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    Today Show

    Today Show

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    NBC
    Welcome to The Today Show guide, on January 14 1952 "Today" began it's journey as TV's longest running morning news program on NBC, went on the air. It aired at 7:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) as a 2-hour news and information show. For many years it was a 2-hour program from 7:00 to 9:00 ET, until NBC expanded it to 3 hours (7-10 A.M. Eastern Time) on October 2, 2000. On September 10, 2007 a fourth hour was added to the show. Today was the first of its genre when it first signed on with host Dave Garroway. The show successfully blends national news headlines, in-depth interviews with newsmakers, lifestyle features, other light news and gimmicks (including the presence of the chimpanzee J. Fred Muggs as the show's mascot during the early years), and local news updates. It has spawned several other shows of a similar type, including ABC's Good Morning America, CBS's The Early Show, and the Canadian series, Canada AM. The show is filmed and produced at studio 1A in Rockefeller Center, New York, just across the street from NBC headquarters at the GE Building. The studio is located right next to the street and many times the hosts do the weather or other events from outside. Today was the brainchild of Pat Weaver, who was then vice-president of NBC. Later, he became president of the company from 1953 to 1955, and then served as chairman of the board for another year. The show is currently hosted by Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie. Al Roker does weather updates and Natalie Morales reads news headlines. Popular former weathercaster Willard Scott still appears on the show daily doing the 100th birthday announcements he first became famous for in the 1980s.moreless
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    Days of our Lives

    Days of our Lives

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    NBC
    Like sands through the hourglass, so are the Days of our Lives...

    For over forty years, those words, spoken by the late Macdonald Carey, have introduced and underscored one of daytime drama's rare mainstays. NBC's Days of our Lives, will celebrate its 48th anniversary on November 8, 2013. It first premiered as a half-hour drama in 1965 and expanded to an hour ten years later. Today, it remains a consistent favorite among viewers of daytime television serials. It is the powerhouse of NBC's soap opera lineup and demonstrates its staying power in television history.

    In its lifetime years, Days of our Lives has garnered numerous Emmy Awards, Soap Opera Digest Awards and People's Choice Awards. The show's success derives from its consistent commitment to excellence in writing and storytelling, supported by an ensemble of performers, and an uncanny knack for anticipating viewer interests. From demonic possessions and baby switches to exciting teen stories and love triangles, Days of our Lives remains a perennial favorite among viewers of all ages.

    Filmed in Burbank, California, Days of our Lives is set in the fictitious midwestern town of Salem. The core families are the Hortons and the Bradys, and the multi-layered storylines involve elements of romance, adventure, mystery, comedy and drama. Original cast member Frances Reid continues to star as Alice Horton.

    Days of our Lives is produced by Corday Productions Inc. in association with Sony Pictures Television. Executive producer, Ken Corday, is following in the tradition of his parents, Betty and Ted Corday, who co-created Days of our Lives and helmed the series for many years.moreless
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    Bonanza

