• 21
    Night Gallery

    Night Gallery

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Night Gallery was creator-host Rod Serling's follow-up to The Twilight Zone. Set in a shadowy museum of the outre, Serling weekly unveiled disturbing portraiture as preface to a highly diverse anthology of tales in the fantasy-horror vein. Bolstering Serling's thoughtful original dramas were adaptations of classic genre material--short stories by such luminaries as H. P. Lovecraft, Fritz Leiber, A.E. van Vogt, Algernon Blackwood, Conrad Aiken, Richard Matheson, August Derleth, and Christianna Brand. Variety of material brought with it a variety of tone, from the deadly serious to the tongue-in-cheek, stretching the television anthology concept to its very limits. (CREW INFORMATION SUPPLEMENT: Jaroslav Gebr was the artist for the pilot film's three gallery paintings. For the series, all of the gallery canvases were painted by Tom Wright. The gallery's metal sculptures were created by Phil Vanderlei and Logan Elston. Most episodes contained multiple story segments. For the listing of episode credits, crew information is listed under the primary story segment except where a production aspect--music, cinematography--differs among the segments.)moreless
  • 22
    Ironside

    Ironside

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Welcome to the Ironside guide at TV.com. When an assassin's bullet confines him to a wheelchair for life ending his career as Chief of Detectives, Robert T. Ironside becomes a consultant to the police department. Detective Sergeant Ed Brown and policewoman Eve Whitfield join with him to crack varied and fascinating cases. Ex-con Mark Sanger is employed by the chief as home help but eventually becomes a fully fledged member of the team also. Officer Whitfield leaves after 4 years service, and is replaced by Officer Fran Belding. If you have any information about this series, feel free to contribute it. Thanks.moreless
  • 23
    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    These people, dressed as they are, come from all over the United States to make deals here at the Marketplace of America, Let's Make A Deal® One of TV's all time greatest and most successful shows, Let's Make a Deal was a game of intuition, skill, luck, decision-making and greed...all mixed into one. It was fun and would have been a success even if the show had stuck with the formal dresses and suits that the game started with on December 30, 1963. That's right, contestants wore dresses and suits in the very early months of LMaD {December 30, 1963-July 31, 1964}. A few months after the show's premiere on February 3, 1964 someone came with a sign to attract host Monty Hall's attention and low and behold, he chose her (or him)! Sometime later on August 3-7, 1964, someone wore a crazy costume and the entire studio changed from a formal, quiet, dignified setting to a free-for-all. The show came alive and became the legendary success it would be known for. Each day, a gallery of 31 contestants (each wearing some loony costume, either their own creation or suggested by the show's producers) vied for Monty's attention. One, two or perhaps three at a time, Monty would choose contestants to make a deal with him. Many of the deals would involve either: * An unstated amount of cash in Monty's hand or an unknown prize behind the curtain. * Keys which unlocked anything from boxes to cars. Usually, the trader had to select from at least three keys. Monty always offered cash or the curtain/box as options. The number of working keys depended on the deal; more than once, every key worked (in the deals involving multiple contestants). Variant: Just three keys shown (only one of which works) and a couple playing for a car chooses the one they think works; Monty always shows one that doesn't work and then offers a substitute prize option. * Deciding if leather wallets contained thousands of dollars in cash or car keys or perhaps only a small amount or nothing at all (except for play money or worthless keys). Before the reveal, the contestant could choose the curtain or box. * Deciding whether an announced prize was real or fake and choosing a cash amount or the box/curtain as a substitute. * Choosing an envelope, purse, wallet, etc., which concealed dollar bills. The contestant could take the cash or trade for the curtain/box, but always risked giving up an announced dollar bill (usually $1 or $5) which awarded a grand prize (usually a car or trip); often, the "consolation" prize was $500, $1000 or $1500. * Choosing four of seven envelopes, each containing $1 and $2 bills, whose contents they hoped added up to at least $7 for a grand prize. * Monty's Cash Register, wherein a couple had to punch keys on a 15-key register. Exactly 13 of the buttons hid amounts of either $50 or $100, and getting to a stated amount (usually $500-$1000) won a grand prize. The couple could stop at any time and keep what they have (always then being tempted with a follow-up keep-or-trade deal) but hitting "no sale" at any time ended the game; if the unlucky button were struck on the first try, hitting the second "no sale" button the very next time also won the grand prize. Otherwise, Monty allowed the couple to take home whatever dollar amount they hit with the next key punch. * Three unrelated traders acted as a team on deals. Sometimes, only one was allowed to speak for the team without consultation of the others; other times, a "majority rules" format was used. Usually after a series of deals, the team was broken up and could individually decide on one or more options on a final deal. * At the start of the show, a contestant given a large grocery item (e.g., a box of candy bars), always containing a cash amount. Throughout the show, he/she is given several chances to trade the box and/or give it to another trader, in exchange for the box or curtain. Only after the Big Deal of the Day was awarded (or if the last trader with said item elects to go for the Big Deal) was the cash amount given. Variant: A "claim check" given to a trader at the start of the show for any prize shown during the regular deals and chances to trade throughout the episode. The prize ranged from cash and cars to zonks. Variant: The "claim check" was played as the very last regular deal with one sure deal offered in lieu of its contents. ...