• 81
    The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo

    The Misadventures of Sheriff Lobo

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    The Misadventures Of Sheriff Lobo was a spin-off of the hit show BJ And The Bear. Taking place in Orly County, Georgia, Sheriff Lobo is the lead defender and chief offender of the law. The corrupt sheriff is assisted in is schemes and misdeeds by Deputies Perkins and Hawkins. When the naive Governor visits Orly, he reassigns Lobo and the deputies to his crime fighting task force in Atlanta.moreless
  • 82
    The Family Holvak

    The Family Holvak

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    Set in the state of Tennesse during the Great Depression, this family drama centered around the Holvak family: Rev. Tom Holvak, his wife Elizabeth, and their two children, Ramey and Julie Mae.moreless
  • 83
    Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii

    Elvis: Aloha from Hawaii

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    NBC
    On January 14, 1973, Elvis Presley performed at the Convention Center in Honolulu, Hawaii. Aired on NBC, this special television event was the first program to ever be beamed around the world via satellite.

    On this television special, Elvis performed his FORBIDDENc recordings like "Hound Dog," "Blue Suede Shoes," and "Can't Help Falling in Love," along with covers of The Beatles' "Something," Frank Sinatra's "My Way," and Hank Williams' "I'm So Lonesome I Could Cry," and the show is probably most famous for the introduction to Elvis' hit song, "An American Trilogy."

    Backed up by James Burton on guitar, Glen Hardin on piano, Ronnie Tutt on drums, John Wilkinson on the rhythm guitar, Jerry Scheff on bass, and many others, Elvis made this performance a huge success.moreless
  • 84
    Police Woman (1978)

    Police Woman (1978)

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Police Woman guide at tv.com Sergeant Pepper Anderson was an undercover agent for the Criminal Conspiracy Unit of the Los Angeles Police Department. Working with her on the Vice Squad were Detectives Joe Styles and Pete Royster. Pepper posed undercover from mob girl to prostitute, and the team reported directly to Lieutenant Bill Crowley. The pilot episode for 'Police Woman' appeared on 'Police Story' as "The Gamble".moreless
  • 85
    The Daffy Duck Show (1978)

    The Daffy Duck Show (1978)

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    The Daffy Duck Show (1978) First Aired November 4 I978 and featured the animated comic shorts of Warner Brothers and Looney Toons character Daffy Duck. Daffy Duck's character is voiced by Mel Blanc. Mel Blanc also voiced other characters such as Porky Pig / Speedy Gonzales / Sylvester / Tweety / Foghorn Leghorn / Pepe Le Pew and Yosemite Sam.moreless
  • 86
    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

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    NBC
    The Hollywood Squares is a classic 1966 game show that mixes trivia with the classic strategy game, tic-tac-toe. Two contestants go head-to-head to try to get three Xs or Os in a row on a giant tic-tac-toe board. But it's not as easy as it sounds. Each space on the giant board contains a celebrity, who answers a trivia question whenever a contestant tries to win their space. The celebrity may know the answer to the trivia question, or they may make something up. The contestant has to decide whether the celebrity is answering truthfully or not, and they only get to occupy that space on the board if they choose correctly. The Hollywood Squares offers a chance to see some of Tinsel Town's biggest stars at their least scripted. This inventive game show became known for the unpredictability of the stars, who used the show to exhibit their real selves, without any media exaggeration. The Hollywood Squares featured many celebrities, including Billy Crystal, Vincent Price, Aretha Franklin, Joan Rivers, Eva Gabor, Don Knotts, and many more.moreless
  • 87
    Centennial

