listed might not be correct.moreless
  • 126
    The All-New Popeye Hour

    The All-New Popeye Hour

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    CBS (ended 1981)
    Popeye originally started as a 1929 comic strip character in E.C. Segar's "Thimble Theatre." Soon he appeared as an animated character on screen in 1933 and has ever since starred in hundreds of animated cartoons as well as a live-action movie. In the 1970s, Hanna-Barbera brought Popeye and friends to the Saturday morning realm with better animation than the 1960s Popeye cartoons for TV. When the show became the "Popeye and Olive Show" in 1980, such segments included a spoof on the film "Private Benjamin" with Olive Oyl in the role of Goldie Hawn. "Private Olive" also featured the ghastly creature named Alice the Goon from the comics as well as Eugene the magical Jeep from Darkest Africa. At the end of each cartoon there was a segment featuring Popeye and his nephews. This had Popeye teaching them a lesson. For example, Popeye was smoking his pipe, so the kids asked about it and he explained that he doesn't actually SMOKE it, and that it was his TOOTING pipe. There was no violence on the show, which paralleled later scenes in the Segar comic.

    The middle feature of the 1978-81 series was Dinky Dog, the misadventures of a humongous sheepdog and his mistresses, Monica and Sandy.moreless
  • 127
    Genesis II

    Genesis II

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    CBS (ended 1973)
    In 2133 A.D., after a great war that destroyed civilization, a group of peace-loving scientists known as PAX excavate a former NASA research center and find Dylan Hunt, who has been in suspended animation for over 150 years. Dylan recovers quickly and joins a PAX team trying to rebuild society in the post-apocalyptic world, making use of leftover maglev subway tunnels that only they know how to access.

    Genesis II was developed by the late Gene Roddenberry of Star Trek fame. A TV-movie pilot was made for CBS, and 20 episodes were outlined, but executives eventually rejected the Genesis II series in favor of one based on the movie series Planet of the Apes. We have information on 6 of these planned episodes.

    A second pilot was made the following year called Planet Earth, starring John Saxon, and it too became a TV-movie but did not make it to series.

    Years later, after Roddenberry's death, the hero's name "Dylan Hunt" was resurrected and used for the hero of the TV series Andromeda.moreless
  • 128
    Tattletales

