• 81
    You Don't Say!

    You Don't Say!

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    Two stars, each with a contestant, try to guess an answer (a person, place or thing)from the clue-giver who says a sentence with a missing word at the end,the clue word which the clue-giver does not say(thus the name of the show "You Don't Say!") a word that sounds like the answer or hints it. Not allowed is for the sentence to refer to the answer nor clues that directly point to the answer or part of the answer (upper case clues). However, there is some leniency. For example, if the answer is George C. Scott, one cannot say "Great....." because that is part of the answer. However "Getting off .... free" is legal because it is Scot, not Scott -- it doesn't point directly to the answer. (As Tom Kennedy says "Missing clue must not be a proper name.") Also illegal is the saying of the missing clue by the clue-giver. In each case, using proper names or clue-givers saying missing clues disqualifies the clue and forfeits the turn to the other team.> The object is to get three points to win $100 and then play the bonus board game, where an answer and three clues were sent in by a viewer. The winner then has these clues revealed to them and if the contestant says the correct answer they win $300/$200/$100/ and the viewer wins $150 merchandise from a major catalogue. If the contestant wins a 3-0 shutout(called a blitz game) and also guesses right on the first clue of the bonus board, that player also wins a new car! (Prior to 1968, players could win a trip to some destination via TWA airlines.) This NBC game show ran from 1963-69. The 1975 version (seen on ABC) used the same rules but a different format: four stars gave clues to two contestants. Names of places were added as well as famous names. Contestants in turn would choose a star for a clue. The first clue paid $200 & descended by $50 for each miss. Once a star was picked, that star couldn't play again until all four stars had a turn to give the clues. $500 or better won the game & a chance @ the Bonus round. The contestant gave the clues on the bonus round to the stars & had 6 chances to try to get each star to guess the name (or place). The contestant won $500 for one star, $1,000-2, $2,000-3 & $5,000 for all 4 stars. If the player got each star to guess correctly on one clue, the player won $10,000! In both the NBC & ABC versions, contestants stayed until they lost twice (or hit the $20,000 limit; ABC). Soap operas Bright Promise (NBC) & The Edge of Night (ABC) replaced You Don't Say!moreless
  • 82
    Michael Shayne

    Michael Shayne

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Michael Shayne was a one season series about a Miami private detective starring Richard Denning, best known for his role as Governor Paul Jameson on the original long running series Hawaii Five-O.moreless
  • 83
    Car 54, Where are You?

    Car 54, Where are You?

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    NBC (ended 1963)
    This black and white comedy show of the 1960's featured an unforgettable pair of hilarious police officers. Their scraps are many, but you can't help forgiving them their errors when their hearts are so big. Together, they fight crime in New York City, bringing out the best in others around them. Theme Song There's a hold-up in the Bronx, Brooklyn's broken out in fights. There's a traffic jam in Harlem, That's backed up to Jackson Heights. There's a scout troop short a child, Khrushchev's due at Idlewild... Car 54 where are you? Is this show on DVD? No. Do they re-run this show on TV? No, sorry, it isn't re-running on any channel. But, TV Land or the Hallmark Channel could re-run it, so check your local listings. But I don't guarantee this so don't take my word for it. Where have I heard of Charlotte Rae from? She starred on Diff'rent Strokes for awhile and The Facts of Life. Check her person page for more info about her. Is this show in color or black and white? Black and white. Trivia For the black-and-white location shots, the patrol cars were painted red so as not to confuse the locals. Nominations / Awards Won - 1962 Emmy for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy. Winner was Nat Hiken for Car 54, Where are You? Movie Connections Referenced in: The Incredibles, Munster, Go Home, Lethal Weapon 3, Sundae in New York, and Twilight Zone: The Movie. Spoofed in: Slumber Party '57. Movie: Car 54, Where Are You?.moreless
  • 84
    Outlaws