    Centennial

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Centennial is an epic production based on the bestselling novel by James Michener. Set in the fictional town of Centennial, Colorado, it chronicles the settlement and history of the town from 1795 to the 1970's. Based on the novel of the same name ====================== Production Companies * Universal TV Distributors * National Broadcasting Company (NBC) * Studios USA Television * Universal Pictures (video) ====================== Awards Emmy Awards -- 1979 Nominated -- Outstanding Art Direction for a Limited Series or a Special -- Jack Senter (production designer), John W. Corso (art director), Sherman Loudermilk (art director), Joseph J. Stone (set decorator), John M. Dwyer (set decorator), Robert George Freer (set decorator) [For chapter seven: "The Shepherds"] Nominated -- Outstanding Film Editing for a Limited Series or a Special -- Robert Watts [For chapter one: "Only the Rocks Live Forever"] Golden Globes -- 1980 Nominated -- Best TV Actor - Drama -- Richard Chamberlain Nominated -- Best TV-Series - Drama ========================== Goofs: * Continuity: The cover of the wagon as Poteet drives during the ambush disappears and reappears between shots. * Anachronisms: As Potatoes Brumbaugh walks from his field to talk to Jim Loyd, you can see a truck going down the road in the far background. * Continuity: Towards the beginning of the final episode of the miniseries, Louis Verner and Sidney Enderman are walking through the streets of the town of Centennial. When they first start their journey, it is a nice sunny day. A few seconds later as they walk past Zendt's old store and behind the hotel to meet Cisco Calendar, it is suddenly a drab, overcast day and there is a bit of a dusting of snow and ice on the ground. ===================== Alternate Versions: * This was originally shown on the NBC network in twelve separate episodes, with the first and last each running three hours and the ten in between at two hours each (this is with commercials). Some basic cable channels have rerun it in thirteen two-hour segments, with all but the opening and closing episodes consisting of the last hour of one segment and the first hour of the next. ======================= Budget: $25,000,000 (estimated) ======================== Release dates: USA -- 1 October 1978 Belgium -- 19 January 1979 Netherlands -- 9 February 1979 France -- 9 March 1980 Sweden -- 4 October 1980 West Germany -- 7 July 1984 ========================== Filming Locations: Alamo Village - Highway 674, Brackettville, Texas, USA Bent's Old Fort National Monument - 35110 Highway 194 East, La Junta, Colorado, USA Bracken County, Kentucky, USA (exterior shots representing St. Louis, MO) Brackettville, Texas, USA Denver, Colorado, USA Grand Teton National Park, Moose, Wyoming, USA Orchard, Colorado, USA Port Washington, Ohio, USA Rocky Mountain National Park, Estes Park, Colorado, USA Roscoe Village, Ohio, USA White Hall State Historic Site - 500 White Hall Shrine Road, Richmond, Kentucky, USA (Bockweiss-Pasquinel home in St. Louis) Winfield, Ohio, USA ========================== Technical Specifications: Laboratory Technicolor Film negative format (mm/video inches) 35 mm Cinematographic process Spherical Printed film format 35 mm Aspect ratio 1.33 : 1 =========================moreless
  • 88
    Lotsa Luck

    Lotsa Luck

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Bachelor Stanley Belmont lives with his bossy mother, his sister (Olive) and her unemployed husband (Arthur). All live off of Stanley. Arthur is perfectly content to live with Stanley and avoid finding a job. Bummy is Stanley's friend and co-worker at the New York City bus company's lost-and-found department. **************************** Created by Carl Reiner, Bill Persky & Sam Denoff, Produced by Bill Persky & Sam Denoff based on the British London Weekend Televison series "On The Buses" ================ US comedy series 1973-74 22 episodes x 30 min (10Sep73-24May74) NBC (Mondays 8:00pm EST)(fall 1973) NBC (Fridays 8:00pm EST)(early 1974) ************************ The British series "On the Buses" (LWT) ran for 75 episodes from 1969-73 and led to 3 movies - all starred Reg Varney as Stan Butler **************************moreless
  • 89
    Julia