* And much more! Sometimes Monty would either sweeten the deal or allow the contestants to call off the deal for cash. Sometimes, the contestants did very well -- they could win rooms of furniture, appliances, TVs and stereos, cars, furs, trips, thousands of dollars in cash and MUCH MORE... Or they could be stuck with a ZONK! (those silly, nonsense prizes when they made the wrong decision). And yes, there were many zonks -- ranging from: * Live animals (usually from local zoos or farms). These included everything from pigs and cattle to skunks and lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)! * Rooms full of worthless junk. * Antique, broken-down cars (often rusted-out shells with overheated radiators). * Oversized mooseheads, deerheads and more. * Stuffed teddy bears. * Announcer Jay Stewart and model Carol Merrill dressed up as comedy characters. Often, they held such things as oversized paint rollers or were situated on things like jumbo kiddie cars and rocking horses. ... and much, much MORE!!! Not all the games involved luck or speculation. Some were skill games testing a contestant's knowledge of shopping and products (an early version of the 1970s The Price is Right, if you will). Some contestants had to determine which prize was a stated amount (or sometimes, choose two or more items which added up to a given amount), arrange items in order of value, remember which product was beneath the letter of a car, etc. Usually, Monty gave the contestants either a cash buyout or substitute prize either as the game progressed or just before the correct answer was revealed. Even if the contestant lost, he/she was given $50 or $100 as a consolation gift. Sometimes, two or more contestants or couples competed in a single deal to guess the prices of items with the closest guessers getting increasing amounts of cash (usually but not always, $100, $200, $300 and $400); if the trader won $700, they won a car. Even the loser got to spend any accumulated winnings on a curtain or box with more cash options thrown in as well. When about 7-8 minutes were left, Monty would call on the top winners from the show and ask them if they wanted to trade what they already won for a shot at the Big Deal of the Day � usually worth $2000-$5000 on the daytime show and from $7500 to $15,000 or more on the nighttime and syndicated versions). Once two contestants were selected, they would - with the top winner going first - select a curtain. There were no zonks at this stage, but the contestants risked going home with much less than they won (ergo, trading in a new $2000 kitchen for a color console TV worth $500 or a couple hundred dollars in cash). More than once, contestants traded cars for a chance at the Big Deal, and while they were usually lucky, there was at least one occassion where someone traded their car for less than $100 in prizes! Many times, the Big Deal of the Day was a fantastic prize -- such as a motorhome, a cabin cruiser, a four-seat airplane, a mink sable, a modular home, a Cadillac Eldorado convertible and a 60-day trip around the world...or in some cases, $10,000 or more in cash were among the many examples. The show debuted on NBC on December 30, 1963-January 3, 1964 and switched to ABC on December 30 1968-January 3, 1969. NBC (and later on ABC) later premiered a weekly prime-time version of the show (NBC's appeared in 1967; ABC's in February 1969) which was a major hit with viewers. A twice-weekly syndicated LMaD surfaced in 1971, and was (yup) a big hit. During the 1975-76 season, the Big Deal winner could risk his/her top prize for a shot at the Super Deal, where behind one of three doors was hidden a $20,000 grand prize; selecting the $20,000 window allowed the contestant to keep the Big Deal, though the Big Deal was forfeited if they chose incorrectly (they received a $1000 or $2000 consolation prize; later, $2000 and another unknown consolation amount between $3000 and $8000). LET'S MAKE A DEAL finished and goes out of business on July 9, 1976. During its final original-run season in syndication (1976-1977), the show was taped in Las Vegas, with the final shows taped in December 1976. The Super Deal feature was scrapped, and the last show was said to have featured no zonks. An unsuccessful five-day-a-week revival surfaced in syndication in 1980-1981, but would be a modest success when Monty tried again in five-a-week syndication in 1984-1986. While cheap prizes were the norm very early in the 1984-1986 run (the most expensive cars were often Chevrolet Sprints and Pontiac 1000s(!)), the show held its own and eventually gave away decent cars -- including a fully equipped $13,000 Chevrolet Camaro and a $15,000 Madza RX7. The most notable change was with a new feature, Door 4. Played twice a week or so, Door 4 was totally a surprise (announced only by sudden quick siren and at times, camera zoom fanfare). A People-Picker computer selected the contestant, and he/she would be presented a check worth $1000. He/she could keep the check or spin a carnival-type wheel for a chance at a new car, $100, $200, $2000, $3000, $4000...or perhaps a zonk (I was ZONKED by Money Hall T-shirt)! Regardless of what he/she decided, they were always asked to spin the wheel just to see what would've happened (when they decided to keep the check, the contestant usually would find out they passed up the car!). A short-lived NBC revival surfaced in 1990-1991, with Bob Hilton serving as host. He didn't last long and Monty was soon making deals; alas, even his return couldn't save the show. An embarassingly bad remake called Big Deal, surfaced in 1996, where contestants performed stunts as part of the game. The revival, which aired on FOX, didn't last long. Neither did a March 2003 hour-long remake of LMaD, with Billy Bush as host. The ratings started off decently and the show appeared promising. However, some critics pointed to questionable content (the opening deal in the premiere had women reaching underneath a stagehand's undergarments to retrieve part of their deal) as a prime reason the revival quickly soured; putting LMaD up against American Idol didn't help. In August 2001, Game Show Network (as of March 2004, simply GSN) began airing reruns of the 1970s LMaD, with the 1980-1981 and 1984-1986 runs part of the package. The show has been (and remains) a wonderful addition to GSN! NBC Broadcast History December 30, 1963-June 26, 1964, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:25pm June 29, 1964-September 29, 1967, Monday-Friday at 1:30-1:55pm May 21, 1967-September 3, 1967, Sunday at 8:30-9:00pm October 2, 1967-December 27, 1968, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm July 16, 1990-January 11, 1991, Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30am March 4-18, 2003, Tuesday at 8:00-9:00pm ABC Broadcast History December 30, 1968-July 9, 1976, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm February 7, 1969-May 9, 1969, Friday at 9:00-9:30pm May 16, 1969-January 9, 1970, Friday at 7:30-8:00pm January 24, 1970-January 2, 1971, Saturday at 7:30-8:00pm January 18, 1971-August 30, 1971, Monday at 7:30-8:00pm Syndicated History September 13, 1971-September 10, 1977 Various Times September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981 Various Times September 17, 1984-September 12, 1986 Various Times Depending on the TV Market of the area.moreless
  • 24
