• 101
    Wish Kid

    Wish Kid

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Welcome to the Wish Kid guide at TV.com! Wish Kid was a Saturday morning animated series created to play off the success of pre-teen movie star Macaulay Culkin. This show opened with Macaulay in a live-action appearance in which he explained the show's premise. Nick McClary (Culkin) owned a magic baseball glove which, if punched three times, granted his every wish he desired. The only catch was that the glove could be used just once per week. Stories revolved around Nick's wishes and the trouble that usually followed. Nick's best friend was Darryl, the only one in on the glove's secrets and usually became involved in the adventures. Nick was frequently harassed by Frankie Dutweiler, the neighborhood bully. Other characters included, neighbor Mrs. Opal, Nick's Mom and Dad and his baby sister, Katie. The show ran one year on NBC, with new episodes airing on the Family Channel in 1996 (along with the original 13 NBC episodes). Wish Kid is a DiC Enterprises production. Contributations are welcome.moreless
  • 102
    Eerie, Indiana

    Eerie, Indiana

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    "To whom it may concern. If you're reading this document, it means I'm either dead - or disappeared under mysterious circumstances. My name is Marshall Teller. Not long ago I was living in New Jersey just across the river from New York City. It was crowded, polluted, and full of crime. I loved it. But my parents wanted a better life for my sister and me - so we moved to a place so wholesome, so squeaky clean, you could only find it on TV. Unfortunately, nothing could be further from the truth. Sure, my new home town *looks* normal enough, but look again. What's wrong with this picture? The American dream come true, right? Wrong. Nobody believes me, but this is the center of weirdness for the entire planet. Eerie, Indiana. My home sweet home. Still don't believe me? You will." Created by José Rivera, Eerie, Indiana is about thirteen-year-old Marshall Teller (Omri Katz), who has been uprooted from his beloved home town in New Jersey to Eerie, Indiana, which seems at first to be the most normal place in the world. But Marshall soon discovers that there's more to Eerie than meets the eye. Underneath the illusion of normality, Eerie is swarming with weird stuff. Women who seal themselves in giant kitchenware, werewolves, even Elvis, who lives on Marshall's paper route. The only person that believes him is his new friend, ten-year-old Simon Holmes (Justin Shenkarow). Together they decide to investigate Eerie's weirdness and keep record of it, in hopes to one day show the world. Spin-off: Eerie, Indiana: The Other Dimension.moreless
  • 103
    Captain N & the Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3

    Captain N & the Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 was based on the hugely successful NES game, Super Mario Bros. 3. It was aired as two episodes along with the second season of Captain N: The Game Master. See that guide for the Captain N cast list and episodes. The Adventures of Super Mario Bros. 3 was produced by DIC. Words to the Opening Sequence: It is a legend no one will forget. Everyone thought King Koopa had left the Mushroom Kingdom. And then his Doom Ship attacked! King Koopa was back with the greatest danger ever known: his Koopa kids. Using their new super powers, the Super Mario Brothers rescued Princess Toadstool and beat back the evil Koopa family. King Koopa: I'll get those plumbers! At first the Koopalings did not have real names because at the the time when the company was making the cartoon they did not know what their names would be, so they made up names for each of the Koopa kids. So the Koopa kids not having their real names in this cartoon is not a mistake or goof. Here are their real and cartoon names: Wendy = Kootie Pie Larry = Cheatsy Ludwig = Kooky Morton = Big Mouth Roy = Bully Lemmy = Hip Iggy = Hop NOTE: For continuity's sake, please refer to the koopalings by their cartoon names in your submissions. Also King Koopa (Bowser) not looking the way he does in the games is not a goof either. NOTE: Though he was called Bowser a few times in this cartoon, he is mainly known as King Koopa, so the guide will usually refer to him as Koopa for continuity's sake. Please refer to him as Koopa in your submissions. NOTE: On the cartoons, Princess Toadstool was never called Peach (her name in all the current games), so the guide will usually refer to her as Princess or Princess Toadstool for continuity's sake. Please refer to her as Princess in your submissions.moreless
  • 104
    I'll Fly Away

    I'll Fly Away

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    NBC (ended 1993)
    Drama about a Southern lawyer with three children who has a Black housekeeper. Set in 1958, when much of the South was still segregated.
  • 105
    Captain N and the New Super Mario World

