• 41
    Magnum, P.I.

    Magnum, P.I.

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    CBS (ended 1988)
    Former Naval Intelligence officer Thomas Magnum resigns his commission to become a private investigator on the north shore of Oahu, Hawaii. He lands a home in the guest house on the estate of millionaire author Robin Masters in exchange for testing the estate's security, but is forced to work under the strict and ever watchful eye of Jonathan Quayle Higgins, a former British Army soldier who serves as the estate manager, and constantly patrols the grounds with his two "lads" Zeus and Apollo, who are loyally trained Doberman Pinschers always ready to pounce on Magnum. Magnum makes good use of the perks that come with working on the estate, including driving Masters' sporty red 308 GTS Ferrari, Audi, and all-terrain Jimmy, as well as equipment such as high-end cameras and telescopes. Of course, all of these expensive toys are under the keen scrutiny of Higgins, and Thomas often finds himself at the end of Higgins's hard bargaining to secure their loan. Although Magnum's carefree ways often clash with Higgins's stricter manner, their mutual respect forms a strong basis for their working relationship. Two of Magnum's former Vietnam comrades and friends live and work nearby. T.C. Calvin owns "Island Hoppers", a helicopter tour company, and Rick Wright manages the King Kamehameha Club, an exclusive beach front club. T.C.'s piloting skills and Rick's shady underworld contacts often get them roped into Magnum's cases. Others in Magnum's circle include Naval officers Mac MacReynolds, Maggie Pool, and Buck Greene; Hawaii P.D. officers Nolan Page and Yoshi Tanaka; Dr. Ibold; Higgins's fellow Brit Agatha Chumley; Rick's underworld contact "Ice Pick"; and Deputy D.A. Carol Baldwin. Robin Masters was never fully seen, ultimately leading Magnum to the conclusion that Higgins was actually Masters, though this theory was never fully proven. The show was a huge hit, with the first five seasons ranking in the top 20 shows in the U.S. ratings each year, thanks to its wide range of stories appealing to a broad cross section of fans, The series ranged from broad slapstick comedy and farce, to deep, thoughtful drama, to edge-of-the-seat action. The series was widely applauded for being the first to recognize the difficulty Vietnam era soldiers faced in making the readjustment to civilian life. Many episodes touched upon the impact that serving in Vietnam had on Magnum and his friends, as well as echoes to the events of World War II. The series won many awards, including Emmys and Golden Globes for Selleck and Hillerman. Broadcast History: December 1980 - April 1981: Thursday on CBS, 9:00 PM October 1981 - April 1987: Thursday on CBS, 8:00 PM October 1987 - May 1988: Wednesday on CBS, 9:00 PMmoreless
  • 42
    48 Hours

    48 Hours

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    CBS
    48 Hours began January 19, 1988 with Dan Rather anchoring/hosting until 2002. Leslie Stahl, took over for Rather in the Fall of 2002 and continues with the program to present day. This news magazine program began as a half hour show, evolving into the one hour investigative report that it remains today. The name has changed from "48 Hours" to "48 Hours Investigates" and the current, "48 Hours Mystery". Having won numerous awards in broadcast, it also now features a stellar 'cast' of individual award winning reporters and has been known to not just report on stories, but make real differences.moreless
  • 43
    The King of Queens

    The King of Queens

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    CBS (ended 2007)
    The King of Queens revolves around Doug Heffernan (Kevin James, Everybody Loves Raymond), a Queens, N.Y., parcel delivery man with simple desires. Among his prized possessions is a 70-inch television that his lovely wife, Carrie (Leah Remini, Fired Up), provided for him. However, now that Carrie's widowed father, Arthur (Jerry Stiller, Seinfeld), lives with them, Doug's television room has become Arthur's bedroom. Doug and his sports-watching buddies, Spence (Patton Oswalt, Crank Yankers) and Deacon (Victor Williams, The Animatrix)--and the beloved television--have been relegated to the garage, and Doug now shares his castle with a very eccentric father-in-law and his very unusual habits.