    Bonanza

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    White-haired Ben was the proud patriarch of the Cartwrights, the family at the center of one of TV's most beloved and long-running series. Their ranch, the Ponderosa, was 1,000 square-miles (600,000 acres) in size and sprawled from mountainous shores of Lake Tahoe to the desert terrain near Virginia City in the Nevada Territory. Ben oversaw his frontier empire with the help of his three sons: Adam, Hoss, and Joe. The series was set in 1859 when the series began and would progress through and following the Civil War.
    ---------------------------------- Series creator and producer David Dortort, who oversaw the series during its 14 year network run on NBC, says he first first got the idea for the series writing the 1953 episode of "Fireside Theatre" titled "Man of the Comstock."
    ---------------------------------- By 1959, NBC wanted a big filmed series to promote the sales of color television sets. NBC was the only network investing in color programs since its parent company RCA owned the electronic color transmitting system used by TV. "Bonanza" was just the type of show the network needed to "show off" its living color. In its initial season, it floundered in the ratings on Saturday nights against CBS' "Perry Mason"; it's said its renewal had a lot to do with its being shot in color. In the second season, "Bonanza" more than held its own in the Nielsens. It was the network's decision to move the series to Sunday nights that allowed it explode into a Top-10 hit.
    ---------------------------------- "Bonanza" differed in many ways from the dozens of other westerns on the air during its run. It relied more heavily on the characters than it did on action--though there was plenty of that. Good and bad weren't always as simple as "black hats" vs. "white hats"; many times, good people didn't live happily ever after. Despite that, Ben imparted a high code of ethics upon his sons. Among the principles: 1-Intolerance and bigotry were not acceptable. The Cartwrights often came to the defense of Indians, Chinese, and others who were the targets of the narrow-minded. 2-Once a man had paid his debt to society and was released from prison, he deserved a clean slate and a chance to start over. 3-The land was sacred. Ben's greatest business headaches came from his refusal to allow his land to be polluted and destroyed for profit. When the Cartwrights cut down a tree for lumber, they planted another. Their environmental concerns remain unique for a television series.
    ---------------------------------- Ben's path to his dream home of the Ponderosa (named for the Ponderosa Pine, plentiful in that area) was a long time in coming. He was a seaman, acting as first mate for Captain Abel Stoddard, when he met his boss' daughter Elizabeth and fell in love. She died after giving birth to first child Adam. Leaving the sad memories behind in the Northeast, he traveled to St. Louis and opened a trading company. He met and married the Swedish stunner Inger Inger Borgstrom who loved horses and shooting. She gave birth to son Hoss en route to the frontier, but was killed by an arrow during an ambush. Moving to New Orleans, Ben became an importer/exporter and fell for Creole beauty Marie DeMarigny. He made her wife number three and finally made it to the West. They established the Ponderosa and she gave him another son, Joseph. Marie died several years later in a riding accident. The story of each of these romance were detailed in individual episodes early in the series' run.
    ---------------------------------- The high mortality rate of women encountered by Ben and his sons, known jokingly as the "Cartwright Curse," became a running gag among comedians and viewers alike. If a female became a love interest to any of the show's men, even money says she'll be sick, dying, or dead by the end credits.
    --------------------------- Location filming kept the series from feeling "studio bound" and gave Bonanza a chance to highlight its color cinematography. Though much was filmed on a huge sound stage at Paramount Studios, scenes were regularly shot on the studio's outdoor "Western Street" and on locations throughout Southern California and Lake Tahoe, Nevada. The rising cost of shooting at Paramount eventually forced a move to the Warner Brothers studio in Burbank. To explain the new appearance of Virginia City, Season 12 began with "The Night Virginia City Died" where a huge fire destroyed the "old" town.
    ---------------------------------- Changes inevitably took place among cast members during "Bonanza"'s long run. After several years of complaining about being held back from a movie career, Pernell Roberts was finally sent on his merry way after of Season 6. Prior to that, amid fears of Roberts' departure, Guy Williams was brought in for a few episodes as Ben's nephew Will Cartwright. It's said the cast resented his character being added and he disappeared after five appearances. Beginning with "Sense of Duty" in Season 9, David Canary joined the cast as Ponderosa ranch foreman Candy Canady. He practically became a Cartwright, appearing in roughly a third of the series' total episodes. He disappeared with no mention at the end of season eleven after failing to get a raise from producer Dortort. Young orphaned teenager Jamie Hunter did become a real fourth Cartwright son when he was taken in by Ben in Season 12 and legally adopted in "A Home for Jamie" the next season. In the wake of Dan Blocker's death following Season 13, the cast was beefed up. David Canary returned as Candy (reportedly Michael Landon personally asked him to appear) and Tim Matheson was added a Griff King, a young man paroled into Ben's custody who was hired as a ranch hand.
    ---------------------------------- The loss of Blocker left a hole that simply couldn't be filled. This, combined with the show's move to Tuesday nights after eleven years on Sunday, dealt the series a death blow. Ratings took a nosedive and Bonanza aired it final episode in the middle of Season 14 on January 16. 1973.
    ---------------------------------- After all these years, Bonanza remains hugely popular. Besides the quality of the program itself, having filmed in color has kept it from looking "old". Episodes began to be released by CBS/Paramount on DVD beginning in 2009, and were uncut from their network airing with all the original music intact.
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  • 4
    I Dream of Jeannie

