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    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1982)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made its debut on NBC's daytime schedule on October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of The Hollywood Squares" acting both as straight man and an abettor in the fun. 2 contestants, including a returning champion competed in a best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant was "Mr. X" while the female was "Miss Circle" (the "O"). In turn, each contestant chooses a star to which host Marshall read a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with their own answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It was up to the contestant to decide whether they would agree or disagree with the star. A correct judgment earned the player their mark in the square, but an wrong reply meant their opponent got the square. That's unless it led to tic-tac-toe for which the contestant had to earn himself/herself. The 1st player to complete a tic-tac-toe (up-and-down, across or diagonally) won the game and cash, which varied depending on the version: • NBC daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967). $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC nighttime (1968): $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1982): $250 per game. Certain games were designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which was a bonus prize (or prize package) for the contestant who won it. To earn the Secret Square prize package, the contestant had to choose that celebrity (up to that point, known only to the home audience) for which Marshall read a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant was correct in agreeing or disagreeing, he or she won the Secret Square prize package. The prize won with the Secret Square and the frequency played was as thus: • NBC daytime: The 1st or 2nd game of each match. A new prize package was worth started about $1000 and so on (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat were included) and depending on what was added grew in value until claimed. • NBC nighttime (Friday Night): The 1st 2 games of the show. The 1st prize was generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America), while the 2nd Secret Square was a new car (most frequently the 1968 Pontiac Firebird, though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX were also offered). • Syndicated: During the early years (1971-1973), the 1st 2 games of each show, later the 1st 3 games (1973-1978). At 1st, unclaimed Secret Square stashes carried over to the next playing, but later went lost if the contestant didn't win it. At first, each Secret Square was worth about $2000 but later, individual prize packages were worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (1978-1980) that went back to be having the 1st 2 Games when "The Bonus Prize Squares" added to the nighttime syndicated run. The rules for becoming champion and reward also depended on the version you watched: • NBC daytime: Winning the best 2-of-3 match (which netted $400). At 1st, there was no bonus game; returning champions simply faced a new challenger after the commercial break and finally on September 6-10, 1976, a new "Bonus Prize Squares" game was added wherein the champion selected a star and won an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1978-1979). Originally, a 5-Match Champion retired undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) and a new car. The bonus was upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 to include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship, $5000 cash for early of it's period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the lead won a bonus prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value was about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the lead won a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in the NBC primetime and syndicated versions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant was given $50 for each square they had after the final question was played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – television, movies, music, sports, experts & the stage of Broadway and other locales– of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips and bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or walk-ons. The most popular regulars were Rose Marie, Charley Weaver, Wally Cox, Morey Amsterdam, Abby Dalton, George Gobel and ... of course, longtime center square Paul Lynde. Paul Lynde – by the way – wasn't always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime version of The Hollywood Squares premiered. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. Three months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one year (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV & Syndicated 1979-1980 Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 versions of the theme music of The Hollywood Squares were used. The 1st theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" was composed by Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season and it was replaced by a piece composed by William Loose; known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," it's the 2nd theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and ended before & after the 1978-1979 season. The disco-flavored theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" was composed by Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became the 3rd and last version of the song starting on December 3-7, 1979 and finishing on September 11, 1981. The Hollywood Squares ran on NBC daytime up to June 20, 1980, when it was replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime show. 3 revivals all had varying levels of success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as The Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour); A 1986-1989 syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares square placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) and the 1998-2004 edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network; the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes. Originally having aired in several weekday timeslots, the show was eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30 a.m. EST). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many of the stars have died or are unfamiliar to younger audiences) and were eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 10, 1982 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company.moreless
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    The Celebrity Apprentice

