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    Awkward

    Awkward

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    MTV - Music Television (Returning September 23rd, 2014)
    The life of teenager Jenna Hamilton, played by Ashley Rickards, is forever changed after an accident turns into a horrible misunderstanding. When she receives a mysterious letter, a silly but awkward series of events unfolds as she struggles with her identity, love life and the difficulties of high school life.moreless
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    Beavis and Butt-head

    Beavis and Butt-head

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    MTV - Music Television
    Beavis and Butt-head was first aired on the U.S. cable network MTV in March 1993. This show, which combined animation and music videos, was an example of the unique programming that MTV has consistently provided for its youthful demographics. The half-hour program alternated between a simple narrative, which focused on the exploits of two low-life adolescents, and clips from music videos, which the two teens commented on. Creator Mike Judge had penned the aimless duo for a festival of animation when Abby Turkuhle, MTV's senior vice president picked up an episode for the network's animated compendium Liquid Television. MTV immediately contracted for 65 episodes from Judge, with Turkuhle as producer, and placed Beavis and Butt-head in the 7:00 and 11:00 P.M. week-day time slots. The characters, Beavis and Butt-head, are rude, crude, and stupid, and can be placed in the "dumb comedy" tradition, which includes Abbott and Costello, The Three Stooges, Cheech and Chong, Saturday Night Live's Wayne and Garth, and FOX's The Simpsons. When the show debuted, television critics differed in their opinions, with some praising the show for daring to present the stupidity of male "metalheads" who watch too much television (effectively satirizing the core MTV audience), and others categorizing Beavis and Butt-head as another example of television's declining quality. Beavis and Butt-head did find an audience and began pulling in MTV's highest ratings. But the show was also quite controversial, instigating heated public debate on the interconnected issues of representations of violence in the media and generational politics surrounding youth subcultures. Beavis and Butt-head they found, was especially popular with those in their twenties. It turned out to be bothersome to many that young people enjoyed the show and laughed at its two imbecilic boys, even if these fans were much more intelligent and much less grating than Beavis and Butt-head. In this sense, Beavis and Butt-head raised the issue of generational taste cultures. Definitions of "taste," Pierre Bourdieu notes, "unite and separate, uniting those who are the product of similar conditions but only by distinguishing them from all others. And taste distinguishes in an essential way, since it is the basis of all that one has--people and things--and of all that one is for others, whereby one classifies oneself and is classified by others." To the degree that taste cultures agree, they are brought together into a subcultural formation; but to this degree they are also separated from those with whom they differ. It was the "bad taste" of Beavis and Butt-head's audience which bothered many, and this brings to the surface another one of the reasons why Beavis and Butt-head was so controversial. Cultural critics, educators, and concerned parents gathered skeptically, sternly, and anxiously in front of the television set and passed judgment upon the "tasteless" Beavis and Butt-head show. And in an ironic reversal, Beavis and Butt-head countered by ascending the cultural hierarchy. The two youths channel-surfed, looking for videos that didn't suck (i.e. those with heavy metal or hardcore rap, those that contained violence, or encouraged genital response.) In becoming the self-proclaimed Siskel and Ebert of music video, they served to evaluate pop culture with an unencumbered bottom line--does a music video "suck" or is it "cool?" Beavis and Butt-head as a television show, was certainly towards the lower end of traditional scales of cultural "quality." But these two animated "slackers" evaluated other media, and so pronounced their own critical opinions and erected their own taste hierarchies. Beavis and Butt-head had their own particular brand of "taste:" they determined acceptability and unacceptability, invoking, while simultaneously upending, notions of "high" and "low" culture. In this, they entered that hallowed sphere of criticism, where they competed with others in overseeing the public good and preserving the place and status of artistic evaluation. They disregarded other accepted forms of authority, refusing to acknowledge their own limited perspectives. But like other critics, this was an important part of their appeal. After all, critics are sought out for straightforward opinion, not muddled oscillation. In this recuperation of the critical discourse, Beavis and Butt-head joined with their audience, approximating the contradictory impulses of contemporary cynical youth, who mixed their self-delusion with self-awareness. In the case of fans of Beavis and Butt-head, these lines of demarcation indicated both a generational unity and the generation-based barriers between the baby boomers and the "baby busters." The reputed cynicism of the "twentynothings" was on view as Beavis and Butt-head evoked both a stunted adolescence which was long past and an unsure and seemingly inaccessible future.moreless
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    Ridiculousness

