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    Emergency!

    Emergency!

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Emergency! set the bar for all the edge-of-your-seat thrilling rescue and recovery shows that followed. Created by hit writer/producer Jack Webb (Dragnet; Adam-12) Emergency! is a fictionalized but still realistic look at how firefighting and emergency services were dragged into the 20th century, particularly emphasizing the new-to-most and still dubious field of paramedical treatment started in Los Angeles County, California in 1969. Senator Alan Cranston praised the show for informing the public about the value of funding such programs. The show got its point across to the average American by showing dedicated but regular professionals going about their jobs of helping people and saving lives. Even when the general public wasn't always forthcoming in their gratitude. Most of the show's action centered around the fictional Fire Station 51 (real-life Station 127 in Carson, CA) and its 6-man A-shift crew, but also emphasized the ER staff of Squad 51's base station at Rampart General (Harbor-UCLA Medical Center). Stories of the 1000's upon 1000's of young people the show inspired into emergency careers are legendary. Seasons 1-4 have been released on DVD by Universal.moreless
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    Ironside

    Ironside

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Welcome to the Ironside guide at TV.com. When an assassin's bullet confines him to a wheelchair for life ending his career as Chief of Detectives, Robert T. Ironside becomes a consultant to the police department. Detective Sergeant Ed Brown and policewoman Eve Whitfield join with him to crack varied and fascinating cases. Ex-con Mark Sanger is employed by the chief as home help but eventually becomes a fully fledged member of the team also. Officer Whitfield leaves after 4 years service, and is replaced by Officer Fran Belding. If you have any information about this series, feel free to contribute it. Thanks.moreless
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    Quincy, M.E.

    Quincy, M.E.

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    NBC (ended 1983)
    Quincy, M.E, a man who must have been a nightmare to work with! Quincy was a crusading Medical Examiner in Los Angeles, an expert at his job he was always capable of finding something that everyone else missed. A small clue that would go against all the rest of the evidence in a case and would lead to him arguing with his boss, Asten, and/or the investigating detective, nearly always Monahan. Quincy started of as a straight forward crime series with a difference, it was a M.E. investigating not a police officer or private eye.As the series went from strength to strength the writers, probably with a little push from Klugman, started bringing in stories about social injustice rather than criminal. Most of the time this worked, in fact it is sometimes interesting to see that some of the things highlighted still have not changed even now! Sometimes it came over a little preachy but the show can never be faulted for trying to enlighten the eyes of its viewers.moreless
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    Columbo

    Columbo

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    Many criminals made the mistake of underestimating Lieutenant Columbo, a homicide investigator with a crumpled trench-coat and a beat-up car, who certainly acted as an incompetent bumbler. But he was so polite to every suspect, and he talked so much about his wife (who we never got to see on any episode, but who many believe later had her own show, starring Kate Mulgrew, later of Star Trek: Voyager fame) that he lulled even the shrewdest murderer into a false sense of security. And although the audience had witnessed the murder in the beginning of each episode, it was still a surprise to see what mistakes the killers had made during the seemingly perfect murder. Peter Falk carried the old trench-coat for 7 seasons of 90 and 120 minute movies on NBC, before the series ended. But over a decade later, Falk agreed to revive the character on ABC for an additional 2 seasons with a subsequent string of TV-movies with the loveable detective once again using his calling-card false good-byes: "Oh, there´s just one more thing..." (A note on the running time of the episode: During the first 7 seasons, 18 episodes were 120 minutes long, while the other 27 episodes were 90 minutes long. The episodes after that were all 120 minutes long. In the episode guide, I have only marked out the 90 minute-episodes.)moreless
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    Dragnet

