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    Black Sheep Squadron

    Black Sheep Squadron

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Loosely based on the memoirs of Major Greg "Pappy" Boyington who led one of the most famous Marine Corps fighter squadrons of World War 2: Fighting Squadron 214, nicknamed the "Black Sheep" squadron. Based in the South Pacific, the rag-tag Corsair flying misfits is led by "Pappy" Boyington. The opening credits read: In World War II Marine Corps Major Greg "Pappy" Boyington commanded a squadron of fighter pilots. They were a collection of misfits and screwballs who became the terrors of the South Pacific. They were known as the Black Sheep Squadron.moreless
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    NBC Nightly News

    NBC Nightly News

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    NBC
    Currently anchored by Brian Williams, NBC Nightly News is NBC's evening news program, watched by millions of Americans every night. NBC Nightly News originated from the Huntley-Brinkley Report, but when David Huntley retired, they changed the name and format. You can catch the show every evening at 6:30 PM ET / 5:30 PM CT.moreless
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    Banacek

    Banacek

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Banacek, a suave, debonair, freelance insurance investigator, only takes on the impossible cases and at twice the normal recovery fee. Insurance companies are loath to call on his services for the recovery of lost or stolen insured items because of these fees. Nevertheless, they call on him when they get stuck, as no one else can solve these impossible cases. A self-made millionaire, and living in Boston's posh Beacon Hill area, Thomas Banacek (played by actor George Peppard) has a taste for only the finest things. Being of Polish decent, he also loves to recite enigmatic Polish proverbs. Although there always seemed to be a career insurance agent looking to beat Banacek to the prize, thus saving the insurance company Banacek's hefty fee, the most strong willed of them was Carlie Kirkland (played by actress Christine Belford). Her plan was simple, get close to Banacek, learn what he finds out and recover the item just before Banacek can. Banacek is aided in his efforts by his limo chauffer and gofer, Jay (played by actor Ralph Manza). Jay usually has his own ideas on how the items were taken, and also has dreams of recovering the items himself first and get the reward. Banacek also relies heavily on his close friend and bibliophile/bookstore owner Felix Mulholland (played by actor Murray Matheson) to help in background research.moreless
  • 24
    Columbo

    Columbo

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    Many criminals made the mistake of underestimating Lieutenant Columbo, a homicide investigator with a crumpled trench-coat and a beat-up car, who certainly acted as an incompetent bumbler. But he was so polite to every suspect, and he talked so much about his wife (who we never got to see on any episode, but who many believe later had her own show, starring Kate Mulgrew, later of Star Trek: Voyager fame) that he lulled even the shrewdest murderer into a false sense of security. And although the audience had witnessed the murder in the beginning of each episode, it was still a surprise to see what mistakes the killers had made during the seemingly perfect murder. Peter Falk carried the old trench-coat for 7 seasons of 90 and 120 minute movies on NBC, before the series ended. But over a decade later, Falk agreed to revive the character on ABC for an additional 2 seasons with a subsequent string of TV-movies with the loveable detective once again using his calling-card false good-byes: "Oh, there´s just one more thing..." (A note on the running time of the episode: During the first 7 seasons, 18 episodes were 120 minutes long, while the other 27 episodes were 90 minutes long. The episodes after that were all 120 minutes long. In the episode guide, I have only marked out the 90 minute-episodes.)moreless
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    Dragnet

    Dragnet

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    TV Rating:
    Canada: G
    USA: TV-G Dragnet 1967 through Dragnet 1970 is the second of the Dragnet series to grace our television. Beginning in January 1967 and running till September 1970, the series stared Jack Webb as the lead character Detective Sargent Joe Friday. He also directed and produced the series. This series focuses on two detectives, Sargent Joe Friday and Officer Bill Gannon, played by Harry Morgan. Throughout this series, these two brave men of the LAPD, track down criminals in the city of Las Angeles, California, while also helping its citizens recover their possessions and sometimes their very souls. The original "Dragnet" (Dragnet 1951) is the grandfather of ALL of today's police drama shows. Dragnet 1967 through 1970 is the first canceled network TV series to successfully come back to life on a broadcast network. In late 1965, Universal and NBC hired Webb to revive "Dragnet" as a made-for-TV movie. Filmed in early 1966, this TV movie didn't air until January 1969. Titled "World Premiere: Dragnet," this well-made film has Friday and Gannon linking the slaying of photographer's models to the disappearance of a war widow, while Gannon prepares to retire.moreless
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    Sanford and Son

