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  • 61
    The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

    The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Ghost and Mrs. Muir guide at TV.com.
  • 62
    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In turned out to be one of the most successful mid-season replacements, ranking right up there withAll in the Family and it was just as controversial. This memorable variety show that gave us such memorable sayings like "very interesting", "ring my chimes", "look that up in your Funk and Wagnalls", "sock it to me", "You bet your Sweet Bippy", "Here Comes The Judge!", "Its Time to Say Goodnight Dick", as well as many others, proved to be unlike any variety show that ever graced television. Hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, this unique variety show was a fast moving barage of jokes, one-liners, running skits, musical numbers as well as making fun of social and political issues of the late 1960's. It was the group of regulars, particularly those from 1968-1970, that made it memorable. Gary Owens, Judy Carne, Arte Johnson, Ruth Buzzi, Alan Sues, Goldie Hawn, Chelsea Brown, Henry Gibson and Jo Anne Worley seemed to make the most lasting impressions with viewers. Lily Tomlin joined the cast in 1970 at a point when most of these original regulars were leaving. Gary Owens was the announcer, Judy Carne was the "Sock it to Me" girl, Arte Johnson frequently portrayed the German soldier who spouted "very interesting" or the dirty old man that would annoy the frumpy Gladys played by Ruth Buzzi. Goldie Hawn was the blonde dingbat and Chelsea Brown was the only black female who was later replaced by Teresa Graves. Henry Gibson usually recited poetry and Jo Anne Worley usually was seen singing with her loud voice. In 1970, most of the originals left the series and the ratings began to slowly drop. Lily Tomlin was hired and instantly her characters began to energize an already sagging show. Ernestine, the wacky telephone operator was probably the most popular. The final season, had almost a totally new set of regulars with the exception of Ruth Buzzi and Gary Owens. Lily Tomlin was seen occasionally on account of the fact that she was planning on leaving the show. The series ended in 1973. In 1993, NBC aired a 25th Anniversary Special that garnered fantastic ratings and prompted two more specials to air, one in December 1993 and one in February of 1994. NBC Broadcast History January 1968-May 1973-----Mondays----8:00 p.m. For the first time since it originally aired, Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In was seen in its original hour-long episodes on the cable network Trio. Previously, the series had been shown on Nick at Nite but only as edited half-hour episodes. Also, on the Comedy Network in Canada, There is a Valentines Day Special and periodically the 25th anniversary special is repeated on that channel.moreless
  • 63
    Chico and the Man

    Chico and the Man

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Chico and the Man debuted in 1974 on NBC. The setting was East Los Angeles in a small run down garage. The owner, Ed Brown, became partners in the business with a young Chicano, Chico Rodriguez. Major changes occured toward the end of the 3rd season when Freddie Prinze, who played Chico, committed suicide. The final three episodes of the third season where filmed explaining Chico had gone to Mexico for a visit. The following season, Chico was written out of the show as going into business with his father. A new "Chico" was introduced at the beginning of the fourth and final season in Raul Garcia, a young boy whom Ed calls Chico. Other characters include, Louie Wilson, the garbage man who dropped by the garage and Della Rogers who ran a food stand not far from the garage. NBC Broadcast History September 1974-January 1976----Fridays----8:30 p.m.
    January-March 1976----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m.
    April-August 1976----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m.
    August 1976-February 1978----Fridays----8:30 p.m.
    June-July 1978----Fridays----8:30 p.m.moreless
  • 64
    Banyon

    Banyon

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Private eye drama from the Quinn Martin Productions factory set in the 1930's featuring Robert Forster as Los Angeles private detective Miles C. Banyon. Veteran actors Joan Blondell and Richard Jaeckel co-starred in the series which featured some stylish production values and solid scripts but failed to catch on with the viewers and was given the hook by NBC after only 15 episodes.moreless
  • 65
    B.J. and the Bear