    Captain N and the New Super Mario World

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Super Mario World was based off the popular video game of the same name and continued the Super Mario cartoon series. With Mario, Luigi and Princess Toadstool on Dinosaur Island and Yoshi replacing Toad and with them foiling the plans of King Koopa and his Koopa kids. This cartoon aired side-by-side with Season 3 of Captain N: The Game Master. See that guide for the shared Captain N cast list and episodes. Super Mario World was produced by DIC. At first the Koopalings did not have real names because at the the time when the company was making the cartoon they did not know what their names would be, so they made up names for each of the Koopa kids. So the Koopa kids not having their real names in this cartoon is not a mistake or goof. Here are their real and cartoon names: Wendy = Kootie Pie Larry = Cheatsy Ludwig = Kooky Morton = Big Mouth Roy = Bully Lemmy = Hip Iggy = Hop Also King Koopa (Bowser) not looking the way he does in the games is not a goof either.moreless
  • 106
    Brotherly Love

    Brotherly Love

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    Joe's parents are divorced and he moves away with his mom and his dad starts a new life with his new wife Claire. His dad and Claire have 2 sons Matt and Andy. When their dad dies Joe goes to them to collect his share of his dad's garage.moreless
  • 107
    Dark Skies

    Dark Skies

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    Dark Skies is set in the 1960s and includes a government employee, John Loengard, and his fiance Kimberly Sayers. John's quest for the truth leads him to Majestic-12, a secret government operation (above all offices and law) dealing with extra-terrestrials. At first the show seems to be just another show about Government spies and greyliens, but look closer and you will see much deeper. The plot thickens. The Greys, it seems, are only hosts for the real aliens, called the Hive. The Hive are much more dangerous than was previously imaginable with the Greys. This horrible truth is to be kept from the American people by Captain Bach, the leader of super-secret government organization called Majestic-12. The two main characters are on the run from the alien Hive and from the Government, and their travels lead them all over the country as they learn more and learn to fear more. Many historical figures are woven into the Dark Skies story, an important part of the turbulent ambience in which the characters exist. Many bear witness to the conspiracy involving "Majestic 12."moreless
  • 108
    Stark Raving Mad

    Stark Raving Mad

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    NBC (ended 2000)
    Tony Award nominee Tony Shalhoub and Neil Patrick Harris return to series television in this comedy series from Emmy Award winner Steven Levitan. Harris stars as Henry McNeely, a young, book editor who is thrust into the dark and chaotic world of best-selling horror writer Ian Stark. Providing distractions as Henry tries to keep Stark on track, are Stark's dazed writing assistant Jake Donavan, sassy bartender/college student Maddie Keller and Stark's overly affectionate dog, Edgar. (NBC press release)

    Yet another could've-been hit blundered by the collaborative incompetence of former entertainment president Garth Ancier and former (notice a pattern?) West Coast president Scott Sassa, Stark Raving Mad received a full season pickup. And that's where the network's support began and ended. Stark never clicked with the audience watching the show it followed on the schedule, Frasier, rendering it a time slot hit -- and not much of one at that. Though common sense would have suggested that's because their brand of humor was incompatible... well, it was on NBC, after all. After the original 13 episodes were broadcast by January, 2000, (at which time Regis Philbin stepped in and sent the show into a deep Nielsen gorge), the series bounced off and on -- mostly off -- the schedule, and nearly half of the back nine that the network ordered in November, 1999 were never broadcast at all. Although NBC executives believe that sitcoms that don't work on Thursday won't work anywhere, your editor doesn't. He does, though, wonder what might have been had Stark Raving Mad aired on Tuesday after Just Shoot Me -- which it was perfectly compatible with. Guess we'll never know. Besides, three years later, and Ancier's/Sassa's even more incompetent replacement, Jeff Zucker, was playing the same hide-and-seek games with JSM that they were with SRM.

    "Batty, bonkers, crazy, loopy, loony, hazy Chaotic, neurotic, peculiar and amazing Demented, deranged, particularly strange Frantic, ranting, shaky, flaky, making me insane." -- theme song

    Stark Raving Mad is produced by Steven Levitan Productions, in association with 20th Century Fox Television

    Broadcast History

    Sep 1999-Mar 2000, Thu 9:30-10:00 Jul 2000, Thu 9:30-10:00moreless
  • 109
    The Temptations

    The Temptations

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    NBC
    Group leader Otis Williams narrated the story of the musical group The Temptations and their rise to fame. The miniseries chronicles the success of the group as well as the downfall of one of the members into drug addiction.moreless
  • 110
    Hang Time

    Hang Time

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    NBC (ended 2001)
    Hang Time is basically just another teen coming-of-age sitcom. The twist here is, however, that it focuses on a boys basketball team with one female team member. The show is generically the same as the rest - same jokes, same gags, same characters, touches on the same issues - but it is one of the best of the genre. In fact, the series was continuosly the highest rated Saturday morning series on NBC's teen line-up.moreless
  • 111
    City Guys