    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made it's debut on NBC-TV Daytime on Monday-Friday October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" acting both as the straight man & the abettor to the fun. 2 contestants which is including a returning champion compete in A Best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant is "Mr. X" (The "X") & The female is "Miss/Ms. Circle" (The "O"). In turn, each contestant picks a star to which "The Master" Marshall reads a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with the actual answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It's up to the contestant to figure it out when the answer to the question by saying "I Agree" or "I Disagree" with the star. A Correct judgment wins the contestant gets the square otherwise An Wrong Judgment meant the contestant gets the square. That's unless it leads to win Tic-Tac-Toe for which the contestant willing to earn him/herself in order to win the square. The 1st Contestant to complete a tic-tac-toe (3 Stars Across: Left & Right, Up & Down or Diagonally & Sideways or Otherwise 5-6 Squares on NBC-TV) win the game/match & collects the cash, which varied concerning on the show's portion: • NBC-TV Daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967) & The New Car. $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 & The New Car from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC-TV Nighttime (1968 ) : $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1981): $250 per game. The Certain Games are designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which is a bonus prize (or prize package & early on with the additional cash) for the contestant who'll wins everything. To Win The Secret Square Prize Package, The contestant will picks the star (up to this/that point, known only to the home audience at the shot of Color Television Camera to Make A Close-Up on 1 of The 9 Stars) for which Marshall reads a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant's correct by agreeing or disagreeing the right or wrong, he or she wins The Secret Square Prize Package. On NBC-TV Daytime: The prizes (as well as Cash) can win on "The Secret Square" for The 1st, 2nd or The Rubber Game of The Match for the cash & prize package is worth started about & exactly $1000 from October 17 to December 30, 1966 and begins increasing the total within $1000 Greater or Less from January 3, 1967 to June 20, 1980 (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat are included) and before being itself collected. • NBC-TV Nighttime (Friday Night January 12-September 13, 1968 ) : The 1st 2 Secret Square on the show. The 1st Prize is generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America) & The 2nd & Last Prize is A New Car (most frequently The 1968 Pontiac Firebird though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX are also offered). • Syndicated (Nighttime & Weekday/Night) : In The 1st 2 Seasons (1971-1973), The 1st 2 Games of each & every week, Season 3 to 7: The 1st 3 Games (1973-1978 ). At 1st, The Losing Secret Square Prize Packages going up to 2-3 Games of the show and losing it when the contestant made the star's answer to the Secret Square Question by Agreeing or Disagreeing Wrong. At first, each Secret Square is worth about $2000 but later, All individual prize packages are worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (Seasons 8 & 9: 1978-1980 ) The Secret Square goes to Games 1, 2 (and later 3) are used in separate style in Season 8 when "The Bonus Prize Squares" is added to the nighttime syndicated edition along with NBC-TV Daytime Edition. At 1st, There's No Bonus Game from October 17, 1966 to September 3, 1976; The Returning Champions simply faced The New Challenger before the commercial break & Finally on September 6-10, 1976, The New "Bonus Prize Squares" game is added & where's the champion to picks the star and win an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1979-1980). Originally, A 5-Match Champion Undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) & A New Car to Leaves the show from October 17, 1966 to January 2, 1976. The Bonus Award are upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 as called "THE WHOLE THING" and this/that include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship & $5000 cash for early of it's own period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the leads to win A Bonus Prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value is about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the leads to win a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in The NBC Nighttime & Syndicated Portions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "The Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant is given $50 for each square they've got after the last question is answered & played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – Television, Movies, Music, Sports, Fashion, Regular Experts, New York's Broadway & Other Local Shows in The U.S. of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips (zingers) & bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or sit-ins. The Most Popular Regulars (SQUARE OWNERS) are Rose Marie, Charley Weaver (1966-1974), Wally Cox (1967-1973), Morey Amsterdam (1967-1969), Abby Dalton (1967-1970), George Gobel (1974-1981) and ... of course, the all-time center square Paul Lynde (1968-1981). Paul Lynde – by the way – He's not always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to the weekday broadcast of October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for not sitting the same center square, but sitting the different square for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime portion of The Hollywood Squares released. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. 3 Months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one season (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV 1979-1980 Daytime Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 Theme songs of The Hollywood Squares are all used. The 1st Theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" is composed by (The Late) Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season (Season 4) and it's replaced by a musical piece is composed by (The Late) William Loose for known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," It's The 2nd Theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and it ended before & after the 1978-1979 season (Season 13.) The Disco-Flavored Theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" is composed by (The Late) Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became The 3rd & Last Theme Song Starting on September 10-14, 1979 & Finishing it on September 11, 1981. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" broadcasted on NBC-TV Daytime and cancelled severely on June 16-20, 1980, when it's replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime talk-variety show on June 23-27, 1980. 3 Remarks are all having tries for success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as THE MATCH GAME/HOLLYWOOD SQUARES HOUR); A 1986-1989 Syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares Square Placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) & The 1998-2004 Edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network (and now GSN); the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes (130 total). Originally having aired in several weekday/night timeslots, the show is eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30-11:00 AM EDT). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many to most of the stars have died in the same & different years or are really too unfamiliar to younger viewers) and are all eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000 and soon after it's gone for good. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES: {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 11, 1981 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company. Now This Show Owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television.moreless
  • 25
    Diff'rent Strokes