    I Dream of Jeannie

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    I Dream of Jeannie had a premise of astronaut Tony Nelson finding a beautiful, blond 2000-year-old genie in a bottle after a flight. Jeannie turns out to be mischievous, a little innocent and very much in love with her master. The only other person who knows their secret is Roger Healey, Tony's best friend and fellow astronaut. NASA psychiatrist Dr. Alfred Bellows is frustrated and flustered by the strange things that always seem to happen around Major Nelson, but never actually finds out what's causing them. The 30 episodes in the first season was in black and white while the remaining 109 episodes were color. The show was written, produced and created by Sidney Sheldon. The show went into production in December, 1964. The 1st season 30 episodes were filmed in black and white film. (The black and white episodes have been colorized for reruns by some syndicated packages). The show went into color in 1966. The show finished filming in January, 1970. A Jeannie reunion on The Today Show on March 1, 1995 had an interview with Barbara Eden and Larry Hagman. Barbara Eden reprised her role of Jeannie in the movie A Very Brady Sequel and in a commercial for Lexus in 1998. The Donny and Marie Show had guests Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman, Bill Daily and Sidney Sheldon in November, 1999. Barbara Eden hosted a 8 part segment for the syndicated Entertainment Tonight and Entertainment This Week in May, 1984 about 1960's comedy shows including I Dream Of Jeannie. That segment had interviews with Larry Hagman, Bill Daily and Hayden Rorke. Barbara Eden, Larry Hagman and Bill Daily reunited for a group interview with Larry King in June, 2003.moreless
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    Star Trek

    Star Trek

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    "Space...The Final Frontier. These are the voyages of the Starship, Enterprise. Its 5-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before!"

    The series is set in the 23rd century where Earth has survived World War III then moved on to explore the stars. Humanity has allied with other alien races and formed the United Federation of Planets, and Starfleet serves as its exploratory and military branch. Captain James T. Kirk of the starship Enterprise explores the galaxy with a crew of 430 men and women, contacting new life forms, conducting diplomat missions, and exploring the unknown.

    Star Trek premiered on NBC after executive producer and creator Gene Roddenberry produced not one but two pilots to convince them of the quality of his show. The series ran two years but never achieved good ratings despite building a small but solid fan following. A letter-writing campaign convinced NBC to run a third season, but Roddenberry left in protest and the network buried the show in a late Friday night time slot.

    After its three-year run Star Trek began running syndication where it was discovered by legion of new fans and became a phenomenon. This led to an animated series, six movies, and four spin-off television shows. Despite its short network run, Star Trek has become one of the most successful shows in television history.

    Aside from its three main stars, Star Trek featured a large cast of reoccurring guest stars that includes James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols, George Takei, Walter Koenig, Majel Barrett, and Grace Lee Whitney. Other notable guest stars include Diana Muldaur, Gary Lockwood, Ricardo Montalban, Sally Kellerman, Julie Newmar, Frank Gorshin, John Colicos, Roger C. Carmel, William Campbell, Ted Cassidy, Michael Ansara and Elisha Cook, Jr. Notable writers for the series include Gene Roddenberry, Gene L. Coon, George Clayton Johnson, Jerry Sohl, Jerome Bixby, Robert Bloch, Theodore Sturgeon, Harlan Ellison, David Gerrold, and D.C. Fontana.moreless
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    The Virginian

