• 81
    Nichols

    Nichols

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    NBC (ended 1972)
    James Garner's first TV series since his successful run on Maverick twelve years earlier, centered on Nichols (no first name given) - a similar, if slightly more self-centered, anti-hero. In 1914, just before WWI, tired of guns and fighting, Nichols retired from the US Cavalry after 18 years of service and returned to his family's homestead in Nichols, Arizona (founded by his parents) - only to find that both the land and the town have been taken over by the Ketcham clan, who force him into becoming the town's sheriff. Since the town was crooked and completely controlled by the devious Ketchams, Nichols' efforts focused primarily on getting rich and moving on as soon as he served his six-month "sentence" as Sheriff. A former division boxing champion, he favored using fists over guns whenever possible. But, like Bret Maverick before him and Jim Rockford to follow, Nichols usually preferred smooth-talking his way out of a situation rather than resorting to violence. The stories take place during a time of technological transition. As the opening credits showed, while the old western town still predominantly relied on horsepower, Nichols preferred to get around on a "newfangled" Indian motorcycle - and another leading character, Ketch, drove an automobile. Unfortunately, despite this "new" approach and an impressive stable of recurring and guest stars - and repeated efforts at stimulating a revival - the series was cancelled after only one season. Sadly, other than a brief run on the Armed Forces Network in Europe during the early-1980's, the show has since vanished - unavailable on either DVD or cable reruns.moreless
  • 82
    The Americans

    The Americans

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    NBC
    The Americans feature the lives of brothers Ben and Jeff Canfield during the Civil War. Each supports the opposite side. Ben went to the North while Jeff went South.
  • 83
    Love Story

    Love Story

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Based on the 1970 hit movie of the same name.
  • 84
    David Cassidy - Man Undercover

    David Cassidy - Man Undercover

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    This short-lived series featured the undercover adventures of Dan Shay, a policeman in his late 20's but young-looking enough to pass as a teen. This let him infiltrate high school crime rings, gangs, etc., while dealing with the occasional family matter at home with his wife and daughter.moreless
  • 85
    San Francisco International Airport

    San Francisco International Airport

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Part of NBC's rotating "Four-In-One" series, San Francisco International Airport was about the various problems that can happen at a large metropolitan airport.
  • 86
    Mulligan's Stew

    Mulligan's Stew

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Mulligan's Stew was a short-lived drama about a couple who, in addition to raising their own three children on a limited income, must now take on four more children whose parents were killed in a plane crash.moreless
  • 87
    James at 15

    James at 15

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Following a television movie of the same name, James at 15 was a short-lived NBC drama that explored a teenage boy's coming of age. The series begins in Boston, where James (Lance Kerwin) and his family have moved from rural Oregon. James at 15 was distinctive at the time (1977-78) for its sequences showing James' daydreams, a subtle mixing of some comedy and drama, and because of its frank examination of serious teen issues, especially for the 1970s. Episodes explore such topics as cancer, sexually-transmitted disease, alcoholism, and most notably - James' loss of his virginity with a Swedish foreign exchange student. Recurring characters include James' parents, his sisters Sandy and Kathy, and his school friends Sly and Marlene. The series was re-titled James at 16 (the opening credits changed to show a line drawn through the "15" and the appearance of a "16") in February of 1978.moreless
  • 88
    The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo

    The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    The Misadventures Of Sheriff Lobo was a spin-off of the hit show BJ And The Bear. Taking place in Orly County, Georgia, Sheriff Lobo is the lead defender and chief offender of the law. The corrupt sheriff is assisted in is schemes and misdeeds by Deputies Perkins and Hawkins. When the naive Governor visits Orly, he reassigns Lobo and the deputies to his crime fighting task force in Atlanta.moreless
  • 89
    NFL on NBC

    NFL on NBC

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    The first time a football game was ever aired on television was October 1, 1939 when an experimental NBC affiliate aired a game between the Philadelphia Eagles and Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1955 NBC became the third over-the-air national home of the NFL (after ABC and DuMont) when they were the exclusive broadcaster of the Championship Game until 1963. From 1960-1961 select NBC affiliates also aired games involving the Pittsburgh Steelers and Baltimore Colts. From 1970-1997 NBC aired all Sunday afternoon games involving AFC teams, before that package moved to CBS with the start of the 1998 season. Football would later return to NBC in 2006, although as a different program: Sunday Night Football.moreless
  • 90
    The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

    The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Ghost and Mrs. Muir guide at TV.com.
  • 91
    The Family Holvak

    The Family Holvak

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Set in the state of Tennesse during the Great Depression, this family drama centered around the Holvak family: Rev. Tom Holvak, his wife Elizabeth, and their two children, Ramey and Julie Mae.moreless
  • 92
    Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii

    Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii

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    NBC
    On January 14, 1973, Elvis Presley performed at the Convention Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Aired on NBC, this special television event was the first program to ever be beamed around the world via satellite.