    Sanford and Son

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Sanford and Son first aired in January of 1972 on NBC as a mid-season replacement. The series was the second series created by the All in the Family creator, Norman Lear and it was based on the British sitcom, Steptoe and Son. Sanford and Son was the first sitcom that Lear created that had a cast composed mostly of African Americans. Lear would follow it up in 1974 with Good Times and The Jeffersons in 1975. Sanford and Son was also the only Lear sitcom that didn't air on CBS. Sanford and Son starred stand-up comedian, Redd Foxx as 65-year old junk collector, Fred Sanford. Fred ran his junk collection business from his home located in Los Angeles. His home was run-down but it was comfortable enough for him and his son, Lamont, with whom he lived with and who was a partner in the business. Lamont was dissatisfied with the business and would threaten to leave but Fred would fake a heart attack and yell "I'm coming, Elizabeth." Elizabeth had been Fred's wife who had preceded him in death. Other members of the cast and recurring characters included, Aunt Esther Anderson, Elizabeth's "ugly" Bible-toting sister who was married to wino Woody Anderson. Donna Harris, was Fred's steady girlfriend who worked as a nurse. Grady Wilson, Melvin and Bubba Bexley were good friends of Fred's while Rollo Lawson, Ah Chew and Julio Fuentes were friends of Lamont's. Officer Smith "Smitty", Officer Hopkins "Hoppy" and Officer Swanhauser "Swanny" were police officers who were seen occasionally. At the end of the 3rd season and the beginning of the 4th season, nine episodes (production numbers 0320-0325 and 0401-0403) were filmed without Redd Foxx who underwent contract negotiations that led to a hiatus. It was explained that Fred was in St. Louis visiting family and Grady Wilson moved in temporarily to watch over Lamont. During the first couple of seasons of Sanford and Son, episodes of Steptoe and Son were re-done and are marked with a note in the episode guide. Spin-offs: Grady, The Sanford Arms and Sanford NBC Broadcast History January 1972-April 1976----Fridays----8:00 p.m. April-August 1976----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. September 1976-September 1977----Fridays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #6 in the 1971-1972 Season #2 in the 1972-1973 Season #3 in the 1973-1974 Season #2 in the 1974-1975 Season #7 in the 1975-1976 Season #27 in the 1976-1977 Season First Telecast: January 14, 1972 Last Telecast: September 2, 1977 Episodes: 136 Color Episodes Theme Song: "The Streetbeater" Written by: Quincy Jones Performed by: Quincy Jones (Instrumental)moreless
  • 27
    The Monkees