    The Virginian

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    This is a long-lived series which was almost unique for its time in that it was filmed in color and that each episode had a running time of one and one-half hours (ca. 74 minutes if you exclude commercials). As was the case with many other series of the time, it had a large, ensemble cast and in some episodes only a single star or some of the stars would appear. Even when all the stars might appear, often the appearances could be mere cameos. Based on Owen Wister's 1902 novel, which has been filmed several times previously, and again in 2000, the series centered around events at Shiloh Ranch near Medicine Bow, Wyoming, which, at least initially, was owned by former judge Henry Garth (Lee J. Cobb) and his daughter Betsy (Roberta Shore). The remaining initial cast included the ranch hands led by the foreman, the Virginian (James Drury), and included Trampas (Doug McClure) and, for the first three seasons, Steve Hill (Gary Clarke). Over time the ranch ownership changed and several of the hands came and went with only The Virginian and Trampas remaining around for all nine seasons. Well-produced, the series often featured unusual or well-known Guest Stars (Bette Davis, George C. Scott, Myrna Loy, Ricardo Montalban, Ulla Jacobssen, Franchot Tone, etc.). The editor of the page has been gradually viewing and filling in cast information and detailed synopses on the various episodes but given the large number that exist, this will be a long drawn out process. The episode descriptions are almost complete for some years but many episode descriptions, particularly in the later years, remain to be completed. Many of the detailed synopses which have been completed are the only ones accessible for the series either on the web or in print and every effort is made to ensure their accuracy. The remaining episodes will be gradually filled in as time and energy permit (the editor personally has about another 100 episodes which he has not had time to view!) and others are encouraged to submit summaries and information. Although grey market videos circulate, and some episodes are commercially available in Europe on DVD, very few episodes are available on commercial video in North America. These pages were last updated on April 28/05. The most recent "updates" have involved mainly reorganizing existing information to meet new TV Tome web page structures. These include changing the existing long episode descriptions to shorter summaries (currently working on Season 4) and moving the longer summaries to a "recap" section. However, some new episode descriptions, recaps and casts/crew are being added/corrected by me to fill in gaps in the earlier years...and lately several people have sent me short and long synopses of missing episodes and this is much appreciated!moreless
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    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made its debut on NBC's daytime schedule on October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of The Hollywood Squares" acting both as straight man and an abettor in the fun. 2 contestants, including a returning champion competed in a best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant was "Mr. X" while the female was "Miss Circle" (the "O"). In turn, each contestant chooses a star to which host Marshall read a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with their own answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It was up to the contestant to decide whether they would agree or disagree with the star. A correct judgment earned the player their mark in the square, but an wrong reply meant their opponent got the square. That's unless it led to tic-tac-toe for which the contestant had to earn himself/herself. The 1st player to complete a tic-tac-toe (up-and-down, across or diagonally) won the game and cash, which varied depending on the version: • NBC daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967). $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC nighttime (1968): $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1982): $250 per game. Certain games were designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which was a bonus prize (or prize package) for the contestant who won it. To earn the Secret Square prize package, the contestant had to choose that celebrity (up to that point, known only to the home audience) for which Marshall read a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant was correct in agreeing or disagreeing, he or she won the Secret Square prize package. The prize won with the Secret Square and the frequency played was as thus: • NBC daytime: The 1st or 2nd game of each match. A new prize package was worth started about $1000 and so on (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat were included) and depending on what was added grew in value until claimed. • NBC nighttime (Friday Night): The 1st 2 games of the show. The 1st prize was generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America), while the 2nd Secret Square was a new car (most frequently the 1968 Pontiac Firebird, though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX were also offered). • Syndicated: During the early years (1971-1973), the 1st 2 games of each show, later the 1st 3 games (1973-1978). At 1st, unclaimed Secret Square stashes carried over to the next playing, but later went lost if the contestant didn't win it. At first, each Secret Square was worth about $2000 but later, individual prize packages were worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (1978-1980) that went back to be having the 2 Games when "The Bonus Prize Squares" added to the nighttime syndicated run. The rules for becoming champion and reward also depended on the version you watched: • NBC daytime: Winning the best 2-of-3 match (which netted $400). At 1st, there was no bonus game; returning champions simply faced a new challenger before the commercial break and finally on September 6-10, 1976, a new "Bonus Prize Squares" game was added wherein the champion selected a star and won an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1979-1980). Originally, a 5-Match Champion retired undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) and a new car. The bonus was upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 to include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship & $5000 cash for early of it's period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the lead won a bonus prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value was about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the lead won a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in the NBC primetime and syndicated versions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant was given $50 for each square they had after the final question was played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – television, movies, music, sports, experts & the stage of Broadway and other locales– of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips and bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or walk-ons. The most popular regulars were Rose Marie, Charley Weaver, Wally Cox, Morey Amsterdam, Abby Dalton, George Gobel and ... of course, longtime center square Paul Lynde. Paul Lynde – by the way – wasn't always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to the weekday broadcast of October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for not sitting the same center square, but sitting the different square for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime portion of The Hollywood Squares released. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. 3 Months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one year (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV & Syndicated 1979-1980 Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 Theme songs of The Hollywood Squares were used. The 1st theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" was composed by Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season and it was replaced by a piece composed by William Loose for known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," it's the 2nd theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and ended before & after the 1978-1979 season. The disco-flavored theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" was composed by Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became the 3rd and last theme song starting on September 3-7, 1979 and finishing on September 11, 1981. The Hollywood Squares ran on NBC daytime up to June 20, 1980, when it was replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime show. 3 revivals all had varying levels of success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as The Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour); A 1986-1989 syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares square placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) and the 1998-2004 edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network; the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes (130 total). Originally having aired in several weekday timeslots, the show was eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30 a.m. EST). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many of the stars have died or are unfamiliar to younger audiences) and were eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 11, 1981 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company. Now This Show Owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television.moreless
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    Bat Masterson