    Diff'rent Strokes

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    NBC (ended 1986)
    Diff'rent Strokes took place in New York City and centered around the happenings in the Drummond household. Philip Drummond was a widower and had a daughter, Kimberly. He was also quite wealthy and lived in the penthouse of a luxurious apartment building. His wealth was due to the fact that he was the president of Trans Allied, Inc.

    However, the household was shaken up when Drummond's black housekeeper died and her deathbed wish was that he would take care of her two sons, Arnold and Willis Jackson. So, Drummond took both of them in and they became the sons Drummond never had.

    Others in the cast included Mrs. Garrett the new housekeeper who later left for her own series, The Facts of Life. She was replaced by Adelaide, who was seen occasionally and she was later replaced by Pearl. In the seventh season, Drummond wed an aerobics instructor, Maggie McKinney and she moved in with her son, Sam, from a previous marriage.

    First Telecast: November 3, 1978 Last Telecast: August 30, 1986

    Episodes: 189 Color Episodes

    Theme Song:

    "It Takes Diff'rent Strokes" Written by: Alan Thicke, Gloria Loring and Al Burton

    Sung by: Alan Thicke

    Spinoffs: Hello, Larry and The Facts of Life

    Episode descriptions: courtesy of Todd Fuller at Diff'rent Strokes Online.