    Tattletales

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    CBS (ended 1984)
    Tattletales was an updated version of the Goodson-Todman game show He Said, She Said, where celebrity couples answered questions about their marriage. As before, the idea was to match responses and win prizes for audience members. But this revision had quite a few differences that made it one of the more respectable hits of the 1970s - and not just with the sometimes outrageous responses that were commonplace in that decade. Tattletales went through two distinct formats during its two runs from 1974-1978 and again from 1982-1984. The one constant, however was that each couple represented a specific section of the 122-member audience - the Red section, the Blue section and the "Bananas" (the Yellow section) and the couple assigned to them would try to win money to be split amongst the audience members of that section by matching responses. The rules were as follows: Format 1 (February to about June 1974): The wives or husbands were onstage while their husbands or wives were secluded in an soundproof room. Host Convy posed a question to the women or men (e.g.: "What's the first thing your husband gripes about in the morning?") and the first to ring in related an appropriate story and a one- or two-word clue she or he believed her or his husband or wife would be able to recognize the story from. Convy then read the question to the husbands or the wives - shown from the isolation room via the television screen - and the clue. The husband or the wife who believed he was being talked about rang in and tried to tell the story. If the correct husband or wife rang in and his or her response was essentially similar, the couple won $100 for their rooting section on 1-Clueword or 2-Clueword worth $50 for their rooting section. After the question had been played twice (with a second set of spouses getting to vie for the cash), Convy asked a "Tattletales Quickie." Here, each spouse was posed a question as before (though usually multiple choice or yes/no). $100 was paid off among the couples who matched. Round 2 was played as before, only now the male or female halves of the couples were brought on stage and the wives or the husbands had to match. At the end of the second round, the couple(s) with the most money earned or split a $1000 bonus ($334 if all 3 tied; $500 for the 2 top money-winners and $1000 for a sole winner). Since several shows were taped at a time, the couples switched rooting sections each day (i.e., the couple who represented the Bananas on Monday would play for the Red or Blue sections on Tuesday and so on). Format 2 (June 1974-rest of run): All questions were now of the "Tattletales Quickies" variety. As before, they could be multiple choice or yes/no, but now they were open-ended; since this was the 1970s and a game show that frequently encouraged double-entendre, there were many wild and outrageous responses and while most of the questions were designed to get laughs (e.g., "Who was at the door the last time your husband answered ... and he was totally in the buff?"), some questions were deadly serious ("Would you allow a 5-year-old boy to take refuge in your home if he said his father hits him?"). Rewards were split this time ($50 for all three couples, $75 if two couples were correct and $150 if just one couple was right) and the rules for winning were also the same. If no couple was right, the pot was carried over to the next question ($300 or $450). Although the final question of the day had $300 available and sometimes additional questions (worth $150 or $300) were played if time allowed. For those who find such matters interesting, the maximum possible payout for a couple was $1750 (which has been achieved as has all 3 couples winning $0 for the entire show). In the 80's version, it wasn't always married couples. Special weeks featured mother-sons (Isabel Sanford and her son racked up $1600 for their rooting section), best friends (all male panel), sisters (all female panel) and television couples (who shared on-stage secrets). Tattletales lived three different lives - twice on CBS (February 1974 to March 1978 and January 1982 to June 1984) and a 1-year run in once-a-week syndication during the 1977-1978 season. During each of the runs, it was traditional for a beautiful young woman to hand Bert the microphone more than once Convy engaged in a passionate liplock! When Bert played the game (on several occassions), it was usually Gene Rayburn who took over the hosting duties. ----------------------------------------------------------------- THE BROADCAST HISTORY of TATTLETALES: February 18, 1974-June 13, 1975 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV June 16, 1975-August 15, 1975 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV August 18, 1975-November 28, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV December 1, 1975-November 4, 1977 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV November 7, 1977-December 9, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV December 12, 1977-March 31, 1978 at 10:00-10:30am on CBS-TV January 18, 1982-June 1, 1984 at 12Noon-12:30pm or 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. On Syndicated from September 12, 1977 to September 3, 1978.moreless
  • 129
    Help! It's the Hair Bear Bunch

    Help! It's the Hair Bear Bunch

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    CBS (ended 1972)
    At the Wonderland Zoo, three crazy bears that are always looking for the better life. Every night they outsmart the zookeeper and his assistant in search of fun and antics.
  • 130
    PGA Tour

    PGA Tour

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    CBS
    The PGA Tour is an all-important yearly sports event that top golfers participate in.
  • 131
    The Secret Storm

    The Secret Storm

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    This long-running soap opera was originally titled THE STORM WITHIN. The title wasn't appealing to one of the show's sponsors, Bisodol (an antacid), who was worried it would inspire images of an upset stomach. To appease Bisodel, the serial was retitled THE SECRET STORM, and premiered on February 1, 1954.

    Set in the small town of Woodbridge, New York, the show centered on the newly rich, neurotic Ames family. Patriarch Peter Ames was left to raise his three kids when his wife, Ellen, was killed in an automobile accident. Audiences would soon learn that sudden deaths, exotic diseases, mental illness, and extramarital affairs would figure heavily in storylines.

    The Ames family figured prominently during the serial's first 15 years. Peter was a widower with two teenage children, Jerry and Susan, and a 9-year-old daughter, Amy. Ellen's unexpected death had an especially painful effect on Peter and young Jerry. For a while, the family feared Peter was losing his mind. Later, he turned to booze for comfort.

    THE SECRET STORM premiered as a 15-minute serial, then expanded to 30-minutes in 1962. The soap remained one of daytime's most popular serials until 1969, when it was purchased by CBS. The network executives were inexperienced at producing soap operas and began tinkering with the serial's format. Cast members were suddenly dropped without warning and new characters were constantly introduced, only to be written out a few months later. When the soap was switched to a less-than-desirable late-afternoon timeslot, it seemed like the beginning of the end. By 1974, the soap had gone through several writers, and was daytime TV's lowest-rated soap. After a 20 year run, CBS canceled the serial in 1974, and replaced it with a game show. The soap's final episode aired on February 8, 1974.

