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    The Wire

    The Wire

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    HBO (ended 2008)
    In chronicling a multi-generational family business dealing illegal drugs and the efforts of the Baltimore police to curb their trade, this series draws parallels between these organizations and the men and women on either side of the battle.

    The words of Gary W. Potter, Professor of Criminal Justice and Police Studies at Eastern Kentucky University, in writing about the savings and loan scandals of the 1980s, can also be used to illuminate some of the central premises of the show:

    "There is precious little difference between those people who society designates as respectable and law abiding and those people society castigates as hoodlums and thugs. The world of corporate finance and corporate capital is as criminogenic and probably more criminogenic than any poverty-wracked slum neighborhood. The distinctions drawn between business, politics, and organized crime are at best artificial and in reality irrelevant. Rather than being dysfunctions, corporate crime, white-collar crime, organized crime, and political corruption are mainstays of American political-economic life."

    Tim Goodman, the television critic for The San Francisco Chronicle, summed the show up perfectly when he wrote: "This show is precisely the reason you pay for HBO."

    In New York's Newsday, Diane Werts says: "Most TV crime series aspire to John Grisham's level. 'The Wire' aspires to Dostoevsky's."

    Season Themes

    Season One centers around a family of drug dealers and the innerworkings of their empire. It also follows the detectives who are trying to catch the high members of the empire. Season Two steps away from the drug trade (while still mentioning characters from the previous season) to a case of dead prostitutes which turns into a look at the corruption surrounding the Port. Season Three investigates politics and finishes the main stories that were left open in season one. Season Four focuses on four middle school students and their journeys through the public school system and continues to address the politics of an inner-city and the issues of an election. Season Five is rumored to be about the media's role in Baltimore. Season Five will be the show's final season.

    Theme Music

    In the Season One opening credits, the Blind Boys of Alabama did Tom Waits's "Way Down in the Hole". The Season Two opening credits feature Waits's version of the song. According to creator David Simon, "It was our way of saying: This is the same show (song) but this year, the tale itself (singer, tonality) will be different." The Neville Brothers's version of the song opens Season Three. The theme which plays over the end credits was composed by the show's music supervisor, Blake Leyh.

    International Airings

    Australia -- Monday at 12:00 p.m. on Ch.9. Currently airing Season 3. New Zealand -- Wednesday at 11:40 p.m. on TV2, beginning December 15, 2004.

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  • 2
    Tell Me You Love Me

    Tell Me You Love Me

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    HBO (ended 2007)
    This relationship drama brings viewers into the lives of three couples in committed relationships with intimacy problems. Jamie and Hugo are engaged and having doubts about fidelity, Carolyn and Palek are trying to have a baby, while Katie and David are parents who can't find time for sex. All three couples find themselves in therapy with a psychologist, Dr. May Foster. The show was created by Cynthia Mort; the pilot will be directed by Patricia Rozema, and will be executive produced by Gavin Polone and Vivian Cannon. Tell Me You Love Me is a production of Home Box Office (HBO) in association with Pariah Production.moreless
  • 3
    Elizabeth I

    Elizabeth I

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    HBO (ended 2006)
    Elizabeth I is a two-part mini-series starring Helen Mirren and Jeremy Irons and exploring the private and public life of Elizabeth I and her struggle to stay afloat in a male-dominated world.moreless