• 121
    Greatest Heroes of the Bible

    Greatest Heroes of the Bible

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    This was an eight-hour miniseries re-creating Biblical stories from the Old Testament. It ran for four consecutive nights on NBC, then returned as a series of specials afterwards.
  • 122
    Monster Squad

    Monster Squad

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    While working as a night watchman, Walt (played by Fred Grandy), activates a crime computer he invented. It brings to life three of the wax figures - Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, and Wolfman. Wanting to make up for their past lives, the three monsters assist Walt in fighting Crime.moreless
  • 123
    City of Angels (1976)

    City of Angels (1976)

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Wayne Rogers plays Jake Axminster, a barely ethical private investigator working in Los Angeles, California during the 1930s. Jake has little trust for anyone and is more often than not broke. His bimbo secretary Marsha helps keep money coming into the office with an escort side business. After Mash, Rogers complained that he was forever typecast and couldn't get a job. This series lasted 13 episodes before it was canceled.moreless
  • 124
    Run, Joe, Run

    Run, Joe, Run

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Joe, a trained member of the military's K9-Corp., was falsely accused of attacking his master, Sergeant Corey. Joe managed to escape before being killed and a bounty was put on his head. While Sergeant Corey tried to find him before the authorities did, Joe managed to help the people he encounterd on his travels. Although Corey always came close, he never managed to find Joe. During the second season, Corey was called back to duty and Joe teamed up with Josh McCoy, a hiker, and continued on his trek while helping others.moreless
  • 125
    Casper & the Angels

    Casper & the Angels

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    After 16 years since his last network show, Casper returns to NBC. The series is set in 2179 where Casper helps out policewomen Mini & Maxi on baffling cases (2 episodes per show). Hairy Scary was there to convince Casper to scare people! Casper & Hairy Scary had two NBC specials as well. A Halloween special where Hairy Scary & his friends ruin Halloween for Casper & his new orphan friends. And a Christmas special that featured Yogi & the gang taking shelter @ their haunted house.moreless
  • 126
    The Jimmy Stewart Show

    The Jimmy Stewart Show

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    NBC (ended 1972)
    Jim Howard had a fairly easy-going life as an anthropology professor at small Josiah Kessel College, which was founded by his grandfather. However, things have gotten a little crazy since his son Peter's house burned down and he offered to let Peter's entire family move in with him temporarily.moreless
  • 127
    Legends of the Super-Heroes

    Legends of the Super-Heroes

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    A show about some of the greatest super heroes in the universe like Batman, Hawkman, Flash, Green Lantern, and many more.
  • 128
    Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

    Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

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    NBC (Holiday Event 1948)
    Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is an annual event featuring imaginative floats and spectacular pageantry making it one of America's favorite holiday extravaganzas.
  • 129
    C.P.O. Sharkey

    C.P.O. Sharkey

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    The series, set at a navy recruit training station in San Diego, presents a satirical look at navy life as seen through the expereinces of Chief Petty Officer Otto Sharkey, an acid-tongued, twenty-four-year veteran who wages his own private war against the changes that constitute the new navy.moreless
  • 130
    Roland Garros

    Roland Garros

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    NBC
    With over 80 years of history, Roland Garros has become the most famous and acclaimed tennis tournament to be played on clay in the world. Played and televised in mid-May until early June this French tournament is one of the premier events on the tennis calendar. The second Grand Slam of the annual tennis season and the first Grand Slam tournament to join the Open era in 1968, it keeps attracting the elite of the tennis world to its orange courts in Paris every year.moreless
  • 131
    The Bold Ones: The Protectors

    The Bold Ones: The Protectors

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    The Bold Ones: The Protectors AKA The Bold Ones: The Law Enforcers, and Deadlock,was an American crime drama series that aired on NBC from 1969 to 1970. It only lasted for seven episodes which included a one hour pilot movie.

    The Protectors was part of The Bold Ones, a rotating series of dramas that also included The New Doctors, The Lawyers, and The Senator. This was the shortest of the four series.

