• 161
    The Animated Adventures of Flash Gordon

    The Animated Adventures of Flash Gordon

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    This well-crafted cartoon series from 1970s animation powerhouse Filmation was a reworking of the original Flash Gordon serial. Art design and production design reflected the earlier era with a combination of Art Deco, Gothic Revival, Victorian and other styles. Like the earlier versions, the show was presented in a serial format, with each episode ending in a cliffhanger. The series began with Flash, Dale Arden and Dr. Hans Zarkov already in flight to Mongo, skipping any scenes on Earth. On Mongo, Flash befriended virtually every race and gained allies in his fight against Ming the Merciless, hammering home a message to the young audience that they can achieve anything if they work together. The series was re-tooled for its second season (ostensibly for the usual "poor ratings" reason), dropping the serialized format for 12-minute short stories. A new addition for the second season was the pet dragon Gremlin, which bore a fairly close resemblance to the character, Godzooky, from competitor Hanna-Barbera's Godzilla animated series. Producer Lou Scheimer says that when the Samuel Peeple's pilot script proved too expensive for live action television, he sold the live action rights to Dino De Laurentiis, who promised Scheimer enough money to do the cartoon series. Scheimer also voiced the recap narration at the beginning of each "chapter." Most of the ships (except for Arborea's Leaf Fighters) were actual models painted black with white striping. After being shot on high-contrast film stock and processed, the colors were reversed to negative, leaving white ships with black lines. Coloring completed the footage. Because the ships are essentially 24 frame per second live action, their motion was smoother than if they had been animated. No directors were ever credited for individual episodes, although directors Hal Sutherland, Don Towsley and Lou Zukor have been listed as involved with this series.moreless
  • 162
    Joe Forrester

    Joe Forrester

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Joe Forrester looked at the life of a regular cop on the beat, a patrolman who had been working the same district for many years. He felt friendships and information sources he had cultivated were worth more than the comfort of a patrol car or detective status. He occasionally overlooked minor infractions of the law, but was known and respected and trusted by everyone. His girlfriend Georgia Cameron and good buddy Bernie Vincent were always bailing him out of trouble when he chose to help those in dire need.moreless
  • 163
    The Bold Ones: The Protectors

    The Bold Ones: The Protectors

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    The Bold Ones: The Protectors AKA The Bold Ones: The Law Enforcers, and Deadlock,was an American crime drama series that aired on NBC from 1969 to 1970. It only lasted for seven episodes which included a one hour pilot movie.

    The Protectors was part of The Bold Ones, a rotating series of dramas that also included The New Doctors, The Lawyers, and The Senator. This was the shortest of the four series.

    Deputy Chief Sam Danforth is the deputy chief of police in a volatile California city. He is a conservative law and order type who is brought in from Cleveland to try to keep crime controled. Danforth often has run-ins with the city's new idealistic, liberal black District Attorney, William Washburn.moreless
  • 164
    Chase (1973)

    Chase (1973)

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Police Captain Chase Reddick forms an undercover team of specialists in chasing down elusive criminals. The team includes dog-handler Sam MacCray, motorcycle cop Fred Sing, expert wheelman Steve Baker, and helicopter pilot Norm Hamilton. However, with episode 15 the team was revamped, with the 3 vehicle specialists being replaced by more conventional operatives, Inspector Frank Dawson and Officers Ed Rice and Tom Wilson.moreless
  • 165
    The Ray Stevens Show