    Julia

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Welcome to the Julia guide at TV.com. The show is about Julia Baker (Diahann Carroll), a young African-American woman working as a nurse. She is also a widow (her husband died in Vietnam) trying to raise a young son (Marc Copage) alone. Other members of the cast include Dr. Morton Chegley (Lloyd Nolan), Mrs. Waggedorn (Betty Beaird), and Earl Waggedorn (Michael Link). It was one of the best shows of the late 60s/early 70s and is a classic.moreless
  • 90
    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    These people, dressed as they are, come from all over the United States to make deals here at the Marketplace of America, Let's Make A Deal® One of TV's all time greatest and most successful shows, Let's Make a Deal was a game of intuition, skill, luck, decision-making and greed...all mixed into one. It was fun and would have been a success even if the show had stuck with the formal dresses and suits that the game started with on December 30, 1963. That's right, contestants wore dresses and suits in the very early months of LMaD {December 30, 1963-July 31, 1964}. A few months after the show's premiere on February 3, 1964 someone came with a sign to attract host Monty Hall's attention and low and behold, he chose her (or him)! Sometime later on August 3-7, 1964, someone wore a crazy costume and the entire studio changed from a formal, quiet, dignified setting to a free-for-all. The show came alive and became the legendary success it would be known for. Each day, a gallery of 31 contestants (each wearing some loony costume, either their own creation or suggested by the show's producers) vied for Monty's attention. One, two or perhaps three at a time, Monty would choose contestants to make a deal with him. Many of the deals would involve either: * An unstated amount of cash in Monty's hand or an unknown prize behind the curtain. * Keys which unlocked anything from boxes to cars. Usually, the trader had to select from at least three keys. Monty always offered cash or the curtain/box as options. The number of working keys depended on the deal; more than once, every key worked (in the deals involving multiple contestants). Variant: Just three keys shown (only one of which works) and a couple playing for a car chooses the one they think works; Monty always shows one that doesn't work and then offers a substitute prize option. * Deciding if leather wallets contained thousands of dollars in cash or car keys or perhaps only a small amount or nothing at all (except for play money or worthless keys). Before the reveal, the contestant could choose the curtain or box. * Deciding whether an announced prize was real or fake and choosing a cash amount or the box/curtain as a substitute. * Choosing an envelope, purse, wallet, etc., which concealed dollar bills. The contestant could take the cash or trade for the curtain/box, but always risked giving up an announced dollar bill (usually $1 or $5) which awarded a grand prize (usually a car or trip); often, the "consolation" prize was $500, $1000 or $1500. * Choosing four of seven envelopes, each containing $1 and $2 bills, whose contents they hoped added up to at least $7 for a grand prize. * Monty's Cash Register, wherein a couple had to punch keys on a 15-key register. Exactly 13 of the buttons hid amounts of either $50 or $100, and getting to a stated amount (usually $500-$1000) won a grand prize. The couple could stop at any time and keep what they have (always then being tempted with a follow-up keep-or-trade deal) but hitting "no sale" at any time ended the game; if the unlucky button were struck on the first try, hitting the second "no sale" button the very next time also won the grand prize. Otherwise, Monty allowed the couple to take home whatever dollar amount they hit with the next key punch. * Three unrelated traders acted as a team on deals. Sometimes, only one was allowed to speak for the team without consultation of the others; other times, a "majority rules" format was used. Usually after a series of deals, the team was broken up and could individually decide on one or more options on a final deal. * At the start of the show, a contestant given a large grocery item (e.g., a box of candy bars), always containing a cash amount. Throughout the show, he/she is given several chances to trade the box and/or give it to another trader, in exchange for the box or curtain. Only after the Big Deal of the Day was awarded (or if the last trader with said item elects to go for the Big Deal) was the cash amount given. Variant: A "claim check" given to a trader at the start of the show for any prize shown during the regular deals and chances to trade throughout the episode. The prize ranged from cash and cars to zonks. Variant: The "claim check" was played as the very last regular deal with one sure deal offered in lieu of its contents. ...* And much more! Sometimes Monty would either sweeten the deal or allow the contestants to call off the deal for cash. Sometimes, the contestants did very well -- they could win rooms of furniture, appliances, TVs and stereos, cars, furs, trips, thousands of dollars in cash and MUCH MORE... Or they could be stuck with a ZONK! (those silly, nonsense prizes when they made the wrong decision). And yes, there were many zonks -- ranging from: * Live animals (usually from local zoos or farms). These included everything from pigs and cattle to skunks and lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)! * Rooms full of worthless junk. * Antique, broken-down cars (often rusted-out shells with overheated radiators). * Oversized mooseheads, deerheads and more. * Stuffed teddy bears. * Announcer Jay Stewart and model Carol Merrill dressed up as comedy characters. Often, they held such things as oversized paint rollers or were situated on things like jumbo kiddie cars and rocking horses. ... and much, much MORE!!! Not all the games involved luck or speculation. Some were skill games testing a contestant's knowledge of shopping and products (an early version of the 1970s The Price is Right, if you will). Some contestants had to determine