    The Celebrity Apprentice

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    NBC
    The Apprentice is the ultimate job interview, where sixteen Americans (eighteen in seasons two through six, fourteen in seasons seven and nine) compete in a series of rigorous business tasks, many of which include prominent Fortune 500 companies and require street smarts and intelligence to conquer, in order to show Donald Trump, the boss, that they are the best candidate for his companies. In each episode, the losing team is sent to the boardroom, where Trump and his associates, Carolyn Kepcher and George Ross, and later, his children, Donald Trump, Jr., and Ivanka Trump, judge the job applicants on their performance in the task. One person is fired and sent home. Who will succeed? Who will fail? And who will be The Apprentice? The eleventh season of The Apprentice will be the fourth celebrity candidate format, with the cast set to be announced by January. The tenth season of The Apprentice returned to having real people compete to become the Apprentice. The theme of this season was candidates who'd been badly affected by the country's recent economic recession, and all sixteen candidates competed to try and get a second chance and ultimately change their lives. The teams were divided into men vs. women once more, and again, the drama between team members was plentiful, and the boardroom battles were epic. The tasks were a bit predictable, as most were simple marketing tasks or fundraising tasks, but at least Trump returned to making understandable, actually fairly rational firing decisions in the boardroom. The season also contained the first-ever firing by disqualification when a candidate illegally sent text messages to friends outside of the game and was caught for it. In the end, Brandy Kuentzel faced off with Clint Robertson in the first-ever pre-taped final boardroom, with Kuentzel walking away as the seventh (regular) Apprentice (and the third female Apprentice). The ninth season of The Apprentice was the third celebrity edition. Fourteen celebrities competed for the title of the third Celebrity Apprentice and the grand prize of $250,000 for the charity of the choice. The season was already rife with big personalities and lots of drama, and many tough competitors emerged early on. However, like the prior season, Trump made firings that weren't very credible, and the drama was almost nonexistent. In the end, rock star Bret Michaels faced off with actress and author Holly Robinson Peete in the final two, and quite possibly due to a sympathy factor from him getting sick weeks before the live finale, Trump crowned Michaels as the third Celebrity Apprentice, though Robinson Peete got a large cash donation to her charity, anyway. The eighth season of The Apprentice was yet another celebrity edition. Sixteen celebrities competed for the title of the second Celebrity Apprentice and the grand prize of $250,000 for the charity of their choice. The cast was more interesting than the previous batch of celebrities, and the drama was a lot more intense. However, Trump started making less credible decisions in his firings, and the episodes were soon more about the drama among the celebrities than it was about the actual tasks. In the end, comedienne Joan Rivers faced off against professional poker player Annie Duke in the show's second all-female final two, and despite the majority opinion that Duke's performance throughout the season had been better overall, Trump ended the season on a sour note with the controversial decision to name Rivers as the second Celebrity Apprentice. The seventh season of The Apprentice saw the show returning to New York City. And this time, instead of real people being the candidates, celebrities were. Fourteen celebrities vied for the title of the first-ever Celebrity Apprentice, including a returning Omarosa Manigault-Stallworth from the first season. Among the changes were both teams facing the boardroom following the task to hear what each team did right and wrong, in case that team ended up in the boardroom. The season certainly wasn't without its share of drama, and it showed some pretty smart celebrity candidates. In the end, America's Got Talent judge Piers Morgan and country singer Trace Adkins faced off in the final two, and Morgan took the title of first-ever Celebrity Apprentice, taking $250,000 for the charity of his choice along with him. The sixth season of The Apprentice saw the show leave New York City and move to an all-new location: Los Angeles, California! Here, Carolyn Kepcher and George Ross were gone and replaced as viceroys by Donald Trump's children, Donald, Jr., and Ivanka. While the candidates, among whom were the show's first Asian-American man, the first Jamaican woman, a cervical cancer survivor, and not one, but two openly gay men, were interesting, the season pulled the show's lowest ratings ever, with too much focus on Trump and his brands, as well as Los Angeles pop culture, and not enough on the candidates and the tasks. Also, Trump's logic behind his firing decisions made less and less sense. In the end, Stefani Schaeffer, James Sun, Nicole D'Ambrosio, and Frank Lombardi all faced off in the show's first-ever final four finale that saw Stefani and James ending up as the final two, and Stefani walking away as the sixth Apprentice (and the second female Apprentice, to boot). The fifth season of The Apprentice started with something new: the first Project Managers were chosen by Trump, and they got to pick their own teams. Also, exemptions were wiped clean from the rules. The season started out with promise, with four international candidates from Canada, Cuba, Great Britain, and Russia, but lost steam as the more interesting, colorful candidates, including three of the four international ones, quickly bit the dust and were fired earlier than the blander, less interesting ones. The show ended up with what's been considered to be its worst final two