    B.J. and the Bear

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    What kind of trouble can a monkey and a trucker get into? This classic series explores just that! BJ McKay was a good-looking young trucker who traveled around the country in his big red & white rig, with a single companion - his pet chimp, Bear. B.J. was based in rural Georgia and was confronted by a succession of corrupt local sheriffs - Elroy P. Lobo (who was later given his own series, Lobo); Sgt. Wiley of Winslow County and his two fellow lawmen, Sheriffs Cain and Masters. The only honest cop B.J. seemed to encounter was the Fox, who spent much of her time trying to trap the crooked local cops. Tommy was a lady trucker friend and Bullets ran the local hangout, the Country Comfort Truck Stop. In 1981, B.J. settled down to run a trucking business in Los Angeles called Bear Enterprises. His new adversary was Rutherford T. Grant, a corrupt politician who headed the state Special Crimes Action Team. Grant was a silent partner in TransCal, the largest trucking firm in California and stopped at nothing to stomp out potential competition. Because of Grant's intervention, B.J. found it impossible to get regular truck drivers to work for him and had to settle for a crew of 7 young, beautiful lady truckers, including a pair of identical twins and Grant's daughter, Cindy. The Theme Song was written by Glen A Larson and sung by Greg Eviganmoreless
  • 66
    Star Trek: The Animated Series

    Star Trek: The Animated Series

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    This is the further adventures of the Star Trek series in a half-hour animated form. This show basically continues the adventures of the original series (presumably in the fourth year of the five-year mission), but takes advantage of the unlimited special effects provided by animation to introduce more alien crewmen (the felinoid M'Ress and the tripedal Arex) as well as introduce more elaborate adventures like an underwater adventure, the miniaturization of the crew to 1 cm., and the appearance of a giant fire-breathing two-headed dragon. The show is currently not considered "canon" by Paramount and the folks associated with the various subsequent TV shows. However, elements of the animated series have been used in subsequent shows (Sarek refers to the events of "Yesteryear" in TNG's "Reunification Pt. 1") and the Enterprise-D's holodeck seems to have been in part inspired by the holodeck we see in "Practical Joker". Also, writers such as Peter David have used some elements from the animated series in the books and comics. Although produced on the cheap (note the incredibly static backgrounds, recycled animations, and the fact that James Doohan, Nichelle Nichols, and Majel Barrett do about 95% of the guest voices), the script writing and concepts (mostly by writers from the original series) are generally of high quality (the show won an Emmy for best Children's Programming in '73) and the show is in many worthy of inclusion in the Trek annals.moreless
  • 67
    H.R. Pufnstuf

    H.R. Pufnstuf

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    This classic series begins with Jimmy, a young English boy, playing near the edge of a bay with his magical talking gold flute, Freddie. While at the edge of the bay, Jimmy climbs aboard a talking boat that beckons to him. As it drifts out to sea, an evil witch named Witchiepoo, seeking Freddie to add to her collection of magical possessions, casts a spell and makes the boat turn into an evil boat which attacks Jimmy (who then jumps overboard to save himself). Swimming to the shore of Living Island, Jimmy is rescued by its mayor, H. R. Pufnstuf, and his Rescue Racer crew (Kling and Klang) before Witchiepoo can get her hands on the boy or the magic flute. They befriend Jimmy, sheltering and protecting him from the kooky old witch. Everything on Living Island is alive. Books have faces, houses sneeze and trees can talk, not to mention the regular citizens who all look like an animal of some sort. Dr Blinky is an Owl, Ludicrous is a Lion and Judy Frog is; well she's a frog and the only character I didn't like as a child. And then there is the evil Witchiepoo. She continually tries to satisfy her obsession for the talking flute with the aid of her goofy henchmen Orson, Seymore, Stupid Bat, and her motorized broomstick, called the Vroom Broom. Each episode involves Jimmy attempting to escape from the island with the help of Pufnstuf and his friends, with flute intact of course. H.R. Pufnstuf was created by Sid and Marty Krofft.moreless
  • 68
    The Flip Wilson Show

