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    The Dean Martin Show

    The Dean Martin Show

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    This long running comedy-musical variety series premiered September 16, 1965 on NBC. It remained on the network's schedule for 9 seasons.
    Joining Dean as a regular was pianist Ken Lane.
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    Then Came Bronson

    Then Came Bronson

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to the Then Came Bronson guide at TV.com. . . hang in there! Ever since the Hellenic Homer wroteThe Odyssey, tales of travel and adventure have been an important component of western literature. By the late nineteen fifties two works of art captured the imagination of readers and viewers of television. The first was Jack Kerouac's popular beat novel On the Road (1957). Then, ten years later, in the late sixties, Jim Bronson played on television a forlorn newspaperman disillusioned after the suicide of his best friend and "working for the man." In order to renew his soul he becomes a nomadic vagabond searching for the meaning of life and experience what life has to offer. In the process he shares his apparent noble values with the people he meets and lends a helping hand when he can. Our hero rides a Harley Sportster, and, as such, was viewed by many fans as a modern version of the solitary cowboy meandering the American west. The television series began with a movie pilot on Monday, March 24, 1969. The series was green-lighted for one year and began its first run on September 17, 1969. The introduction of the show was noteworthy. Bronson drives up to a red light and what seems to be a businessman in a car next to Bronson, says: Driver: "Taking a trip?" Bronson: "What's that?" Driver: "Taking a trip?" Bronson: "Yeah." Driver: "Where to?" Bronson: "Oh, I don't know. Wherever I end up, I guess." Driver: "Pal, I wish I was you." Bronson: "Really?" Driver: "Yeah." Bronson: "Well, hang in there." With that memorable introduction began a television series that is fondly remembered by many fans who vicariously lived Bronson's life during the late sixties. Hang in there . . . Fans of the show are encouraged to post their remembrances of the series in the Forum section.moreless
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    The Steve Allen Show

    The Steve Allen Show

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    NBC (ended 1960)
    The Steve Allen Show premiered June 24, 1956. For most of the series' run, NBC scheduled The Steve Allen Show Sundays at 8:00pm opposite CBS's "Ed Sullivan Show."
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    Meet the Press