    Theme Song "My eyes are gettin' weary, My back is gettin' tight, I'm sittin' here in traffic, On the Queensborough bridge tonight, But I don't care cuz all I wanna do, Is cash my check and drive right home to you, Cuz baby all my life I will be driving home to you."moreless
  • 44
    Touched by an Angel

    Touched by an Angel

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    CBS (ended 2003)
    Tess (Della Reese, The Royal Family) and Monica (Roma Downey, A Woman Named Jackie) are two angels sent to earth to help people with their problems. Helping them are Andrew and the new angel, Gloria.moreless
  • 45
    M*A*S*H

    M*A*S*H

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    CBS (ended 1983)
    M*A*S*H was a true ensemble series. Whilst characters such as Kellye, Igor, Rizzo, Goldman and Ginger are listed where they appear as specific characters central to the plot, they also appeared regularly as non-speaking cast members. This is also true of many of the nurses, corpsmen, orderlies and drivers listed as guest stars. Based on the 1968 novel by Richard Hooker and the 1970 20th Century-Fox movie of the same name, M*A*S*H aired on CBS from September 17, 1972 to February 26th, 1983 for 251 episodes, and has become one of the most celebrated television series in the history of the medium. During its initial season, however, M*A*S*H was in danger of being canceled due to low ratings. The show reached the top ten program list the following year, and never fell out of the top twenty rated programs during the remainder of its run. The final episode of M*A*S*H was a two and one half hour special that attracted the largest audience to ever view a single television program episode. In many ways the series set the standard for some of the best programming to appear later. The show used multiple plot lines in a half-hour episodes, usually with at least one story in the comedic vein and another dramatic. Some later versions of this form, e.g. Hooperman (ABC 1987-1989) and The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd (NBC 1987-1989), would be known as the dramady, half-hour programs incorporating elements of both comedy and drama. Other comedies would forgo the more serious aspects of M*A*S*H, but maintain its focus on character and motive. And some dramatic programming, such as St. Elsewhere and Moonlighting would draw on the mixture of elements to distinguish themselves from more conventional television. M*A*S*H was set in Uijeongbu, South Korea, north of Seoul, during the Korean War. The series focused on the group of doctors and nurses whose job was to heal the wounded who arrived at this "Mobile Army Surgical Hospital" by helicopter, ambulance or bus. The hospital compound was isolated from the rest of the world. One road ran through the camp; a mountain blocked one perimeter and a minefield the other. Here the wounded were patched up and sent home--or back to the front. Here, too, the loyal audience came to know and respond to an exceptional ensemble cast of characters. The original cast assumed roles created in Altman's movie. The protagonists were Dr. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce(Alan Alda) and Dr. "Trapper" John McIntyre (Wayne Rogers). Pierce and McIntyre were excellent surgeons who preferred to chase female nurses and drink homemade gin to operating and who had little, if any use for military discipline or authority. As a result, they often ran afoul of two other medical officers, staunch military types, Dr. Frank Burns (Larry Linville) and Senior Nurse, Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan (Loretta Swit). The camp commander, Lt. Col. Henry Blake (McLean Stevenson), was a genial bumbler whose energies were often directed toward preventing Burns and Houlihan from court martialing Pierce and McIntyre. The camp was actually run by Corporal Walter "Radar" O'Reilly (Gary Burghoff), the company clerk who could spontaneously finish Blake's unspoken sentences and hear incoming helicopters before they were audible to other human ears. Other regulars were Corporal Max Klinger (Jamie Farr) who, in the early seasons, usually dressed in women's clothing in an ongoing attempt to secure a medical (mental) discharge, and Father Francis Mulcahy (William Christopher), the kindly camp priest who looked out for an orphanage. In the course of its eleven years the series experienced many cast changes. McIntyre was "discharged" after the 1974-75 season because of a contract dispute between the producers and Rogers. He was replaced by Dr. B.J. Hunnicutt (Mike Farrell), a clean cut family man quite different from Pierce's lecherous doctor. Frank Burns was given a psychiatric discharge in the beginning of the 1977-78 season and was replaced by Dr. Charles Emerson Winchester (David Ogden Stiers), a Boston blue blood who disdained the condition of the camp and tent mates Pierce and Hunnicutt. O'Reilly's departure at the beginning of the 1979-80 season was explained by the death of his fictional uncle, and Klinger took over the company clerk position. Perhaps the most significant change for the group occurred with the leave-taking of Henry Blake. His exit was written into the series in tragic fashion. As his plane was flying home over the Sea of