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    Unsolved Mysteries

    Unsolved Mysteries

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    NBC
    Unsolved Mysteries explores unsolved cases in which you, the viewer, can call in or write and solve them. The show looks at cases such as: lost loves, missing persons, homocide, supernatural, the unexplained, wanted, etc. Unsolved Mysteries usually has four segments in one show, and sometimes shows updates. Unsolved Mysteries has solved 40% of their featured cases, that is 300 cases solved out of about 1,200. Broadcast History First Telecast:October 5, 1988 (as a regular NBC series Last Telecast: Sep 1988-Sep 1994, NBC Wed 8:00-9:00 Sep 1994, NBC Sun 7:00-8:00 Oct 1994-Sep 1997, NBC Fri 8:00-9:00 Apr 1998-May 1998, CBS Fri 9:00-10:00 Jul 1998-Aug 1998, CBS Fri 9:00-10:00 Apr 1999-Aug 1999, CBS Fri 9:00-10:00 Jul 2001-2002, Lifetime Mon-Fri 1:00-2:00 Oct 2008-,Spike TVmoreless
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    Miami Vice

    Miami Vice

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    NBC (ended 1989)
    Miami Vice was one of the most innovative and powerful TV series of all time. Focusing on the Miami Metro-Dade Police "Vice" Department and it's continued battle against the illicit drug, prostitution, and firearms crime underworld of the city of Miami. It used fashion, color, and a varied musical selection in order to accentuate and amplify the emotional undercurrent of the drama it portrayed.moreless
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    In the Heat of the Night

    In the Heat of the Night

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    NBC (ended 1995)
    Based on the critically acclaimed novel of the same name, this series provided a hopeful, yet honest look at life in the new South. Set in the fictional Sparta, Mississippi, the show was a marvelous blend of heartfelt drama and folksy humor. It portrayed both the professional and personal pursuits of Sparta P.D's officers. Series star Carroll O'Connor, in a role far removed from Archie Bunker, served as executive producer. Using the pen name Matt Harris, Mr. O'Connor was also the story editor and wrote many of the episodes.moreless
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    Ironside

    Ironside

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Welcome to the Ironside guide at TV.com. When an assassin's bullet confines him to a wheelchair for life ending his career as Chief of Detectives, Robert T. Ironside becomes a consultant to the police department. Detective Sergeant Ed Brown and policewoman Eve Whitfield join with him to crack varied and fascinating cases. Ex-con Mark Sanger is employed by the chief as home help but eventually becomes a fully fledged member of the team also. Officer Whitfield leaves after 4 years service, and is replaced by Officer Fran Belding. If you have any information about this series, feel free to contribute it. Thanks.moreless
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    Quincy, M.E.

    Quincy, M.E.

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    NBC (ended 1983)
    Quincy, M.E, a man who must have been a nightmare to work with! Quincy was a crusading Medical Examiner in Los Angeles, an expert at his job he was always capable of finding something that everyone else missed. A small clue that would go against all the rest of the evidence in a case and would lead to him arguing with his boss, Asten, and/or the investigating detective, nearly always Monahan. Quincy started of as a straight forward crime series with a difference, it was a M.E. investigating not a police officer or private eye.As the series went from strength to strength the writers, probably with a little push from Klugman, started bringing in stories about social injustice rather than criminal. Most of the time this worked, in fact it is sometimes interesting to see that some of the things highlighted still have not changed even now! Sometimes it came over a little preachy but the show can never be faulted for trying to enlighten the eyes of its viewers.moreless
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    Columbo

    Columbo

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    Many criminals made the mistake of underestimating Lieutenant Columbo, a homicide investigator with a crumpled trench-coat and a beat-up car, who certainly acted as an incompetent bumbler. But he was so polite to every suspect, and he talked so much about his wife (who we never got to see on any episode, but who many believe later had her own show, starring Kate Mulgrew, later of Star Trek: Voyager fame) that he lulled even the shrewdest murderer into a false sense of security. And although the audience had witnessed the murder in the beginning of each episode, it was still a surprise to see what mistakes the killers had made during the seemingly perfect murder. Peter Falk carried the old trench-coat for 7 seasons of 90 and 120 minute movies on NBC, before the series ended. But over a decade later, Falk agreed to revive the character on ABC for an additional 2 seasons with a subsequent string of TV-movies with the loveable detective once again using his calling-card false good-byes: "Oh, there´s just one more thing..." (A note on the running time of the episode: During the first 7 seasons, 18 episodes were 120 minutes long, while the other 27 episodes were 90 minutes long. The episodes after that were all 120 minutes long. In the episode guide, I have only marked out the 90 minute-episodes.)moreless
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    Crime Story