    Bat Masterson

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Bat Masterson carried a gold topped cane, wore a derby, and clothes that were more suited for an eastern city than in Tombstone, Arizona. He was a professional gambler, a scout, an Indian fighter and a lawman. He used his cane and his 'wits' before resorting to his gun. The series is based upon the legend created by the real William Bartley "Bat" Masterson.moreless
  • 9
    Daniel Boone

    Daniel Boone

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Frontier hero Daniel Boone conducts surveys and expeditions around Boonesborough, running into both friendly and hostile Native Americans, just before, during, and after the Revolutionary War. Aiding him during the run of the series are his lovely wife, Rebecca, precocious son, Israel, Oxford educated half-breed Mingo, former slave Gabe Cooper, easy going oafs Yadkin and Josh Clements, and tavern owner Cincinnatus.moreless
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    The Bob Hope Show

    The Bob Hope Show

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    The Bob Hope Show hosted by Bob Hope, debuted on April 9, 1950. During the 1952-1953 season, NBC rotated with other variety shows in a Sunday night block known as "The Colgate Comedy Hour" (Sept. 1950 to Dec. 1955). Also known as, "The Chevy Show with Bob Hope." When the first special debuted in October of 1950 it was the most expensive television program made up to that point - costing an astronomical $1,500 a minute to produce. Bob Hope had his own television show and radio show at the same time. For the next three seasons, The Bob Hope Show was broadcast once a month on Tuesday nights, giving Milton Berle a week off. Bob ended his radio show in April, 1956. Bob Hope also had another show by a similar name, "The Bob Hope Show (All Star Revue)". In addition, he performed in "Specials" for many years. It is the longest running variety program in television's history with a record of 45 years of televised entertainment.moreless
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    The Red Skelton Show