    NBC Broadcast History

    November 1978-October 1979----Fridays----8:00 p.m. October 1979-October 1981----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. October 1981-August 1982----Thursdays----9:00 p.m. August 1982-August 1985----Saturdays----8:00 p.m.

    ABC Broadcast History

    September 1985-March 1986----Fridays----9:00 p.m. June-August 1986----Saturdays----8:00 p.m.

    Theme Song: "It Takes Diff'rent Strokes" Written by: Alan Thicke, Gloria Loring and Al Burton Sung by: Alan Thicke

    Now, the world don't move to the beat of just one drum. What might be right for you, may not be right for some. A man is born, he's a man of means. Then along come two, they got nothing but their jeans.

    But they got, Diff'rent Strokes. It takes, Diff'rent Strokes. It takes, Diff'rent Strokes to move the world.

    Everybody's got a special kind of story. Everybody finds a way to shine. It don't matter that you got, not alot, so what. They'll have theirs, and you'll have yours, and I'll have mine, and together we'll be fine....

    'cause it takes, Diff'rent Strokes to move the world. Yes it does. It takes, Diff'rent Strokes to move the world.
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  • 26
    The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

    The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    Welcome to the complete The Man from U.N.C.L.E. guide at TV.com. This is the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement.
    Meet our top Enforcement Agents, Mr. Illya Kuryakin and Mr. Napoleon Solo. For four seasons, their job was to stop evil organizations such as THRUSH in their plans and attempts for world domination.moreless
  • 27
    Quincy, M.E.

    Quincy, M.E.

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    NBC (ended 1983)
    Quincy, M.E, a man who must have been a nightmare to work with! Quincy was a crusading Medical Examiner in Los Angeles, an expert at his job he was always capable of finding something that everyone else missed. A small clue that would go against all the rest of the evidence in a case and would lead to him arguing with his boss, Asten, and/or the investigating detective, nearly always Monahan. Quincy started of as a straight forward crime series with a difference, it was a M.E. investigating not a police officer or private eye.As the series went from strength to strength the writers, probably with a little push from Klugman, started bringing in stories about social injustice rather than criminal. Most of the time this worked, in fact it is sometimes interesting to see that some of the things highlighted still have not changed even now! Sometimes it came over a little preachy but the show can never be faulted for trying to enlighten the eyes of its viewers.moreless
  • 28
    The Midnight Special

    The Midnight Special

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Midnight Special guide at TV.com. The Midnight Special was a late-night rock music series airing Friday nights (or, to be more exact, early Saturday mornings). On most NBC affiliates, The Midnight Special followed "The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson."

    For its first 8 seasons, The Midnight Special's time slot was from 1:00am to 2:30am. But when Johnny Carson cut "The Tonight Show" down from 90 to 60 minutes, The Midnight Special was moved up to the 12:30am-2:00am time slot.

    NBC aired The Midnight Special's pilot on August 19, 1972. The pilot was presented as a 90-minute special encouraging young people to vote in the upcoming Presidential election. On February 2, 1973, The Midnight Special premiered as a weekly series. For most of its run, a different guest host was featured every week. (An exception to this was from July 1975 through March 1976 when Helen Reddy was the regular host.) Wolfman Jack, fresh from his role in "American Graffiti," was the series' announcer and a frequent guest host.

    Around 1978, at the height of the Disco craze, the set was modified to resemble a Disco nightclub, complete with a platform dance floor. Wolfman Jack stood behind an elevated DJ booth. But by Fall 1979, as the genre's popularity waned, the disco set was gone.

    During its last few seasons, The Midnight Special received criticism for not giving enough attention to the punk & new wave music of the late-1970s to early 1980s. While a few punk/new wave acts were presented (either as live guests or in music videos), the majority of musical guests continued to be MOR or disco acts.

    Beginning April 11, 1980, The Midnight Special faced competition from ABC's "Fridays," a "Saturday Night Live" comedy series. Fridays' musical guests were often more cutting edge than those seen on The Midnight Special.