ever, and in the end, the final international candidate, Sean Yazbeck, claimed victory over Lee Bienstock, the youngest candidate to ever make it to the final two, and won the title of the fifth Apprentice, as well as the honor of being the first winner to not be a native-born American. The fourth season of The Apprentice returned to the basics -- the same men vs. women format and winning Project Managers winning exemption -- but this time, with a twist. The winning Project Managers would only receive exemption from Trump if the team cast a majority vote to okay it. The season, which featured the first-ever openly gay contestant and first-ever Russian immigrant, easily shaped up to be one of the best seasons of the show, with an interesting cast, exciting tasks, and even the show's first-ever quadruple-firing! In the end, Dr. Randal Pinkett faced off with Rebecca Jarvis in the final two and won his rightful title as the fourth Apprentice and the first African-American winner. However, the finale was marred by his refusing Trump's offer to hire Rebecca, as well, in what would've been the show's first double-hiring. The third season of The Apprentice included a new twist: there are already two preset teams, "Book Smarts" and "Street Smarts" (Magna Corporation and Net Worth Corporation, respectively). They went head-to-head to see which team was smarter. In the end, the question was answered in the showdown of the century -- Kendra Todd, a college graduate, faced off against Tana Goertz, a high school graduate, in the show's first all-female final two. While in the end, the Book Smarts won the battle, as Kendra was given the grand prize and the title of the third Apprentice (and the first female Apprentice, to boot), the experiment of season three showed that both groups of people can be very successful. The second season of The Apprentice pitted men and women against each other again, but with several changes. The winning Project Manager, or team leader, received an exemption the next week should his or her team lose the task. The tasks became tougher, the judging became harder, and the contestants became fiercer. By the end of the season, Kelly Perdew, though met with tough competition by Jennifer Massey, took his place with Trump on the other side of the boardroom table as the second Apprentice. The first, and now classic, season of The Apprentice asked the age-old question: which gender is smarter? Packed with memorable contestants and mesmerizing moments, the first season was an enormous hit, garnering some of NBC's best ratings in years. By season's end, Bill Rancic was told, "You're hired!" and named the first and original Apprentice over Kwame Jackson, and all of the cast members became instant celebrities, with Donald Trump, as always, at the head of the pack. NBC Broadcast History January 8 & 15, 2004-- Thursday 8:30pm January 14 & 28, 2004 through April 14, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Repeats) January 21, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (First Run Episode) January 29, 2004 - Present Day -- Thursday 9:00pm September 11, 2004 - September 25, 2004 -- Saturday 8:00pm October 2, 2004 - October 23, 2004 -- Saturday 9:00pm (Repeats) Special Presentations February 5 & 12, 2004 -- Thursday 8:42pm (Special Supersized Episodes) April 17, 2004 -- Saturday 9:00pm (2 Hour Rebroadcast Season 1 Finale) September 9, 2004; January 20, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (1 1/2 Hour Season Premieres) September 16, 2004 -- Thursday 9:20pm (Special Supersized Episode 1 Hour & 40 Minutes) September 29, 2004 -- Wednesday 9:00pm (Day Early) December 1, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Recap Special, Day Early) January 27, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Supersized Episode) March 24, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Time) CNBC also airs episodes of The Apprentice on a rotating schedule (when the season is current) Global Broadcast History (Canada) January 8 & 15, 2004 -- Thursday 8:30pm January 14 & 28, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Repeats) January 21, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (First Run Episode) January 29, 2004 - Present Day -- Thursday 9:00pm October 2, 2004 - October 23, 2004 -- Saturday 9:00pm (Repeats Special Presentations in Canada April 18, 2004 -- Sunday 1:06am (2 Hour Rebroadcast Season 1 Finale) September 9, 2004 -- Thursday 8:30pm (1 1/2 Hour Season 2 Premiere) September 16, 2004 -- Thursday 9:20pm (Special Supersized Episode 1 Hour & 40 Minutes) September 29, 2004 -- Wednesday 9:00pm (Day Early) December 1, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Recap Special, Day Early) January 20, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (1 1/2 Hour Season 3 Premiere) January 27, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Supersized Episode) March 24, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Time) The Apprentice (US Version)in Other Countries: New Zealand: 8:35 PM on TV2 Hong Kong: 8.35 PM Saturdays on TVB Pearl Latin America:9PM Wednesdays on People+Arts (a BBC-Discovery Channel) Turkey: 9PM Thursdays on CNN Turk Sweden: 10:30 PM Sundays on Kanal 5 United Kingdom: 6 PM Weekdays on BBC-2 Brazil: 9PM Wednesdays on People+Arts (a BBC-Discovery Channel). A Brazilian version, O Aprendiz airs Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 PM on People+Arts and at 10:15 PM on Rede Record The Apprentice Theme Song is "For the Love of Money" by The O'Jays. The Apprentice is created by Mark Burnett, the mind behind series like Survivor, The Contender, and The Restaurant. The Apprentice has been instantly successful, garning Emmy ratings, spinoffs (the upcoming The Apprentice: Martha Stewart), copycat series, spoofs, DVD sets, and books. While only premeiring a year ago, it is regarded as a shining classic in a genre filled with junk.moreless
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    Love in the Wild