    The Monkees

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    The adventures of a musical quartet that goes from one outrageous circumstance to another that was inspired by The Beatles 1964 film “A Hard Day’s Night.” The enhanced descriptions contained within this guide are courtesy of trusted contributor Aaron Handy III (AH3RD) of the The Monkees Film & TV Vault. TRIVIA: The boys live at 1438 North Beachwood that later is stated as 1334 (their actual fan club address). The license plate number of their custom Pontiac GTO is PER 450. Broadcast History: NBC September 12, 1966-September 9, 1968 CBS Saturday Afternoon September 13, 1969-September 2, 1972 ABC Saturday Afternoon September 9, 1972-August 25, 1973 Original NBC Schedule: September 1966 -September 1968, NBC Monday 7:30-8:00 P.M. (Eastern) Original NBC A.C. Nielsen Ratings: SEASON RANK SHARE 1966-1967 N/A 31.4 1967-1968 N/A 27.2 Original Sponsors: The Kellogg Company Yardley Cosmetics of London Kool Aid Company (1969-72 CBS repeats only) Post Cereals (1969-72 CBS repeats only) Saturday Afternoon Schedules (Eastern) September 1969-September 1970, CBS Saturday Noon-12:30 P.M. September 1970-September 1971, CBS Saturday 12:30-1:00 P.M. September 1971-September 1972, CBS Saturday Noon-12:30 P.M. September 1972-August 1973, ABC Saturday 1:00-1:30 P.M. Exclusive Distributor (Syndication History): Columbia Pictures Television (1975-1985) Colex Enterprises (1985-1989) LBS Communications (1989-1996) Columbia TriStar Television Distribution (1996-Current) 58 Episodes in Color on Film Emmy Awards For The Monkees 1966-67 (presented June 4, 1967) Winner: The Monkees Outstanding Comedy Series Winner: James Frawley, "The Royal Flush" Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Comedy 1967-68 (presented May 19, 1968) Nominated: James Frawley, "The Devil And Peter Tork" Outstanding Directorial Achievement in a Comedy Theme Song: Here we come, Walking down the street. We get the funniest looks from, Everyone we meet. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, and people say we monkey around. But we're too busy singing, to put anybody down. We go wherever we want to, Do what we like to do. We don't have time to get restless, There's always something new. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, and people say we monkey around. But we're too busy singing, to put anybody down. We're just trying to be friendly, Come watch us sing and play. We're the young generation, And we got something to say. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, You never know where we'll be found. So you'd better get ready, We may be comin’ to your town. Hey, hey we're the Monkees, and people say we monkey around. But we're too busy singing, to put anybody down.
    First air date: September 12, 1966 Last air date: March 25, 1968 Original air time: Monday 7:30:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
  • 28
    Adam-12

    Adam-12

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Adam-12 follows the career of Officer Pete Malloy, who had decided to leave the LAPD after his young partner was killed in the line of duty. He has one night to go and for that last ride, he is assigned a rookie, fresh out of the police academy, to take out on his first night on the street. After that night, Malloy decides that he must stay around a little longer if Officer Jim Reed is going to survive his 9 month probationary period.
    Adam-12, which was another "true-story" based television series from Jack Webb in the same vein as Dragnet and Emergency, was the first TV series to more realistically portray the joys and frustrations of being a police officer in the late 1960s through middle 1970s. This "new" attention to detail made the show a catalyst for uncounted numbers of people to enter law enforcement agencies when they became adults, the same way COPS has done since 1989.
    "1-Adam-12" was the radio call sign of the patrol unit that Malloy and Reed worked. In Los Angeles, the first digit (1), represented the division worked. "Adam" is the LAPD designation for a 2-person patrol unit; "12" was the beat area assigned. Although, Malloy & Reed could be seen patrolling the streets all over Los Angeles from downtown to the Valley, they retained the division number 1, no matter where they were. In reality, you work the same district each day and are assigned a zone in that district.
    The police station used throughout the series for exteriors was the then recently built (1965) Rampart Station, which is in actuality, Los Angeles, Division 2. Jack Webb was such a stickler for authenticity, that he had the Rampart substation's insides exactly duplicated in the sound stage for interiors.
    Adam-12 remained popular during it's entire run, though it began to slip some in it's sixth season. This prompted the producers to free Malloy and Reed up from their district and start patrolling all over the L.A. area. Their assignments would now take them to LAX, the Los Angeles Harbor, the Foothill District, the West Valley area, Venice, Van Nuys, Hollywood and North Hollywood. Also included would be a two part episode where Reed and Malloy go airborne with an ASD helicopter unit.moreless
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    CHiPs (1983)

    CHiPs (1983)

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    NBC (ended 1983)
    The adventures of Highway Patrol officers in Los Angeles. This great series had 6 seasons before it ended. The main characters are Jon Baker and Frank Poncherello, two motorcycle officers always on the street to save lives. 1998 followed the TV movie "CHiPs ´99" with some of the series cast but we can also see new faces like Officer Roulette and his partner or Sandy Baker, Jon´s spouse.moreless
  • 30
    The Dean Martin Show

    The Dean Martin Show

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    This long running comedy-musical variety series premiered September 16, 1965 on NBC. It remained on the network's schedule for 9 seasons.
    Joining Dean as a regular was pianist Ken Lane.
  • 31
    Night Gallery