which prize was a stated amount (or sometimes, choose two or more items which added up to a given amount), arrange items in order of value, remember which product was beneath the letter of a car, etc. Usually, Monty gave the contestants either a cash buyout or substitute prize either as the game progressed or just before the correct answer was revealed. Even if the contestant lost, he/she was given $50 or $100 as a consolation gift. Sometimes, two or more contestants or couples competed in a single deal to guess the prices of items with the closest guessers getting increasing amounts of cash (usually but not always, $100, $200, $300 and $400); if the trader won $700, they won a car. Even the loser got to spend any accumulated winnings on a curtain or box with more cash options thrown in as well. When about 7-8 minutes were left, Monty would call on the top winners from the show and ask them if they wanted to trade what they already won for a shot at the Big Deal of the Day � usually worth $2000-$5000 on the daytime show and from $7500 to $15,000 or more on the nighttime and syndicated versions). Once two contestants were selected, they would - with the top winner going first - select a curtain. There were no zonks at this stage, but the contestants risked going home with much less than they won (ergo, trading in a new $2000 kitchen for a color console TV worth $500 or a couple hundred dollars in cash). More than once, contestants traded cars for a chance at the Big Deal, and while they were usually lucky, there was at least one occassion where someone traded their car for less than $100 in prizes! Many times, the Big Deal of the Day was a fantastic prize -- such as a motorhome, a cabin cruiser, a four-seat airplane, a mink sable, a modular home, a Cadillac Eldorado convertible and a 60-day trip around the world...or in some cases, $10,000 or more in cash were among the many examples. The show debuted on NBC on December 30, 1963-January 3, 1964 and switched to ABC on December 30 1968-January 3, 1969. NBC (and later on ABC) later premiered a weekly prime-time version of the show (NBC's appeared in 1967; ABC's in February 1969) which was a major hit with viewers. A twice-weekly syndicated LMaD surfaced in 1971, and was (yup) a big hit. During the 1975-76 season, the Big Deal winner could risk his/her top prize for a shot at the Super Deal, where behind one of three doors was hidden a $20,000 grand prize; selecting the $20,000 window allowed the contestant to keep the Big Deal, though the Big Deal was forfeited if they chose incorrectly (they received a $1000 or $2000 consolation prize; later, $2000 and another unknown consolation amount between $3000 and $8000). LET'S MAKE A DEAL finished and goes out of business on July 9, 1976. During its final original-run season in syndication (1976-1977), the show was taped in Las Vegas, with the final shows taped in December 1976. The Super Deal feature was scrapped, and the last show was said to have featured no zonks. An unsuccessful five-day-a-week revival surfaced in syndication in 1980-1981, but would be a modest success when Monty tried again in five-a-week syndication in 1984-1986. While cheap prizes were the norm very early in the 1984-1986 run (the most expensive cars were often Chevrolet Sprints and Pontiac 1000s(!)), the show held its own and eventually gave away decent cars -- including a fully equipped $13,000 Chevrolet Camaro and a $15,000 Madza RX7. The most notable change was with a new feature, Door 4. Played twice a week or so, Door 4 was totally a surprise (announced only by sudden quick siren and at times, camera zoom fanfare). A People-Picker computer selected the contestant, and he/she would be presented a check worth $1000. He/she could keep the check or spin a carnival-type wheel for a chance at a new car, $100, $200, $2000, $3000, $4000...or perhaps a zonk (I was ZONKED by Money Hall T-shirt)! Regardless of what he/she decided, they were always asked to spin the wheel just to see what would've happened (when they decided to keep the check, the contestant usually would find out they passed up the car!). A short-lived NBC revival surfaced in 1990-1991, with Bob Hilton serving as host. He didn't last long and Monty was soon making deals; alas, even his return couldn't save the show. An embarassingly bad remake called Big Deal, surfaced in 1996, where contestants performed stunts as part of the game. The revival, which aired on FOX, didn't last long. Neither did a March 2003 hour-long remake of LMaD, with Billy Bush as host. The ratings started off decently and the show appeared promising. However, some critics pointed to questionable content (the opening deal in the premiere had women reaching underneath a stagehand's undergarments to retrieve part of their deal) as a prime reason the revival quickly soured; putting LMaD up against American Idol didn't help. In August 2001, Game Show Network (as of March 2004, simply GSN) began airing reruns of the 1970s LMaD, with the 1980-1981 and 1984-1986 runs part of the package. The show has been (and remains) a wonderful addition to GSN! NBC Broadcast History December 30, 1963-June 26, 1964, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:25pm June 29, 1964-September 29, 1967, Monday-Friday at 1:30-1:55pm May 21, 1967-September 3, 1967, Sunday at 8:30-9:00pm October 2, 1967-December 27, 1968, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm July 16, 1990-January 11, 1991, Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30am March 4-18, 2003, Tuesday at 8:00-9:00pm ABC Broadcast History December 30, 1968-July 9, 1976, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm February 7, 1969-May 9, 1969, Friday at 9:00-9:30pm May 16, 1969-January 9, 1970, Friday at 7:30-8:00pm January 24, 1970-January 2, 1971, Saturday at 7:30-8:00pm January 18, 1971-August 30, 1971, Monday at 7:30-8:00pm Syndicated History September 13, 1971-September 10, 1977 Various Times September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981 Various Times September 17, 1984-September 12, 1986 Various Times Depending on the TV Market of the area.moreless
  • 91
    Card Sharks