Japan it was shot down and the character killed. Despite the "realism" of this narrative development, public sentiment toward the event was so negative that the producers promised never to have another character depart the same way. Colonel Sherman Potter (Harry Morgan), a doctor with a regular Army experience in the cavalry, replaced Blake as camp commander and became more both more complex and more involved with the other characters than Blake had been. Though the series was set in Korea, M*A*S*H, both the movie and the series, was initially developed as a critique of the Vietnam War. As that war dragged toward conclusion, however, the series focused more on characters than situations--a major development for situation comedy. Characters were given room to learn from their mistakes, to adapt and change. Houlihan became less the rigid military nurse and more a friend to both her subordinates and the doctors. Pierce changed from a gin-guzzling skirt chaser to a more "enlightened" male who cares about women and their issues, a reflection of Alda himself. O'Reilly outgrew his youthful innocence, and Klinger gave up his skirts and wedding dresses to assume more authority. This focus on character rather than character type set M*A*S*H apart from other comedies of the day and the style of the show departed from the norm in many other ways as well, both in terms of its style and its mode of production. While most other contemporary sitcoms took place indoors and were largely produced on videotape in front of a live audience, M*A*S*H was shot on film on location in Southern California, as well as in a closed studio set (studio #9 at 20th Century Fox). Outdoor shooting at times presented problems. While shooting the final episode, for example, forest fires destroyed the set, causing a delay in filming. The series also made innovative uses of the laugh track. In early seasons, the laugh track was employed during the entire episode. As the series developed, the laugh track was removed from scenes that occurred in the operating room. In a few episodes, the laugh track was removed entirely, another departure from sitcom conventions. The most striking technical aspect of the series is found in its aggressively cinematic visual style. Instead of relying on straight cuts and short takes episodes often used long shots with people and vehicles moving between the characters and the camera. Tracking shots moved with action, and changed direction when the story was "handed off" from one group of characters to another. These and other camera movements, wedded to complex editing techniques, enabled the series to explore character psychology in powerful ways, and to assert the preeminence of the ensemble over any single individual. In this way M*A*S*H seemed to be asserting the central fact of war, that individual human beings are caught in the tangled mesh of other lives and there must struggle to retain some sense of humanity and compassion. This approach was grounded in Altman's film style and enabled M*A*S*H to manipulate its multiple story lines and its mixture of comedy and drama with techniques that matched the complex, absurd tragedy of war itself. M*A*S*H was one of the most innovative sitcoms of the 1970s and 1980s. Its stylistic flair and narrative mix drew critical acclaim, while the solid writing and vitally drawn characters helped the series maintain high ratings. The show also made stars of it performers, none more so than Alda, who went on to a successful career in film. The popularity of M*A*S*H was quite evident in the 1978-79 season. CBS aired new episodes during prime time on Monday and programmed reruns of the series in the daytime and on Thursday late night, giving the show a remarkable seven appearances on a single network in a five day period. The series produced one unsuccessful spin-off, AfterMASH, which aired on CBS from 1983-85. The true popularity of M*A*S*H can still be seen, for the series is one of the most widely syndicated series throughout the world. Despite the historical setting, the characters and issues in this series remain fresh, funny and compelling in ways that continue to stand as excellent television. Some of the above info from the article in the Museum Of Broadcast Communications: M*A*S*H page, written by Jeff Shires. M*A*S*H Theme Song - "Suicide Is Painless" Written by Digital Tradition Mirror (Lyrics shortened for television theme) Through early morning fog I see, Visions of the things to be, The pains that are withheld for me, I realize and I can see... That suicide is painless, It brings on many changes, And I can take or leave it if I please. Ratings (Top 30 or Better) – 1972-1973:Not in Top 30 1973-1974:#4 1974-1975:#5 1975-1976:#15 1976-1977:#4 1977-1978:#9 1978-1979:#7 1979-1980:#5 1980-1981:#4 1981-1982:#9 1982-1983:#3 Telecast: CBS September 17, 1972 - September 19, 1983 Broadcast History (all times Eastern): Sep 1972 - Sep 1973, CBS Sun 8:00-8:30 Sep 1973 - Sep 1974, CBS Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1974 - Sep 1975, CBS Tue 8:30-9:00 Sep 1975 - Nov 1975, CBS Fri 8:30-9:00 Dec 1975 - Dec 1977, CBS Tue 9:00-9:30 Jan 1978 - Sep 1983, CBS Mon 9:00-9:30 251 Episodes In Color On Film Repeats air on Hallmark Channel.moreless
  • 46
    Mike & Molly