    Night Gallery

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Night Gallery was creator-host Rod Serling's follow-up to The Twilight Zone. Set in a shadowy museum of the outre, Serling weekly unveiled disturbing portraiture as preface to a highly diverse anthology of tales in the fantasy-horror vein. Bolstering Serling's thoughtful original dramas were adaptations of classic genre material--short stories by such luminaries as H. P. Lovecraft, Fritz Leiber, A.E. van Vogt, Algernon Blackwood, Conrad Aiken, Richard Matheson, August Derleth, and Christianna Brand. Variety of material brought with it a variety of tone, from the deadly serious to the tongue-in-cheek, stretching the television anthology concept to its very limits. (CREW INFORMATION SUPPLEMENT: Jaroslav Gebr was the artist for the pilot film's three gallery paintings. For the series, all of the gallery canvases were painted by Tom Wright. The gallery's metal sculptures were created by Phil Vanderlei and Logan Elston. Most episodes contained multiple story segments. For the listing of episode credits, crew information is listed under the primary story segment except where a production aspect--music, cinematography--differs among the segments.)moreless
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    Then Came Bronson

    Then Came Bronson

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to the Then Came Bronson guide at TV.com. . . hang in there! Ever since the Hellenic Homer wroteThe Odyssey, tales of travel and adventure have been an important component of western literature. By the late nineteen fifties two works of art captured the imagination of readers and viewers of television. The first was Jack Kerouac's popular beat novel On the Road (1957). Then, ten years later, in the late sixties, Jim Bronson played on television a forlorn newspaperman disillusioned after the suicide of his best friend and "working for the man." In order to renew his soul he becomes a nomadic vagabond searching for the meaning of life and experience what life has to offer. In the process he shares his apparent noble values with the people he meets and lends a helping hand when he can. Our hero rides a Harley Sportster, and, as such, was viewed by many fans as a modern version of the solitary cowboy meandering the American west. The television series began with a movie pilot on Monday, March 24, 1969. The series was green-lighted for one year and began its first run on September 17, 1969. The introduction of the show was noteworthy. Bronson drives up to a red light and what seems to be a businessman in a car next to Bronson, says: Driver: "Taking a trip?" Bronson: "What's that?" Driver: "Taking a trip?" Bronson: "Yeah." Driver: "Where to?" Bronson: "Oh, I don't know. Wherever I end up, I guess." Driver: "Pal, I wish I was you." Bronson: "Really?" Driver: "Yeah." Bronson: "Well, hang in there." With that memorable introduction began a television series that is fondly remembered by many fans who vicariously lived Bronson's life during the late sixties. Hang in there . . . Fans of the show are encouraged to post their remembrances of the series in the Forum section.moreless
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    Petrocelli

    Petrocelli

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Tony Petrocelli is a Harvard-educated attorney of Italian descent who left the big-city rat race and headed west. He and his wife, Maggie, are roughing it in a trailer while their new home is still under construction. They face hardships in this new environment - getting along financially because so many of his clients can't afford to pay him, and earning the acceptance of his fellow San Remo, Arizona, citizens. Most of his cases involve murder, and he defends his clients mightily. Serving as his able investigator is Pete Ritter, an ex-cop cowboy. Lt. John Ponce is the local law enforcer. What makes this show unique was that we see the crime from the different witnesses' perspectives. Five people see it five different ways. Which ones are telling it accurately, and which ones aren't? If it's the real killer (who most likely isn't the one charged) talking, his version is likely to be a boldfaced lie. But which one is that? Petrocelli is unique in another way, as well. It was first a 1970 movie, entitled "The Lawyer". In this film, Barry Newman played an attorney who was defending a doctor accused of murdering his wife, a case loosely based on the Sam Sheppard trial. In 1974, Newman was called back to do a similar made-for-TV movie called "Night Games". Albert Salmi was now playing his investigator. This TV movie became the successful pilot for the Petrocelli series, which enabled Newman and Salmi to work together for two more years, bringing us a new intriguing case to solve every week.moreless
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    Police Story

    Police Story

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Police Story was created by former Los Angeles policeman Joseph Wambaugh. After retiring from the force, he wrote two highly successful novels about police operations, The New Centurions and The Blue Knight. He served as consultant on this show to ensure its authenticity. The stories probed with the psychological problems and effects that police work had on the force. Three episodes of Police Story went on to become serieses of their own: Police Woman, The Return Of Joe Forrester, and David Cassidy - Man Undercover. Although Police Story was an anthology, several characters occasionally made return appearances. The most notable examples are Tony Calabrese and Bert Jameson. The realism and exceptional story telling made this the cop show of its time.moreless
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    Meet the Press