    Meet the Press

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    NBC
    Meet the Press debuted on November 6, 1947, and has become the longest-running television show in the history of broadcasting. Watch as the current moderator interviews some of the most influential people in Washington.moreless
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    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    Six months after Jack Paar made a stormy departure from "The Tonight Show" (over jokes about Communism, among other issues) and viewers enduring a succession of "substitute" hosts (and an ill-fated attempt at a magazine-type show), NBC (and middle America) finally got the comedian they were waiting for. Johnny Carson – who had honed his craft on radio and daytime television, and to that point was best known as host of Who Do You Trust – made his debut as host of "The Tonight Show" on October 1, 1962. Thus began a love affair with America that lasted 30 years, not only making Carson wealthy and powerful, but earning him the title, "King of Late Night." It started out shaky. NBC built Carson a cheap set on the sixth floor of 30 Rockefeller Center, not thinking the show would last. Ed McMahon was less confident; he still lived in Philadelphia and commuted for the next three years. In 1962, "Tonight" began at 11:15 pm ET and lasted 105 minutes. By then, most NBC affiliates had inflated their late-evening newscasts to half an hour. It meant that, unless viewers tuned in on the NBC owned-and-operated stations in New York, Washington, DC, Chicago, Philadelphia, or Los Angeles, chances are they missed Carson's monologue. NBC quickly moved the start time of Johnny's show to 11:30 pm ET to ensure everyone could see the best part of his domain. In 1972, the show moved from New York to NBC's West Coast headquarters, thus setting up countless gags about "beautiful downtown Burbank." For a number of years, NBC reran "Tonight" on weekends at 11:30 pm ET. These reruns, of course, didn't score nearly the ratings as the originals maintained. By the end of 1974, Carson told NBC to turn their late weekends to another program. NBC hired a young Canadian performer and writer named Lorne Michaels to develop (what would quickly become) the "Tonight" antithesis -- Saturday Night Live. Carson became the man with whom millions of Americans ended their day with a relatively simple formula: an opening monologue of topical (sometimes corny) humor. Johnny's stock in trade became his down-home, glib sense of humor and his natural wit. He possessed the knack of being equal parts L.A. hip and Midwest backward. However, he never mocked people or resorted to mean-spirited or cheap, off-color jokes; instead, he often poked fun at human nature and events of the day in such a way that made America know it was OK to laugh at themselves. The Carson Monologue became "must see TV," and to miss a night was leave one's self less than "in the know" at the water cooler the following day. On one occasion, a Carson joke about toilet paper shortage actually led to hoarding of the product by thousands of consumers. Following the monologue, viewers saw either a "desk bit" between Carson and McMahon, or a more elaborate, produced skit. Then, interviews and performances by a wide range of celebrities followed (some reports have Johnny's guest list at more than 20,000). Carson was often at his best while interviewing the "everyday" person, especially young children. Some of the notable skits and features: • Carnac the Magnificent – Debuting in 1964, Carson (wearing a jeweled and feathered turban) would "divine" answers to questions from "hermetically sealed" envelopes, a standard gag from Vaudeville. Example: "The answer is...Chicken teriyaki! The question..."What is the name of the last surviving Japanese kamikaze pilot?" • The Mighty Carson Art Players – Starting in 1967, this catch-all title featured parodies of movies, TV shows and commercials. Classic skits included a tongue-twisting take-off on Dragnet (1968, with Jack Webb); commercial parodies of E.F. Hutton (with a deceased Carson rising from a casket to "my broker is E.F. Hutton..."), American Express (with Carson as Karl Malden), Energizer Batteries (Carson as Robert Conrad), and various diarrhea commercial take-offs. Also under the "Mighty Carson" umbrella was the Tea Time Movie sketch, with Carson playing Art Fern, an oily afternoon movie host and commercial huckster. These sketches were full of double entendre humor, first featuring busty Carol Wayne as the straight foil, "the Matinee Lady." Following Wayne's drowning death in 1985, Teresa Ganzel was added. Other classic moments included Carson as President Reagan (and actor Fred Holliday) in a hilarious "Who's On First?"