    The Ray Stevens Show

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Ray Stevens Show Guide at TV.com. This variety series occurred during the summer of 1970 as a replacement for "The Andy Williams Show," which was canceled in 1971. One of the regular performers, "Mama" Cass Elliot, was a very successful singer who made many TV appearances from the 1960s until her untimely death in 1974. The United States First Telecast: June 20th, 1970 Last Telecast: August 8th, 1970 These episodes aired on Saturdays at 7:30PM This show was basically full of different sketches and musical performances by the cast. It was taped in Canada and aired in the US on NBC and in the UK on BBC. The show was originally a Canadian sketch series. But the series is perhaps most interesting in hindsight, affording an early view of the movie comedy superstar-to-be Steve Martin. The show produced 8 episodes, each about an hour long. It's a shame that the show only ran for the summer. Canada First Telecast: Unknown Last Telecast: Unknown The United Kingdom First Telecast: September 18th, 1970 Last Telecast: December 6th, 1970 There were 7 "editions" of the show in the UK, which aired on BBC-2 on Sundays at 7:25PM. Although this was only a short summer series, it was a landmark. Andy Williams' production company had had a deal with NBC to provide Andy's summer 1970 replacement series, and Canadian producers Alan Blye and Chris Beard worked through their friend, CTV Network President Murray Chercover, to have the one-hour Ray Stevens Show produced in Canada. Stevens had had several hit novelty records – Ahab the Arab, Gitarzan and Harry The Hairy Ape among them. He added a new hit with the show's theme song, Everything Is Beautiful, sung by a children's chorus as the opening titles were revealed as a fence was painted blue and chromakey did the rest. British singer Lulu, American comedian Steve Martin and former Mamas and Papas singer Cass Elliot were among the regulars, along with the comedy talents of Canadians Billy Van and Carol Robinson. Jimmy Dale led the all-Canadian orchestra, and Doug Riley's Dr. Music vocal group was also much in evidence. Produced at CTV's Toronto affiliate CFTO, the Ray Stevens Show debuted on Saturday, June 20, 1970 on CTV and NBC, and ran through to August 8th. Singer-composer-comedian-impressionist Ray Stevens starred in this summer replacement for The Andy Williams Show. Ray, who was a frequent guest on Andy's show, was featured in production numbers and comedy skits in this summer program, which was taped in Toronto. The skits tended to be very broad and often verged on the physical violence associated with Mack Sennett slapstick. NOTE: A lot of this information was taken and copied/pasted from other websites via Google. The last paragraph was taken from The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network and Cable Shows 1946 - Present: Eighth Editionmoreless
  • 166
    Name That Tune (1974)

    Name That Tune (1974)

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    The definitive "guess the tune before your opponent" game, Name That Tune returned for its most successful run ... in once-a-week syndication. It was a series of changes that were made during the run that made it among the most exciting game shows of the mid-to-late 1970s and early 1980s. Two contestants competed in a series of rounds, each with different rules. Generally, the premise was to guess the song correctly, but it wasn't always "do it before your opponent does." Some of the games included (but not limited to): • A straightforward best-of-five tune-guessing game. The first contestant to ring in could guess the tune. A correct guess was worth one point, but if incorrect, his/her opponent could guess. • Melody Roulette – Host Tom Kennedy spun a large roulette wheel containing dollar amounts ($100 on up to $500), along with DOUBLE and TRIPLE spaces and sometimes, even a CAR. Wherever it stopped, that's the value of the tune; a correct guess won that contestant the cash, but if not, his/her opponent could guess. The first to name 3 (or 2) tunes got to keep the cash (and possibly, the car). The car could be won only once. • The Money Tree – As the song played, the contestant's opponent pulled out dollar bills from his/her money tree. The first one to guess three tunes kept whatever cash remained; also, a player won if the opponent ran out of money. • Sing-A-Tune - A competition where each player, in secret, wrote down the names to the tune being performed by the show's singer (la-laaing out any incriminating words). • Bid-A-Note – The show's signature game. Kennedy red the contestants a clue to the song, and the players bid downward against each other to determine how few notes they needed ("I can name that tune in four notes!"). There were many other games as well, and each round was worth points. The high scorer after three rounds (or a tie-breaker, if necessary) was the day's champion and moved on to the Golden Medley. In the Golden Medley, the champion had to identify seven tunes within 30 seconds. Prizes were awarded for each correct answer; naming all seven tunes won the player $15,000 in prizes in the early seasons, while an incorrect guess at any time stopped the game. The show's biggest change – an ultimately successful one – came in 1976. Now, weekly (or NBC daily) winners returned to identify a more difficult montage of tunes, with a correct guess worth ($25,000 NBC) $100,000 (done twice during the 1976-1977 season). The show's title was changed to reflect the grand prize (The $100,000 Name That Tune). With fewer than five grand-prize winners each year, the $100,000 format was later retooled into a season-ending playoff and the rules modified to allow for a guaranteed $100,000 payoff. The $100,000 Name That Tune ended its run in 1981, but returned as a five-a-week syndicated entry in 1984, with Jim Lange hosting. The format was nearly identical, with Melody Roulette and Bid-A-Note returning along with a new round called Tune Topics (wherein all the songs had to do with a given topic; e.g., if that day's topic is "Honey I'm Home," one of the songs could be "Up On the Roof."). Also, the $100,000 tournament was played every eight weeks or so, with the winner getting $10,000 and $90,000 in prizes. Some of those prizes were offered as part of a home-viewer sweepstakes. The updated The $100,000 Name That Tune was not successful and ended its run after one season. An attempted comeback of sorts, Name That Video, appeared in 2000 on VH1, with the rules modified to accommodate videos instead of music. It didn't last.moreless
  • 167
    Hot Dog