    Meet the Press

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    NBC
    Meet the Press debuted on November 6, 1947, and has become the longest-running television show in the history of broadcasting. Watch as the current moderator interviews some of the most influential people in Washington.moreless
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    Jigsaw John

    Jigsaw John

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    John St. John is a police detective for the LAPD who solves murder cases. He is given the nickname Jigsaw John because of his ability to put the pieces together, just like a jigsaw puzzle.moreless
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    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

    The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    Six months after Jack Paar made a stormy departure from "The Tonight Show" (over jokes about Communism, among other issues) and viewers enduring a succession of "substitute" hosts (and an ill-fated attempt at a magazine-type show), NBC (and middle America) finally got the comedian they were waiting for. Johnny Carson – who had honed his craft on radio and daytime television, and to that point was best known as host of Who Do You Trust – made his debut as host of "The Tonight Show" on October 1, 1962. Thus began a love affair with America that lasted 30 years, not only making Carson wealthy and powerful, but earning him the title, "King of Late Night." It started out shaky. NBC built Carson a cheap set on the sixth floor of 30 Rockefeller Center, not thinking the show would last. Ed McMahon was less confident; he still lived in Philadelphia and commuted for the next three years. In 1962, "Tonight" began at 11:15 pm ET and lasted 105 minutes. By then, most NBC affiliates had inflated their late-evening newscasts to half an hour. It meant that, unless viewers tuned in on the NBC owned-and-operated stations in New York, Washington, DC, Chicago, Philadelphia, or Los Angeles, chances are they missed Carson's monologue. NBC quickly moved the start time of Johnny's show to 11:30 pm ET to ensure everyone could see the best part of his domain. In 1972, the show moved from New York to NBC's West Coast headquarters, thus setting up countless gags about "beautiful downtown Burbank." For a number of years, NBC reran "Tonight" on weekends at 11:30 pm ET. These reruns, of course, didn't score nearly the ratings as the originals maintained. By the end of 1974, Carson told NBC to turn their late weekends to another program. NBC hired a young Canadian performer and writer named Lorne Michaels to develop (what would quickly become) the "Tonight" antithesis -- Saturday Night Live. Carson became the man with whom millions of Americans ended their day with a relatively simple formula: an opening monologue of topical (sometimes corny) humor. Johnny's stock in trade became his down-home, glib sense of humor and his natural wit. He possessed the knack of being equal parts L.A. hip and Midwest backward. However, he never mocked people or resorted to mean-spirited or cheap, off-color jokes; instead, he often poked fun at human nature and events of the day in such a way that made America know it was OK to laugh at themselves. The Carson Monologue became "must see TV," and to miss a night was leave one's self less than "in the know" at the water cooler the following day. On one occasion, a Carson joke about toilet paper shortage actually led to hoarding of the product by thousands of consumers. Following the monologue, viewers saw either a "desk bit" between Carson and McMahon, or a more elaborate, produced skit. Then, interviews and performances by a wide range of celebrities followed (some reports have Johnny's guest list at more than 20,000). Carson was often at his best while interviewing the "everyday" person, especially young children. Some of the notable skits and features: • Carnac the Magnificent – Debuting in 1964, Carson (wearing a jeweled and feathered turban) would "divine" answers to questions from "hermetically sealed" envelopes, a standard gag from Vaudeville. Example: "The answer is...Chicken teriyaki! The question..."What is the name of the last surviving Japanese kamikaze pilot?" • The Mighty Carson Art Players – Starting in 1967, this catch-all title featured parodies of movies, TV shows and commercials. Classic skits included a tongue-twisting take-off on Dragnet (1968, with Jack Webb); commercial parodies of E.F. Hutton (with a deceased Carson rising from a casket to "my broker is E.F. Hutton..."), American Express (with Carson as Karl Malden), Energizer Batteries (Carson as Robert Conrad), and various diarrhea commercial take-offs. Also under the "Mighty Carson" umbrella was the Tea Time Movie sketch, with Carson playing Art Fern, an oily afternoon movie host and commercial huckster. These sketches were full of double entendre humor, first featuring busty Carol Wayne as the straight foil, "the Matinee Lady." Following Wayne's drowning death in 1985, Teresa Ganzel was added. Other classic moments included Carson as President Reagan (and actor Fred Holliday) in a hilarious "Who's On First?"