-style routine, and a duet with Julio Iglesias ("To All The Girls I've Loved Before"), with Carson giving a convincing Willie Nelson impersonation. • Floyd R. Turbo – The super-patriot who gave over-the-top editorials. Other memorable moments: • Falsetto-singer and ukulele player Tiny Tim on-air marriage to Miss Vicki (Vicki Budinger) on December 17, 1969. • Ed Ames infamous tomahawk throw demo, striking the outlined target squarely in the crotch. • The marmoset who relieved itself while poking around at Carson's head; plus other animals (brought on by frequent guests Joan Embery and Jim Fowler) who refused to behave or were just being themselves. • Potato chip collector Myrtle Young, who momentarily thinks Johnny has eaten one of her prized chips. Among the performers who owe (at least part) of the beginning of their careers to Carson: Joan Rivers, Roseanne Barr, Drew Carey, Jay Leno, David Letterman, Eddie Murphy, Jerry Seinfeld and Garry Shandling, plus many others. Ironically, Letterman (a frequent "Tonight" guest host in the late 1970's) was Carson's first choice as his successor. Leno, however, had already been given the seat as "permanent guest host," following Carson's professional breakup with Joan Rivers (who had joined the up and coming FOX Network to do her own late night show in 1986.) Leno, though seen by some at NBC as "too ethnic looking," had the favor of NBC's West Coast executives, and was chosen over Letterman, whom NBC West saw as "too cranky and edgy" to replace the mild-mannered Carson. This was perceived as a final snub to Carson, and prompted Letterman to defect to CBS, and compete head to head against the show he'd always wanted to host. The entire "Tonight" endgame saga would be the subject of Bill Carter's book The Late Shift: Letterman, Leno & the Network Battle for the Night (later turned into an HBO film, with Rich Little as Johnny). Carson's 30-year ride was hardly without its more tenuous moments, thanks to several contract disputes and his well-publicized failed marriages (he was thrice divorced during his run on the show). Carson's "alimony payment" jokes would become a staple of the show. Following much protracted negotiation (including talk of his leaving "Tonight"), Carson signed a new contract with NBC in 1980. Three stipulations in the deal: 1) "Tonight" was reduced from 90 minutes to 60; 2) Carson would dictate what kind of show NBC could run at 12:30 am ET. This meant replacing Tom Snyder's Tomorrow show with from Carson's stable. 3) Carson Productions was formed. Among its most heralded works was the show that followed "Tonight" -- Late Night with David Letterman. Carson Productions' other gift to NBC was a series of specials called Television's Greatest Commercials, hosted by Ed McMahon. McMahon was also a victim of a one-shot deal called Johnny Carson's Greatest Practical Jokes, in which Johnny had loaded the trunk of Ed's car with office equipment and taped Ed failing to get past NBC Security (and a guard named Carson). Both of these specials would merge with Dick Clark's running TV Censored Bloopers in January 1984, becoming TV's Bloopers & Practical Jokes. In 1983, Carson Productions produced and distributed "Carson's Comedy Classics," a somewhat low-budget, 30 minute repackaging of "Tonight" clips, culled mainly from the years 1972-1982. Carson's lock on late night came into question in the late 1980's, likely precipitated by two events: the debut of The Arsenio Hall Show in 1989, and Dana Carvey doing a less-than-loving portrayal (with Phil Hartman as a one-note Ed McMahon) of Carson on Saturday Night Live. Carvey's "Johnny" was basically a dinosaur -- a relic clueless of pop culture and mired in "unhipness." In one of the more scathing takes, Carvey presented Carson as "Carsenio," giving his Johnny a wedge cut and Arsenio-styled suit. These less-than-flattening portrayals of Carson on SNL were seen by some as NBC giving tacit approval to the move to push Johnny out. Carson, during his last show, in thanking Doc and the band, would lament TV's loss of the "last big swing band," saying, "To say that this band is not 'hip' is to not know the meaning of the word." In 1991, as Carson was starting his 29th year, the "King of Late Night" announced in his usual no-big-deal style that he was retiring, expressing a desire to leave the show while still in his prime. His second-to-last show on May 21, 1992 featured just two guests: Robin Williams and Bette Midler, with Midler serenading Carson with "One for My Baby," a teary-eyed Carson taking in the moment. The final show on May 22, 1992 was a quiet and contemplative retrospective, featuring "a day in the life" on the Tonight Show set, and a tribute to his late son, Rick (who was killed in a car crash the previous June). Alone on a stool, in front of the familiar curtain, a tearful Carson bade his audience "a heartfelt good night," thus ending not only a show, but an era of television. With very few exceptions, Carson's "Tonight" departure was the last most people saw of their beloved late-night TV comic. Most notably: a voice appearance as himself on The Simpsons episode, 'Krusty Gets Kancelled,' and a pair of appearances on Late Show with David Letterman. Just prior to Carson's death, it was revealed that Johnny would occasionally give Dave an idea or two for his monologue, thus cementing the notion that Carson saw Letterman as his true late night heir. When Johnny Carson died on January 23, 2005, America mourned the passing of a late-night legend. Jay Leno devoted his January 24, 2005 show to his predecessor (though it should be noted, Leno read a prepared "tribute" from cue cards). On the show were Ed McMahon, Drew Carey and Carson's close friends Bob Newhart and Don Rickles, all providing their remembrances. Letterman's first new show following Carson's death featured longtime "Tonight" executive producer Peter Lassally and a performance of "Here's That Rainy Day" -- one of Johnny's favorites -- by bandleader Doc Severinsen, with NBC Orchestra mates Tommy Newsom and Ed Shaughnessy. Thanks to TV Tome contributors Brian Rathjen & doppelgänger.moreless
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    Laredo