    Love in the Wild

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    NBC
    Prospective couples are placed in exotic locations and put to the test with multiple challenges in order to see if a romance can bloom.
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    American Ninja Warrior

    American Ninja Warrior

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    NBC
    Athletes from across America try to conquer an obstacle course. The top ten athletes travel to Japan to compete in Ninja Warrior (the Japanese original). Their main task ahead is to make it to the top of Sasuke, a 150ft tall metal monster obstacle. As of 2009 only 4 people in Ninja Warrior's 12 year historyhave made it to the top.moreless
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    Hollywood Game Night

    Hollywood Game Night

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    NBC
    The series won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Host for a Reality or Reality-Competition Program - Jane Lynch.
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    Deal or No Deal

    Deal or No Deal

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    NBC (ended 2009)
    NBC brings the high stakes international hit game show Deal or No Deal to American audiences. Actor-comedian Howie Mandel hosts the exciting game of odds and chance.
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    State Trooper

    State Trooper

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    NBC (ended 1959)
    Investigator Rod Blake of the Nevada State police works with the county sheriffs to catch the bad guys.
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    America's Toughest Jobs

    America's Toughest Jobs

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    NBC (ended 2008)
    This NBC reality project spotlights the action and adventure found in this country's workforce. It is a competition series where each week 13 men and women must work on physically demanding jobs. Each week a contestant will be eliminated if his or her work is not up to par. The last remaining worker will receive the combined annual salaries of the jobs in the competition.moreless
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    The Winner Is...

    The Winner Is...

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    NBC
  • 10
    Last Comic Standing

    Last Comic Standing

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    NBC
    A nationwide talent search accepting the best professional and non-professional stand-up comedians. Once the selection process is narrowed to 10, the show covers the contestants as they live together and compete for an exclusive contract with NBC, and to be called the Last Comic Standing.

    In Season 3 ("The Battle of the Best"), the object of the contest was the first season's 10 finalists versus second season's 10 finalists. No immunity challenges this time, or time spent showing the comics living together. It's pure stand-up.

    Rating: TV-14moreless
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    Great American Road Trip

    Great American Road Trip

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    NBC
    Does the thought of a family road trip fill you with dread? NBC has come up with a way to appeal to American's competitive spirits with this reality series. Seven families will drive cross-country to popular national destinations and compete in physical challenges.moreless
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    Average Joe