    The Red Skelton Show

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Welcome to The Red Skelton Show guide at TV.com. Season 1 and 2 (1951-53) on NBC 30 mins.
    Season 3-18 (1953-70) on CBS 30 mins. (1954 Summer show) Red Skelton Review 60min. (1962-70) Red Skelton Hour Season 19 (1970-71) Monday on NBC 30 mins. (1951-52) Emmy Best Comedy Show. Best Comedian.
    (1958-59) Emmy nom for Best Comedy Series
    (1959-60) Emmy nom for Director in Comedy
    (1959-60) Emmy nom for Program in Humor
    (1960-61) Emmy for Writing in Comedy
    (1961-62) Emmy nom for Director in Comedy
    (1961-62) Emmy nom for Program in Humor
    (1961-62) Emmy nom for Writing in Comedy
    (1962-63) Emmy nom for Program in Comedy
    (1962-63) Emmy nom for Program in Variety
    (1962-63) Emmy nom for Writing in Comedy
    (1964-65) Emmy nom for Entertainment
    (1965-66) Emmy nom for Variety Series
    (1966-67) Emmy nom for Electronic Production.
    (1969-70) Emmy nom for Choreography. Ratings: (1951-52) #5moreless
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    Ironside

    Ironside

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Welcome to the Ironside guide at TV.com. When an assassin's bullet confines him to a wheelchair for life ending his career as Chief of Detectives, Robert T. Ironside becomes a consultant to the police department. Detective Sergeant Ed Brown and policewoman Eve Whitfield join with him to crack varied and fascinating cases. Ex-con Mark Sanger is employed by the chief as home help but eventually becomes a fully fledged member of the team also. Officer Whitfield leaves after 4 years service, and is replaced by Officer Fran Belding. If you have any information about this series, feel free to contribute it. Thanks.moreless
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    The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

    The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    Welcome to the complete The Man from U.N.C.L.E. guide at TV.com. This is the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement.
    Meet our top Enforcement Agents, Mr. Ilya Kuryakin and Mr. Napoleon Solo. For four seasons, their job was to stop evil organizations such as THRUSH in their plans and attempts for world domination.moreless
  • 14
    Dr. Kildare

    Dr. Kildare

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    NBC (ended 1966)
    Dr. Kildare came to television after having been an extremely successful series of movies in the 1940s. (The character had originally been created by Max Brand in a series of pulp novels). It told the story of a young intern in a large metropolitan hospital trying to learn his profession, deal with problems of the patients and win the respect of the senior doctor in his specialty, internal medicine. James Kildare was the young intern, Dr. Leonard Gillespie was his stern but inspiring superior and father figure and Blair General the hospital where they worked. During the course of its five-year run, Dr. Kildare went through an evolutionary process. By the third season, Kildare was promoted to resident. Certain regular supporting characters were not seen in the subsequent seasons as the program concentrated more on the patients and their families. In the final 1965-66 season, the format changed. The show, now in colour, was aired twice a week as a half-hour program, rather than once a week for an hour.moreless
  • 15
    The High Chaparral

    The High Chaparral

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    High Chaparral was the name given to the ranch owned and operated by the Cannon family in the Arizona Territory during the 1870's. Stubborn, proud Big John Cannon (Leif Erickson) is unceasing in his determination to carve a life in the untamed land. Frequently at odds with Big John is his firebrand of a younger brother Buck (Cameron Mitchell) and John's sensitive son, Billy Blue (Mark Slade). After his first wife's death, Big John marries Victoria (Linda Cristal), daughter of wealthy Mexican Land-owner, Don Sebastian Montoya (Frank Silvera) as a political alliance. Her roguish brother Manolito (Henry Darrow) accompanies her to the Cannon ranch and becomes a permanent member of the household. Sam Butler (Don Collier) is hired as the ranch foreman, while his brother Joe (Bob Hoy) along with Reno (Ted Markland), Pedro (Roberto Contreras), Ira (Jerry Summers), and Vaquero (Rudolfo Acosta) are the hard-working, fun-loving ranch hands. Family differences, the conflicts between the Indians and the Americans, and the ever-present threats from rustlers and renegades all provided materials for the stories in the series. A number of cast changes occurred in the program's last seasons. The character of Blue Cannon was dropped. Ranch hands Ira and Reno left. Added to the cast was Wind (Rudy Ramos), a half-Pawnee youth who became a member of the Cannon bunkhouse.moreless
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    Columbo