    Laredo

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    NBC (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the Laredo guide at TV.com. Laredo combined action with humor to tell the tales of three Company B Texas Rangers. Reese Bennett is older then his two partners, Chad Cooper and Joe Riley. Reese is in his forties and was previously a Union Army Officer. Chad was in the Border Patrol during the Civil War but is originally from New Orleans. He joined the Rangers to search for the gunrunners who helped ambush fellow border patrolmen. Joe was a gunfighter who was at times on the wrong side of the law and joined the rangers as protection from a sheriff or two. Chad and Joe love to tease Reese about his age. They had a Gunga Din like camaraderie. They are lead by Captain Parmalee who was stern and disciplined. He would send them on their missions and many times was not amused by the shenanigans they got into. Erik Hunter joined them in the second season. Veteran actor Claude Akins played Ranger Cotton Buckmeister in 5 different episodes but never officially became part of the cast. The pilot, "We've Lost A Train", appeared as an episode of The Virginian in April of 1965. Reese's horse Cactus was mentioned in several episodes. Chad's horse was Amigo, which was Peter Brown's own horse in real life.moreless
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    Another World

    Another World

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    NBC (ended 1999)
    For thirty-five years, Another World was a much loved part of the NBC daytime lineup. Fans followed the Frame, Cory, Hudson, and many other families through trial and tribulation, pain and pleasure. Another World was the first soap to expand to an hour (then 90 minutes from March 1979-August 1980). It also was the first soap to have spin-offs (Somerset and Texas). In April of 1999, the parent company and network made a decision not to continue the program, and the show aired it's final episode in June of 1999. Although gone from the airwaves, the show will live on in the hearts of the fans. "We do not live in this world alone, but in a thousand other worlds." Created By: Irna Phillips with William J. Bell First Broadcast: May 4, 1964 Last Broadcast: June 25, 1999 Program Type: Soap Opera Production Company: Procter and Gamble Productions Broadcast History: 3:00pm - 3:30pm (5/4/64-1/3/75) 3:00pm - 4:00pm (1/6/75-3/2/79) 2:30pm - 4:00pm (3/5/79-8/1/80) 2:00pm - 3:00pm (8/4/80-6/25/99) Television Episodes: 8891 B&W; Color Episodes Spin-offs: Texas (1980-1982); Somerset (1970-1976)moreless
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    The Match Game

    The Match Game

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    You mean there was a Match Game back in the 1960s? Yes sure was. But this original incarnation of what became one of the most popular wild game shows ever was a quite different creature to say the least. Y'see, this version of The MATCH GamE employed a staid but reliable format that earned the show a 7-season run and guaranteed host of The MATCH GamE Gene Rayburn a permanent place in game show history. Debuting Monday December 31, 1962 on NBC-TV "In Living Color", The MATCH GamE pitted 2 teams of 3 players each (2 contestants each paired with a star team captain for a total of 6 contestants). Rayburn posed a simple question (e.g., "Name a green vegetable" or "To a rich man, ($)_______ dollars is nothing."). Each team member without consulting the others writes his/her response on an index card with a crayon. Rayburn then calls for each player's answer, one at a time. The teams earn points for each correct answer as thus: * Two players match: (10 points from December 31, 1962 to April 12, 1963) 25 points (April 15, 1963-September 26, 1969). * All three players match: (20 points) 50 points. Play alternates between the 2 teams until 1 scores 100 points. The winning contestants split $100 (or $125 if they earned 125 points or $150 when they win 150 points) and advance to the Audience Match. In the Audience Match, the team tried to predict the Secret No. 1 answer of a 100-member polling group (usually, a previous studio audience, but it could also other groups such as women or college students). The questions are like before and each player tried to guess the top response. Rewards were paid thusly: * One correct: $50. * Two correct: $100. * All three right: $150. The highest possible payout was $450 making the game's theorhetical maximum winnings $550, $575 or $600. The team then switches celebrity partners and play the game again with the opposing team also changing partners. Starting on March 27-31, 1967, The Telephone Match was added, where a home viewer was called and asked to match his answer to a question with the response from a pre-selected audience member by a number up to 100-plus audience members. The two players split a growing cash jackpot for matching answers – $500 plus(+) $100 per day until claimed. The MATCH GamE ended its long 7-Season run on Friday September 26, 1969 on NBC-TV, but don't expect to see very many episodes on GSN (the old Game Show Network). Thanks to NBC's practice of reusing videotapes to record shows (and since The MATCH GamE was aired live in the beginning) only 11 episodes - all but a couple black and white kinescopes from 1963-1965 - are known to exist. A color video studio master from 1969 also is rumored to be around but has not been rerun. As we all know, The MATCH GamE returned nearly 4 years later in 1973 on CBS-TV in what would become a much funnier contest called Match Game 73. That's not to say there were plenty of funny, classic moments on this 1st Edition. A note on the episode guide: since the show ran Monday-Friday of each week, and the guests were the same for all 5 days, each episode listed is actually a week's worth of episodes (1760 in all). The MATCH GamE is "A Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Production" in association with the NBC-TV Network. The Broadcast Report of The MATCH GamE: December 31, 1962-September 26, 1969, NBC-TV Monday-Friday at 4:00-4:25 p.m. in Living Color. *The 1st theme song was "A Swingin' Safari" written by Bert Kaempfert from December 31, 1962 to September 1, 1967. *The 2nd theme song called "The MATCH GamE" (along with the same beat of "Everybody's Talking" A 1967 ABC-TV Game Show starring (The Late) Lloyd Thaxton) performed by The Score Production Band from September 4, 1967 to September 26, 1969. In the later version of The MATCH GamE they also had a portion of the show were if they had time left they would play a game with the audience. The question was read and the panelist one panelist would write an answer and the person in the audience would guess and if they got it write they would get $50.moreless
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    The Ruff & Reddy Show