    Deputy Chief Sam Danforth is the deputy chief of police in a volatile California city. He is a conservative law and order type who is brought in from Cleveland to try to keep crime controled. Danforth often has run-ins with the city's new idealistic, liberal black District Attorney, William Washburn.moreless
  • 132
    Sierra

    Sierra

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    From the executive producer of Emergency! came Sierra, a short-lived police drama set in Yosemite National Park, where Chief Ranger Jack Moore led a group of rangers on a series of search and rescue missions.moreless
  • 133
    The Ray Stevens Show

    The Ray Stevens Show

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Ray Stevens Show Guide at TV.com. This variety series occurred during the summer of 1970 as a replacement for "The Andy Williams Show," which was canceled in 1971. One of the regular performers, "Mama" Cass Elliot, was a very successful singer who made many TV appearances from the 1960s until her untimely death in 1974. The United States First Telecast: June 20th, 1970 Last Telecast: August 8th, 1970 These episodes aired on Saturdays at 7:30PM This show was basically full of different sketches and musical performances by the cast. It was taped in Canada and aired in the US on NBC and in the UK on BBC. The show was originally a Canadian sketch series. But the series is perhaps most interesting in hindsight, affording an early view of the movie comedy superstar-to-be Steve Martin. The show produced 8 episodes, each about an hour long. It's a shame that the show only ran for the summer. Canada First Telecast: Unknown Last Telecast: Unknown The United Kingdom First Telecast: September 18th, 1970 Last Telecast: December 6th, 1970 There were 7 "editions" of the show in the UK, which aired on BBC-2 on Sundays at 7:25PM. Although this was only a short summer series, it was a landmark. Andy Williams' production company had had a deal with NBC to provide Andy's summer 1970 replacement series, and Canadian producers Alan Blye and Chris Beard worked through their friend, CTV Network President Murray Chercover, to have the one-hour Ray Stevens Show produced in Canada. Stevens had had several hit novelty records – Ahab the Arab, Gitarzan and Harry The Hairy Ape among them. He added a new hit with the show's theme song, Everything Is Beautiful, sung by a children's chorus as the opening titles were revealed as a fence was painted blue and chromakey did the rest. British singer Lulu, American comedian Steve Martin and former Mamas and Papas singer Cass Elliot were among the regulars, along with the comedy talents of Canadians Billy Van and Carol Robinson. Jimmy Dale led the all-Canadian orchestra, and Doug Riley's Dr. Music vocal group was also much in evidence. Produced at CTV's Toronto affiliate CFTO, the Ray Stevens Show debuted on Saturday, June 20, 1970 on CTV and NBC, and ran through to August 8th. Singer-composer-comedian-impressionist Ray Stevens starred in this summer replacement for The Andy Williams Show. Ray, who was a frequent guest on Andy's show, was featured in production numbers and comedy skits in this summer program, which was taped in Toronto. The skits tended to be very broad and often verged on the physical violence associated with Mack Sennett slapstick. NOTE: A lot of this information was taken and copied/pasted from other websites via Google. The last paragraph was taken from The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable Shows 1946 - Present: Eighth Editionmoreless
  • 134
    The Animated Adventures of Flash Gordon

    The Animated Adventures of Flash Gordon

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    This well-crafted cartoon series from 1970s animation powerhouse Filmation was a reworking of the original Flash Gordon serial. Art design and production design reflected the earlier era with a combination of Art Deco, Gothic Revival, Victorian and other styles. Like the earlier versions, the show was presented in a serial format, with each episode ending in a cliffhanger. The series began with Flash, Dale Arden and Dr. Hans Zarkov already in flight to Mongo, skipping any scenes on Earth. On Mongo, Flash befriended virtually every race and gained allies in his fight against Ming the Merciless, hammering home a message to the young audience that they can achieve anything if they work together. The series was re-tooled for its second season (ostensibly for the usual "poor ratings" reason), dropping the serialized format for 12-minute short stories. A new addition for the second season was the pet dragon Gremlin, which bore a fairly close resemblance to the character, Godzooky, from competitor Hanna-Barbera's Godzilla animated series. Producer Lou Scheimer says that when the Samuel Peeple's pilot script proved too expensive for live action television, he sold the live action rights to Dino De Laurentiis, who promised Scheimer enough money to do the cartoon series. Scheimer also voiced the recap narration at the beginning of each "chapter." Most of the ships (except for Arborea's Leaf Fighters) were actual models painted black with white striping. After being shot on high-contrast film stock and processed, the colors were reversed to negative, leaving white ships with black lines. Coloring completed the footage. Because the ships are essentially 24 frame per second live action, their motion was smoother than if they had been animated. No directors were ever credited for individual episodes, although directors Hal Sutherland, Don Towsley and Lou Zukor have been listed as involved with this series.moreless
  • 135
    Name That Tune (1974)

    Name That Tune (1974)