    Hot Dog

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Saturday morning variety show (originally aired 1970-1971) showed children how things were made, using famous personalities, such as Woody Allen and Jonathan Winters, to make witty and comical remarks about the given subject, such as toothpaste, bowling balls, baseball gloves, etc.moreless
  • 168
    Here Comes the Grump

    Here Comes the Grump

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    Here comes the Grump is a modern fairy tale, that begins with a curse over the Princess Dawn's kingdom. For break it, she needs to find the Crystal Key (hidden in the Cave of the Whispering Orchids). For help her, join forces with Terry Dexter (a boy from the earth) and Blip (his psychedelic dog). In the way, Grump (an unhappy Dwarf) and his allergic dragon, try to make them fall. All in surreal animated stories.moreless
  • 169
    Fred and Barney Meet the Shmoo

    Fred and Barney Meet the Shmoo

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    Fred & Barney Meet The Shmoo was complied after the cancellation of two shows: Fred & Barney Meet The Thing and The New Shmoo.

    The series consisted of...

    The New Fred & Barney Show; debuted in January 1979 on NBC, it's new adventures of the modern stone age family on their 3rd network.

    The Thing; based on the Fantastic 4 character. Except this one has a secret identity, teenaged Ben Grimm. When Ben wanted to transform into the orange hero, he would put the two halves of his ring & shout, "Thing ring, do your thing!"

    The Shmoo; based on Al Capp's character from L'il Abner. The Shmoo is a friend to a trio who worked for Mighty Mysteries Comics. The Shmoo could turn into anything to help his friends out.

    QUICKIE; Sing Along With The Shmoo. It's where the Shmoo acted like a bouncing ball as songs were sung.

    Fred & Barney would actually meet the Shmoo next season, during the Bedrock Cops segment of the Flintstone Comedy Show.moreless
  • 170
    Lucas Tanner

    Lucas Tanner

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    NBC (ended 1975)
    David Hartman plays former St. Louis Cardinals baseball player and writer for Sports Week magazine Lucas Tanner. After his wife, Ellie, and son, Chip, die in a car accident, Lucas decides to dedicate the rest of his life to being a schoolteacher, helping young people to find their goal in life as he did.moreless
  • 171
    Around the World in 80 Days

    Around the World in 80 Days

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    This is the animated version of the Jules Verne classsic . Englishman Phileas Fogg wished to marry his fiance' Belinda Maze, neice of aristocrat Lord Maze. Maze will not consent to the marriage unless Fogg proves himself worthy of Belinda's hand. The challenge: Go around the world in 80 days(which was impossible to do in 1872). Lord Maze also wagers 25,000 pounds Fogg will not succeed. Fogg accepts the challenge and the bet. To make sure he wins the bet; Maze hired the detective Mr. Fix to sabotage Fogg's task. With his friend Jean Passepartout; the duo set out on their journey with Fix following right along. Each episode Fogg and Passepartout attempts to reach their goal(and teaches the audience about the destination they are at this week), including stopping Mr. Fix's devious plans before the allotted time.moreless
  • 172
    Name That Tune (1977)

    Name That Tune (1977)

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    NBC (ended 1977)
    The daytime version of the nighttime syndicated hit. Tom Kennedy hosted with Kathie Lee Johnson (Gifford) as singer with Tommy Oliver & the Orchestra. Two contestants competed for cash & prizes. Games played were Melody Roulette, Build-A-Tune (exclusively for this version) & Bid-A-Note. The contestant who won the most points, played the Golden Medley. The player had to identify 7 songs in 30 seconds to win a prize package + come back the next day to play the Mystery Tune. The Mystery tune was played the same way as the syndicated version, except the grand prize was a flat $25,000. This version on NBC lasted only six months.moreless
  • 173
    Little Women

    Little Women

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Short-lived drama based on the book by Louisa May Alcott. Is about the four March Girls on the trials and tribulations during the war while their father is away.
  • 174
    The D.A. (1971)

    The D.A. (1971)