    The Ruff & Reddy Show

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    NBC (ended 1964)
    The Ruff & Reddy Show was Hanna-Barbera's first cartoon series which featured a cat (Ruff) and dog (Reddy) in serialized adventures, with thirteen episodes comprising a story arc. Ruff, was voiced by Don Messick, and Reddy was voiced by Daws Butler.

    Hanna and Barbera opened their cartoon studio the same year MGM (the studio they worked for) closed down its cartoon studio. After much effort, they were able to sell Ruff & Reddy to NBC, but they were only able to get $2700 per half hour of cartoon show, so all the meticulous detail into making the Tom and Jerry shorts were eschewed for a production-line process. Bill and Joe, taking a cue from 1949's "Crusader Rabbit," reasoned the best way to offset the low production values was to create appealing heroes and captivating storylines. Ruff and Reddy made their way through clandestine escapades squaring off against villains like Scarey Harry Safari, Killer and Diller, and Captain Greedy and Salt Water Daffy. Assisting our heroes in several adventures was wacky scientist Professor Gizmo.

    The show was first aired on NBC in December 1957 as part of live action host segments. Jimmy Blaine was the host on the show's first run (1957-60), and Captain Bob Cottle replaced him in the second run (1962-64). When the show went into syndication, the opening titles, which were never shown on the NBC telecasts, were seen with the "H-B Enterprises" card. The theme song was also heard for the first time:

    Get set, get ready Here comes Ruff and Reddy They're tough but steady Always rough and ready

    They sometimes have their little spats Even fight like dogs and cats But when they need each other That's when they're Ruff and Reddy Ruff & Reddy episodes appeared on Family Channel's "Incredible Animals" cartoon show in 1992 and recently the series has aired on Cartoon Network and its sister channel Boomerang.moreless
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    The Jack Paar Program

    The Jack Paar Program

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    The Jack Paar Program hosted by Jack Paar began after he left The Tonight Show to host this primetime weekly talk-variety show. Jack featured more topical subjects and films that he himself recorded. His flair for the dramatic and indepth news-like delivery made this program interesting and informative as well as entertaining.moreless
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    Get Smart