    The Flip Wilson Show

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Comic Flip Wilson was the first black performer to achieve major popularity as host of his own variety hour.  The Flip Wilson Show was an enormous hit, during it's first two seasons. Although music and guests were an important part of the format, Flip's comedy was the real focus point of the series. Flip's best-known expression was a wide-eyed "The Devil made me do it". The Series Won Two Emmy Awards in 1970 for Best Variety Series and Writing in a Variety Series. Flip also won a Golden Globe in 1971 for Best TV Actor. 'The Flip Wilson Show' was the only prime-time series where you could find musical guests like Issac Hayes, James Brown and The Temptations. Flip got his unique nickname because he 'flipped' people out with his stories. He was a very well known stand-up comedian and frequently made appearances on 'Tonight Show.' Flip was discovered by the King of late night himself Johnny Carson, and fellow comedian Redd Foxx. NBC was quick to make him the host of what would become one of, if not the most popular variety shows ever. This show garnered the number two spot (ratings wise) coming in behind All in the Family. "The Flip Wilson Show" would keep these ratings for a solid 2 years, and was in the top 20 when it went off air in 1974. "The Flip Wilson Show" had a strong stable of writers. Couple that with Wilson's tremendous talent and likability; you get a show that destroyed everything the other networks threw against it. Wilson himself wrote about a third of the show, and edited much of the rest. The series stuck to five day rehearsal and shooting schedules; which was the most of any other variety show, but Flip was focused on making his series a cut above. "Occasionally it takes some time to hit off because we have to find the right approach," Wilson said in 1972, "But once that happens, we're smokin'." If he was driven, it was because of tough times in the past, and a hard struggle through the black nightclubs of the fifties. "With all the trouble black people have", he once stated, "they try to forget on weekends. You've got to be good to make them laugh." Flip's laws of comedy: "Be sudden, be neat. Be unimpassioned, and if you're serious about something, leave it out." It was Flip's Geraldine character that made the phrase "What you see is what you get" famous. That was Wilson's philosophy as well: "My show is my statement", he told Time magazine in 1972, "What I have to say is on the screen. My life is my own. I don't want to talk about my private self. Why should I?" THE NEILSEN RATINGS FOR THE FLIP WILSON SHOW (Top 25): October 1970 - April 1971: #2 October 1971 - April 1972: #2 October 1972 - April 1973: #12 NBC Broadcast History September 1970-June 1971----7:30-8:30 September 1971-June 1974----8:00-9:00 Flip's Various Characters included: Geraldine - the wise-cracking, smart mouth woman with an unseen boyfriend named, "Killer" Reverend Leroy - the flamboyant pastor of the Church Of What's Happenin' Now Sonny - the White House janitor Freddie Johnson - Quite the ladies manmoreless
  • 69
    The Gong Show