    Mike & Molly

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    CBS
    A couple finds love at an Overeaters Anonymous meeting in this multicamera comedy from Chuck Lorre, the force behind Two and a Half Men and The Big Bang Theory. The show stars Billy Gardell and Melissa McCarthy as the title characters.moreless
  • 47
    Everybody Loves Raymond

    Everybody Loves Raymond

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    CBS (ended 2005)
    Everybody Loves Raymond revolves around Ray Barone, a successful sportswriter living on Long Island with his wife, Debra, daughter, Ally, and twin sons, Geoffrey and Michael. That's the good news. The bad news? Ray's meddling parents, Frank and Marie, live directly across the street and embrace the motto "Su casa es mi casa," infiltrating their son's home to an extent unparalleled in television history. Frank's favorite expression, "Holy Crap," is shouted at regular intervals, and Marie's "cooking advice" is less than appreciated by Debra. Brother Robert, a divorced policeman, is constantly moving in and out of his parents' house, and loves to drop over and resent Ray's successful career and happy family life. Ray and Debra just wish someone would knock once in a while.moreless
  • 48
    The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson

    The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson

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    CBS
    On January 3, 2005, Craig Ferguson became the newest face in late night television. That's when he took over The Late Late Show. Ferguson was selected from a number of guest hosts after previous host Craig Kilborn stepped down in August 2004. Many people might recognize Craig as "Nigel Wick", Drew Carey's boss from The Drew Carey Show. The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson follows the traditional "late night talk show formula", which includes the host coming out from backstage and talking to the audience for a few minutes, then sits down at his desk, interviews a couple guests, and brings on an occasional stand-up comedian or musical talent to perform. The Late Late Show airs Monday-Friday at 12:35 am on CBS, following The Late Show with David Letterman. Theme Song: It's Hard to Stay Up It's Been a Long, Long Day and You Got the Sandman at the Door But Hang On, Leave the TV On and Let's Do It Anyway It's OK, You Can Always Sleep Through Work Tomorrow, OK? Hey Hey Tomorrow's Just a Future Yesterday Performed by Craig Fergusonmoreless
  • 49
    Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman

    Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman

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    CBS (ended 1998)
    Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman was a show that focused on Dr. Mike, a woman doctor in a time when that was unheard of. It started with her journey to Colorado Springs to be the town's physician after her father's death in 1868. The show focused around the town that she loved, treated and it also focused on the three children, Matthew (Chad Allen), Colleen (Erika Flores, later Jessica Bowman) and Brian Cooper (Shawn Toovey), whom she had to raise after their mother died from a rattle snake bite. In the later years, the show focused on Dr. Mike and Sully (Joe Lando) who got married and had a daughter towards the end of the shows successful run. There have been two movies made for television, and fans are gathering together in an effort that a third Dr. Quinn movie be produced.moreless
  • 50
    Hee-Haw