    On this television special, Elvis performed his FORBIDDENc recordings like "Hound Dog," "Blue Suede Shoes," and "Can't Help Falling in Love," along with covers of The Beatles' "Something," Frank Sinatra's "My Way," and Hank Williams' "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," and the show is probably most famous for the introduction to Elvis' hit song, "An American Trilogy."

    Backed up by James Burton on guitar, Glen Hardin on piano, Ronnie Tutt on drums, John Wilkinson on the rhythm guitar, Jerry Scheff on bass, and many others, Elvis made this performance a huge success.moreless
  • 93
    The Bill Cosby Show

    The Bill Cosby Show

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    The Bill Cosby Show aired for two seasons on NBC, 1969-70 and 1970-71. There were 52 episodes made in the series. In this lighthearted comedy, Bill Cosby played the role of Chet Kincaid, physical education teacher at a Los Angeles high school. The Chet Kincaid character was a bachelor, an average cool guy trying to earn a living, and help people out along the way. Many of the episodes involved Chet in various situations at the high school with his students and fellow teachers. In some episodes, Chet was asked to substitute, and fill in as algebra or english teacher. In one hilarious episode, Chet was the drivers ed instructor trying to teach a nervous student how to drive. Other episodes involved younger children, and some episodes involved family and adult characters. Different guest stars also appeared in various episodes thruout the series. The shows theme song- "Hikky Burr" was written by Bill Cosby and Quincy Jones with Cosby providing the vocals. The lyrics were hard to comprehend, but the song had a groovy tune and funky beat. For the second season, a more uptempo and jazzy version of the song was used. The show was entertaining, and did not use a laugh track, which is unique. The Bill Cosby Show was not your average, laugh-out-loud type of sitcom. The episodes were humorous, but the show emphasized warmth, intelligent character studies and plausible, real life situations. The plot of many episodes centered around a lesson in life learned, which was explained in the classic Cosby style.moreless
  • 94
    Movin' On

    Movin' On

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Will and Sonny are long-haul truckers who found some sort of adventure every week . Claude Akins and Frank Converse starred in it and Merle Haggard's song of the same name was used for the theme.moreless
  • 95
    Police Woman (1978)

    Police Woman (1978)

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Police Woman guide at tv.com Sergeant Pepper Anderson was an undercover agent for the Criminal Conspiracy Unit of the Los Angeles Police Department. Working with her on the Vice Squad were Detectives Joe Styles and Pete Royster. Pepper posed undercover from mob girl to prostitute, and the team reported directly to Lieutenant Bill Crowley. The pilot episode for 'Police Woman' appeared on 'Police Story' as "The Gamble".moreless
  • 96
    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

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    NBC
    The Hollywood Squares is a classic 1966 game show that mixes trivia with the classic strategy game, tic-tac-toe. Two contestants go head-to-head to try to get three Xs or Os in a row on a giant tic-tac-toe board. But it's not as easy as it sounds. Each space on the giant board contains a celebrity, who answers a trivia question whenever a contestant tries to win their space. The celebrity may know the answer to the trivia question, or they may make something up. The contestant has to decide whether the celebrity is answering truthfully or not, and they only get to occupy that space on the board if they choose correctly. The Hollywood Squares offers a chance to see some of Tinsel Town's biggest stars at their least scripted. This inventive game show became known for the unpredictability of the stars, who used the show to exhibit their real selves, without any media exaggeration. The Hollywood Squares featured many celebrities, including Billy Crystal, Vincent Price, Aretha Franklin, Joan Rivers, Eva Gabor, Don Knotts, and many more.moreless
  • 97
    Lotsa Luck

    Lotsa Luck

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Bachelor Stanley Belmont lives with his bossy mother, his sister (Olive) and her unemployed husband (Arthur). All live off of Stanley. Arthur is perfectly content to live with Stanley and avoid finding a job. Bummy is Stanley's friend and co-worker at the New York City bus company's lost-and-found department. **************************** Created by Carl Reiner, Bill Persky & Sam Denoff, Produced by Bill Persky & Sam Denoff based on the British London Weekend Televison series "On The Buses" ================ US comedy series 1973-74 22 episodes x 30 min (10Sep73-24May74) NBC (Mondays 8:00pm EST)(fall 1973) NBC (Fridays 8:00pm EST)(early 1974) ************************ The British series "On the Buses" (LWT) ran for 75 episodes from 1969-73 and led to 3 movies - all starred Reg Varney as Stan Butler **************************moreless
  • 98
    Banyon