    The Gong Show

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    And now, let us introduce, for your viewing pleasure: • A bearded, demented-looking dentist taunts his hapless patient as he drills her teeth, flipping the drill's switch to the tune of "Stars and Stripes Forever." • A petite homecoming queen, obviously nervous, is duped into singing the National Anthem after she and fellow members of the choir have been introduced as collectively performing "The Star Spangled Banner." • A grossly overweight man tap-dances to music from "Swan Lake"; later his equally obese wife squeezes into a tiny tutu and, after fitting her head in a teacup, spins around while playing "Old Folks at Home" on the mandolin. • An Elvis impersonator sings "Hound Dog," but his voice is a monotone. Who didn't live for acts such as those on The Gong Show, the classic parody of ameteur talent contests? Chuck Barris was the straight man (yeah, right) to a panel of three celebrity judges – usually singer Jaye P. Morgan, comedian Arte Johnson (of Rowan and Martin's Laugh In) and Jamie Farr (of M*A*S*H*); plus one or more guests – each assigned the task of enduring and judging the ameteur acts that performed, either solo or in groups. Yes, some of the acts that performed had legitimate talent and did very well, although all of good acts were ameteurs because of Barris' strict rule against allowing professionals as contestants. However, the real fun came in watching those hilariously awful acts. Just a short list of acts might include: • The mustached-magician trying to get his "talented" pigeons to dance. • The teen-aged girls in pastel-colored prom dresses singing "People Who Need People" while dancing in a conga line. • The young comic who did impressions of modern-day actors performing Shakespeare. • An older woman whose dog had the knack for imitating other barnyard animals. • A man who broke eggs over his head while making faces in a sheet of Plexiglas. • "Professor Flamo" – a man who sang out in pain while lowering various body parts onto burning candles. Joey D'Auria was "Professor Flamo" and would later become Bozo the Clown on WGN (1984-2001). • An entire episode dedicated to contestants singing their rendition of "Feelings." ... and countless other acts that were wild and outrageous. Do those acts sound bad? Of course they did, and any one of the celebrity judges had the right to terminate the act by striking his/her mallet against an oversized "gong" (often, two or all three did, and several times, they fought to get to the gong first). The act had to immeidately cease and were out of the running for the grand prize. Early in the run, some acts were "gonged" just seconds into the act, prompting Barris to implement a mandatory 45-second wait (though judging by the frequent reactions of the celebs, that was often way too long). Acts that did reach their conclusion (the longest performances were usually two-and-a-half minutes) were scored by the panelists on a scale of 0 to 10, with a high score of 30 possible. The highest-scoring act of the day won the grand prize – $516.32 on the daytime show, $712.05 (later $1,000) on the syndicated version; however, a grand-prize winner was not necessarily guaranteed, particularly if all of the acts were gonged. The 1976 syndicated version, which debuted months after the NBC version began, was identical to the daytime version, except that Gary Owens hosted (until 1978, when Barris took over that job). Acts on The Gong Show became more and more risqué during the final months of the daytime version. The final straw came during a 1978 daytime telecast, when many viewers declared a certain act obscene (The Popsicle Twins) (that act would fit in quite nicely with Game Show Network's overtly sex-littered 1998 revival, called Extreme Gong); NBC apparently agreed and – whether on its own accord or bowing to pressure from viewers and advertisers – cancelled The Gong Show. Not to worry for original Gong Show fans; the fun continued unabated in syndication until 1980. Running gags featuring the show's regular cast were also popular. Some included: • An inept musician (Larry Spencer) who announces his intention to "play" a certain musical instrument "right now" (with the instrument failing on cue) • Barris reading a children's story with alternate endings (and enacted by the show's cast). • Brief skits from the "Unknown Comic" (comedian Murray Langston) and "Gene Gene the Dancing Machine" (Gene Patton). There was also Scarlett & Rhett where every joke was a dirty one that constantly required the "OOPS!" sign to flash! Also, guest performers – former winning contestants with legit talent and real celebrities, including Alice Cooper – were invited to perform in non-scoring, non-gongable segments. John Barbour (later of Real People) was supposed to be the host, but his straight-man style didn't work out and Barris let him go before the first aired episode taped. Barris took over the job himself and the rest was history. The Gong Show quickly became a part of American popular culture, with local versions staged as fundraisers by college, high school and civic groups. There were two unsuccessful attempts to revive The Gong Show. A 1988 revival, hosted by Don Bleu didn't catch on with viewers and was cancelled after less than 26 weeks. Critics panned the aforementioned Extreme Gong (a revival to play off the popularity of reruns of the original series), thanks in large part to the risqué content; hosted by comedian George Gray, the celebrity panel was replaced by a 1-900 number for viewers to judge the acts.moreless
  • 70
    The Bold Ones: The Lawyers

    The Bold Ones: The Lawyers

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    NBC (ended 1972)
    The Bold Ones was a revolving series of shows that aired on NBC in the 1970s. The idea of the whole series came from a critically acclaimed made for TV movie The Sound Of Anger, which aired in 1968 and is included in this guide as a first pilot for the series, even though it was made as a one time, stand alone movie.
    From this beginning, the idea for a series on the law firm featured in the movie was born and another pilot was shot entitled The Whole World Is Watching. While the series The Bold Ones was being developed, it was expanded to include other areas of interest, including medicine, law enforcement, and politics, all of which would rotate in the same time slot, a programming model taken from 1950s and 1960s television.
    In The Bold Ones: The Lawyers, Burl Ives is a brilliant, flamboyant attorney. Joseph Campanella and James Farentino played the Darrell brothers, who are his young law partners. The law firm was located in Los Angeles.
    Roy Huggins was executive producer. One episode of The Lawyers was titled "The Rockford Riddle", which points to Huggins' later series The Rockford Files.moreless
  • 71
    Chase (1973)

    Chase (1973)

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Police Captain Chase Reddick forms an undercover team of specialists in chasing down elusive criminals. The team includes dog-handler Sam MacCray, motorcycle cop Fred Sing, expert wheelman Steve Baker, and helicopter pilot Norm Hamilton. However, with episode 15 the team was revamped, with the 3 vehicle specialists being replaced by more conventional operatives, Inspector Frank Dawson and Officers Ed Rice and Tom Wilson.moreless
  • 72
    Sealab 2020