    In May 1981, NBC replaced The Midnight Special with "SCTV Network 90," an expanded version of "Second City TV," previously a syndicated 30-minute series.moreless
  • 29
    The Facts of Life

    The Facts of Life

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    NBC (ended 1988)
    The Facts of Life began in August of 1979 and aired on NBC. It was a spin-off to the sitcom Diff'rent Strokes on which Charlotte Rae played Mrs. Garrett, housekeeper to Philip Drummond's household. In The Facts of Life, Mrs. Garrett has become headmistress to an exclusive girls school, Eastland. Although the series had a rocky start, including low ratings and a cast overhaul. The series went on to becomes one of the longest running sitcoms of the 80's. In the first season the stories revolved around Mrs. Garrett and her adjustment to her new job. The first season also introduced to us seven girls, Nancy, Blair, Sue Ann, Cindy, Molly, Natalie and Tootie. At the beginning of the second season, the cast was trimmed down to Mrs. Garrett and four primary girls, Blair, Tootie, Natalie and a new girl, Jo. These four girls would remain until the end of the series with Mrs. Garrett re-marrying and leaving in 1986 and Cloris Leachman coming in to play Mrs. Garrett's sister, Beverly Ann from 1986-1988. On November 18, 2001, ABC aired The Facts of Life Reunion, in which Mrs. Garrett, Natalie, Blair and Tootie reunite. First Telecast: August 24, 1979 Last Telecast: September 10, 1988 Episodes: 209 Color Episodes Theme Song: "The Facts of Life" Written by: Alan Thicke, Gloria Loring and Al Burton Sung by: Charlotte Rae (Season 1) and Gloria Loring (Seasons 2-9) Spin-off of : Diff'rent Strokes NBC Broadcast History August-September 1979----Fridays----8:30 p.m. March-May 1980----Fridays----8:30 p.m. June-July 1980----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. August-October 1980----Fridays----8:30 p.m. November 1980-October 1981----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. October 1981-August 1985----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. September 1985-June 1986----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. June 1986-May 1987----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June-July 1987----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. July 1987-September 1988----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 35 or Better) #26 in the 1980-1981 Season #24 in the 1981-1982 Season #24 in the 1983-1984 Season #32 in the 1984-1985 Season #27 in the 1985-1986 Seasonmoreless
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    NBC Nightly News

    NBC Nightly News

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    NBC
    Currently anchored by Brian Williams, NBC Nightly News is NBC's evening news program, watched by millions of Americans every night. NBC Nightly News originated from the Huntley-Brinkley Report, but when David Huntley retired, they changed the name and format. You can catch the show every evening at 6:30 PM ET / 5:30 PM CT.moreless
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    The Daffy Duck Show (1978)

    The Daffy Duck Show (1978)

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    The Daffy Duck Show (1978) First Aired November 4 I978 and featured the animated comic shorts of Warner Brothers and Looney Toons character Daffy Duck. Daffy Duck's character is voiced by Mel Blanc. Mel Blanc also voiced other characters such as Porky Pig / Speedy Gonzales / Sylvester / Tweety / Foghorn Leghorn / Pepe Le Pew and Yosemite Sam.moreless
  • 32
    Dean Martin Celebrity Roast

    Dean Martin Celebrity Roast

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    NBC (ended 1984)
    In 1973, The Dean Martin Show was declining in popularity. So for the 1973 - 1974 season, a new feature called a "roast" was added to try to pick up the ratings. The roasts seemed to be pretty popular among television audiences. So after the show was cancelled in 1974, NBC drew up a contract with Dean to do several specials and do more roast specials. Enter The Dean Martin Celebrity Roast. Starting with Bob Hope in 1974, the roast was taped in California and turned out to be a hit, leading to many other roasts to follow. In the fall of 1974, the roasts moved permanently to the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. From 1974 until early 1979, in the hotel's Ziegfeld Room, stars like Frank Sinatra, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Stewart, Joan Collins, and many others were roasted.moreless
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    Hec Ramsey

    Hec Ramsey

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Richard Boone starred as Hec Ramsey, gunfighter turned criminologist, in this turn of the century western. The show was one of the four rotating elements of the NBC Sunday Mystery Movie for two seasons from 1972-74. Rick Lenz and Harry Morgan co-starred. The show was canceled due to disagreements between star Richard Boone and Universal Studios, which produced the series. Boone wanted the show to become a weekly series whilst the studio preferred it to remain in its rotating monthly format.moreless
  • 34
    The Bold Ones: The New Doctors

    The Bold Ones: The New Doctors

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    The New Doctors began as one of three rotating series under the umbrella name The Bold Ones. The other series were The Lawyers and The Protectors (also called The Law Enforcers). In the second season, The Protectors was replaced by The Senator. By the fourth season, only The New Doctors remained and was shown on a weekly basis.
    The doctors work at the Craig Institute under the supervision of senior partner, Dr. David Craig. He is assisted by surgeon Dr. Ted Stuart (who was replaced in the fourth season by Dr. Martin Cohen) and Dr. Paul Hunter, who oversees the medical research department.
    The episodes dealt with then-cutting edge topics such as embryo transplants and patients' right-to-die issues, as well as the subjects of organ transplants, mental illness and an episode on muscular dystrophy directed by Jerry Lewis.moreless
  • 35
    Project UFO