    Get Smart

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    In 1965 the cold war was made a little warmer and a lot funnier due in part to the efforts of an inept, underpaid, overzealous spy: Maxwell Smart, Agent 86. The hit comedy series 'Get Smart' is the creation of comic geniuses Buck Henry and Mel Brooks. Henry teamed with Brooks to create what has undoubtedly become one of the finest parody/satires of all time. The project seemed headed for success from the start: ABC had green lighted it based on the strength of the concept, and they had an actor already under contract to play Smart. Brooks was approached to write the pilot. As he was looking for a way to finance his new movie The Producers, he agreed. Deemed "not funny", the initial script was rejected by ABC. Undaunted, the production team shopped the script around and NBC accepted it with one minor change. They wanted Don Adams in the title role. And so, an unlikely legend was born. Set in Washington, D.C., the show features Agent 86 (Maxwell Smart), his boss (The Chief), Smart's partner and later wife (Agent 99) and a host of other agents both good and evil. Perhaps one of the most important elements of the show is the gadgetry created to help Smart in his quest to keep the free world free. On this show, anything including the kitchen sink can be a phone, a tape recorder, a camera or weapon. Looking for an Agent? Check under your seat cushion. Want a weapon? Try your finger-gun. Need to make a phone call? Open up that bologna sandwich. The show was painted in the broadest of strokes and played every moment for its own delightful reality. In order to give the agents of CONTROL, a series of worthy opponents, KAOS was created. Smart and 99 battled the likes of Mr. Big, The Claw, and Siegfried. On the home front, Max and 99 had a relationship that developed as the show ran and eventually they married. 99 soon gave birth to twins (a boy and a girl) and the Smart family (and the show) began to experience some growing pains. Get Smart ran from 1965 through 1970 on both NBC and CBS. For one month in 1995 FOX attempted to bring the series back with some changes; Max as the Chief, 99 as a Congresswoman, and the Smart twins were now inexplicably only one child. Despite the lack of success experienced by the sequel, Get Smart remains a favorite by agents and civilians alike. (TV Land) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Telecast NBC September 18, 1965 - September 20, 1969 CBS September 26, 1969 - September 11, 1970 Broadcast History Sep 1965 - Sep 1968, NBC Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1968 - Sep 1969, NBC Sat 8:00-8:30 Sep 1969 - Feb/Apr - Sep 1970, CBS Fri 7:30-8:00 Episodes 138 Episodes On Film 1 Episode in Black And White; 137 Episodes In Color -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------moreless
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    Peter Gunn

    Peter Gunn

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Welcome to the Peter Gunn guide at tv.com. Mystery/Detective show "Peter Gunn" was telecast on NBC for two seasons moving over to ABC for it's third final season. Peter Gunn was a private detective in the film noir tradition. All of the shows were black and white and featured the music of Henry Mancini. The action of the show was closely tied to the musical score and you could usually tell what was happening on the screen by the music accompanying it. The show was set in and around Mother's Jazz Club in Los Angeles. Pete, as his friends called him, was often aided by police Lieutenant Jacoby. At the jazz club, Mother was joined as a regular character by Edie Hart, a jazz singer and Pete's girlfriend. Henry Mancini released an album called Music from Peter Gunn featuring the theme and music from this show. It won a Grammy award at the first Grammy award presentation. The Characters: Peter Gunn: The title character of the show. He's the hip, sophisticated version of the detectives of the past. All those that came after him looked back to him for inspiration. Edie Hart: Pete's girlfriend and a jazz singer at Mother's Jazz Club. Mother: The owner of Mother's Jazz Club and very protective of her friends. Lieutenant Jacoby: Pete's pal and informant from the police department. Recurring Characters: Barney: The bartender at Mother's Jazz Club. Emmett: The piano player at Mother's Jazz Club. Wilbur: The owner of the beatnik club. Sgt. Lee Davis: Desk sergeant at headquarters.moreless
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    Wagon Train

    Wagon Train

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    Wagon Train followed the trials and tribulations of pioneering families as they set out from the East to carve out a new life in the West soon after the American Civil War. For some of the travellers it was a happy ending, but not for all, which only heightened the drama along the way. Such a structure ensured that the scriptwriters had a wide scope for their stories which , more often than not, revolved around the characters rather than the action, although the series had more than it's fair share of that too. With a new storyline nearly every week and a larger than average budget for the time, it was never difficult for the producers to attract well known guest stars in front of the cameras with some famous names behind the cameras too. Wagon Train was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic between 1957 and 1965. It survived cast changes to the leading actors and changes to the format which is testimony enough to the show's popularity. Even now fans who watched it back then remember it with fondness, and regular re-runs ensure it's continuing popularity with newer generations.moreless
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    M Squad

    M Squad

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    NBC (ended 1960)
    Lee Marvin starred as Lt. Frank Ballinger, a plainclothes detective assigned to an elite police group known as M Squad. 117 Episodes. 30 min. B&W
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    NFL on NBC

    NFL on NBC

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    The first time a football game was ever aired on television was October 1, 1939 when an experimental NBC affiliate aired a game between the Philadelphia Eagles and Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1955 NBC became the third over-the-air national home of the NFL (after ABC and DuMont) when they were the exclusive broadcaster of the Championship Game until 1963. From 1960-1961 select NBC affiliates also aired games involving the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Colts. From 1970-1997 NBC aired all Sunday afternoon games involving AFC teams, before that package moved to CBS with the start of the 1998 season. Football would later return to NBC in 2006, although as a different program: Sunday Night Football.moreless
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    Underdog