    Card Sharks

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    NBC (ended 2002)
    "Ace is high, deuce is low. Call them right and win the dough ... onnnn ... Card Sharks!" That's how the opening spiel for one of the most popular new game shows of the late 1970s went. Based on the card game Acey Deucy, Card Sharks enjoyed two successful runs: from 1978 to 1981 on NBC daytime; and from 1986-1989 on CBS (a five-a-week syndicated entry aired from 1986-1987). There was also an ill-advised debacle of a run, a five-a-week syndicated show that appeared in the fall of 2001. The basic premise for all three runs was similar: complete the row of cards before your opponent does, by correctly guessing whether the next card was higher or lower. 1978-1981 and 1986-1989 versions The rules for the 1978 and 1986 versions, which saw two players (one a returning champion) compete, were virtually identical. Each player had his/her own row of five cards. To gain control of his row, he/she had to be more accurate in answering a high-low opinion question posed of a group of 100 people. For example: "We asked 100 Catholics, 'Are you offended by football commentators using the term Hail Mary to describe a last-second desparation pass?' How many said yes?" The first player gave his/her numerical answer (and usually, some reasoning), after which the opponent guessed whether the correct answer was higher or lower. Depending on who was more accurate in their answer (an exact guess was worth $500 in addition to control of the cards), that player saw his/her base card and could either play it or change it with (what they hoped) was a better card. The object was to correctly guess whether the next card in sequence was higher or lower. A correct guess allowed the player to continue or freeze (at which time a marker moved to that point in the row, where that contestant could continue if they won another high-low question); however, an incorrect guess (or whenever the card was identical) caused the player to lose all his/her cards after the starting point and allowed his/her opponent to play their row (however, they could not change the base card, no matter how much it was disliked). Up to four high-low questions were played, the fourth one always being "sudden death," where someone had to win on that play of the cards. The player who was correct on that question could either play out their row (with the option to change) or force his/her opponent to play without the change option. If the player completed the row, they won the round and $100; however, a wrong guess gave his/her opponent the victory. The front game was played best-of-three rounds, with the third round a tiebreaker. In the tiebreaker, each player was given three cards in their row, and a maximum of three high-low questions were played. The winner was champion and played the Money Cards. End Game: Money Cards In Money Cards, seven cards were situated in three rows. The player was spotted $200 and could bet anywhere from $50 up to everything they had on whether they thought the next card was higher or lower. A correct guess won the bet, a wrong guess (or if the card was identical) deducted it. The player could change the first card on each row. After the first row of three cards, the player moved to the second row and was given an additional $200; however, if the player lost everything on the first row before reaching the end, the card that caused him/her to "BUST" was moved to the second row, and the player was given $200; however, going bankrupt at any point thereafter ended the bonus game. After completing the second row successfully, the end card was moved to the top row for the Big Bet, where the player had to bet at least half their bankroll on the final card. A maximum of $28,800 was possible in the NBC version (accomplished once). Champions stayed on up to seven times. During the 1980-1981 season, the player could win $500 for turning over all five cards in a single play, without an incorrect guess. Also, an identical card in the Money Cards meant a "push" (no win or loss on that play). Changes for 1986 version Several changes were made for the CBS and 1986 syndicated run, as thus: * Two other types of questions were played. They included: -- Questions about a special polling group of 10 