    Outlaws

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    NBC (ended 1962)
    Outlaws, debuting on September 29, 1960, was a unique Western in that the stories were told with a dark edge from the point of view of the criminal. The audience was given the rare opportunity to see how the outlaws thought, how and why they plotted their crime, and their perspective on being caught. The show was also more historically accurate than most Westerns of the time, featuring actual outlaws such as The Dalton Gang, Bill Doolin, and Sam Bass. The first season of Outlaws starred Barton McLane as Chief United States Marshal Frank Caine, Don Collier as Deputy Marshal Will Foreman, and Jock Gaynor as Will's nephew, Deputy Marsall Heck Martin. Deputy Martin disappered after the 9th episode (with no explanation) and Will's new partner was Deputy Steve Corbie, played by Wynn Pearce. The second season of Outlaws brought many changes. The stories were now like other Westerns; told from the the point of view of the Marshal. The setting moved from Guthrie, Oklahoma to Stillwater. Marshal Frank Caine was gone, Will Forman was promoted to Marshal and his deputy was Chalk Breeson, played by Bruce Yarnell. Two other characters joined the cast; the cafe owner Connie Masters (Judy Lewis) and Slim (Slim Pickens), who assisted the lawmen when he wasn't getting into trouble. Though a third season had been planned and scripts were written, Outlaws was canceled because an influential produceer coveted the 7:30-8:30 Thursday night timeslot for his own show.moreless
  • 85
    Tales of Wells Fargo

    Tales of Wells Fargo

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    NBC (ended 1962)
    Dale Robertson played Wells Fargo special agent Jim Hardie in this 30-minute NBC western from 1957. In its sixth and final season, the show expanded to a full hour and was broadcast in color.moreless
  • 86
    Loretta Young Show

    Loretta Young Show

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    The Loretta Young Show's trademark was the dramatic entrance Miss Young made at the beginning of each episode. She would come sweeping through a doorway with her full-skirted dress swirling around her and move into the center of the room to introduce the evening's play. Equally distinctive was the program's close, when she would return and read a few lines of poetry or a passage from the Bible that amplified or restated the message of the play just telecast. Miss Young starred in over half the plays aired during the series' eight-season run, playing everything from nuns to housewives. The periods and locations varied, the story may have been serious, amusing, or touching, but all were uplifting. When this series premiered it was titled Letter to Loretta. All of the stories were done as responses to letters that she had received. She would read a letter at the beginning of each show and then star in the dramatized answer. Although the title was changed to The Loretta Young Show on February 7, 1954, this format was retained through the first two seasons. At the start of the 1955-1956 season the series became a straight dramatic show and the letter concept was dropped. Miss Young also cut back her starring appearances to roughly half of each year's episodes.moreless
  • 87
    Wichita Town

    Wichita Town

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    NBC (ended 1960)
    Welcome to the Wichita Town guide at TV.com. Premise: The exploits of Marshal Mike Dunbar as he attempts to maintain law and order in Wichita Town, Kansas, during the 1870's. NBC Broadcasting History: September 1959 - April 1960 - Wednesdays 10:30pm (Original Run) June 1960 - September 1960 - Fridays 8:30pm (Summer Reruns) Episodes: 26 Aired Black & White Mirisch-McCrea Productions Theme: by Wayne P. Walkermoreless
  • 88
    The Richard Boone Show

    The Richard Boone Show

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    NBC (ended 1964)
    NBC's The Richard Boone Show! Having turned down a seventh season of Have Gun--Will Travel, Richard Boone embarked on a personal project: bringing repertory theater to the small screen. He gathered a group of 10 actors and actresses to perform with him in an anthology series. No one person was a star, not even Boone himself. The actor playing the leading role one week might have only a cameo in the next. The show opened to rave reviews across the country, but the television audience, unused to this type of programming, was slow to catch on. Because of this, the show was cancelled after one season--this in spite of continued glowing reviews and a huge protest from critics and viewers alike when the cancellation was announced. The Richard Boone Show won the Golden Globe for Outstanding T.V. Dramatic Program for 1963-64.moreless
  • 89
    Fury

