• 41
    Blockbusters

    Blockbusters

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    NBC (ended 1987)
    Are two heads really better than one? That's what the early 1980s version of Blockbusters attempted to determine. That's because a solo player was pitted against a family pair (siblings, parent/child, uncle/aunt and nephew/niece, grandparent/grandchild ... anything except husband and wife or other form of couple), with one set of contestants the returning champion(s). The object was to connect both sides of the 5-by-4 board of hexagons through correct answers. The solo player (red) had to connect vertically (at least four blocks), while the family pair (white) went side-to-side (needing to connect at least five blocks). Each hexagon had a letter, which was the first letter in the answer to a question host Cullen read. For example, if a player chose "B," the question might be – "What 'B' is a male amphibian or Jerimiah in the Three Dog Night song 'Joy to the World'?" Answer – Bullfrog). Anyone could buzz in and answer, with a correct answer gave the player/team the box and a wrong answer allowing the opponent(s) to answer. If nobody answered correctly, another question whose answer began with that same letter is asked. Players always tried to block the opponent's progress at all times (requiring them to work their way around and answer more than the minimum number of questions needed to win); often, players chose a box that could help them but not do their opponent's a bit of good. Each game in the best-of-three match was worth $500, with two games winning the match and a trip to the Gold Run bonus round. In the Gold Run, the player (or one member of the family team) had 60 seconds to connect the left to right sides of the board by answering Blockbusters-style questions. Each block represented a single letter or (much more often) an acronym (e.g., "YP" could lead to the question, "Telephone directory containing business listings and advertisements." Answer: Yellow Pages). Passing on a question or giving an incorrect answer caused that box to turn black, and the player had to work their way around it. The player/team won $5,000 for making a connection, but if they were unsuccessful, they earned $100 for every question they had right; and yes, Cullen was kind enough to provide the answers to those questions that were missed. (Note: If the player gets blocked out, he/she he/she could still continue and try to build up the consolation prize of $100 for every correct answer. Also, early in the 1980-1982 run, a player/team played the Gold Run after every game won for $2,500 the first time and $5,000 the second time.) Teams competed until defeated or winning 10 games; thus $60,000 was possible (achieved by several players/teams). On August 31, 1981, the 10-game limit was upped to 20 and successful contestants were invited back to compete for more cash; more than once, the $120,000 maximum was achieved. Oh, did two heads really prove better than one? On the last show, Cullen let us know – not really, since about half of the champions were solo players and the other half were the family pair. But it was an interesting concept and a fun game to watch. Nearly five years after the original Blockbusters left NBC, a new version appeared. While the major rules were similar, two solo players competed in the best-of-three affair (now hosted by Bill Rafferty). The champion (white) had to connect side-to-side and the challenger (red) went top-to-bottom in game 1, with both players switching in game 2. If a tie-breaker game was needed, the board was reduced to a 4-by-4 grid, with neither player having an advantage (white still went from side-to-side, red still went top-to-bottom). Games were worth $100 each instead of $500, and champions played the Gold Run as before (except that later in the run if the bonus game isn't won, the $5,000 bonus is increased by that much for every playing until claimed, but is reset to $5,000 if a new champion is crowned). Blockbusters is currently airing on weekday mornings at 9am on GSN.moreless
  • 42
    Momma's Boys

    Momma's Boys

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    NBC
    Ryan Seacrest produces this NBC reality project featuring mothers in search of mates for their eligible bachelor sons.
  • 43
    Name That Tune (1977)

    Name That Tune (1977)

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    The daytime version of the nighttime syndicated hit. Tom Kennedy hosted with Kathie Lee Johnson (Gifford) as singer with Tommy Oliver & the Orchestra. Two contestants competed for cash & prizes. Games played were Melody Roulette, Build-A-Tune (exclusively for this version) & Bid-A-Note. The contestant who won the most points, played the Golden Medley. The player had to identify 7 songs in 30 seconds to win a prize package + come back the next day to play the Mystery Tune. The Mystery tune was played the same way as the syndicated version, except the grand prize was a flat $25,000. This version on NBC lasted only six months.moreless
  • 44
    Hit Me Baby One More Time

    Hit Me Baby One More Time

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    NBC (ended 2005)
    Veteran hit makers perform the songs that made them famous, as well as a cover of a popular contemporary song in this new competition. At the end of the show the audience picks their favorite! "Hit Me Baby One More Time" is based on the popular UK show of the same name. Hosted by Vernon Kay.moreless
  • 45
    Age of Love