people (e.g., teachers who have been in the classroom for 25 years or more, people who own pigs as pets). The group was on the show the entire week and an exact guess paid $100 to the contestant while the panel got $10 each. -- "Educated guess" questions, or general knowledge questions with numerical answers. Exact guess also paid $500. * Later in the run, if a third game was needed, one question was played. The winner of that question was then shown both base cards (one for him/herself, the other the opponent's), and the contestant could either play or pass (like sudden death). * In the Money Cards, the contestant was spotted $400 upon reaching the second row, and could change up to one card per row from among three spare cards; a maximum of $32,000 was possible (this amount never being achieved). * A few months into the run, a second part to the end game was played after the Money Cards, played thusly: -- 1986-1988: The longest-lived format. The player was spotted one free Joker, and could find up to two additional Jokers hidden either on the board, among one of the three spare cards or in the deck. After the Money Cards, the player was shown a row of seven face-down cards, and the player simply placed the Joker(s) in front of the card they thought said "CAR." A correct guess won the car. During Kids Week, the youthful contestants played either for a prize package (including a computer, telescope, encyclopedias and other gifts) or a family trip to Hawaii. Also, two free Jokers were given at the outset with two more hidden in the deck. -- Fall 1988-1989: A question posed of the special 10-member polling group. The player had to point an arrow by their answer, and a correct guess won the car (or the Hawaii trip if if was Kids Week). The player pocketed $500 if they were just one off. * During the 1986 syndicated run's front game, the player could uncover cards with cash amounts or the names of prizes on them (e.g., a bedroom group). He/she had to win the round to claim the prizes. 2001 version The 2001 syndicated version was a disaster in many critics' eyes, with much of their criticism aimed at the completely-overhauled front game. Here, four players compete, two at a time. The opponents, playing in a best-of-three match – each play a common row of seven high-low cards; the third match, if necessary, was a three-card showdown. A correct guess kept that player in control, but an incorrect guess gave the opponent the right to make the next call. At any time, a player could ask to change the card (by use of one of two special "clip chip" tokens in their possession). The player was shown a video depicting one of the following: * A situation (not unlike Candid Camera or Street Smarts, which was stopped before its resolution. The player had to correctly guess the outcome in order to change the card. * Someone introduces himself/herself and then asks which of two others he/she is associated with. * Someone trying to list answers related to a topic within 10 seconds, or sing the correct lyrics to an obscure song. "Clip chips" could not be used in the tie-breaking match. The first player to win two games won $1,000 and moved on to a final one-game showdown with the winner of the second game. The winner of that match earned an additional $1,100 (for a total of $2,100), which would be used as betting money for the Money Cards. The Money Cards was essentially similar as the earlier runs, except just six cards – three on the first row, two on the middle row and the one card Big Bet row – were used and the player was spotted $700 for each row (including the Big Bet row). The maximum amount possible of $51,800 was never achieved. The 2001 syndicated version had two things which saved it from being a total disaster: 1. the Money Cards 2. a special week of shows (which were taped after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks) where firefighters and police officers played for charities aimed at helping victims and their families recover from the attacks. It was not the only time Card Sharks met disaster (or the other way around). When Bob Eubanks said goodbye to the CBS version in the spring of 1989, he gave a tearful farewell for the first card-dealer of the CBS version, who died early in the run.moreless
  • 92
    The Fantastic Journey