    Underdog

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    NBC (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the Underdog guide at TV.com. There's no need to fear! Underdog is here! When criminals in this world appear
    And break the laws that they should fear
    And frighten all who see or hear
    The cry goes up both far and near
    For Underdog! Underdog! Underdog! Underdog!
    Speed of lightning, roar of thunder
    Fighting all who rob or plunder
    Underdog. Underdog!
    When in this world the headlines read
    Of those whose hearts are filled with greed
    Who rob and steal from those who need
    To right this wrong with blinding speed
    Goes Underdog! Underdog! Underdog! Underdog!
    Speed of lightning, roar of thunder
    Fighting all who rob or plunder
    Underdog. Underdog!
    ** The original airing order of the episodes is not available, but if you uncover it or have some info to add, please submit it. Thanks. **moreless
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    Flipper

    Flipper

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    NBC (ended 1967)
    Flipper was a show about a game ranger named Porter Ricks, and his two sons, Sandy and Bud. The show centers around a precocious pet dolphin, named Flipper, and all their adventures. The show ran for three seasons, and they stopped making new episodes in 1967. The series was a spin off of the feature filmFlipper in 1963. The film had a sequel, "Flipper's New Adventure" in 1964. A new Flipper TV series appeared for a short time in the 1990s. A feature film also entitledFlipper was released in 1996, starring Paul Hogan as Porter Ricks, and Elijah Wood as his nephew, Sandy, and of course, Flipper. The original Flipper was named Mitzi and she lived from 1958 to 1972. The dolphin had died of a heart attack. Flipper had a stunt double (Mr. Gipper) to do all of the tail walking. Flipper Theme Song: They call him Flipper, Flipper, faster than lightning, No-one you see, is smarter than he, And we know Flipper, lives in a world full of wonder, Flying there-under, under the sea! Everyone loves the king of the sea, Ever so kind and gentle is he, Tricks he will do when children appear, And how they laugh when he's near! They call him Flipper, Flipper, faster than lightning, No-one you see, is smarter than he, And we know Flipper, lives in a world full of wonder, Flying there-under, under the sea! (written by "Henry Vars and Dunham")moreless
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    The Deputy

    The Deputy

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Early 1880's Arizona Territory was the setting for this western. The show is mainly concerned with the differences between Chief Marshal SIMON FRY (HENRY FONDA) who is dedicated to his job and Storekeeper CLAY MCCORD (ALLEN CASE). CLAY is an expert shot, but doesn't want to use a gun because he believes that they are the major cause of frontier violence. However, he is persuaded many times to be THE DEPUTY to help the aging town marshal in Silver City, HERK LAMSON (WALLACE FORD), keep order when the Chief Marshal was out of town. CLAY had a younger sister, FRAN (BETTY LOU KEIM), who helped him run the store. SGT. HAPGOOD TASKER (READ MORGAN) was an Army sergeant whose job was to set up a supply office in Silver City. When this character was introduced to the show, the HERK and FRAN characters were dropped. HENRY FONDA provided narration for all the episodes and was seen only when his character was in town. September 1959-September 1961 NBC Saturday 9:00 -9:30 pmmoreless
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    Klondike

    Klondike

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Welcome to the TV.Com guide to Klondike. Klondike is set in an Alaskan gold rush town. The show stars JamesCoburn and Ralph Taeger. This series ran for only 18 episodes and then was reformatted mid-season into another short lived series called Acapulco .moreless
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    Thriller

    Thriller

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    NBC (ended 1962)
    Welcome to the Thriller guide at TV.com. This hour-long anthology series was hosted by Boris Karloff, who each week brought you a tale of spine-tingling suspense. Karloff would open each episode with a brief onscreen appearance (in the tradition of "Alfred Hitchcock Presents"), setting the scene for the story to follow and introducing us to the cast. Occasionally the hour was divided into two or sometimes even three separate tales, and Boris Karloff himself acted in several episodes. The earlier entries lean more towards straight mystery and suspense, while later shows deal directly with horror and the occult.moreless
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