    Fury

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    NBC (ended 1960)
    Fury chronicled the story of Joey, an orphan boy befriended by Jim Newton a recently widowed horse rancher, who's wife and son were killed in an auto accident by a drunk driver. Joey was brought to court for breaking a window. Jim had seen the whole incident and went to court with Joey, he told the Judge that Joey was innocent, and convinced the Judge to let Joey come stay at the Broken Wheel.moreless
  • 90
    The Tall Man

    The Tall Man

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    NBC (ended 1962)
    Set in New Mexico during the 1870s, The Tall Man told fictionalized stories of the adventures of two real-life characters, Deputy Sheriff Pat Garrett and William H. Bonney. The Latter was more popularly known as Billy the Kid, a youthful gunfighter with a penchant for getting himself into trouble. Billy and Pat, whose honesty and forthrightness had earned him the nickname "The Tall Man". First Telecast: September 10, 1960 NBC Last Telecast: September 1, 1962 NBC Broadcast History: Sept. 1960-Sept. 1962 NBC Saturday: 8:30-9:00moreless
  • 91
    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

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    NBC
    The Hollywood Squares is a classic 1966 game show that mixes trivia with the classic strategy game, tic-tac-toe. Two contestants go head-to-head to try to get three Xs or Os in a row on a giant tic-tac-toe board. But it's not as easy as it sounds. Each space on the giant board contains a celebrity, who answers a trivia question whenever a contestant tries to win their space. The celebrity may know the answer to the trivia question, or they may make something up. The contestant has to decide whether the celebrity is answering truthfully or not, and they only get to occupy that space on the board if they choose correctly. The Hollywood Squares offers a chance to see some of Tinsel Town's biggest stars at their least scripted. This inventive game show became known for the unpredictability of the stars, who used the show to exhibit their real selves, without any media exaggeration. The Hollywood Squares featured many celebrities, including Billy Crystal, Vincent Price, Aretha Franklin, Joan Rivers, Eva Gabor, Don Knotts, and many more.moreless
  • 92
    Secret Squirrel Show

    Secret Squirrel Show

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    NBC (ended 1967)
    Secret Squirrel, a kooky spy who wore an overcoat stashed with a myriad of devices, and Morocco Mole, his sidekick, were the stars of this NBC cartoon. Secret's boss, Double Q, handed out assignments for Secret and Morocco in order for them to thwart the plans of villains such as the infamous Yellow Pinkie, their worst enemy. The show originally aired as part of "The Atom Ant / Secret Squirrel Show," briefly broke off into it's own show, the once again reunited with Atom Ant. Secret returned in 1993 when the show "2 Stupid Dogs" contained brand new Secret Squirrel shorts.moreless
  • 93
    Shannon (1961)

    Shannon (1961)