    The Fantastic Journey

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    A scientific expedition in the Atlantic Ocean headed by Dr. Paul Jordan becomes lost in the Bermuda Triangle and washes up on an uncharted island. In the pilot episode they meet Varian, a man from the 23rd century who tells them about a place to the East called Evailand where they can find a door way back to their own time. Most of the group either died or made it home leaving Varian, Fred Walters and Paul's 13 yr. old son Scott to make their way east. Along the way they meet up with travelers from other times, planets and dimensions who have also become trapped. Liana, a woman with an alien mother and an Atlantium father with her cat Sil-l, is the first to join them. Then Jonathan Willoway, a scientist from the 60s is invited to join. Together they travel through portals from one dimension to the next hoping to find the one that leads home.moreless
  • 93
    The Godzilla Power Hour

    The Godzilla Power Hour

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Theme:
    Up from the Depths!
    Thirty Stories high!
    Breathing Fire! His Head in the Sky!
    GODZILLA! GODZILLA! GODZILLA!
    And Godzooky.
    GODZILLAAAAAA!!

    Godzilla. The old 1970's cartoon created by Hanna-Barbera is about a giant lizzard who could breathe fire, shoot red lazers out from his eyes, and fight monsters, too. This monster was originally a Japanese monster, but this guy was developed into a cartoon beast. The episodes feature Godzilla battling nothing but gigantic monsters. He does get help from some people, and his son.
    Characters: Captin Carl Majors is commandor of a ship known as The Calico. He is in charge of a device to call Godzilla when ever he and his crew are in danger. Dr. or Prof. Quinn Darian is a scientist who works with Capt. Majors on The Calico. Brock is Quinn's assistant. He is at his mid 20s and is alway ready to help. Pete is a young tyke who is the nephew of Quinn. Although he and Godzooky get into trouble sometimes, he is helpful to the crew, and not so helpful at sometimes. Godzooky. Ah, what to say about this flying baby lizzard who nobody can understand? Well...he's the son of Godzilla? DUH! Alright! Godzooky is about as big as a condo, who can fly by his webbed arms. He is quite a handful and can be quite annoying at sometimes but comes in use for a second calling device for Godzilla if the first device is destroyed. Godzilla I don't think I need to talk about because all of you know who he is!

    Other cartoon series with Godzilla: Godzilla: The Seriesmoreless
  • 94
    McCloud

    McCloud

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    Deputy Marshal Sam McCloud of Taos, N.M. is assigned to the 21st Precinct of the New York Police Department to study local police methods, where he can stay close to his girl, Chris Coughlin, a writer for her father's paper, the New York Chronicle. McCloud is a keen and brilliant investigator who garbs his talents in a Stetson and a sheepskin coat. "There ya go" is his byword. Chief Clifford's disregard of his manner frequently puts him in unavailing positions, but his original view of the city allows him to follow difficult cases to often far-reaching conclusions. McCloud is a variant of Don Siegel's 1968 film masterpiece Coogan's Bluff, and features elaborate writing, bold action, and the quintessence of high comedy. Dennis Weaver was nominated for an Emmy in 1974 and 1975.moreless
  • 95
    What Really Happened To the Class Of '65?

    What Really Happened To the Class Of '65?