    Age of Love

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    NBC (ended 2007)
    Age of Love centers on Melbourne tennis champion Mark Philippoussis (age 30) as he's wooed by a group of thirteen special ladies. What Philippoussis doesn't know is that these women range in age from 21 to 48. Will he go for one of the younger gals, or will he become smitten by someone more mature?moreless
  • 46
    Phenomenon

    Phenomenon

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    NBC (ended 2007)
    Ten magicians and mentalists compete for top honors for supernatural sensation judges Criss Angel and Uri Geller. Fans are challenged with figuring out how the contestants perform their tricks, and whether any are based on real psychic abilities. Users can participate through forums and interactive games.moreless
  • 47
    The Law Firm

    The Law Firm

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    NBC
    From award-winning producer David E. Kelley (The Practice, Ally McBeal) comes “The Law Firm,” featuring 12 real lawyers competing against each other for a $250,000 prize. The lawyers, split into two teams, will try real cases in an actual court where the outcomes are legally binding. The managing partner of “The Law Firm” is top trial attorney and legal analyst Roy Black, who decides which of the 12 will be eliminated in each episode. Though early on it was thought that Black would send home a lawyer from the losing team, much like in the "Apprentice," Black has announced that winning a case does not guarantee immunity. Black can send somone home from the winning team if he feels that player was the worst in that case. UPDATE: NBC pulled "The Law Firm" from the schedule after two weeks on the air. The remaining episodes were aired on NBC's sister network, Bravo.moreless
  • 48
    My Dad Is Better Than Your Dad

    My Dad Is Better Than Your Dad

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    NBC (ended 2008)
    Dad is in the spotlight in this family-focused reality competition series. Fathers lead the action alongside their kids through a series of challenges for a grand prize of $50,000 dollars.
  • 49
    Jackpot

    Jackpot

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Jackpot started out in 1974 on NBC, taking over the Jeopardy! time slot (Noon/11:00 CT). 16 contestants competed for a week as one was designated the Expert. The Expert picked one of 15 players, then the player tells how much the riddle's worth that adds to the jackpot (or if it's the Jackpot riddle). If the Expert answers it corretcly, s/he stays. Otherwise, the players trade places. There's also a Super Jackpot. To get that, the player has to match the last three digits of the target number (IE: $410). The target number then was multiplied from 5-50 to establish the Super Jackpot (IE: $410 x 50 = $20,500). If that happens, both the player chosen & the expert get a chance to split a Super Jackpot that ranged from $4,975-$50,000. To have it @ $50,000, the Target would have to be $995 x 50 = $49,750 (the producers sprung for the extra $250). 10 years later after NBC yanked the show, the series found a new home (Toronto, Canada), new host (Mike Darrow) & new network (USA Cable). Play was like the NBC version except the Expert was called the King/Queen of the Hill, players traded places whether or not the Jackpot riddle was won. There were also bonus prizes, return trips & other special contests (IE: $10,000 Riddler contest, $50K super riddle). Riddles ranged from $50-$250 while Super Jackpots ranged from $2,000-$9,950. In 1989, it was syndicated. Geoff was back & the show moved to L.A. In this version, to add money to the jackpot, the riddle has to be answered correctly. There was slso Doubl Dollars, Instant Target Match in this version. Unfortunately, the production company went bankrupt.moreless
  • 50
    I'm Telling!

    I'm Telling!

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    NBC (ended 1988)
    Do you have a pesky little brother who follows you around, asks you a ton of questions and just gets in your way? Or a snobbish big sister who hogs the bathroom and grosses you out whenever she kisses her boyfriend? Perhaps kid sister is a tattletale and always reading your diary. Maybe big brother spends too much time bouncing a basketball and not enough time with you ... or on his homework (as his report cards full of C's and D's attests). This game show's for you. Laurie Faso hosted this junior version of The Newlywed Game, as three brother-sister teams competed. In round one, the brothers would be sent away to the Iso Zone while the sisters played. Three subjects were shown & the randomiser would spin as the player stopped the randomiser, then a question was asked to all three sisters. Each player would take a turn on the randomiser. After all three subjects were shown, the brothers returned & the game was on. Each right answer earned points (25-question 1, 50-2 & 75 for 3) while wrong answers ended up in squabbles. Round two was played the same, except the sisters went away & the brothers chose the categories. The points were higher (50-1, 75-2 & 150-3). The game would be over if there was no way the team would catch up mathematically or won outright. If there was a tie, the tiebreaker would have kids guess how many items were in a jar (IE; jellybeans, cookies, etc.). The one that comes closest wins. The winners got $1,000 savings bond while losers got consolation gifts. The winning siblings played the Pick-A-Prize Arcade, where the brother had to guess what prizes his sister would pick & the other way around. Each kid picked 6 prizes by hitting a button at that prize. Right guesses earned them the prize. But if they made 10 matches, they won all 20 prizes! There were eight brother-sisters episodes in the series. They also had two episodes of each for Brothers Day (where on both episodes, a set of brothers didn't bicker because they made a perfect score of 425) & Sisters Day. Plus one celebrity episode where all winnings were donated to charity.moreless
  • 51
    All Star Secrets