-style routine, and a duet with Julio Iglesias ("To All The Girls I've Loved Before"), with Carson giving a convincing Willie Nelson impersonation. • Floyd R. Turbo – The super-patriot who gave over-the-top editorials. Other memorable moments: • Falsetto-singer and ukulele player Tiny Tim on-air marriage to Miss Vicki (Vicki Budinger) on December 17, 1969. • Ed Ames infamous tomahawk throw demo, striking the outlined target squarely in the crotch. • The marmoset who relieved itself while poking around at Carson's head; plus other animals (brought on by frequent guests Joan Embery and Jim Fowler) who refused to behave or were just being themselves. • Potato chip collector Myrtle Young, who momentarily thinks Johnny has eaten one of her prized chips. Among the performers who owe (at least part) of the beginning of their careers to Carson: Joan Rivers, Roseanne Barr, Drew Carey, Jay Leno, David Letterman, Eddie Murphy, Jerry Seinfeld and Garry Shandling, plus many others. Ironically, Letterman (a frequent "Tonight" guest host in the late 1970's) was Carson's first choice as his successor. Leno, however, had already been given the seat as "permanent guest host," following Carson's professional breakup with Joan Rivers (who had joined the up and coming FOX Network to do her own late night show in 1986.) Leno, though seen by some at NBC as "too ethnic looking," had the favor of NBC's West Coast executives, and was chosen over Letterman, whom NBC West saw as "too cranky and edgy" to replace the mild-mannered Carson. This was perceived as a final snub to Carson, and prompted Letterman to defect to CBS, and compete head to head against the show he'd always wanted to host. The entire "Tonight" endgame saga would be the subject of Bill Carter's book The Late Shift: Letterman, Leno & the Network Battle for the Night (later turned into an HBO film, with Rich Little as Johnny). Carson's 30-year ride was hardly without its more tenuous moments, thanks to several contract disputes and his well-publicized failed marriages (he was thrice divorced during his run on the show). Carson's "alimony payment" jokes would become a staple of the show. Following much protracted negotiation (including talk of his leaving "Tonight"), Carson signed a new contract with NBC in 1980. Three stipulations in the deal: 1) "Tonight" was reduced from 90 minutes to 60; 2) Carson would dictate what kind of show NBC could run at 12:30 am ET. This meant replacing Tom Snyder's Tomorrow show with from Carson's stable. 3) Carson Productions was formed. Among its most heralded works was the show that followed "Tonight" -- Late Night with David Letterman. Carson Productions' other gift to NBC was a series of specials called Television's Greatest Commercials, hosted by Ed McMahon. McMahon was also a victim of a one-shot deal called Johnny Carson's Greatest Practical Jokes, in which Johnny had loaded the trunk of Ed's car with office equipment and taped Ed failing to get past NBC Security (and a guard named Carson). Both of these specials would merge with Dick Clark's running TV Censored Bloopers in January 1984, becoming TV's Bloopers & Practical Jokes. In 1983, Carson Productions produced and distributed "Carson's Comedy Classics," a somewhat low-budget, 30 minute repackaging of "Tonight" clips, culled mainly from the years 1972-1982. Carson's lock on late night came into question in the late 1980's, likely precipitated by two events: the debut of The Arsenio Hall Show in 1989, and Dana Carvey doing a less-than-loving portrayal (with Phil Hartman as a one-note Ed McMahon) of Carson on Saturday Night Live. Carvey's "Johnny" was basically a dinosaur -- a relic clueless of pop culture and mired in "unhipness." In one of the more scathing takes, Carvey presented Carson as "Carsenio," giving his Johnny a wedge cut and Arsenio-styled suit. These less-than-flattening portrayals of Carson on SNL were seen by some as NBC giving tacit approval to the move to push Johnny out. Carson, during his last show, in thanking Doc and the band, would lament TV's loss of the "last big swing band," saying, "To say that this band is not 'hip' is to not know the meaning of the word." In 1991, as Carson was starting his 29th year, the "King of Late Night" announced in his usual no-big-deal style that he was retiring, expressing a desire to leave the show while still in his prime. His second-to-last show on May 21, 1992 featured just two guests: Robin Williams and Bette Midler, with Midler serenading Carson with "One for My Baby," a teary-eyed Carson taking in the moment. The final show on May 22, 1992 was a quiet and contemplative retrospective, featuring "a day in the life" on the Tonight Show set, and a tribute to his late son, Rick (who was killed in a car crash the previous June). Alone on a stool, in front of the familiar curtain, a tearful Carson bade his audience "a heartfelt good night," thus ending not only a show, but an era of television. With very few exceptions, Carson's "Tonight" departure was the last most people saw of their beloved late-night TV comic. Most notably: a voice appearance as himself on The Simpsons episode, 'Krusty Gets Kancelled,' and a pair of appearances on Late Show with David Letterman. Just prior to Carson's death, it was revealed that Johnny would occasionally give Dave an idea or two for his monologue, thus cementing the notion that Carson saw Letterman as his true late night heir. When Johnny Carson died on January 23, 2005, America mourned the passing of a late-night legend. Jay Leno devoted his January 24, 2005 show to his predecessor (though it should be noted, Leno read a prepared "tribute" from cue cards). On the show were Ed McMahon, Drew Carey and Carson's close friends Bob Newhart and Don Rickles, all providing their remembrances. Letterman's first new show following Carson's death featured longtime "Tonight" executive producer Peter Lassally and a performance of "Here's That Rainy Day" -- one of Johnny's favorites -- by bandleader Doc Severinsen, with NBC Orchestra mates Tommy Newsom and Ed Shaughnessy. Thanks to TV Tome contributors Brian Rathjen & doppelgänger.moreless
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    James at 15