    City Guys

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    NBC (ended 2001)
    Chris Anderson may be a scion of New York high society, but after he gets kicked out of his school for bad behavior, he winds up in the same place as Harlem street kid Jamal Grant: the none-too-hallowed halls of Manny High School, where they, along with their friends, learn that staying out of trouble is harder than their parents may think. Soon, friendship and rivalry develop between a streetwise black student and a Park Avenue preppy, both of them transfer students at a Manhattan high school. City Guys is a comedy-drama television show that ran from 1997 to December 2001. It lasted five seasons, and ended its airing time around the dissolution of TNBC. It was then aired in syndication. The show was very similar in style to Saved by the Bell, however with an urban setting and more diverse cast. The show was mainly driven by six main characters who had to stay on the ball in high school and avoid trouble, while their principal attempted to keep them in line. The characters dealt with the typical teen issues, such as cheating on tests, peer pressure and dealing with school violence. It was one of Two TNBC shows not to have constant cast changes like Hang Time and Saved by the Bell: New Class.moreless
  • 112
    Captain N: The Game Master

    Captain N: The Game Master

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Kevin Keene, a teenager from Northridge, California, and his dog Duke are brought to another universe called Videoland, where Nintendo video games are real, to defeat the evil villainess Mother Brain. Mother Brain is trying to conquer Videoland. Kevin has been brought to defeat her, as foretold in an ancient prophecy. Kevin is given the title "Captain N: The Game Master." He and Duke join the N Team consisting of Princess Lana (the ruler of Videoland), Simon Belmont (the hero from "Castlevania"), Mega Man, Kid Icarus, and later Gameboy (a supercomputer that looks like a Game Boy system). The N Team goes up against the evil Mother Brain (the villianess from "Metroid") and her minions King Hippo (from "Punch Out"), the Eggplant Wizard (from "Kid Icarus"), Dr. Wily (from "Mega Man") and Count Dracula (from "Castlevania"). The forces of good and evil go up against each other and often find themselves in comical, hilarious situations. The Characters The Good Guys: Kevin Keene/Captain N: Kevin Keene is from Northridge California. He was brought to Videoland through the Ultimate Warp Zone to become the savior of Videoland as Captain N: The Video Game Master. Kevin cares greatfully for Lana and his dog Duke. As Captain N, he has a weapon called a Zapper which shoots laser-like beams to dedigitize his enemies. He also wears a power pad, a wonderful item that allows him to jump higher, run extremely fast, and stop time around him for a limited duration. Duke the Dog: Duke is Kevin's pet dog whose weapons are his bark and his bite. Duke will do anything to protect Kevin but is actually a slightly coward. He loves to chase cats. Princess Lana: Princess Lana took over as ruler of Videoland after her father King Charles disappeared. She wishes for peace more than anything else and is too trusting of others, even Mother Brain, if there is a chance of peace. This leads to many problems. Kid Icarus: Kid Icarus AKA Pit is the winged archer from Mount Icarus. Even though he's small and weak, he has a variety of arrows from which to choose for his attacks. He has speech impendiment when he puts the suffix "-icus" after a few words. Mega Man: Mega Man was created by Dr. Light. He is extremely strong due to a mighty arm cannon and is very strong. Like Kid Icarus, he also has a speech impendiment by putting mega in front of a few words. Simon Belmont: Vampire hunter Simon Belmont is extremely vain. He keeps a mirror in his backpack to constantly look at himself. He hats getting his hair mussed up. Despite this, he's very strong. Gameboy: Gameboy was sent to Videoland by King Charles at the start of season 2 from the Mirror World. He is young and naive and uses his display to create weapons. The Bad Guys Mother Brain: Mother Brain is a brain in a bottle and the villain from Metroid. She banished King Charles to Mirror Warp and tries many attempts to overthrow Princess Lana. Eggplant Wizard: Eggplant Wizard is the villain from Mount Icarus. He and King Hippo tend to bungle up tasks that Mother Brain send him on. King Hippo: Like his partner Eggplant Wizard, King Hippo also bungles things up with Eggplant Wizard. He's from Punchland. Dr. Wily: Dr. Wily is Dr. Light's archnemesis who builds Robot Master and other devices for Mother Brain. He also wheezes constantly in his speeches. Alucard: Son of Count Dracula. He's not much like his father. He skateboards and is pretty much a punk. Donkey Kong: Donkey Kong is the giant ape of Kongoland. Although he's not truly evil, he must be appeased with food or else he'll wreak havoc upon the people of Kongoland. Gannon: Gannon is the master of evil on Hyrule. Before he is given the Potion of Power, he looks quite weak until he's returned to his big, powerfulm hoggish mage as he drinks it. He doesn't like to work with others and refuses to obey Mother Brain since he likes to work solo.moreless
  • 113
    Seaquest DSV / 2032