    All Star Secrets

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    All Star Secrets was a daily daytime game show that aired on the NBC network. The program was hosted by co-creator Bob Eubanks and it's first announcer was Charlie O'Donnell of Wheel Of Fortune fame. O'Donnell was later replaced by Tony McClay because of scheduling conflicts.
    The premise of the show was that three contestants were given interesting unknown facts about a panel of five celebrities. The contestants' job was to try and tie the secret to the correct star that the secret was about.moreless
  • 52
    Fantasy

    Fantasy

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    NBC (ended 1983)
    coming soon
  • 53
    I Can Do That

    I Can Do That

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    NBC
    Contestants travel the country competing in challenges in this NBC reality competition series.
  • 54
    Time Machine

    Time Machine

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    NBC (ended 1985)
    The early 1980s brought a wave of trivia-based game shows, all trying to duplicate the success of Jeopardy! (which had recently entered syndication). The short-lived Time Machine tried to tie another relatively recent craze – nostalgia – with trivia in a conglomeration that people probably thought was better-suited for a radio call-in game than an entire series. Contestants who dared step into the Time Machine competed to answer questions about popular culture and recent (usually post-World War II) history. Most of the questions focused on the year an event occurred. Several mini-games were played, with two players each. Some of the games included: • The "Jukebox Game" – A year was given (e.g., 1963) and contestants had to guess whether a hit song occurred before or after (for instance, "The Twist," hit BEFORE (1960). • The "Tube Game" – Questions centered around television and when a particular show was on (see above example). • "Decades" – Players had to guess when a particular event occurred (e.g., the start of the Korean War occurred in 1950). Other games centered around news events, sports and other entertainment genres. The winners from each of those rounds competed against a returning champion in a question and answer-type quiz. The winner of that round played a bonus round. Two different bonus games were used during the show's run, played thusly: • January to early February – Davidson read a list of items all tied to a specific year – for instance, "West Side Story," Chevrolet Impala Super Sport introduced, "I Fall to Pieces" by Patsy Cline, Peace Corps started and Roger Maris' 61st home run. If the contestant correctly identified the year (1961), he/she won a bonus prize. • Early February-April – A specific year was given (e.g., 1959) and up to four questions relating to whether a certain event happened before or after that year were read (e.g., Vietnam War started; correct answer, BEFORE). Four correct answers won the player a new car, while an incorrect answer before then stopped the game. Many viewers decided to bypass this Time Machine (opting for The $25,000 Pyramid instead), and after the concept was stretched way, way beyond its limit (16 weeks), NBC decided to set the Time Machine's destination for "oblivion."moreless
  • 55
    Food Fighters

    Food Fighters

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    NBC
    In this cooking competition gameshow, home cooks compete against five professional chefs to create dishes using their homemade recipes. Each victory over a professional chef gains the contestant a large cash prizes that keep raising in value. Hosted by Adam Richman ("Man v. Food"), Food Fighters is set to premiere on July 22nd, 2014.moreless
  • 56
    Wordplay

    Wordplay

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    NBC (ended 1987)
    Wordplay was a word game played for laughs.

    Two contestants competed.

    The Wordplay game board consisted of 9 words, in three rows of three. It looked a little bit like this.

    IDIOCY = LUNATIC--BRIOCHE--CONUNDRUM = = = PLATITUDE=PSYCHE=ONOMATOPOEIA = = ASSONANCE PHLEGM

    The lines and equal signs show how certain words were connected to each other (each one is connected to at least one other).

    As you can see, the first and third rows were on a level with each other; the middle row was one row higher.