    Average Joe

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    NBC (ended 2005)
    The series involves an ex-beauty queen/NFL cheerleader who's lead to believe she'll be on a dating show where she'll get to pick from a group of handsome men, a la "The Bachelorette." The first twist comes when she arrives and discovers the guys are actually "Average Joes." In the first season, the bachlorette is Melana Scantlin. NBC Studios is behind the series which will contain original twists and turns for the current dating/reality genre. Specifics however where not revealed. In the show, each week the beauty learns about her suitors during group and individual dates, as she determines which one might be her soul mate. She faces tough decisions as she must eliminate some guys in order to focus on those she has the most chemistry with. As the host and confindant, Kathy Griffin will offer her take on the behaviors and personalities af the men and is on hand to introduce the many twists and turns the show takes. The Peacock has committed to six episodes of the reality series from Executive Producers Stuart Krasnow ("America's Most Talented Kid") and Andrew Glassman (CNBC). Kathy Griffin ("The Mole") will host the project which, like FOX's "Mr. Personality" will test how important looks are in the dating process. Average Joe 2: Hawaii Hot on the heels of this Fall's hit Average Joe, NBC premieres the second installment of the series, Average Joe: Hawaii, on Monday, January 5 (10-11 p.m. ET). This new series was taped before the first series ever aired, thus protecting the twist. "As soon as we saw the first tapes of the original ‘Average Joe,' we knew there was rich potential for a second helping of this twisted take on the dating show. The fact that we taped both series before either hit the air allows for the surprise twists to hit the new participants with the same impact they had on the original show," said Zucker. In this new series, the crown of "Average Joe's" former beauty queen and NFL cheerleader Melana Scantlin is passed on to another former Miss USA contestant and model - Larissa Meek, who is swept away to a secluded island paradise with the promise of romance to be found among a group of 18 Prince Charmings. With no way of knowing the secret twist to "Average Joe" in advance, our new beauty must decide how to proceed when she meets the unexpected group of guys with big personalities, but admittedly average looks, ranging from a 5-foot-3 engineer to 340 pound sewage contractor. While finding themselves on what one dismayed ‘Average Joe' describes as "nerd island," the guys happily greet their beauty unaware that in a few short weeks a group of eight traditional dating-show-studs will join the competition to vie for her affection. As the series proceeds, new takes on the twists of "Average Joe" are in store for the audience along with brand new dramatic surprises; and tensions between the two groups of men reach new levels in several emotionally charged ‘joe' vs. ‘jock' showdowns. Average Joe 3: Adam Returns NBC will be premiering the third season of the series, Average Joe: Adam Returns, on Monday, March 15 (10:00 PM). The new season will be having new twists, and the biggest one would probably be Adam Mesh's return to the show. After Melana Scantlin's choice to take Jason as a winner on Average Joe's first season finale, instead of Adam, Adam's fans sent a big number of e-mails for bringing Adam back. Finally, after second season finished its airing, Adam Mesh will return to the show as a main bachelor in Average Joe 3: Adam Returns. Now Adam Mesh has the power to choose over some girls... Average Joe 4: The Joes Strike Back The newest and boldest installment of NBC's popular relationship series Average Joe about average-looking guys with big hearts and great personalities hoping to win the love of a beautiful woman returns with more twists, turns and conflicts than ever before. This time, stunning 26-year-old red-headed beauty Anna is the alluring bachelorette. Born in Poland and raised in Las Vegas, Anna has a degree in business administration and is now a model and entrepreneur. Once again, the unsuspecting model thought she was on a traditional dating show only to be surprised by a swarm of average Joes, including a tool salesman, a pest control guy and a computer-science student pursuing his Ph.D. In the six-episode series, the 18 enthusiastic average Joes hope to woo and win her over with their charm and personalities. But first, they'll have to navigate through an all new series of dramatic twists and turns, outrageous surprises ? and their toughest competition yet ? seven strikingly handsome jocks who are cocky and confident that Anna will only have eyes for them. Also included are a romantic getaway to exotic Tahiti, surprise visitors for both the Joes and Anna, and the return of three of the most popular former Average Joes in the premiere. NBC Broadcast History November 2003 - April 2004 -- Mondays 10:00 PM June 2005 - July 2005 -- Tuesdays 8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History - Special Night: Season 4 FINALE - July 27 2005 -- Wednesday 8:00 PMmoreless
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    Amnesia

    Amnesia

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    NBC (ended 2008)
    How well do you know your own life? Contestants are tested on this very subject on Amne$ia, a new series hosted by Dennis Miller (author of The Rants, co-host of GSN's Grand Slam) airing Friday nights on NBC. Amne$ia tests contestants on the details of their lives, from events in their distant past, to the minutiae of things they might see but not realize every day. Possible questions include what type of wedding dress your spouse wore to the speed in your neighborhood. Amne$ia follows hot on the heels of two popular NBC games shows -- Deal or No Deal and 1 vs. 100. The program premieres on Friday, February 22, 2008, immediately following the season finale of 1 vs. 100.moreless
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    American Gladiators