    ORIGINAL CAST MARJORIE GATESON...............Grace Tyrell RUSSELL HICKS...................J.T. Tyrell PETER HOBBS......................Peter Ames ROBERT MORSE.....................Jerry Ames JEAN MOWRY.......................Susan Ames JADA ROWLAND.......................Amy Ames HAILA STODDARD................Paulne Harris

    BROADCAST HISTORY 2/1/54 - 6/15/62: 4:15p weekdays (15 minutes) 6/18/62 - 9/6/68: 4:00p weekdays (30 minutes) 9/9/68 - 9/1/72: 3:00p weekdays (30 minutes) 9/4/72 - 3/23/73: 3:30p weekdays (30 minutes) 3/26/73 - 2/8/74: 4:00p weekdays (30 minutes)moreless
  • 132
    The Great Adventure

    The Great Adventure

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    CBS (ended 1964)
    TV series of dramatizations of the lives of famous historical persons, as well as important historical events.
  • 133
    Cher

    Cher

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    Following their divorce in 1974, pop singers Sonny & Cher Bono, who had formerly starred together on The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, each hosted a variety series of their own. Sonny's, entitled The Sonny Comedy Revue, debuted on ABC in the fall of 1974. The show featured the same regulars as The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, except for Cher. Each episode starred a female guest star that ribbed Sonny about how short and untalented he was. The show's lack of originality and Cher, lead to the shows cancellation after 13 episodes. However, six weeks later, On February 12, 1975 Cher debuted on CBS at 7:30, with guest stars Elton John, Bette Midler, and Flip Wilson. The pilot episode (billed as a special) served as Cher's return to television. The special garnered high ratings, and rave reviews. "I'm scared to death" Cher said at the time. "I'm so afraid of that first walk-out. Here I am- alone, naked to the world. What do you think world? Do you forgive me?" The series was produced by Laugh-In vet George Schlatter, and always started with Cher draped in the dark, singing low over a lone piano slowly beginning the opening song. Then, throwing off the covering as the music picks up tempo, Cher struts to the front of the stage, revealing her latest navel-exposing Bob Mackie outfit. A lot of press was generated by Cher's exposed belly-button, it had never been done on television before. Even 'Jeannie' obscured hers with scarves. After a spectacular premiere, the show settled into a respectable number 22 in the ratings. Despite not being being on par with CBS' original expectations Cher was renewed for another season, but ratings continued to fall, so in January of 1976, Cher called it quits and announced that she and Sonny Bono were re-teaming for a brand new Sonny and Cher Show. "I made the decision after I'd done four Cher shows last Fall. Nothing to do with the ratings." Cher said later, "Doing a show alone was more than I could handle. I had to be into everything, from helping on scripts to picking the music. And they had me doing a monologue. That's not like me, to be out there alone making with the jokes."moreless
  • 134
    Valley of the Dinosaurs

    Valley of the Dinosaurs

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    Deep in the heart of the Amazon, the Butler family was exploring an uncharted river canyon. Suddenly caught up in a violent whirlpool, they were propelled through an underground cavern, and flung into a hostile world of giant prehistoric creatures. A world that time forgot.

    Now befriended by a family of cave dwellers, each day is an adventure in survival for the Butlers in, the Valley of the Dinosaurs!moreless
  • 135
    Tony Orlando And Dawn

    Tony Orlando And Dawn

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    Welcome to the Tony Orlando And Dawn guide at TV.com.
  • 136
    Delvecchio

    Delvecchio

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    CBS (ended 1977)
    Delvecchio is a tough, independent, big-city LAPD police detective fighting crime in Los Angeles. Sgt. Dominick Delvecchio (played by Taxi and Numbers star Judd Hirsch) and his partner Sgt. Paul Shonski (Hills Street Blues star Charles Haid) are assigned cases that range from narcotics investigations to murders to auto thefts. His boss, and the man who assigns most of his cases, is Lt. Macavan (Michael Conrad, also of Hill Street Blues). Also seen regularly is Delvecchio's father, Tomaso (Mario Gallo), an Old World type who runs a small barbershop and is constantly perplexed about why his stubborn, determined son has become a cop. Hirsch plays Delvecchio as an honest LAPD cop of high integrity who works out of the Washington Heights division. He spends much of his free time studying for the bar exam, which he continuously fails. The critically acclaimed series lasted through one two hour TV movie pilot and twenty regular one hour episodes.moreless
  • 137
    Whew!

    Whew!