    Columbo

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    Many criminals made the mistake of underestimating Lieutenant Columbo, a homicide investigator with a crumpled trench-coat and a beat-up car, who certainly acted as an incompetent bumbler. But he was so polite to every suspect, and he talked so much about his wife (who we never got to see on any episode, but who many believe later had her own show, starring Kate Mulgrew, later of Star Trek: Voyager fame) that he lulled even the shrewdest murderer into a false sense of security. And although the audience had witnessed the murder in the beginning of each episode, it was still a surprise to see what mistakes the killers had made during the seemingly perfect murder. Peter Falk carried the old trench-coat for 7 seasons of 90 and 120 minute movies on NBC, before the series ended. But over a decade later, Falk agreed to revive the character on ABC for an additional 2 seasons with a subsequent string of TV-movies with the loveable detective once again using his calling-card false good-byes: "Oh, there´s just one more thing..." (A note on the running time of the episode: During the first 7 seasons, 18 episodes were 120 minutes long, while the other 27 episodes were 90 minutes long. The episodes after that were all 120 minutes long. In the episode guide, I have only marked out the 90 minute-episodes.)moreless
  • 17
    Dragnet

    Dragnet

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    TV Rating:
    Canada: G
    USA: TV-G Dragnet 1967 through Dragnet 1970 is the second of the Dragnet series to grace our television. Beginning in January 1967 and running till September 1970, the series stared Jack Webb as the lead character Detective Sargent Joe Friday. He also directed and produced the series. This series focuses on two detectives, Sargent Joe Friday and Officer Bill Gannon, played by Harry Morgan. Throughout this series, these two brave men of the LAPD, track down criminals in the city of Las Angeles, California, while also helping its citizens recover their possessions and sometimes their very souls. The original "Dragnet" (Dragnet 1951) is the grandfather of ALL of today's police drama shows. Dragnet 1967 through 1970 is the first canceled network TV series to successfully come back to life on a broadcast network. In late 1965, Universal and NBC hired Webb to revive "Dragnet" as a made-for-TV movie. Filmed in early 1966, this TV movie didn't air until January 1969. Titled "World Premiere: Dragnet," this well-made film has Friday and Gannon linking the slaying of photographer's models to the disappearance of a war widow, while Gannon prepares to retire.moreless
  • 18
    The Monkees

    The Monkees

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    The adventures of a musical quartet that goes from one outrageous circumstance to another that was inspired by The Beatles 1964 film “A Hard Day’s Night.” The enhanced descriptions contained within this guide are courtesy of trusted contributor Aaron Handy III (AH3RD) of the The Monkees Film & TV Vault. TRIVIA: The boys live at 1438 North Beachwood that later is stated as 1334 (their actual fan club address). The license plate number of their custom Pontiac GTO is PER 450. Broadcast History: NBC September 12, 1966-September 9, 1968 CBS Saturday Afternoon September 13, 1969-September 2, 1972 ABC Saturday Afternoon September 9, 1972-August 25, 1973 Original NBC Schedule: September 1966 -September 1968, NBC Monday 7:30-8:00 P.M. (Eastern) Original NBC A.C. Nielsen Ratings: SEASON RANK SHARE 1966-1967 N/A 31.4 1967-1968 N/A 27.2 Original Sponsors: The Kellogg Company Yardley Cosmetics of London Kool Aid Company (1969-72 CBS repeats only) Post Cereals (1969-72 CBS repeats only) Saturday Afternoon Schedules (Eastern) September 1969-September 1970, CBS Saturday Noon-12:30 P.M. September 1970-September 1971, CBS Saturday 12:30-1:00 P.M. September 1971-September 1972, CBS Saturday Noon-12:30 P.M. September 1972-August 1973, ABC Saturday 1:00-1:30 P.M. Exclusive Distributor (Syndication History): Columbia Pictures Television (1975-1985) Colex Enterprises (1985-1989) LBS Communications (1989-1996) Columbia TriStar Television Distribution (1996-Current) 58 Episodes in Color on Film Emmy Awards For The Monkees 1966-67 (presented June 4, 1967) Winner: The Monkees Outstanding Comedy Series Winner: James Frawley, "The Royal Flush" Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Comedy 1967-68 (presented May 19, 1968) Nominated: James Frawley, "The Devil And Peter Tork" Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Comedy Theme Song: Here we come, Walking down the street. We get the funniest looks from, Everyone we meet. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, and people say we monkey around. But we're too busy singing, to put anybody down. We go wherever we want to, Do what we like to do. We don't have time to get restless, There's always something new. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, and people say we monkey around. But we're too busy singing, to put anybody down. We're just trying to be friendly, Come watch us sing and play. We're the young generation, And we got something to say. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, You never know where we'll be found. So you'd better get ready, We may be comin’ to your town. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, and people say we monkey around. But we're too busy singing, to put anybody down.
    First air date: September 12, 1966 Last air date: March 25, 1968 Original air time: Monday 7:30:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
  • 19
    Adam-12