    American Gladiators

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    NBC (ended 2008)
    American Gladiators pits everyday athletes against the show's gladiators in contests of physical strength and endurance. The revival of theAmerican Gladiators franchise features such classic events as The Joust, The Wall, Hang Tough, and Eliminator with upgraded 21st century technology, as well as many new and expanded events. The show is hosted by Hulk Hogan and Laila Ali.moreless
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    Treasure Hunters

    Treasure Hunters

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    NBC (ended 2006)
    Treasure Hunters is an exciting new adventure quest series featuring multi-player teams that will be sent off around the globe on a search for clues leading to the location of a hidden treasure. The first team to decipher all of the clues will be given the location of the treasure. The focus of the show will is not so much on the race to find clues, but on the actual solving of the puzzle instead.moreless
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    The Sing-Off

    The Sing-Off

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    NBC
    Vocal-only groups get a chance to compete for a recording contract from Sony Music in this NBC take-off on American Idol.
  • 17
    The Weakest Link (US)

    The Weakest Link (US)

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    NBC (ended 2002)
    This British import, along with Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, helped kick off a brief game show craze. The host, Anne Robinson, the same as the British version, was frighteningly rude to the players, insulting their lack of knowledge with some acidic remarks and glaring looks. While the clock ticked down from two minutes, (ten seconds less each subsequent round), questions were tossed to each player. A correct response raised the bank, and each player could call out "Bank" before their question, to shift the winnings into the kitty. Any wrong answer, and the bank would revert to the first stage. A string of eight correct answers could give the team $125,000 per round. At the end of each round, the players voted someone off. That person had to suffer walking in disgrace across the stage, then giving a short opinion about losing. The last two played a final round, in which the bank was doubled, then faced each other in a best of five question showdown. Only one took home the money. The catch phrase, "You are the weakest link. Good-bye.", caught on with viewers. At one point in the summer of 2001, eight of the top 25 U.S. prime time shows were contests. 'Link's initial ratings were a big boost to NBC, which quickly added a second weekly time slot, and ordered a second season of episodes. However, during the aftermath of 9/11, and the Afghan war, TV schedules were disrupted, many shows were pre-empted, and the momentum slowed. In that winter, NBC cut the broadcast to once a week, on Sunday night, but then the NBA games often cut off the beginning of the show, and during the playoffs, shows were rescheduled for future dates. More and more special celebrity episodes were aired. Interest was falling, ratings dropped, and on May 16, 2002, Jeff Zucker, entertainment president, announced the cancellation. On July 14, NBC aired it's last new episode. Later that year, some of the unaired shows appeared on PAX network. This was a great relief to some of the game winners, who didn't get paid until the broadcast, and were sworn to secrecy under threat of lawsuits. The remaining episodes later aired on GSN, who had bought the rights.moreless
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    The Gong Show