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    CBS (ended 1980)
    Welcome to the Whew! guide at TV.com. "Close calls! Narrow escapes! Split-second decisions! And $25,000 in cash! A combination guaranteed to make you say... Whew! That's the exclamation many contestants and viewers likely heard themselves uttering when watching this fast-paced game show, where strategy often dictated how well contestants did moreso than finding mistakes in the writer's statements. Not that the writers were bumbling idiots, of course, but that'll be explained in a bit. Two contestants, including a returning champion, competed in this show, which lasted 14 months on CBS (which, BTW, was Match Game 79's successor). The object was to correct "bloopers" (mistakes in the writers' statements, always underlined) on the gameboard within a 60-second time limit, while avoiding time-penalty "blocks" placed on the board by his/her opponent. An example of a "blooper": "Elmer Fudd is the host of The Tonight Show." (correct answer: Johnny Carson). The gameboard was a six-tier, 28-space display – a 5-by-5 grid of "bloopers," ranging from $10 (in the leftmost column) to $50; and Level 6 (the top row) having just three mis-statements of $250, $350 and $500. Host Kennedy read two categories, and the challenger decided which role s/he would play first, either as Blocker or Charger. Their roles were defined thusly: • Blocker – While the other player was off-stage, places up to six "blocks" on the gameboard, spaces he/she hoped the Charger would find as they made their way up the gameboard. Only one of the Level 6 questions could have a block, while no more than three could be placed in any of the five lower levels. • Charger – Once the blocks were in place, he/she tried to navigate his/her way up the gameboard, starting at the bottom level and correcting the underlined "bloopers." An incorrect answer meant having to choose another question on that level (he/she could not advance until a correct answer was given), but while it no doubt cost the Charger time, the Blocker was really hoping his/her opponent would uncover one of the "blocks." Those "blocks," when uncovered, were visually depicted by the show's mascots – a gang of motley mobsters, each holding a "no" sign. Revealing the block earned the Charger a five-second penalty (which they sweated out while their opponent, and oftentimes the audience, gleefully counted out the seconds). If time is running short and the Charger believes there is no way he/she can complete the five rows, he/she can yell out "Longshot!" That stopped the clock and automatically allowed that player to answer one of the Level 6 questions ... after the Blocker chooses one to hide a block behind. Should the Charger uncover a block, the Blocker wins the round (and cash for each uncovered block); otherwise, the Charger could correct the "blooper" to win the round and whatever cash he/she had collected on the board. The Blocker also won if the Charger gave a wrong answer or failed to answer in time. The roles were switched for the second round (i.e., the Blocker became the Charger and vice versa). If necessary, a tie-breaking third round was played, with either the champion or the player that lost the coin toss given the choice of roles. The winner of the best-of-three round advanced to the Gauntlet of Villians bonus round. In the Gauntlet of Villians, the player was given 60 seconds-plus one second for every $100 won (e.g., $850 meant 68 seconds) to solve 10 more "bloopers" (one per member of the show's mascot villians, now represented by large cardboard cutouts). The player had two seconds to correct the blooper. A correct response allowed the player to advance; a wrong answer or failing to answer in time (the answer was shown on the villian's screen) meant he/she had to stay put until giving a correct answer. Each correct answer was worth $100, but answering all 10 correctly won the $25,000 grand prize. A player stayed on for up to five shows or winning the grand prize. In November 1979, the producers of Whew! reverted to an age-old scheme to breath live into the ratings-starved game show: adding celebrity partners. The celebs played for an entire week. The players and their celebrity partners worked together to place "blocks" (when they were the Blockers) or correct the bloopers (when they were the Chargers). Other changes: • A team that swept the first two rounds played the third round against the house for more cash and extra bonus time; the show's staff now hid the "blocks" while the team took the Charger's role. • The champion decided whether he/she would tackle the first five and have his/her celebrity partner answer the remaining bloopers, or vice versa. Regardless of the outcome, the champion was paired with the other celebrity when playing against a new challenger. The best-known contestant during the year-long run of Whew! was Randy Amasia, a college student who won $26,190 during his abbrieviated championship reign (since he had won the grand prize on his first try at the Gauntlet of Villians and thereby exceeded CBS's $25,000 winnings ceiling). Amasia – who was one of the show's most brilliant contestants – later presided over several game show-related newsgroups, but it was his search for the videotape containing his championship run (he didn't have a copy) that soon made him famous. The search became more frantic in 2001 when he was diagnosed with terminal throat cancer. The story does not have a happy ending. Oh yes, a studio master containing the show in question was found. However, Amasia never got to savor his moment of glory. Shortly after a copy of the tape was prepared, Amasia succumed to his illness, leaving no doubt many game show fans to mourn a true legend of game showdom.moreless
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    Sabrina and the Groovie Goolies