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    NBC (ended 1962)
    Before James Bond there was Shannon. Portrayed by George Nader, Shannon was an investigator of fraud, murder and espionage in the world of corporate America.
  • 94
    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    These people, dressed as they are, come from all over the United States to make deals here at the Marketplace of America, Let's Make A Deal® One of TV's all time greatest and most successful shows, Let's Make a Deal was a game of intuition, skill, luck, decision-making and greed...all mixed into one. It was fun and would have been a success even if the show had stuck with the formal dresses and suits that the game started with on December 30, 1963. That's right, contestants wore dresses and suits in the very early months of LMaD {December 30, 1963-July 31, 1964}. A few months after the show's premiere on February 3, 1964 someone came with a sign to attract host Monty Hall's attention and low and behold, he chose her (or him)! Sometime later on August 3-7, 1964, someone wore a crazy costume and the entire studio changed from a formal, quiet, dignified setting to a free-for-all. The show came alive and became the legendary success it would be known for. Each day, a gallery of 31 contestants (each wearing some loony costume, either their own creation or suggested by the show's producers) vied for Monty's attention. One, two or perhaps three at a time, Monty would choose contestants to make a deal with him. Many of the deals would involve either: * An unstated amount of cash in Monty's hand or an unknown prize behind the curtain. * Keys which unlocked anything from boxes to cars. Usually, the trader had to select from at least three keys. Monty always offered cash or the curtain/box as options. The number of working keys depended on the deal; more than once, every key worked (in the deals involving multiple contestants). Variant: Just three keys shown (only one of which works) and a couple playing for a car chooses the one they think works; Monty always shows one that doesn't work and then offers a substitute prize option. * Deciding if leather wallets contained thousands of dollars in cash or car keys or perhaps only a small amount or nothing at all (except for play money or worthless keys). Before the reveal, the contestant could choose the curtain or box. * Deciding whether an announced prize was real or fake and choosing a cash amount or the box/curtain as a substitute. * Choosing an envelope, purse, wallet, etc., which concealed dollar bills. The contestant could take the cash or trade for the curtain/box, but always risked giving up an announced dollar bill (usually $1 or $5) which awarded a grand prize (usually a car or trip); often, the "consolation" prize was $500, $1000 or $1500. * Choosing four of seven envelopes, each containing $1 and $2 bills, whose contents they hoped added up to at least $7 for a grand prize. * Monty's Cash Register, wherein a couple had to punch keys on a 15-key register. Exactly 13 of the buttons hid amounts of either $50 or $100, and getting to a stated amount (usually $500-$1000) won a grand prize. The couple could stop at any time and keep what they have (always then being tempted with a follow-up keep-or-trade deal) but hitting "no sale" at any time ended the game; if the unlucky button were struck on the first try, hitting the second "no sale" button the very next time also won the grand prize. Otherwise, Monty allowed the couple to take home whatever dollar amount they hit with the next key punch. * Three unrelated traders acted as a team on deals. Sometimes, only one was allowed to speak for the team without consultation of the others; other times, a "majority rules" format was used. Usually after a series of deals, the team was broken up and could individually decide on one or more options on a final deal. * At the start of the show, a contestant given a large grocery item (e.g., a box of candy bars), always containing a cash amount. Throughout the show, he/she is given several chances to trade the box and/or give it to another trader, in exchange for the box or curtain. Only after the Big Deal of the Day was awarded (or if the last trader with said item elects to go for the Big Deal) was the cash amount given. Variant: A "claim check" given to a trader at the start of the show for any prize shown during the regular deals and chances to trade throughout the episode. The prize ranged from cash and cars to zonks. Variant: The "claim check" was played as the very last regular deal with one sure deal offered in lieu of its contents. ...* And much more! Sometimes Monty would either sweeten the deal or allow the contestants to call off the deal for cash. Sometimes, the contestants did very well -- they could win rooms of furniture, appliances, TVs and stereos, cars, furs, trips, thousands of dollars in cash and MUCH MORE... Or they could be stuck with a ZONK! (those silly, nonsense prizes when they made the wrong decision). And yes, there were many zonks -- ranging from: * Live animals (usually from local zoos or farms). These included everything from pigs and cattle to skunks and lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)! * Rooms full of worthless junk. * Antique, broken-down cars (often rusted-out shells with overheated radiators). * Oversized mooseheads, deerheads and more. * Stuffed teddy bears. * Announcer Jay Stewart and model Carol Merrill dressed up as comedy characters. Often, they held such things as oversized paint rollers or were situated on things like jumbo kiddie cars and rocking horses. ... and much, much MORE!!! Not all the games involved luck or speculation. Some were skill games testing a contestant's knowledge of shopping and products (an early version of the 1970s The Price is Right, if you will). Some contestants had to determine which prize was a stated amount (or sometimes, choose two or more items which added up to a given amount), arrange items in order of