    Alternating turns, the contestants would each pick a word, and a panel of three celebrities would give their definitions (getting more than a few yuks from the audience at times). It was up to the contestant to pick which one was right. If correct, they would earn the amount of money behind the word. If incorrect, their opponent would have a chance to guess the word. If both guessed wrong, it's placed as a block! Two words were played per round, and three rounds per game.

    The dollar values were as follows: $25, $50 and $75 in round one, $50, $100, and $150 in round two, and $100, $200, and $300 in round three. Also, if the word was connected to any other of the money words from the previous rounds, the player would get that added to the amount of the played word.

    One of the 9 words was the bonus word. If the contestant who picked it & guessed the definition correctly, won a trip (whether the player won or lost).

    The player with the most money at the end of three rounds won the game and played the bonus round, called Double Definition.

    If there was a tie, a 7th word was played. The champ would pick a word, the stars would just say the defination (sans the wit). The champ could either guess it or have the opponent guess, hoping the challenger would be wrong.

    In Double Definition, the winning player faced a board with 24 squares (6 across, 4 down), and tried to make a path from one side to the other. The player would be presented with two definitions for one word, and had to figure out what the word was. (Like Type of Fish/Massachusetts Cape, where the answer would be "cod). The player had 45 seconds to accomplish this feat. There was no limit on guesses, but if the player passed a block would go up and s/he would have to work around it. If the player was successful in conquering Double Definition, they would win a cash jackpot that started at $5,000 and went up by $2,500 everyday until won (the highest pot ever won was $27,500). If the player couldn't get it done, they received $100 per correct guess.

    Champions could return up to a max of three days.

    This turned out to be Tom Kennedy's last hosting job on a game show after a long career.

    Other Wordplay trivia; the game show replaced the 35 year old soap, Search For Tomorrow.

    Mousketeer Lonnie Burr was a contestant on that show.

    There is no editor for this show. If you would like to be the editor look here for details.moreless
  • 57
    Hot Potato

    Hot Potato

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    NBC (ended 1984)
    Meet these men; they're three of a kind. BARRY: "Hi, I'm Jack Barry." ENRIGHT: "I'm Dan Enright." CULLEN: "I'm Bill Cullen, and we're…" ALL: "Dead game show kingpins!" And they were the energies behind Hot Potato, the last-ever game show co-produced by Jack Barry. Quite often, Hot Potato is compared to Family Feud. While the two games have some similarities, Hot Potato had distinct differences that made this NBC program one of the more unique game shows of the early 1980s. Two teams of three members each competed. Early in the run, the civilian-only teams had something in common (e.g., beauty operators, police officers) hence, they were billed as "three of a kind." Host Bill Cullen announced a question, which could be based on general knowledge (e.g., Name the states that start with the letter "M"; list the presidents who were born in Ohio) or on polls ("We asked men if they were stranded on a desert island, which female celebrity would they most want with them?"; "What are the most popular hamburger toppings?"). Each question had no less than seven possible answers that the contestants had to guess. (One question had thirteen responses, but only seven were required to win a round.) A member of the champion team went first, electing to either give an answer or force a specific member of the opposing team to answer (see below) thus, passing the "Hot Potato." A correct answer by the team in control allowed the team to retain control and one of his/her team members took a turn. Players were eliminated in the following ways: * By giving an incorrect answer or one not on the survey (a light on Cullen's podium signified simply if that player was right or wrong). * Taking too much time. * Repeating an answer (or more often than not, two answers since Cullen usually gave players a second chance). That eliminated player was disqualified from the remainder of the round and retired to a bench behind the podium. The opposing team then took control. If a member of the team wished to challenge, he/she chose a specific member of the opposing team, who then had to give an answer. If a correct answer was given, the person making the challenge was benched and the other team took control; if a wrong answer was given, the challenged player was knocked out and the original team kept control. Also, after five correct responses were given, Cullen would review the answers to aid the contestants. A team won a round in one of two ways: * By giving the seventh correct answer. * After an opposing team had all three of its members eliminated through challenges or incorrect answers. Cullen then revealed any answers that were not yet given. At the beginning of Hot Potato's short run, a "Seven Straight Jackpot" was instituted, wherein a team that gave seven correct answers without a miss or challenge won a jackpot (which started at $500 and grew by $500 until claimed). The team that won the best-of-three front game was the champion, earned $1,000, and advanced to the end game. There, Cullen announced a category (e.g., length) and read a question that had two possible answers ("Which is longer, the longest earthworm or the longest Cadillac?"). Each correct answer added $500 to the pot, and a team could stop at any time and collect the money, or go on. An incorrect answer at any time stopped the end game and lost any accumulated winnings. Teams were allowed to pass on one question if they were stuck. Five correct answers won the end game's cash jackpot, which increased by $5,000 until claimed (though each new champion started with $5,000). About halfway through the run, the series was reformatted and given the title Celebrity Hot Potato. Teams were changed to having one contestant (one of them a returning champion) paired with two celebrities each. Also, the "Seven Straight Jackpot" - which, BTW, was won on the final civilian show - was scrapped. While Hot Potato was fun, a poor time slot and inevitable comparisons to Family Feud (both aired at 12:00 P.M. ET) led to poor ratings. Several NBC affiliates opted to air their local news at that time. Add to that the death of executive producer Jack Barry in May of 1984 and, well, the show was more doomed than the proverbial hot potato in a microwave oven. After broadcasting 115 shows, NBC canceled Hot Potato June 29, 1984, in the middle of a game that ended in a 1-1 tie (both contestants were awarded $500). Bill Cullen immediately became the new host of The Joker's Wild in the fall of 1984, supplanting Jack Barry. Not long after it was canceled by NBC, Hot Potato saw its first reruns in the fall of 1984, courtesy of CBN (later ABC Family). Only then did audiences get to see Celebrity Hot Potato in the correct order. The show subsequently reran on USA and on Game Show Network (now GSN), though it hasn't been aired in some time. TV.com wishes to extend a big thank-you to David Schwartz at GSN for providing much-needed broadcast information on the Celebrity Hot Potato episodes. The Hot Potato Episode List is correct and complete. Now it's up to you, the contributors, to confirm the questions that were asked in each show and contribute them.moreless
  • 58
    Say When