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    The definitive "guess the tune before your opponent" game, Name That Tune returned for its most successful run ... in once-a-week syndication. It was a series of changes that were made during the run that made it among the most exciting game shows of the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s. Two contestants competed in a series of rounds, each with different rules. Generally, the premise was to guess the song correctly, but it wasn't always "do it before your opponent does." Some of the games included (but not limited to): • A straightforward best-of-five tune-guessing game. The first contestant to ring in could guess the tune. A correct guess was worth one point, but if incorrect, his/her opponent could guess. • Melody Roulette – Host Tom Kennedy spun a large roulette wheel containing dollar amounts ($100 on up to $500), along with DOUBLE and TRIPLE spaces and sometimes, even a CAR. Wherever it stopped, that's the value of the tune; a correct guess won that contestant the cash, but if not, his/her opponent could guess. The first to name 3 (or 2) tunes got to keep the cash (and possibly, the car). The car could be won only once. • The Money Tree – As the song played, the contestant's opponent pulled out dollar bills from his/her money tree. The first one to guess three tunes kept whatever cash remained; also, a player won if the opponent ran out of money. • Sing-A-Tune - A competition where each player, in secret, wrote down the names to the tune being performed by the show's singer (la-laaing out any incriminating words). • Bid-A-Note – The show's signature game. Kennedy red the contestants a clue to the song, and the players bid downward against each other to determine how few notes they needed ("I can name that tune in four notes!"). There were many other games as well, and each round was worth points. The high scorer after three rounds (or a tie-breaker, if necessary) was the day's champion and moved on to the Golden Medley. In the Golden Medley, the champion had to identify seven tunes within 30 seconds. Prizes were awarded for each correct answer; naming all seven tunes won the player $15,000 in prizes in the early seasons, while an incorrect guess at any time stopped the game. The show's biggest change – an ultimately successful one – came in 1976. Now, weekly (or NBC daily) winners returned to identify a more difficult montage of tunes, with a correct guess worth ($25,000 NBC) $100,000 (done twice during the 1976-1977 season). The show's title was changed to reflect the grand prize (The $100,000 Name That Tune). With fewer than five grand-prize winners each year, the $100,000 format was later retooled into a season-ending playoff and the rules modified to allow for a guaranteed $100,000 payoff. The $100,000 Name That Tune ended its run in 1981, but returned as a five-a-week syndicated entry in 1984, with Jim Lange hosting. The format was nearly identical, with Melody Roulette and Bid-A-Note returning along with a new round called Tune Topics (wherein all the songs had to do with a given topic; e.g., if that day's topic is "Honey I'm Home," one of the songs could be "Up On the Roof."). Also, the $100,000 tournament was played every eight weeks or so, with the winner getting $10,000 and $90,000 in prizes. Some of those prizes were offered as part of a home-viewer sweepstakes. The updated The $100,000 Name That Tune was not successful and ended its run after one season. An attempted comeback of sorts, Name That Video, appeared in 2000 on VH1, with the rules modified to accommodate videos instead of music. It didn't last.moreless
  • 136
    Here Comes the Grump

    Here Comes the Grump

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Here comes the Grump is a modern fairy tale, that begins with a curse over the Princess Dawn's kingdom. For break it, she needs to find the Crystal Key (hidden in the Cave of the Whispering Orchids). For help her, join forces with Terry Dexter (a boy from the earth) and Blip (his psychedelic dog). In the way, Grump (an unhappy Dwarf) and his allergic dragon, try to make them fall. All in surreal animated stories.moreless
  • 137
    High Rollers