value, remember which product was beneath the letter of a car, etc. Usually, Monty gave the contestants either a cash buyout or substitute prize either as the game progressed or just before the correct answer was revealed. Even if the contestant lost, he/she was given $50 or $100 as a consolation gift. Sometimes, two or more contestants or couples competed in a single deal to guess the prices of items with the closest guessers getting increasing amounts of cash (usually but not always, $100, $200, $300 and $400); if the trader won $700, they won a car. Even the loser got to spend any accumulated winnings on a curtain or box with more cash options thrown in as well. When about 7-8 minutes were left, Monty would call on the top winners from the show and ask them if they wanted to trade what they already won for a shot at the Big Deal of the Day � usually worth $2000-$5000 on the daytime show and from $7500 to $15,000 or more on the nighttime and syndicated versions). Once two contestants were selected, they would - with the top winner going first - select a curtain. There were no zonks at this stage, but the contestants risked going home with much less than they won (ergo, trading in a new $2000 kitchen for a color console TV worth $500 or a couple hundred dollars in cash). More than once, contestants traded cars for a chance at the Big Deal, and while they were usually lucky, there was at least one occassion where someone traded their car for less than $100 in prizes! Many times, the Big Deal of the Day was a fantastic prize -- such as a motorhome, a cabin cruiser, a four-seat airplane, a mink sable, a modular home, a Cadillac Eldorado convertible and a 60-day trip around the world...or in some cases, $10,000 or more in cash were among the many examples. The show debuted on NBC on December 30, 1963-January 3, 1964 and switched to ABC on December 30 1968-January 3, 1969. NBC (and later on ABC) later premiered a weekly prime-time version of the show (NBC's appeared in 1967; ABC's in February 1969) which was a major hit with viewers. A twice-weekly syndicated LMaD surfaced in 1971, and was (yup) a big hit. During the 1975-76 season, the Big Deal winner could risk his/her top prize for a shot at the Super Deal, where behind one of three doors was hidden a $20,000 grand prize; selecting the $20,000 window allowed the contestant to keep the Big Deal, though the Big Deal was forfeited if they chose incorrectly (they received a $1000 or $2000 consolation prize; later, $2000 and another unknown consolation amount between $3000 and $8000). LET'S MAKE A DEAL finished and goes out of business on July 9, 1976. During its final original-run season in syndication (1976-1977), the show was taped in Las Vegas, with the final shows taped in December 1976. The Super Deal feature was scrapped, and the last show was said to have featured no zonks. An unsuccessful five-day-a-week revival surfaced in syndication in 1980-1981, but would be a modest success when Monty tried again in five-a-week syndication in 1984-1986. While cheap prizes were the norm very early in the 1984-1986 run (the most expensive cars were often Chevrolet Sprints and Pontiac 1000s(!)), the show held its own and eventually gave away decent cars -- including a fully equipped $13,000 Chevrolet Camaro and a $15,000 Madza RX7. The most notable change was with a new feature, Door 4. Played twice a week or so, Door 4 was totally a surprise (announced only by sudden quick siren and at times, camera zoom fanfare). A People-Picker computer selected the contestant, and he/she would be presented a check worth $1000. He/she could keep the check or spin a carnival-type wheel for a chance at a new car, $100, $200, $2000, $3000, $4000...or perhaps a zonk (I was ZONKED by Money Hall T-shirt)! Regardless of what he/she decided, they were always asked to spin the wheel just to see what would've happened (when they decided to keep the check, the contestant usually would find out they passed up the car!). A short-lived NBC revival surfaced in 1990-1991, with Bob Hilton serving as host. He didn't last long and Monty was soon making deals; alas, even his return couldn't save the show. An embarassingly bad remake called Big Deal, surfaced in 1996, where contestants performed stunts as part of the game. The revival, which aired on FOX, didn't last long. Neither did a March 2003 hour-long remake of LMaD, with Billy Bush as host. The ratings started off decently and the show appeared promising. However, some critics pointed to questionable content (the opening deal in the premiere had women reaching underneath a stagehand's undergarments to retrieve part of their deal) as a prime reason the revival quickly soured; putting LMaD up against American Idol didn't help. In August 2001, Game Show Network (as of March 2004, simply GSN) began airing reruns of the 1970s LMaD, with the 1980-1981 and 1984-1986 runs part of the package. The show has been (and remains) a wonderful addition to GSN! NBC Broadcast History December 30, 1963-June 26, 1964, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:25pm June 29, 1964-September 29, 1967, Monday-Friday at 1:30-1:55pm May 21, 1967-September 3, 1967, Sunday at 8:30-9:00pm October 2, 1967-December 27, 1968, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm July 16, 1990-January 11, 1991, Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30am March 4-18, 2003, Tuesday at 8:00-9:00pm ABC Broadcast History December 30, 1968-July 9, 1976, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm February 7, 1969-May 9, 1969, Friday at 9:00-9:30pm May 16, 1969-January 9, 1970, Friday at 7:30-8:00pm January 24, 1970-January 2, 1971, Saturday at 7:30-8:00pm January 18, 1971-August 30, 1971, Monday at 7:30-8:00pm Syndicated History September 13, 1971-September 10, 1977 Various Times September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981 Various Times September 17, 1984-September 12, 1986 Various Times Depending on the TV Market of the area.moreless
  • 95
    Julia