    Dragnet

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    TV Rating:
    Canada: G
    USA: TV-G Dragnet 1967 through Dragnet 1970 is the second of the Dragnet series to grace our television. Beginning in January 1967 and running till September 1970, the series stared Jack Webb as the lead character Detective Sargent Joe Friday. He also directed and produced the series. This series focuses on two detectives, Sargent Joe Friday and Officer Bill Gannon, played by Harry Morgan. Throughout this series, these two brave men of the LAPD, track down criminals in the city of Las Angeles, California, while also helping its citizens recover their possessions and sometimes their very souls. The original "Dragnet" (Dragnet 1951) is the grandfather of ALL of today's police drama shows. Dragnet 1967 through 1970 is the first canceled network TV series to successfully come back to life on a broadcast network. In late 1965, Universal and NBC hired Webb to revive "Dragnet" as a made-for-TV movie. Filmed in early 1966, this TV movie didn't air until January 1969. Titled "World Premiere: Dragnet," this well-made film has Friday and Gannon linking the slaying of photographer's models to the disappearance of a war widow, while Gannon prepares to retire.moreless
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    Night Gallery

    Night Gallery

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Night Gallery was creator-host Rod Serling's follow-up to The Twilight Zone. Set in a shadowy museum of the outre, Serling weekly unveiled disturbing portraiture as preface to a highly diverse anthology of tales in the fantasy-horror vein. Bolstering Serling's thoughtful original dramas were adaptations of classic genre material--short stories by such luminaries as H. P. Lovecraft, Fritz Leiber, A.E. van Vogt, Algernon Blackwood, Conrad Aiken, Richard Matheson, August Derleth, and Christianna Brand. Variety of material brought with it a variety of tone, from the deadly serious to the tongue-in-cheek, stretching the television anthology concept to its very limits. (CREW INFORMATION SUPPLEMENT: Jaroslav Gebr was the artist for the pilot film's three gallery paintings. For the series, all of the gallery canvases were painted by Tom Wright. The gallery's metal sculptures were created by Phil Vanderlei and Logan Elston. Most episodes contained multiple story segments. For the listing of episode credits, crew information is listed under the primary story segment except where a production aspect--music, cinematography--differs among the segments.)moreless
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    McMillan & Wife

    McMillan & Wife

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Police Commissioner Stewart McMillan of San Francisco is a man with ponderous responsibilities. By good fortune, his wife Sally is something of a genius. They live in the city and have a shrewd housekeeper named Mildred, who is as often as not at odds with her slightly distraught sister Agatha. McMillan's duties require him to intervene personally when circumstances warrant in police cases, and here he is aided by the saturnine but enthusiastic Sgt. Charles Enright. The commissioner's mother, Beatrice McMillan, a brilliant person, independent-minded and a very fast driver, breezes through now and again. In the last season, two of the actors have departed, and the show is renamed McMillan.moreless
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    Ellery Queen

    Ellery Queen

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Welcome to the Ellery Queen guide at tv.com. This is one of the classic TV whodunits -- with a twist. The show's format was such that the audience would see everything that the show's namesake character would see, including all of the clues, and then, right before the final scene started (you know... the one where all the suspects are brought into the room for the "YOU... killed the victim. And you did it because..." scene, the star (Ellery Queen, of course) would turn to the TV audience and state "Okay, you've got all the clues. Do you know who did it? I think I do. Can you guess?" And the audience had the chance to be part of the show. Quite unique and half the fun. For books and more information on this character, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueen.com[/url]. For more information on the TV series, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueenshow.com[/url]. Finally, for a 12-DVD set on this series, check out this [url="http://www.raretelevision.com/store/view_product.php?product=ELLTWOA617"]Ellery Queen[/url] DVD set.moreless
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    McCloud

    McCloud

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Deputy Marshal Sam McCloud of Taos, N.M. is assigned to the 21st Precinct of the New York Police Department to study local police methods, where he can stay close to his girl, Chris Coughlin, a writer for her father's paper, the New York Chronicle. McCloud is a keen and brilliant investigator who garbs his talents in a Stetson and a sheepskin coat. "There ya go" is his byword. Chief Clifford's disregard of his manner frequently puts him in unavailing positions, but his original view of the city allows him to follow difficult cases to often far-reaching conclusions. McCloud is a variant of Don Siegel's 1968 film masterpiece Coogan's Bluff, and features elaborate writing, bold action, and the quintessence of high comedy. Dennis Weaver was nominated for an Emmy in 1974 and 1975.moreless