    Adam-12

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Adam-12 follows the career of Officer Pete Malloy, who had decided to leave the LAPD after his young partner was killed in the line of duty. He has one night to go and for that last ride, he is assigned a rookie, fresh out of the police academy, to take out on his first night on the street. After that night, Malloy decides that he must stay around a little longer if Officer Jim Reed is going to survive his 9 month probationary period.
    Adam-12, which was another "true-story" based television series from Jack Webb in the same vein as Dragnet and Emergency, was the first TV series to more realistically portray the joys and frustrations of being a police officer in the late 1960s through middle 1970s. This "new" attention to detail made the show a catalyst for uncounted numbers of people to enter law enforcement agencies when they became adults, the same way COPS has done since 1989.
    "1-Adam-12" was the radio call sign of the patrol unit that Malloy and Reed worked. In Los Angeles, the first digit (1), represented the division worked. "Adam" is the LAPD designation for a 2-person patrol unit; "12" was the beat area assigned. Although, Malloy & Reed could be seen patrolling the streets all over Los Angeles from downtown to the Valley, they retained the division number 1, no matter where they were. In reality, you work the same district each day and are assigned a zone in that district.
    The police station used throughout the series for exteriors was the then recently built (1965) Rampart Station, which is in actuality, Los Angeles, Division 2. Jack Webb was such a stickler for authenticity, that he had the Rampart substation's insides exactly duplicated in the sound stage for interiors.
    Adam-12 remained popular during it's entire run, though it began to slip some in it's sixth season. This prompted the producers to free Malloy and Reed up from their district and start patrolling all over the L.A. area. Their assignments would now take them to LAX, the Los Angeles Harbor, the Foothill District, the West Valley area, Venice, Van Nuys, Hollywood and North Hollywood. Also included would be a two part episode where Reed and Malloy go airborne with an ASD helicopter unit.moreless
  • 20
    The Banana Splits Adventure Hour

    The Banana Splits Adventure Hour

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    In the best tradition of The Monkees. THE BANANA SPLITS ADVENTURE HOURwas an one hour long show featuring the Banana Splits band itself - the animal bubblegum psychedelic band created by Hanna-Barbera. The costumes for the characters were made by Sid & Marty Krofft and the series introduced Barry White as a songwriter. It also included several cartoon segments.The first of these was "The Arabian Knights", the adventures of a team with certain special powers who use them to protect Arabia from the Evil Empire. The second segment was "The Three Musketeers", defenders of the Queen of France to protect her from various enemies. The third segment was "The Hillbilly Bears" from The Atom Ant Show. The fourth segment, the longest of the show, was "Danger Island" set in the South Pacific where the Haydn Family and their fellow-travelers fight against enemies on that island. The fifth and final segment was "The Micro-Ventures" in which the Carter family shrink themselves for adventures. One or two songs were performed on the show by the Banana Splits, and one known fact is that their theme song "The Tra-La-La Song (1 Banana, 2 Banana, 3 Banana 4) hit No. 89 in the charts on February 8, 1969. The show lasted two seasons on NBC-TV "In Living Color" from September 7, 1968 to September 5, 1970 on Saturday mornings at 9:30-10:30am.moreless
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