    Julia

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Welcome to the Julia guide at TV.com. The show is about Julia Baker (Diahann Carroll), a young African-American woman working as a nurse. She is also a widow (her husband died in Vietnam) trying to raise a young son (Marc Copage) alone. Other members of the cast include Dr. Morton Chegley (Lloyd Nolan), Mrs. Waggedorn (Betty Beaird), and Earl Waggedorn (Michael Link). It was one of the best shows of the late 60s/early 70s and is a classic.moreless
  • 96
    Roland Garros

    Roland Garros

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    NBC
    With over 80 years of history, Roland Garros has become the most famous and acclaimed tennis tournament to be played on clay in the world. Played and televised in mid-May until early June this French tournament is one of the premier events on the tennis calendar. The second Grand Slam of the annual tennis season and the first Grand Slam tournament to join the Open era in 1968, it keeps attracting the elite of the tennis world to its orange courts in Paris every year.moreless
  • 97
    Astro Boy (1963)

    Astro Boy (1963)

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    The 1963 black-and-white version of Astro Boy was the first anime to cross the Pacific and penetrate American television. It was highly successful as it drew the highest ratings at that time. It was taken off the air in 1966 as it completed its 104-episode run (193 episodes in Japan), having lost its popularity due to it not being in color and having "depressing" and violent themes and story lines.
    However, in 1980, Astro Boy was reborn in Japan and was brought back to North America in 1982 with a 51-episode color series (52 episodes in Japan).
    All 104 episodes of the original 1963 series which aired in the United States are now available on DVD.moreless
  • 98
    Mr. Novak

    Mr. Novak

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    Mr. Novak was a dramatic series about the accomplishments and frustrations of a young high school English teacher who has just taken his first job. James Franciscus portrays John Novak, a teacher at Jefferson High School in Los Angeles who is a dedicated educator.moreless
  • 99
    Run for Your Life

    Run for Your Life

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    After high level attorney Paul Bryan is diagnosed with a terminal illness by his physician, he sets out to live his entire life in the time left to him. Run For Your Life was a pinnacle of television series writing, producting, and acting, achieving great dramatic intensity, with Ben Gazzara as Paul Bryan. Directors included Stuart Rosenberg, Michael Ritchie, Leslie H. Martinson, John Rich, and Ben Gazzara.moreless
  • 100
    Golden Globe Awards

    Golden Globe Awards

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    NBC
    Near the end of each year, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association gathers to recognize outstanding achievement in film and television. Nominees are announced in December, and the awards ceremony is held and televised in mid-January. It's one of television's most intimate, spontaneous, and fun events. The profits made from the Golden Globe Awards are donated to entertainment - related charities by the HFPA. The organization offers scholarships to budding entertainers and supports educational institutions educating people on film and television.moreless
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