    Hee-Haw

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    CBS (ended 1992)
    Welcome to Kornfield Kounty & HEE HAW! SA-LUTE! Hee Haw, a country version of Rowan and Martin's Laugh In, was a staple of syndicated television for more than 20 years. It began as a weekly series on CBS in 1969, but the network canceled it in 1971 as part of an attempt to cleanse its schedule of rural-flavored shows (other casualties included The Beverly Hillbillies and Green Acres). While much of the shows humor came from its comedy skits and rural jokes, the meat of the show was its country music. Two or three stars – including current superstars and up-and-coming acts, as well as bluegrass and country gospel singers – guested each week. Sometimes, they also participated in the fun. And what do we mean by "fun?" A sampling from a typical episode includes: Comedy Skits: The Cornfield Jokes, Pickin' and Grinnin', Archie's Barbershop, Empty Arms Hotel, KORN Radio, Lulu's Truck Stop, Minnie's School, The Naggers (Gordie Tapp & Roni Stoneman) and much more. The cast also frequently asked Grandpa Jones, "What's For Supper?" And then, there was the comedic Burma-Shave style signs (sometimes used as bumpers between skits or as an outro to a commercial). Song Skits: "Pfft, You Was Gone," "Gloom, Despair and Agony on Me," "Repeating Gossip," "Hee-Haw's All Jug Band" and more. On occasion, serious music segments were featured, such as a singer-songwriter segment (which featured an artist singing one of his biggest hits and then performing a song he wrote that became a hit for someone else). The final segment of each show featured the Hee Haw Gospel Quartet – originally, hosts Owens and Clark, along with Grandpa Jones and Kenny Price – singing a gospel song. Virtually every major country superstar appeared on Hee Haw at one time or another – Charley Pride, George Jones, Conway Twitty, Sonny James, Ernest Tubb, Charlie Rich, Ray Price, Hank Williams Jr., Johnny Cash, Roy Acuff, Barbara Mandrell, Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, Loretta Lynn, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, the Statler Brothers, Alabama, George Strait, Alan Jackson, Travis Tritt, Vince Gill ... and many more. But not all the guests on the show were from country music. Frequently, there were singers from other genres who became popular with country audiences, plus actors and comedians appeared as well. One of the most memorable segments aired in early 1978, when Elvis Presley's father, Vernon Presley, delivered a tribute to his then-recently deceased son. Emotional tributes have also been offered for cast members who had passed away during the series' run. For the 1991-1992 season, the gang left Kornfield Kounty and headed to the city, adopting an urban theme – which included a mall and nightclub – and inviting more pop-oriented country performers in an attempt to draw a younger, more urban audience. The move was none too popular (to put it mildly) with the show's longtime viewers, who saw it as abandoning the traditional country focus that had made the show popular for so long. The revamped format lasted one season. During the 1992-1993 season, Clark hosted a series which featured clips from classic Hee Haw shows, along with new footage. The show was titled Hee Haw Silver. Hee Haw reruns currently air at 8pm Sunday nights, with a second episode airing 4:30pm on Saturday on RFD-TV.moreless
  • 51
    Friends with Better Lives

    Friends with Better Lives

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    CBS
    Best way to describe Friends With Better Lives is to say it is a "continuation" of the old Friends Sitcom, picking up where the old sitcom left off. Now all the characters are into the second - older adult - phase of their lives. As such, this sitcom is great. All the Friends fans will be thrilled to see the new "Chandler" working through his divorce, and all the other characters fall wonderfully into place as replacements for the older versions, as well. Viewers old enough to have enjoyed the old Friends will LOVE this show with gratitude. Viewers who haven't will enjoy it in it's own right - I've only seen the second episode so far (missed the pilot) and am already hooked.moreless
  • 52
    Gilligan's Island

    Gilligan's Island

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    CBS (ended 1967)
    Gilligan's Island centered around a group of people who were stranded on an uncharted deserted island somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. They all were on a boat tour, which found itself in the middle of a storm leading them to crash on an island! Those stranded include, Gilligan, the Skipper, a millionaire (Thurston Howell III) and his wife (Lovey Howell), a movie star (Ginger Grant), a professor (known as "The Professor"), and Mary Ann. Gilligan was the first mate on the boat, the SS Minnow. Most episodes dealt with the castaways trying to get off the island, but their attempts seemed to always be foiled by Gilligan. Broadcast History- Sept 1964-Sept 1965, CBS Sat 8:30-9:00 Sept 1965-Sept 1966, CBS Thurs 8:00-8:30 Sept 1966-Sept 1967, CBS Mon 7:30-8:00moreless
  • 53
    Dallas