    Say When

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    Debuting on Monday January 2, 1961... Say When! is a knockoff of The Price Is Right and the star of the show is Ex-Announcer of Concentration Art James. 2 contestants competed in this shopping game. First, a pre determined amount was set (two $750 games with the two winners going to the $2000 game) Each contestant took turns picking a category prize from 4 (IE; musical instruments, kitchen, car, boat). Prizes could be cheap or expensive. A contestant has to pick a number to replace the prize their opponent chooses and if he/she gets a Blank Check,the contestant has to choose the quantity from 1-100 of that prize,not choose another prize for that turn. If the player felt that the next prize would put him/her over the amount, they can call "Say When" @ that point & stop. If they go over the amount and the opponent wins. The opponent also wins if their leftover score is lower than the person who stopped. If a player reaches 0 total, the player wins a cash jackpot. 2 out of 3 determined the champ! Finally Say When cancelled on Friday March 26, 1965 on NBC-TV.moreless
  • 59
    Eye Guess

    Eye Guess

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    It marked Bob Stewart's first independent game show after studying under the Goodson-Todman school known as Password. Game Show. Answers to 8 numbers are revealed to 2 contestants for 8 seconds and then they try to complete phrases (Example: "When his secretary was late for the 3rd consecutive day, what did her boss do?"). The contestant then picks a number from the Eye Guess board to complete the phrase. Each correct answer was worth 10 points with a 20 point board later. A special answer, not made visible to the contestants, was under the Eye Guess rebus. Each incorrect answer resulted in the turn going over to their opponent. The object of the game was to get 100 points to win the game and get a chance at winning prizes from the Eye Guess board. If a contestant guessed all seven numbers without hitting the stop number, the contestant won a new car! Early in the run Eye Guess has Categories and its items and worth $25 for finding a item to a category and win a New Car. When a "STOP" Sign appears he or she lose everything and 1 other way to "QUIT" the game and keeps the money he or she collected. The theme song for Eye Guess was "Sugar Lips" by Al Hirt. BROADCAST HISTORY of Eye Guess: January 3-December 30, 1966 Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:25am on NBC-TV January 2, 1967-September 26, 1969 Monday-Friday at 12:30-12:55pm on NBC-TV.moreless
  • 60
    Breakthrough with Tony Robbins

    Breakthrough with Tony Robbins

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    NBC
    Self-help guru Tony Robbins is coming to NBC. This reality series is set to be a transformational-style program in the tradition of The Biggest Loser.
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