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    What Really Happened To The Class Of '65 was an anthology series based on Michael Medved and David Wallechinsky's non-fiction best seller that updated the lives of members of a fictious high school's 1965 graduating class.moreless
  • 96
    Ghost Story

    Ghost Story

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Sebastian Cabot originally hosted this thriller/horror anthology series. As Winston Essex, he welcomed the audience to his stately manor, Essex House, where he'd introduce that week's story. As the tale unfolded, it would take an unexpected turn towards the macabre. Starting with the Janury 5, 1973 episode, the narrator was dropped and the title was changed to Circle of Fear. At that point, some non-horror suspense stories started to be included.moreless
  • 97
    Golden Globe Awards

    Golden Globe Awards

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    NBC (Returning January 11th, 2015)
    Near the end of each year, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association gathers to recognize outstanding achievement in film and television. Nominees are announced in December, and the awards ceremony is held and televised in mid-January. It's one of television's most intimate, spontaneous, and fun events. The profits made from the Golden Globe Awards are donated to entertainment - related charities by the HFPA. The organization offers scholarships to budding entertainers and supports educational institutions educating people on film and television.moreless
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    Password Plus

    Password Plus

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    NBC (ended 1982)
    Password Plus is a remake of the familiar Password shows. Password Plus consisted of two rounds. The main round in which the teams had to guess the password using one word clues as was like the original game, however, the passwords were also clues to a puzzle that could be a person, place or thing. The player who guesses the password gets a guess at the puzzle. If a word was not guessed after each clue-giver had given three clues (reduced to two on June 15, 1979), it was added to the board, but no one was allowed a guess at the puzzle. If a clue-giver inadvertently gave a word away, the guesser on the opposing team was given the right to guess the puzzle. If a guesser failed to solve the puzzle after all five clues were revealed, their partner received a guess. If they were incorrect, the puzzle was thrown out. The first two puzzles were valued at $100 and the next two puzzles paid $200. The person who reached $300 won the game and went on to the end round. The end round was called Alphabetics where the contestant and his or her celebrity partner were to try to guess ten passwords that began with certain letters of the alphabet (A-J, B-K, etc.). For every word guessed correctly, they got $100, but to get all ten within 60 seconds, they received $5,000. An illegal clue lowered the jackpot by $1,000. Contestants stayed on the show up to seven games. Later during the Tom Kennedy run, the game was restructured this way. The first three puzzles paid $100, then the contestants would switch celebrity partners at that point. The next three puzzles paid $200. The person who reached $500 won the game and played Alphabetics. This time, Alphabetics had a progressive jackpot that started $5,000 and went up by that much each time it was not won, up to a limit of $50,000 (just like Super Password). Illegal clues lowered the jackpot by 20% (IE; $20,000 would be $16,000 for one illegal clue), but this was later changed to a flat $2,500 reduction in late 1981. By the final week, the 20% reduction had returned. Allen Ludden hosted the show until late October 1980 when he had suffered a stroke as well as having his cancer recur, so Tom Kennedy took over until the series' end. In 1984, this same format was used for Super Password starring Bert Convy. Before they were stars, Kirstie Alley and Chuck Wagner were contestants on Password Plus.moreless
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    The Magician

    The Magician

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Master stage magician Tony Blake, once wrongly imprisoned in South America, uses his wits and his magic skills to help others in need. Early in the series, he jetted around the country in his customized 707 (named the "Spirit") to help people wherever they were, complete with a white Corvette (license plate SPIRIT) loaded through a rear cargo ramp. Jerry Anderson acted as pilot of the Spirit and Tony's assistant. Tony was aided in his ventures by his close friend and confidante, columnist Max Pomeroy, and Max's son, Dennis. In the second half of the season, Tony gave up his plane, making the famous Magic Castle in Hollywood -- a Mecca of sorts for magicians -- his home base.moreless
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    Hec Ramsey

    Hec Ramsey

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Richard Boone starred as Hec Ramsey, gunfighter turned criminologist, in this turn of the century western. The show was one of the four rotating elements of the NBC Sunday Mystery Movie for two seasons from 1972-74. Rick Lenz and Harry Morgan co-starred. The show was canceled due to disagreements between star Richard Boone and Universal Studios, which produced the series. Boone wanted the show to become a weekly series whilst the studio preferred it to remain in its rotating monthly format.moreless
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