    Ridiculousness

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    MTV - Music Television
    Rob Dyrdek hosts this series in front of a studio audience where he presents the most funny viral videos that that he puts into different categories such as "Redneck Good Times," "Worst Case Scenario" to "What Happened Last Night" and more.moreless
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    Rob Dyrdek's Fantasy Factory

    Rob Dyrdek's Fantasy Factory

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    MTV - Music Television
    This MTV original is set in "The Fantasy Factory," a 25,000 square foot warehouse in downtown Los Angeles where the professional skateboarder-turned-reality TV star Rob Dyrdek and his friends bring dreams to life.moreless
  • 5
    Underemployed

    Underemployed

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 2013)
    After their graduation from college, friends Sofia, Daphne, Lou, Raviva, and Miles believe that they will do great things. One year later, they are all struggling to make it through bad jobs, relationship problems, and navigate through a life they never dreamed would be so difficult.moreless
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    The Hard Times of RJ Berger

    The Hard Times of RJ Berger

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 2011)
    RJ, played by Paul Icaono, stars in a coming-of-age show about the hardships a fifteen-year old faces.
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    Good Vibes

    Good Vibes

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 2011)
    This coming-of-age story set in a beach town is the brainchild of Pineapple Express director David Gordon Green.
  • 8
    Nikki & Sara Live

    Nikki & Sara Live

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    MTV - Music Television
  • 9
    Girl Code

    Girl Code

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    MTV - Music Television
  • 10
    Zach Stone Is Gonna Be Famous

    Zach Stone Is Gonna Be Famous

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 2013)
    Zach Stone graduates college and decides to hire a documentary crew to follow him around instead of going to college. His goal? To prove that you can become famous without any talent at all.moreless
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    Death Valley

    Death Valley

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    MTV - Music Television
    The Undead Task Force (UTF, a branch of the LAPD that was formed in 2009 when the San Fernando Valley was overtaken by zombies, werewolves and vampires, must continue to get rid of the monsters and contain them in the valley. While this occurs, scientists work to find out what caused the outbreak. A brave camera crew comes along for the ride.moreless
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    My Life as Liz

    My Life as Liz

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    MTV - Music Television
    Liz Lee is not your typical teenage girl growing up in conservative Texas. Liz tries to make the best of her Senior year of high school by making a niche for herself among her peers.moreless
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    Silent Library

    Silent Library

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    MTV - Music Television
    A gameshow where contestants must perform "challenges", which are usually bizarre and always hilarious, as quietly as possible. If they succeed they are awarded money from the librarian/host . Should they fail, they miss out on the money.moreless
  • 14
    Pranked

    Pranked

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    MTV - Music Television
    MTV culls the best pranks featured on the web in this hilarious new series.
  • 15
    Disaster Date

    Disaster Date

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    MTV - Music Television
    MTV's hidden camera series rewards one unsuspecting dater cash for every minute he or she can hang in there during an awful date.
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    Money From Strangers

    Money From Strangers

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    MTV - Music Television
    Host Jeff Dye and a group of guest comedians decide to persuade unwitting contestants to pull pranks on strangers.
  • 17
    Warren the Ape

    Warren the Ape

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    MTV - Music Television
    Warren the Ape, a D-list puppet stars in a series of parodies in this MTV series.
  • 18
    You Wrote It, You Watch It

    You Wrote It, You Watch It

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 1992)
    The primise to MTV's You Wrote It, You Watch It was simple: people write to the show and skits are made based on the letters. Each show had a theme for example, one show was about letters that were about dreams. Jon Stewart was the host of the show, other cast members were random actors that performed the skits. Some the skit performers when on to MTV's The State and Comdey Central's Viva Varitey and Reno 911.moreless
  • 19
    MegaDrive

    MegaDrive

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    MTV - Music Television
    Johnny Pemberton tests out the most extreme vehicles in America on land and air, all the while freaking out the owners of the vehicles.
  • 20
    The Substitute

    The Substitute

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    MTV - Music Television
    Jon Gabrus, a substitute teacher, surprises students in by turning their classrooms into a game show!
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