    Crime Story

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    NBC (ended 1988)
    Set in 1960s Chicago and Las Vegas in which the police force wage an uncompromising war on the Mob.  Chicago police lieutenant Mike Torello wages an epic battle against organized crime in Michael Mann's arresting combination of cops and robbers, prime time soap, and film noir. Like Eliot Ness and the Untouchables, Torello and his Major Crimes Unit (MCU) have a formidable opponent in Ray Luca, a young, ambitious thug who'll do whatever it takes to claw his way to the top. ==================== Runtime: 60 min (42 episodes) Country: USA Language: English Color: Color Sound Mix: Mono Certification: Iceland:12 (some episodes) / Canada:14A (Manitoba) (DVD rating) / Iceland:16 (some episodes) / Canada:14 (Nova Scotia) (DVD rating) / Canada:G (Quebec) (DVD rating) ======================= Filming Locations 1. Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico 2. Chicago, Illinois, USA (1986-87) 3. Las Vegas, Nevada, USA (1987-88) ======================= Release dates USA -- 18 September 1986 France -- 1 October 1988 West Germany -- January 1989 UK -- 4 May 1989 Sweden -- 8 September 1991 ======================= SERIES Trivia: * The series ends, quite maddeningly, with a cliffhanger. * When the story was first brought to producer Michael Mann, he said he thought the best way to tell the story was as a weekly series. He said he considered doing it as a feature film or a made for television movie as well. * The theme music used for the series was an updated version of the hit song "Runaway" recorded by the original singer Del Shannon. ======================= Production Companies * Michael Mann Productions * New World Television Distributors * Anchor Bay Entertainment (USA) (DVD) * National Broadcasting Company (NBC) (original airing) ========================= SERIES Goofs: * Anachronisms: During the series run, you can clearly see many post 1963 cars in the background. * Anachronisms: All the 1959 Fords the team drive have 1964 Ford poverty hubcaps. ======================= Crazy Credits 1. Al Kooper ... Guy who picks music for the show ======================= Awards Emmy Awards 1988 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Achievement in Hairstyling for a Series -- Bunny Parker (hairstylist) -- [For episode "Moulin Rouge"] 1987 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Achievement in Hairstyling for a Series -- Bunny Parker (hairstylist) -- [For episode "Top of the World"] 1987 -- Nominated -- Outstanding Cinematography for a Series -- James A. Contner -- [For episode "Top of The World"] ======================= CREW: Directed by Colin Bucksey James A. Contner Eugene Corr Robert Dalva Francis Delia Mario DiLeo (as Mario Di Leo) Bill Duke Jan Eliasberg Leon Ichaso David Jackson Paul Krasny Aaron Lipstadt Peter Medak Alan Myerson John Nicolella James Quinn Mark Rosner David Soul Jeff Stein Abel Ferrara (pilot) Gary Sinise (episode "Fortune in Men's Eyes") (episode "Torello on Trial") (as Gary A. Sinise) Writing credits (in alphabetical order) Chuck Adamson creator Chuck Adamson various episodes Nancy Audley writer James Becket writer Eric Blakeney writer David J. Burke pilot and various episodes Clifton Campbell writer Howard Chesley writer Carlton Cuse writer (three episodes) Richard Christian Danus writer Loraine Despres writer Robert Eisele writer Gail Morgan Hickman writer Peter Lance writer (multiple episodes 1987-1988) Lee Maddux writer Michael Mann writer Ann Powell writer Frederick Rappaport writer Gustave Reininger creator Gustave Reininger story (pilot) Gustave Reininger teleplay (pilot) Gustave Reininger various episodes Mark Rosner writer Rose Schacht writer Ken Solarz writer Tom Towler writer Peyton Webb writer Allan Weisbecker writer Yabo Yablonsky writer Produced by Chuck Adamson .... coordinating producer (1987-1988) Stuart Cohen .... producer Gail Morgan Hickman .... producer Michael Jaffe .... producer Brooke