    Banyon

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Private eye drama from the Quinn Martin Productions factory set in the 1930's featuring Robert Forster as Los Angeles private detective Miles C. Banyon. Veteran actors Joan Blondell and Richard Jaeckel co-starred in the series which featured some stylish production values and solid scripts but failed to catch on with the viewers and was given the hook by NBC after only 15 episodes.moreless
  • 99
    Card Sharks

    Card Sharks

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    NBC (ended 2002)
    "Ace is high, deuce is low. Call them right and win the dough ... onnnn ... Card Sharks!" That's how the opening spiel for one of the most popular new game shows of the late 1970s went. Based on the card game Acey Deucy, Card Sharks enjoyed two successful runs: from 1978 to 1981 on NBC daytime; and from 1986-1989 on CBS (a five-a-week syndicated entry aired from 1986-1987). There was also an ill-advised debacle of a run, a five-a-week syndicated show that appeared in the fall of 2001. The basic premise for all three runs was similar: complete the row of cards before your opponent does, by correctly guessing whether the next card was higher or lower. 1978-1981 and 1986-1989 versions The rules for the 1978 and 1986 versions, which saw two players (one a returning champion) compete, were virtually identical. Each player had his/her own row of five cards. To gain control of his row, he/she had to be more accurate in answering a high-low opinion question posed of a group of 100 people. For example: "We asked 100 Catholics, 'Are you offended by football commentators using the term Hail Mary to describe a last-second desparation pass?' How many said yes?" The first player gave his/her numerical answer (and usually, some reasoning), after which the opponent guessed whether the correct answer was higher or lower. Depending on who was more accurate in their answer (an exact guess was worth $500 in addition to control of the cards), that player saw his/her base card and could either play it or change it with (what they hoped) was a better card. The object was to correctly guess whether the next card in sequence was higher or lower. A correct guess allowed the player to continue or freeze (at which time a marker moved to that point in the row, where that contestant could continue if they won another high-low question); however, an incorrect guess (or whenever the card was identical) caused the player to lose all his/her cards after the starting point and allowed his/her opponent to play their row (however, they could not change the base card, no matter how much it was disliked). Up to four high-low questions were played, the fourth one always being "sudden death," where someone had to win on that play of the cards. The player who was correct on that question could either play out their row (with the option to change) or force his/her opponent to play without the change option. If the player completed the row, they won the round and $100; however, a wrong guess gave his/her opponent the victory. The front game was played best-of-three rounds, with the third round a tiebreaker. In the tiebreaker, each player was given three cards in their row, and a maximum of three high-low questions were played. The winner was champion and played the Money Cards. End Game: Money Cards In Money Cards, seven cards were situated in three rows. The player was spotted $200 and could bet anywhere from $50 up to everything they had on whether they thought the next card was higher or lower. A correct guess won the bet, a wrong guess (or if the card was identical) deducted it. The player could change the first card on each row. After the first row of three cards, the player moved to the second row and was given an additional $200; however, if the player lost everything on the first row before reaching the end, the card that caused him/her to "BUST" was moved to the second row, and the player was given $200; however, going bankrupt at any point thereafter ended the bonus game. After completing the second row successfully, the end card was moved to the top row for the Big Bet, where the player had to bet at least half their bankroll on the final card. A maximum of $28,800 was possible in the NBC version (accomplished once). Champions stayed on up to seven times. During the 1980-1981 season, the player could win $500 for turning over all five cards in a single play, without an incorrect guess. Also, an identical card in the Money Cards meant a "push" (no win or loss on that play). Changes for 1986 version Several changes were made for the CBS and 1986 syndicated run, as thus: * Two other types of questions were played. They included: -- Questions about a special polling group of 10 people (e.g., teachers who have been in the classroom for 25 years or more, people who own pigs as pets). The group was on the show the entire week and an exact guess paid $100 to the contestant while the panel got $10 each. -- "Educated guess" questions, or general knowledge questions with numerical answers. Exact guess also paid $500. * Later in the run, if a third game was needed, one question was played. The winner of that question was then shown both base cards (one for him/herself, the other the opponent's), and the contestant could either play or pass (like sudden death). * In the Money Cards, the contestant was spotted $400 upon reaching the second row, and could change up to one card per row from among three spare cards; a maximum of $32,000 was possible (this amount never being achieved). * A few months into the run, a second part to the end game was played after the Money Cards, played thusly: -- 1986-1988: The longest-lived format. The player was spotted one free Joker, and could find up to two additional Jokers hidden either on the board, among one of the three spare cards or in the deck. After the Money Cards, the player was shown a row of seven face-down cards, and the player simply placed the Joker(s) in front of the card they thought said "CAR." A correct guess won the car. During Kids Week, the youthful contestants played either for a prize package (including a computer, telescope, encyclopedias and other gifts) or a family trip to Hawaii. Also, two free Jokers were given at the outset with two more hidden in the deck. -- Fall 1988-1989: A question posed of the special 10-member polling group. The player had to point an arrow by their answer, and a correct guess won the car (or the Hawaii trip if if was Kids Week). The player pocketed $500 if they were just one off. * During the 1986 syndicated run's front game, the player could uncover cards with cash amounts or the names of prizes on them (e.g., a bedroom group). He/she had to win the round to claim the prizes. 2001 version The 2001 syndicated version was a disaster in many critics' eyes, with much of their criticism aimed at the completely-overhauled front game. Here, four players compete, two at a time. The opponents, playing in a best-of-three match – each play a common row of seven high-low cards; the third match, if necessary, was a three-card showdown. A correct guess kept that player in control, but an incorrect guess gave the opponent the right to make the next call. At any time, a player could ask to change the card (by use of one of two special "clip chip" tokens in their possession). The player was shown a video depicting one of the following: * A situation (not unlike Candid Camera or Street Smarts, which was stopped before its resolution. The player had to correctly guess the outcome in order to change the card. * Someone introduces himself/herself and then asks which of two others he/she is associated with. * Someone trying to list answers related to a topic within 10 seconds, or sing the correct lyrics to an obscure song. "Clip chips" could not be used in the tie-breaking match. The first player to win two games won $1,000 and moved on to a final one-game showdown with the winner of the second game. The winner of that match earned an additional $1,100 (for a total of $2,100), which would be used as betting money for the Money Cards. The Money Cards was essentially similar as the earlier runs, except just six cards – three on the first row, two on the middle row and the one card Big Bet row – were used and the player was spotted $700 for each row (including the Big Bet row). The maximum amount possible of $51,800 was never achieved. The 2001 syndicated version had two things which saved it from being a total disaster: 1. the Money Cards 2. a special week of shows (which were taped after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks) where firefighters and police officers played for charities aimed at helping victims and their families recover from the attacks. It was not the only time Card Sharks met disaster (or the other way around). When Bob Eubanks said goodbye to the CBS version in the spring of 1989, he gave a tearful farewell for the first card-dealer of the CBS version, who died early in the run.moreless
  • 100
    The Godzilla Power Hour