    Dallas

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    CBS (ended 1991)
    In the ranks of prime-time dramas, this was one of the biggest. Dallas, the saga of the Ewing Family, began as a five part mini-series in 1978. Throughout its thirteen seasons, many actors passed through the gates of Southfork. In the late 1960's, Peyton Place was a nighttime serial drama success-a novelty at the time. But since then, no P.M. show had caught the soap opera crowd's attention… until Dallas. The show first went on the air for a five week run in early 1978, and then fell into a Saturday nighttime slot later that year. Ratings were fair, but they were nothing compared to when the show moved to Friday nights, when the ratings well didn't run dry for a long, long time. The Ewing family lived at the sprawling South Fork ranch, in hoity-toity Braddock County just outside Dallas. Like any good power family, there was a matriarch and patriarch, and three sons- this core group, their extensive romantic relations, and the Barnes clan of rival oilers were all Jacobs needed to create a self-contained histrionic world of intrigue, dysfunction and passion. Borrowing from Romeo and Juliet, the youngest Ewing boy, Bobby, fell for a beautiful Barnes girl. And with a nod to the biblical Cain and Abel, Bobby and older brother J.R. didn't exactly play nice with each other like you might expect brothers to. Whereas J.R. was nearly a hundred percent scoundrel, Bobby had discernable streaks of honesty and integrity…but that patented Ewing viciousness certainly reared its head once in a while. The South Fork ranch housed Jock and Miss Ellie, the king and queen of South Fork, J.R. and long-suffering wife Sue Ellen, and Bobby and Pamela…though why they all lived under one roof demands a little poetic license, because money certainly wasn't a problem, and it wasn't like there was a whole lot of binding inter-family harmony. Here's just a taste of the drama devices that ensued: insane asylums, car accidents, affairs, illegitimate children, gunfights, fistfights, catfights, lies, drinking problems (both real and imagined), poufy 80's hairstyles for the ladies and best of all, notorious season finale cliffhangers. The most famous, of course, came at the end of the 1979-80 season, when a mysterious late-night intruder shot J.R. in the chest while he was toiling away at the office one night. The resulting "Who Shot J.R.?" publicity raced around the globe, because by that time, Dallas was an international hit in just about every developed country in the world. Odds on the shooter's identity were figured, bets were placed, and theories were construed– since there were about fifteen possible candidates, fans and pundits were kept very busy indeed. Don't read the next part of this sentence if you want to remain one of the few of-age humans who doesn't know whodunit… it was Kristin, J.R.'s scorned sister-in-law and recent romantic entanglement. Dallas was conceived as a show that had plenty of sex and romance for the female audiences, and a lot of cowboy posturing and business intrigue for the male viewers. The formula worked, because by the early 1980's, it was one of the most popular shows in TV history. There were magazine covers galore, a spin-off named Knots Landing about Gary, the middle Ewing son who wasn't seen or heard from much during proceedings at South Fork, and primetime serialization imitators like Dynasty and Falcon Crest. So for the show that kicked off the nighttime drama trend that's status quo today, we tip those ten-gallon hats and breathe a secret sigh of relief that J.R. was just a fictional character who couldn't manipulate us in real life. Because let's be honest, that guy could have taken most of us down. CBS Broadcast History: April 2, 1978- April 30, 1978----Sundays----10:00-11:00 P.M. September 23, 1978- October 14, 1978----Saturdays----10:00-11:00 P.M. October 15, 1978- January 14, 1979----Sundays----10:00-11:00 P.M. January 26, 1979- November 27, 1981----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. December 4, 1981- May 17, 1985----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. September 27, 1985- May 16, 1986----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. September 26, 1986- May 13, 1988----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. October 28, 1988- March 9, 1990----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M. March 16, 1990- May 11, 1990----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. November 2, 1990- December 21, 1990----Fridays----10:00-11:00 P.M. January 4, 1991- May 3, 1991----Fridays----9:00-10:00 P.M.moreless
  • 54
    The Beverly Hillbillies

    The Beverly Hillbillies

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Jed Clampett and kin, a poor Ozark Hillbilly family, were barely surviving until one lucky day. Jed while hunting for food in his swamp missed his target and struck the ground with his shot. Up through the ground came a bubblin' crude, Oil that is, Black Gold, Texas Tea.