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    NBC (ended 1972)
    Based on real cases from the files of the Los Angeles court system, The D.A. starred Robert Conrad and Harry Morgan as members of the Los Angeles District Attorney's Office, in another of Jack Webb's "based on reality" series.
    Said to be personified after real life Charles Manson Clan prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi, Conrad plays hard as nails, no holds barred Deputy D.A. Paul Ryan, who isn't afraid of a fight, no matter how tough.
    Critically acclaimed, the show couldn't stand up to the competition of The Brady Bunch and was cancelled after 15 episodes on NBC. It was replaced by Sanford And Son which became highly successful.moreless
  • 175
    Fred and Barney Meet the Thing

    Fred and Barney Meet the Thing

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    A combination show from Hanna-Barbera productions. Fred and Barney reprise their roles from The Flintstones. The other episodes were of The Thing from The Fantastic Four fame.
  • 176
    The Bugaloos

    The Bugaloos

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    NBC (ended 1972)
    From the psychedelic minds of Sid and Marty Kroft comes this children's show starring four musical teens with wings. The Bugaloos (Joy, Courage, IQ and Harmony) live peacefully in Tranquility Forest with their adopted pal Sparky the Firefly. The constant thorn in their side is the vain and untalented Benita Bizarre who will do anything to become a hit singer and get her songs played on DJ Peter Platter's radio show. Her convoluted plans at music domination always seem to involve kidnapping one or all of The Bugaloos.moreless
  • 177
    Celebrity Sweepstakes

    Celebrity Sweepstakes

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    How much faith do you have that your favorite celebrity can answer a question? Does the audience share your opinion? That, in a nutshell, was the basic premise behind Celebrity Sweepstakes, a game show that appeared on-and-off for about three years in syndication and as a daily series on NBC. Two contestants competed (one a returning champion on the NBC version, two new ones in the weekly syndicated version). Before them, in podiums similar to a racetrack, are six celebrities. Host McKrell reads a question, after which members of the studio audience select the one celebrity they believe will answer correctly; the odds of a particular celebrity having the right answer are determined by the vote (e.g., many votes for one usually meant 1:1 odds, while only a few or no votes for another meant 99:1). The contestants also placed their bets (either $2, $5 or $10 from an initial bankroll of $25, later upped to $50) on the one celebrity they believe will have the right answer. Once the bets and odds were revealed, McKrell asked the celebrities for their answers. Contestants who were right in their judgement won money based on their bets (e.g., betting $10 on someone who had 8:1 odds won $80); otherwise, they lost the amount of their wager. At times, the minimum wager was waived and the contestant could bet everything up to $10 of their bankroll; if the bankroll dropped below $10, the contestant was limited to $2 bets. During the "Homestretch Round" – played near the end of the game after about 15-18 questions were played – contestants could double their wager by picking a second celebrity whom they believed had the right answer (if they so chose). For the day's final question – the "All or Nothing Round," contestants were allowed to choose a celebrity and bet either their entire bankroll or play it safe and bet nothing. The odds were revealed only after the wagers were placed, with awards paid out as appropriate. All contestants kept their winnings; the day's top cash winner in the daily version was champion and returned the next day. 3-time winners won a new car and retired undefeated after 5 wins. The winner in the syndicated version won a bonus prize. Celebrity Sweepstakes lived an interesting on-and-off again life on both NBC and in syndication. The series first appeared on NBC on April 1, 1974, which ran until its cancellation on October 1, 1976. The syndicated show appeared during the 1974-1975 season and again during the 1976-1977 season. After that, it was gone for good.moreless
  • 178
    Sword of Justice

    Sword of Justice

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    A playboy, wrongfully convicted of embezzlement, uses his time served to learn a few tricks of the trade.
  • 179
    Real People

    Real People

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    NBC (ended 1984)
    A weekly primetime newsmagazine that profiled funny, human interest stories. Instead of featuring celebrities, "Real People" searched out humorous individuals, situations and events that highlighted the common man. This landmark show inspired many copycats from the same era ("That's Incredible" & "Not Necessarily the News") to today ("America's Funniest Home Videos" & "The Daily Show").moreless
  • 180
    The Galaxy Goof-Ups

    The Galaxy Goof-Ups

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Originally, this was part of Yogi's Space Race before it had its own show. Yogi, Huck, Scarebear, and Quack-Up join the galaxy guardians headed by their leader, Captain Snerdley. Unfortunately, the quartet always seems to goof-up in some way. They'd rather dance at the disco club then catching evil doers!moreless
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