    Sabrina and the Groovie Goolies

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Welcome to the Sabrina and the Groovie Goolies guide at TV.com. This hour-long show combined Sabrina, The Teenage Witch which migrated from The Archie Comedy Hour with the new series The Groovie Goolies. Originally seen as part of Sabrina the Teenage Witch in 1970, The Groovie Goolies was spun off in 1971 as a solo series and ran from 1971 to 1972 on CBS. It reappeared on ABC from 1975 to 1976.

    The show dealt with Sabrina's involvement with a band of monsters, The Groovie Goolies; a rock band with Dracula, the Wolfman, and Frankenstein; who scare people for their own amusement. They were joined by musical groups the Bare Bones Band and the Mummies & the Puppies.

    A.K.A The Groovie Goolies and Friends (syndicated title). On October 24, 2006, a DVD, The Groovie Goolies' Saturday 'Mourning' Collection, was released.moreless
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    Archie Bunker's Place

    Archie Bunker's Place

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    CBS (ended 1983)
    Archie Bunker's Place premiered in 1979 as a continuation of the very popular CBS series All in the Family. When the new series began, the focus of the series shifted from Archie and Edith's home life to Archie's bar, Archie's Place, which was now being expanded into a short-order restaurant. Some new regulars were introduced into the series such as Archie's new business partner, Murray Klein, cook Veronica Rooney, and some of Archie's friends, who were formerly recurring guest stars were now regulars or even costars. Edith was seen less frequently in the first season. Then at the beginning of the second season, the unthinkable happened. Edith suddenly died of a stroke, leaving Archie to care for little Stephanie all by himself. Archie later became full owner of the bar and grill with financial advice coming from lawyer/business manager Gary Rabinowitz, who happened to be in love with Archie's niece Billie, who had also come to stay with Archie. Archie Bunker's Place left CBS in 1983. Spinoff of: All in the Family Spinoffs: Gloria CBS Broadcast History: Sep 1979--Mar 1983; Sun 8:00-8:30 Mar 1983--May 1983; Mon 8:00-8:30 May 1983--Jun 1983; Sun 8:00-8:30 Jun 1983--Jun 1983; Mon 9:30-10:00 Jun 1983--Sep 1983; Wed 8:00-8:30 Nielsen Ratings: #11 1979-1980 Season #20 1980-1981 Season #13 1981-1982 Season #26 1982-1983 Season Awards for Archie Bunker's Place: Sheree North was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1980. Linda Day was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series for Tough Love in 1981. Anne Meara was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Variety or Music Series for Relapse in 1981. Carroll O'Connor won a Peabody Personal Award for Edith's Death in 1981. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1981. Anne Meara was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Variety or Music Series for Relapse in 1982. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for Golden Globes, USA Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV in 1982. Danielle Brisebois won a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1982. Marco Zappia was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Video Tape Editing for a Series for Three Women in 1983. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1983. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1984.moreless
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    Jason of Star Command

    Jason of Star Command

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    CBS (ended 1979)
    "Jason Of Star Command" was a segment of "Tarzan And The Super 7." (Originally called "The Batman/Tarzan Adventure Hour" and later called "Batman And The Super 7")

    The story of the show is this: Hidden away on the same base as Space Academy, Jason and his various partners (Nicole, Parsafoot and Samantha) and his pocket- robot, Wiki work as agents for Star Command, a secret organization whose mission is to combat evil. Dragos, Jason's main adversary, intends to rule the galaxy and it is up to Jason and the Star Command gang to stop him.

    Show intro: Danger hides in the stars! This is the world of Jason of Star Command. A space-age soldier of fortune determined to stop the most sinister force in the universe: Dragos, master of the cosmos. Aiding Jason in his battle against evil is a talented team of experts. All working together in a secret section of Space Academy. Jason of Star Command!moreless
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