    After selling his swamp to the OK Oil Company for $25 Million, Cousin Pearl convinces Jed he should move his family to Beverly Hills. So Jed, along with his gorgeous daughter Elly May, feisty mother-in-law Granny, and half-witted nephew Jethro, all head to this new land inhabited by movie stars and the well-off.

    Jed and his family get to Beverly Hills, and their money goes into the Commerce Bank of Beverly Hills, with President Mr. Drysdale. For the nine years the clan is in Beverly Hills, all kinds of things happen. They try to get their beautiful daughter Elly May married. Their nephew Jethro gets a high education, highest in the family - he completes school through the sixth grade. Granny has her fights with Mrs. Drysdale and gets romanced by various men. And Jed takes hold of a movie studio. They travel to New York, Washington, and England. They make silent movies. And they make a few good friends.moreless
  • 55
    The Millers

    The Millers

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    CBS (Returning October 30, 2014)
    A recently divorced man’s life gets more complicated when his parents have marital problems of their own.
  • 56
    The Primetime Emmy Awards

    The Primetime Emmy Awards

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    CBS (Returning August 25th, 2014)
    Once a year, television's royalty gathers together for a ceremony honoring the best of the best of primetime TV. Shows, actors, and writers are all given a chance to take home a coveted Emmy statue--but in order to win, they must pass the mysterious and rigorous selection process of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. Millions of people tune in to watch each year's ceremony and find out if their favorite shows and actors have been recognized or ignored, and the results can often make or break a series or career. The Emmy statue, depicting a winged woman holding an atom, was developed in 1948 by Louis McManus. The statue is meant to signify the arts, through the female figure, and the sciences, through the atom. The name for the award is taken from "Immy," a slang term for "image orthicon tube," an ingredient of many early television cameras. Since the figure is female, "Emmy" seemed more suitable to the Academy.moreless
  • 57
    The Waltons

    The Waltons

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    CBS (ended 1981)
    This is the story of the Waltons. The show takes place during the Depression and then during World War II. John & Olivia had eight kids, three girls and five boys. One of the boys died at birth; he was a twin to Jim-Bob. John and Olivia's children names are John-Boy, Jason, Mary Ellen, Erin, Ben, twins Jim-Bob & Joseph, and Elizabeth; Joseph died at birth. John's parents also lived with them - Esther and Zeb. The Waltons was based on the life of the Hamner family. Earl Hamner Jr. was the show's creator and narrator. This show was based on his life growing up.moreless
  • 58
    The Talk

    The Talk

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    CBS
    Inspired by a mother's group Sara Gilbert went to after she had her baby, The Talk is a group of moms who get together to talk family issues, current events, celebrity gossip, and personal stories. Hosted by Sheryl Underwood, Sara Gilbert, Sharon Osbourne, Aisha Tyler, and Julie Chen. "Remember everytime is the right time to have The Talk."moreless
  • 59
    Ghost Whisperer

    Ghost Whisperer

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    CBS (ended 2010)
    Melinda Gordon is a young newlywed with the unique ability to communicate with the earthbound spirits of people who have died, and who seek her help. Melinda uses her gift to relay significant messages and important information to the living, but sometimes the messages she receives are intense and confusing. As a result, she is often met with questions and skepticism by the survivors. But when Melinda is able to help both the lost souls who contact her and those who are still alive, she knows that her unique talent is an asset and not a liability. Opening Narration: "I just got married. I just moved to a small town. I just opened an antique shop. I might be just like you. Except from the time I was a little girl I knew I could talk to the dead. Earthbound spirits my grandmother called them. The ones who have not crossed over because they have unfinished business with the living and they come to me for help. To tell you my story, I have to tell you theirs."moreless
  • 60
    Late Show with David Letterman

    Late Show with David Letterman

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    CBS
    Since 1993, legendary comedian and talk show host David Letterman has been interviewing guests and hosting musical performances at 11:35/10:35c weeknights on CBS. NOTE: Thanks to noted Letterman expert Don "Donz5" Giller for his help in contributing to this episode guide.moreless
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