    Sealab 2020

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    "This is the year two thousand and twenty. The place is the Challenger Seamount, the top of an underwater mountain. A complex beneath the sea. 250 men, women and children live here, each of them a scientist pioneer. For this is our last frontier, a hostile environment which may hold the key to tomorrow. Each day, these oceanauts meet new challenges as they build their city beneath the sea. This is Sealab 2020." Commanded by Doctor Paul Williams, the Sealab researchers explored the nearby ocean floor with advanced technology like the Deep Diver craft. Only 13 episodes of Sealab 2020 were ever made, and the show was not rerun in following years. In 2001, Cartoon Network reworked footage from the show into Sealab 2021, part of their "Adult Swim" block of programming. Dialog was redubbed with often risque, adult-oriented humor replacing the serious child-oriented lines and ecological messages of the original show.moreless
  • 73
    The Tomorrow Show (1973)

    The Tomorrow Show (1973)

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    NBC (ended 1982)
    The Tomorrow Show hosted by Tom Snyder was a late-night talk show that followed The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson.Tomorrow aired Mondays through Thursdays (or, to be more exact, early morning Tuesdays through Fridays). Tomorrow started as a 60-minute series, sometimes known as The Tomorrow Show or Tomorrow starring Tom Snyder. Produced by Rudy Tellez, the show won two EMMY's for its host Tom Snyder in 1974 and 1975. The program expanded to 90 minutes in September 1980. A month later, Rona Barrett joined the series. She eventually became the West Coast co-host and the series was re-titled Tomorrow Coast-To-Coast. Rona Barrett stayed with the show through Spring 1981. In February 1982, NBC replaced Tomorrow Coast-To-Coast with Late Night with David Letterman.moreless
  • 74
    Love Story

    Love Story

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Based on the 1970 hit movie of the same name.
  • 75
    Archer (1975)

    Archer (1975)

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Archer was a detective drama based on the novels of Ross Macdonald. Broadcast History
    January 30, 1975 to March 13, 1975
    NBC Thursdays at 9:00 to 10:00 p.m.
  • 76
    Highcliffe Manor

    Highcliffe Manor

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Highcliffe Manor was a quirky comedy about a creepy mansion in New England, home to an organization full of mad scientists, evil doctors, and other strange people.
  • 77
    Johnny Carson Presents

    Johnny Carson Presents

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Johnny Carson Presents is the NBC prime-time variety show hosted by legendary television personality Johnny Carson. Carson was joined by guests like comedians including Steve Martin and Bill Cosby, and starlets like Bette Davis in these exciting specials.moreless
  • 78
    Miss Universe

    Miss Universe

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    NBC
    Miss Universe is an annual beauty pageant broadcast by NBC and run by the Miss Universe Organization. In the contest, women from more than 80 countries contest for the crown and the title of Miss Universe, vying for the highest cumulative score in swimsuit, evening gown, and question-and-answer competitions. The overall winner receives a contract with the Miss Universe Organization, a chance to spread awareness of disease control, peace, and AIDS awareness across the globe, and the keys to an apartment in Trump Tower (Donald Trump owns the rights to the competition). The pageant aims to host a competition of women that are beautiful, yet are still intelligent, goal-oriented, and well-mannered. The contestants are usually chosen through national pageants in countries across the world, although some countries refuse to participate due to cost or local customs. Over the history of the Miss Universe pageant, the United States has taken the most titles (7), followed Venezuela (6), Puerto Rico (5), and Sweden (3).moreless
  • 79
    Mulligan's Stew

    Mulligan's Stew

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Mulligan's Stew was a short-lived drama about a couple who, in addition to raising their own three children on a limited income, must now take on four more children whose parents were killed in a plane crash.moreless
  • 80
    Ellery Queen

    Ellery Queen

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Welcome to the Ellery Queen guide at tv.com. This is one of the classic TV whodunits -- with a twist. The show's format was such that the audience would see everything that the show's namesake character would see, including all of the clues, and then, right before the final scene started (you know... the one where all the suspects are brought into the room for the "YOU... killed the victim. And you did it because..." scene, the star (Ellery Queen, of course) would turn to the TV audience and state "Okay, you've got all the clues. Do you know who did it? I think I do. Can you guess?" And the audience had the chance to be part of the show. Quite unique and half the fun. For books and more information on this character, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueen.com[/url]. For more information on the TV series, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueenshow.com[/url]. Finally, for a 12-DVD set on this series, check out this [url="http://www.raretelevision.com/store/view_product.php?product=ELLTWOA617"]Ellery Queen[/url] DVD set.moreless
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