    Project UFO

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Welcome to the Project UFO episode guide at TV.com.
  • 36
    Wagon Train

    Wagon Train

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    Wagon Train followed the trials and tribulations of pioneering families as they set out from the East to carve out a new life in the West soon after the American Civil War. For some of the travellers it was a happy ending, but not for all, which only heightened the drama along the way. Such a structure ensured that the scriptwriters had a wide scope for their stories which , more often than not, revolved around the characters rather than the action, although the series had more than it's fair share of that too. With a new storyline nearly every week and a larger than average budget for the time, it was never difficult for the producers to attract well known guest stars in front of the cameras with some famous names behind the cameras too. Wagon Train was a hit on both sides of the Atlantic between 1957 and 1965. It survived cast changes to the leading actors and changes to the format which is testimony enough to the show's popularity. Even now fans who watched it back then remember it with fondness, and regular re-runs ensure it's continuing popularity with newer generations.moreless
  • 37
    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In turned out to be one of the most successful mid-season replacements, ranking right up there withAll in the Family and it was just as controversial. This memorable variety show that gave us such memorable sayings like "very interesting", "ring my chimes", "look that up in your Funk and Wagnalls", "sock it to me", "You bet your Sweet Bippy", "Here Comes The Judge!", "Its Time to Say Goodnight Dick", as well as many others, proved to be unlike any variety show that ever graced television. Hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, this unique variety show was a fast moving barage of jokes, one-liners, running skits, musical numbers as well as making fun of social and political issues of the late 1960's. It was the group of regulars, particularly those from 1968-1970, that made it memorable. Gary Owens, Judy Carne, Arte Johnson, Ruth Buzzi, Alan Sues, Goldie Hawn, Chelsea Brown, Henry Gibson and Jo Anne Worley seemed to make the most lasting impressions with viewers. Lily Tomlin joined the cast in 1970 at a point when most of these original regulars were leaving. Gary Owens was the announcer, Judy Carne was the "Sock it to Me" girl, Arte Johnson frequently portrayed the German soldier who spouted "very interesting" or the dirty old man that would annoy the frumpy Gladys played by Ruth Buzzi. Goldie Hawn was the blonde dingbat and Chelsea Brown was the only black female who was later replaced by Teresa Graves. Henry Gibson usually recited poetry and Jo Anne Worley usually was seen singing with her loud voice. In 1970, most of the originals left the series and the ratings began to slowly drop. Lily Tomlin was hired and instantly her characters began to energize an already sagging show. Ernestine, the wacky telephone operator was probably the most popular. The final season, had almost a totally new set of regulars with the exception of Ruth Buzzi and Gary Owens. Lily Tomlin was seen occasionally on account of the fact that she was planning on leaving the show. The series ended in 1973. In 1993, NBC aired a 25th Anniversary Special that garnered fantastic ratings and prompted two more specials to air, one in December 1993 and one in February of 1994. NBC Broadcast History January 1968-May 1973-----Mondays----8:00 p.m. For the first time since it originally aired, Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In was seen in its original hour-long episodes on the cable network Trio. Previously, the series had been shown on Nick at Nite but only as edited half-hour episodes. Also, on the Comedy Network in Canada, There is a Valentines Day Special and periodically the 25th anniversary special is repeated on that channel.moreless
  • 38
    B.J. and the Bear

    B.J. and the Bear

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    What kind of trouble can a monkey and a trucker get into? This classic series explores just that! BJ McKay was a good-looking young trucker who traveled around the country in his big red & white rig, with a single companion - his pet chimp, Bear. B.J. was based in rural Georgia and was confronted by a succession of corrupt local sheriffs - Elroy P. Lobo (who was later given his own series, Lobo); Sgt. Wiley of Winslow County and his two fellow lawmen, Sheriffs Cain and Masters. The only honest cop B.J. seemed to encounter was the Fox, who spent much of her time trying to trap the crooked local cops. Tommy was a lady trucker friend and Bullets ran the local hangout, the Country Comfort Truck Stop. In 1981, B.J. settled down to run a trucking business in Los Angeles called Bear Enterprises. His new adversary was Rutherford T. Grant, a corrupt politician who headed the state Special Crimes Action Team. Grant was a silent partner in TransCal, the largest trucking firm in California and stopped at nothing to stomp out potential competition. Because of Grant's intervention, B.J. found it impossible to get regular truck drivers to work for him and had to settle for a crew of 7 young, beautiful lady truckers, including a pair of identical twins and Grant's daughter, Cindy. The Theme Song was written by Glen A Larson and sung by Greg Eviganmoreless
  • 39
    McCloud