    The Godzilla Power Hour

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Theme:
    Up from the Depths!
    Thirty Stories high!
    Breathing Fire! His Head in the Sky!
    GODZILLA! GODZILLA! GODZILLA!
    And Godzooky.
    GODZILLAAAAAA!!

    Godzilla. The old 1970's cartoon created by Hanna-Barbera is about a giant lizzard who could breathe fire, shoot red lazers out from his eyes, and fight monsters, too. This monster was originally a Japanese monster, but this guy was developed into a cartoon beast. The episodes feature Godzilla battling nothing but gigantic monsters. He does get help from some people, and his son.
    Characters: Captin Carl Majors is commandor of a ship known as The Calico. He is in charge of a device to call Godzilla when ever he and his crew are in danger. Dr. or Prof. Quinn Darian is a scientist who works with Capt. Majors on The Calico. Brock is Quinn's assistant. He is at his mid 20s and is alway ready to help. Pete is a young tyke who is the nephew of Quinn. Although he and Godzooky get into trouble sometimes, he is helpful to the crew, and not so helpful at sometimes. Godzooky. Ah, what to say about this flying baby lizzard who nobody can understand? Well...he's the son of Godzilla? DUH! Alright! Godzooky is about as big as a condo, who can fly by his webbed arms. He is quite a handful and can be quite annoying at sometimes but comes in use for a second calling device for Godzilla if the first device is destroyed. Godzilla I don't think I need to talk about because all of you know who he is!

    Other cartoon series with Godzilla: Godzilla: The Seriesmoreless
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  • 8:30 pm
    Judge Judy
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    CBS
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    What Would You Do?
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    ABC
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    ABC