    The Gong Show

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    And now, let us introduce, for your viewing pleasure: • A bearded, demented-looking dentist taunts his hapless patient as he drills her teeth, flipping the drill's switch to the tune of "Stars and Stripes Forever." • A petite homecoming queen, obviously nervous, is duped into singing the National Anthem after she and fellow members of the choir have been introduced as collectively performing "The Star Spangled Banner." • A grossly overweight man tap-dances to music from "Swan Lake"; later his equally obese wife squeezes into a tiny tutu and, after fitting her head in a teacup, spins around while playing "Old Folks at Home" on the mandolin. • An Elvis impersonator sings "Hound Dog," but his voice is a monotone. Who didn't live for acts such as those on The Gong Show, the classic parody of ameteur talent contests? Chuck Barris was the straight man (yeah, right) to a panel of three celebrity judges – usually singer Jaye P. Morgan, comedian Arte Johnson (of Rowan and Martin's Laugh In) and Jamie Farr (of M*A*S*H*); plus one or more guests – each assigned the task of enduring and judging the ameteur acts that performed, either solo or in groups. Yes, some of the acts that performed had legitimate talent and did very well, although all of good acts were ameteurs because of Barris' strict rule against allowing professionals as contestants. However, the real fun came in watching those hilariously awful acts. Just a short list of acts might include: • The mustached-magician trying to get his "talented" pigeons to dance. • The teen-aged girls in pastel-colored prom dresses singing "People Who Need People" while dancing in a conga line. • The young comic who did impressions of modern-day actors performing Shakespeare. • An older woman whose dog had the knack for imitating other barnyard animals. • A man who broke eggs over his head while making faces in a sheet of Plexiglas. • "Professor Flamo" – a man who sang out in pain while lowering various body parts onto burning candles. Joey D'Auria was "Professor Flamo" and would later become Bozo the Clown on WGN (1984-2001). • An entire episode dedicated to contestants singing their rendition of "Feelings." ... and countless other acts that were wild and outrageous. Do those acts sound bad? Of course they did, and any one of the celebrity judges had the right to terminate the act by striking his/her mallet against an oversized "gong" (often, two or all three did, and several times, they fought to get to the gong first). The act had to immeidately cease and were out of the running for the grand prize. Early in the run, some acts were "gonged" just seconds into the act, prompting Barris to implement a mandatory 45-second wait (though judging by the frequent reactions of the celebs, that was often way too long). Acts that did reach their conclusion (the longest performances were usually two-and-a-half minutes) were scored by the panelists on a scale of 0 to 10, with a high score of 30 possible. The highest-scoring act of the day won the grand prize – $516.32 on the daytime show, $712.05 (later $1,000) on the syndicated version; however, a grand-prize winner was not necessarily guaranteed, particularly if all of the acts were gonged. The 1976 syndicated version, which debuted months after the NBC version began, was identical to the daytime version, except that Gary Owens hosted (until 1978, when Barris took over that job). Acts on The Gong Show became more and more risqué during the final months of the daytime version. The final straw came during a 1978 daytime telecast, when many viewers declared a certain act obscene (The Popsicle Twins) (that act would fit in quite nicely with Game Show Network's overtly sex-littered 1998 revival, called Extreme Gong); NBC apparently agreed and – whether on its own accord or bowing to pressure from viewers and advertisers – cancelled The Gong Show. Not to worry for original Gong Show fans; the fun continued unabated in syndication until 1980. Running gags featuring the show's regular cast were also popular. Some included: • An inept musician (Larry Spencer) who announces his intention to "play" a certain musical instrument "right now" (with the instrument failing on cue) • Barris reading a children's story with alternate endings (and enacted by the show's cast). • Brief skits from the "Unknown Comic" (comedian Murray Langston) and "Gene Gene the Dancing Machine" (Gene Patton). There was also Scarlett & Rhett where every joke was a dirty one that constantly required the "OOPS!" sign to flash! Also, guest performers – former winning contestants with legit talent and real celebrities, including Alice Cooper – were invited to perform in non-scoring, non-gongable segments. John Barbour (later of Real People) was supposed to be the host, but his straight-man style didn't work out and Barris let him go before the first aired episode taped. Barris took over the job himself and the rest was history. The Gong Show quickly became a part of American popular culture, with local versions staged as fundraisers by college, high school and civic groups. There were two unsuccessful attempts to revive The Gong Show. A 1988 revival, hosted by Don Bleu didn't catch on with viewers and was cancelled after less than 26 weeks. Critics panned the aforementioned Extreme Gong (a revival to play off the popularity of reruns of the original series), thanks in large part to the risqué content; hosted by comedian George Gray, the celebrity panel was replaced by a 1-900 number for viewers to judge the acts.moreless
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    Who's Still Standing?

    Who's Still Standing?

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    NBC (ended 2012)
    Who's Still Standing? is the NBC competition series based on the Israeli hit show Still Standing, where contestants compete in trivia battles. One main competitor faces off against 10 challengers in a battle for a million dollar jackpot, and the stakes are raised even more by having trap doors drop them if they answer wrong.moreless
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    The Apprentice: Martha Stewart

    The Apprentice: Martha Stewart

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    NBC (ended 2005)
    The goal of The Apprentice was to find the best business man or woman to join Donald Trump in his organization. Now, from the people who brought you The Apprentice, Survivor, The Contender, and The Restaurant, they bring you The Apprentice: Martha Stewart where the goal is for Martha Stewart to find the best homemaker like her to head one of her businesses. Who will be Martha Stewart's Apprentice? The theme song for The Apprentice: Martha Stewart is "Sweet Dreams" by Annie Lennox whom personally allowed Martha to use the song.moreless
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