    McCloud

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Deputy Marshal Sam McCloud of Taos, N.M. is assigned to the 21st Precinct of the New York Police Department to study local police methods, where he can stay close to his girl, Chris Coughlin, a writer for her father's paper, the New York Chronicle. McCloud is a keen and brilliant investigator who garbs his talents in a Stetson and a sheepskin coat. "There ya go" is his byword. Chief Clifford's disregard of his manner frequently puts him in unavailing positions, but his original view of the city allows him to follow difficult cases to often far-reaching conclusions. McCloud is a variant of Don Siegel's 1968 film masterpiece Coogan's Bluff, and features elaborate writing, bold action, and the quintessence of high comedy. Dennis Weaver was nominated for an Emmy in 1974 and 1975.moreless
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    My World and Welcome to It

    My World and Welcome to It

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    My World and Welcome to It was a half-hour situation comedy based on the writings of humorist and cartoonist James Thurber, and episodes of the show incorporated stories and cartoons by Thurber. The show used a combination of live action and animation to represent the world of John Monroe, like Thurber a writer and cartoonist, who worked for The Manhattanite, a magazine very much like The New Yorker, for which Thurber wrote and illustrated for many years. All the animation was based on Thurber's drawings, including the show's opening credits.

    John Monroe had to contend with his hot-tempered, often obtuse boss, Manhattanite editor Hamilton Greeley, who usually found John's cartoons incomprehensible. (Greeley was loosely based on New Yorker editor Harold Ross.) Fortunately for John, he could share his frustrations with his writer friend, the sardonic Phil Jensen (based on writer Robert Benchley).

    At home in Westport, Connecticut, John had to contend with the women in his life, whom he spent much agony trying to understand. His wife Ellen was practical and down-to-earth and was constantly bemused by John's inability to cope with day to day life, while his daughter, 10-year-old Lydia, was precocious and intelligent in ways that constantly confounded John.

    In addition to the innovative use of animation combined with live action, the show had several other unusual characteristics. Many of the episodes incorporated Thurber stories like "If Grant Had Been Drinking at Appomattox" or "The Unicorn in the Garden." There were many fantasy sequences, the products of John's fertile imagination, which allowed him to escape reality, much like Thurber's most famous character, Walter Mitty. The cartoons that John drew for The Manhattanite were Thurber's cartoons. And John would often turn from the action to talk directly to the camera, just as George Burns had done on The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show and Garry Shandling would do years later on It's Garry Shandling's Show. In 1970 My World and Welcome to It won the Emmy Award for Best Comedy Series, and William Windom won Best Actor in a Comedy Series for his portrayal of John Monroe. Unfortunately, the show was cancelled after only one season. There was a great outcry when NBC cancelled the show, and there was talk of bringing the show back, but the cost of resuming production would have been too high, so that idea was scrapped. My World and Welcome to It Trivia: The title My World and Welcome to It is also the title of a collection of Thurber stories. The character of John Monroe is named for a character in a series of Thurber short stories. A TV pilot for a comedy series based on Thurber's work was made in 1959, written by My World and Welcome to It creator Melville Shavelson and directed by James Sheldon, who also directed episodes of MWAWTI. The proposed series would have been titled The Secret Life of John Monroe and the pilot, which had virtually the same plot line and characters as the "Christabel" episode of MWAWTI, starred Arthur O'Connell as John Monroe, Georganne Johnson as Ellen Monroe, and Susan Gordon as Lydia Monroe. It also included animation done by UPI Studios. The pilot was shown on Alcoa/Goodyear Playhouse on June 8, 1959. The animation for the series was done by DePatie-Freleng, who were also responsible for the Pink Panther cartoons. The reason for the show's cancellation was that after CBS has unexpectedly cancelled The Red Skelton Show, NBC quickly offered Skelton a half-hour comedy series, and in order to fit this new show into their schedule, they had to cancel a show already on their schedule. Sadly, their choice was My World and Welcome to It. NBC's Red Skelton Show lasted all of one season. CBS reran the series in the summer of 1972, a rare case of a program that had originally been shown on one network being rerun on another network. In 1972 creator Shavelson directed and co-wrote (with Danny Arnold) a film loosely based on Thurber called The War Between Men and Women, which was also the title of an episode of My World and Welcome to It and a famous series of Thurber cartoons. The film starred Jack Lemmon and Barbara Harris and featured a performance by MYAWTI's Lisa Gerritsen.moreless

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