    James at 15

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Following a television movie of the same name, James at 15 was a short-lived NBC drama that explored a teenage boy's coming of age. The series begins in Boston, where James (Lance Kerwin) and his family have moved from rural Oregon. James at 15 was distinctive at the time (1977-78) for its sequences showing James' daydreams, a subtle mixing of some comedy and drama, and because of its frank examination of serious teen issues, especially for the 1970s. Episodes explore such topics as cancer, sexually-transmitted disease, alcoholism, and most notably - James' loss of his virginity with a Swedish foreign exchange student. Recurring characters include James' parents, his sisters Sandy and Kathy, and his school friends Sly and Marlene. The series was re-titled James at 16 (the opening credits changed to show a line drawn through the "15" and the appearance of a "16") in February of 1978.moreless
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    Another World

    Another World

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    NBC (ended 1999)
    For thirty-five years, Another World was a much loved part of the NBC daytime lineup. Fans followed the Frame, Cory, Hudson, and many other families through trial and tribulation, pain and pleasure. Another World was the first soap to expand to an hour (then 90 minutes from March 1979-August 1980). It also was the first soap to have spin-offs (Somerset and Texas). In April of 1999, the parent company and network made a decision not to continue the program, and the show aired it's final episode in June of 1999. Although gone from the airwaves, the show will live on in the hearts of the fans. "We do not live in this world alone, but in a thousand other worlds." Created By: Irna Phillips with William J. Bell First Broadcast: May 4, 1964 Last Broadcast: June 25, 1999 Program Type: Soap Opera Production Company: Procter and Gamble Productions Broadcast History: 3:00pm - 3:30pm (5/4/64-1/3/75) 3:00pm - 4:00pm (1/6/75-3/2/79) 2:30pm - 4:00pm (3/5/79-8/1/80) 2:00pm - 3:00pm (8/4/80-6/25/99) Television Episodes: 8891 B&W; Color Episodes Spin-offs: Texas (1980-1982); Somerset (1970-1976)moreless
  • 40
    Movin' On

    Movin' On

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Will and Sonny are long-haul truckers who found some sort of adventure every week . Claude Akins and Frank Converse starred in it and Merle Haggard's song of the same name was used for the theme.moreless
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