Kennedy .... associate producer Marvin Kupfer .... supervising producer Johnny Lattanzio .... associate producer Michael Mann .... executive producer Peter R. McIntosh .... producer Mark Rosner .... co-producer Christine A. Sacani .... associate producer Ervin Zavada .... producer Original Music by Charlie Calello (as Charles Calello) Al Kooper Non-Original Music by Todd Rundgren Del Shannon (theme song "Runaway") Cinematography by James A. Contner Ronald Víctor García Film Editing by Terence Anderson Tom Benko Rose Kuo Tim Tobin Casting by Bonnie Timmermann Production Design by Stephen Dane Jeffrey Howard John Iacovelli Hilda Stark Art Direction by Cate Bangs Hilda Stark Costume Design by Lynette Bernay Patricia Field Marilyn Matthews Debra McGuire (as Deborah McGuire) Makeup Department Tony DiMaria .... hair designer: Paul Anka Tena Parker-Liddiard .... key hair stylist John Rizzo .... makeup department head Kathe Swanson .... hair stylist Jerry Turnage .... makeup artist Production Management Henry Bronchtein .... unit production manager Brooke Kennedy .... unit production manager Second Unit Director or Assistant Director Aaron Barsky .... first assistant director James Giovannetti Jr. .... second assistant director (as Jim Giovannetti) Fred Miller .... first assistant director Sebastián Silva .... assistant director: Mexico Michael Waxman .... second assistant director Art Department Johnny Lattanzio .... construction coordinator Timothy W. Tiedje .... set dresser Sound Department Ed Callahan .... sound editor Scott D. Smith .... sound mixer Rik Elliott .... virtual 5.1 mixes for DVD (uncredited) Edward M. Steidele .... foley artist (uncredited) Special Effects by Ken Speed .... special effects coordinator Stunts Gregory J. Barnett .... stunts Andy Gill .... stunts: car chase Other crew Chuck Adamson .... executive story editor (1986-1987) Paolo Cascio .... additional second assistant camera Bill Davis .... armorer Sean Doyle .... camera operator Alan Greedy .... script supervisor Gail Morgan Hickman .... executive story consultant Michael Hofstein .... director of photography: second unit Randy Jonsson .... assistant camera (as Randy Johnson) Tommy Klines .... assistant camera Peter Lance .... story editor (multiple episodes 1987-1988) John Santucci .... technical advisor Del Shannon .... singer: title theme (1986-1988) Rony Shino .... location assistant Ken Solarz .... story editor Tom Towler .... story editor Randee Lynne Jensen .... special projects coordinator (uncredited) ==========================moreless
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    Amazing Stories

    Amazing Stories

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    NBC (ended 1987)
    Amazing Stories is an incredible collection of short tales from the creative mind of Steven Spielberg. Most episodes ran in a half-hour time slot, with only a few going longer than that. In spite of the brevity of the show, each episode packs in a well-developed story, along with some subtle commentaries on human nature and morality.moreless
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    McCloud

    McCloud

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Deputy Marshal Sam McCloud of Taos, N.M. is assigned to the 21st Precinct of the New York Police Department to study local police methods, where he can stay close to his girl, Chris Coughlin, a writer for her father's paper, the New York Chronicle. McCloud is a keen and brilliant investigator who garbs his talents in a Stetson and a sheepskin coat. "There ya go" is his byword. Chief Clifford's disregard of his manner frequently puts him in unavailing positions, but his original view of the city allows him to follow difficult cases to often far-reaching conclusions. McCloud is a variant of Don Siegel's 1968 film masterpiece Coogan's Bluff, and features elaborate writing, bold action, and the quintessence of high comedy. Dennis Weaver was nominated for an Emmy in 1974 and 1975.moreless