    High Rollers

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    In 1972, Merrill Heatter and Bob Quigley helped revive the CBS daytime game show lineup with Gambit, a general knowledge quiz tied to Blackjack. The show's success inspired the duo to create a second quiz tied to another Vegas-style game - craps. The result? Another successful game show called High Rollers. This durable dice game went through three distinct formats during each of its runs - an original NBC run from 1974-1976 (with a concurrent syndicated version in 1975); a second NBC run from 1978-1980; and in five-a-week syndication from 1987-1988. But a number of things were identical to all three versions of High Rollers. The host (Alex Trebek in the 1970s, Wink Martindale in the 1980s) asks a toss-up question - usually multiple choice or true/false, often worded to trick the players into ringing before the host could read the entire question. A correct guess allowed that contestant to control a pair of large dice - either roll them himself/herself or force his/her opponent to do so (though in the 1974-1976 version, the hostess, usually Ruta Lee, rolled the dice for the contestants). If the contestant was wrong or failed to answer in time, the decision to roll was the opponent's call. In each version, the idea was to remove the numbers 1 through 9 from a game board, depending on what he/she had rolled. For instance, if an 8 was rolled, he/she can remove the 8; 1 and 7; 1, 2 and 5; etc. Once a number is removed from the board, it is not available for subsequent rolls. The game ended in one of the following ways: * He/she lost by rolling a combination that did not allow him/her to knock off any of the available numbers (e.g., rolling a 3 and 1, 2 and 3 were already removed). The opponent won the game. The exception: If a player rolled doubles, he/she was given an insurance marker, which was turned in if a bad throw was made in exchange for (what they hoped) was a better roll. During the 1974 run, the insurance markers were only used in the Big Numbers bonus game. * Removing the final number by exact count. This was the far rarer result. The winner won whatever prizes he/she had in their possession when the game ended; the loser losing theirs. If the winner didn't have anything (that's what happened quite often, since players often did not want to roll the dice out of fear of losing), they earned $100 (later $250). The numbers gameboard and how the prizes were won depended on the version: * 1974-1976 - The numbers were scattered on a standard board, in two rows. Seven of the numbers had a prize attached to them, with two others having a larger prize - usually a trip, boat, a room of furniture or fur - divided between them (and the player had to claim both halves to gain rights to that prize. At one point in the series, the gameboard hid the face of a famous celebrity, whose identity could be guessed for a $500 bonus. * 1978-1980 - The numbers are scattered randomly on a 3-by-3 gameboard, each in different fonts and colors. Each column had a prize package attached to them, and was claimed only by a player clearing the last number in that column (and of course, winning the game). One column (sometimes two) was dubbed the "hot" column(s), whose numbers added up to 12 or less and could be cleared with a single roll of the dice. Each new prize package was worth about $2,000, and new items were added for each game the package went unwon, meaning a prize package could be worth $10,000 or more & only 5 prizes per column, so a full board would be 15 prizes. In addition to the standard game show prizes (furniture, appliances, trips, furs, jewelry, televisions and stereos, etc.), many of the prizes were quite unique - musical dolls; full-sized aquariums, complete with tropical fish and accessories; African masks; a trip to the Kentucky Derby with $100 bets on each horse; and a fully-catered dinner for 20 people were just some of the examples. * 1987-1988 - The 1978-1980 rules for the most part, except that prize packages now had a maximum of three items (and the "unique" prizes dropped). Also, several of the columns also hid a number of no-lose mini-games, played with a single die for bonus prizes (such as a car or trip). In all three versions of High Rollers, the player winning a best-of-three match was champion advanced to the Big Numbers bonus round. Here, the player faced a gameboard with the numbers 1 through 9. As before, the idea was to remove all nine numbers without making a bad roll, and insurance markers were given out for rolling doubles. Each number was worth $100, but removing all nine numbers won $10,000. Players competed for up to five matches (seven on the 1978 version), at which point they retired undefeated with a new car.moreless
  • 138
    Fred and Barney Meet the Shmoo

    Fred and Barney Meet the Shmoo

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    Fred & Barney Meet The Shmoo was complied after the cancellation of two shows: Fred & Barney Meet The Thing and The New Shmoo.

    The series consisted of...

    The New Fred & Barney Show; debuted in January 1979 on NBC, it's new adventures of the modern stone age family on their 3rd network.

    The Thing; based on the Fantastic 4 character. Except this one has a secret identity, teenaged Ben Grimm. When Ben wanted to transform into the orange hero, he would put the two halves of his ring & shout, "Thing ring, do your thing!"

    The Shmoo; based on Al Capp's character from L'il Abner. The Shmoo is a friend to a trio who worked for Mighty Mysteries Comics. The Shmoo could turn into anything to help his friends out.

    QUICKIE; Sing Along With The Shmoo. It's where the Shmoo acted like a bouncing ball as songs were sung.

    Fred & Barney would actually meet the Shmoo next season, during the Bedrock Cops segment of the Flintstone Comedy Show.moreless
  • 139
    Lucas Tanner

    Lucas Tanner

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    David Hartman plays former St. Louis Cardinals baseball player and writer for Sports Week magazine Lucas Tanner. After his wife, Ellie, and son, Chip, die in a car accident, Lucas decides to dedicate the rest of his life to being a schoolteacher, helping young people to find their goal in life as he did.moreless
  • 140
    Curse of Dracula

    Curse of Dracula

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    In 1979, Count Dracula is alive and well and teaching at a college; part of NBC's "Cliffhangers".
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