    Seaquest DSV / 2032

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    NBC (ended 1996)
    A guide for this show already exists. This one is to be deleted.
  • 114
    The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd

    The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Molly Dodd is a 30-something, creative woman who makes interesting career choices and struggles with complex relationships with men and with her family. Molly's best friend, Nina Shapiro, also makes appearances here and there. Each episode begins with someone close to Molly commenting on some facet of her personality or her life. Elements of magical realism run throughout the series, for instance, when Molly communicates with the ghost of a relative (to tell who would be a spoiler). Molly has trouble saying "no" to people, like her mysterious cousin Mike from Baltimore who moves in with her and stays longer than he's welcome. Molly eventually seeks therapy but is turned away by her therapist when she falls in love with Molly. Some of the most notable men in Molly's life are her father; her ex-husband Fred, a sax player who keeps returning to toy with her emotions; Davey, the elevator man in her apartment building; Moss Goodman, the owner of a bookstore, who is seriously socially handicapped but charming as all get out (on right in the photo); and Nate Hawthorne, a literate cop with severe allergies (on left in the photo). The show's creator, Jay Tarses, makes occasional appearances as Molly's garbage man, Nick. After the second season, the show moved from NBC to Lifetime.moreless
  • 115
    Blossom

    Blossom

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    NBC (ended 1995)
    Young Blossom must navigate teenage life in a house full of men after her mother abandons the family to pursue a singing career in Paris. With the guidance of her loving father, two older brothers (recovering substance abuser Anthony and goofball Joey) and her enthusiastic best friend Six, Blossom deals with the ups and downs of adolescent life intelligently, all while having as much fun as possible. Theme Song: "My Opinionation" written Mike Post and Steve Geyer, performed by Dr. John.moreless
  • 116
    Minor Adjustments

    Minor Adjustments

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    NBC (ended 1996)
    Multi-Emmy award winners Paul Junger Witt, Tony Thomas ("The Golden Girls," "Empty Nest," "The John Larroquette Show") and Ken Estin ("Cheers," "Taxi") are the executive producers of this comedy series starring stand-up comic Rondell Sheridan as a child psychologist who, being a child at heart, has a special gift for talking with children. Successful therapist Dr. Ron Aimes is discovering that being a good husband and father is a lot harder than being a good psychologist. His wife, Rachel (Wendy Raquel Robinson) is the voice of reason and 'straight man' to her husband when it comes to keeping the Aimes family together as she also keeps a close eye on her precocious four-year-old daughter Emma (Camille Winbush) and clever ten-year old Trevor (Bobby E. McAdams II). Keeping life interesting at the office for Dr. Aimes are medical partners Dr. Bruce Hampton (Mitchell Whitfield), seemingly more concerned with his dating life than his dental patients, the edgy and angry Dr. Francine Bailey (Linda Kash), a pediatrican who is recently divorced and fully enjoying her bitter outlook on life, and challenging everyone's patience as the spacey medical group receptionist is Darby Gladstone (Sara Rue), Dr. Hampton's niece. "Minor Adjustments" is a Witt/Thomas Production in association with Warner Bros. Television. Executive producers are Paul Junger Witt, Tony Thomas ("The Golden Girls," "Empty Nest," "The John Larroquette Show") and Ken Estin ("Cheers," "Taxi"). (UPN Press Release)moreless
  • 117
    Midnight Caller

    Midnight Caller

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Jack Killian was a San Francisco cop involved in a friendly fire incident. He left the force and ended up the host of a radio talk show, airing Midnight to 3 every night. Each week he involves himself in the lives and problems of his listeners and his friends. Devon Miles is the owner of the station and Jack’s boss. Billy Po works behind the scenes assisting Jack with the broadcast. Carl Zymak is his former boss (a lieutenant with the SFPD) and close friend assists Jack in helping his listeners. Jack closed all of his shows with, “This is Jack Killian, The Nighthawk on KJCM, 98.3, Good Night America, wherever you are….”moreless
  • 118
    Reasonable Doubts

    Reasonable Doubts

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    NBC (ended 1993)
    Mark Harmon stars as Dicky Cobb, a tough, street-smart cop, and Academy Award winner Marlee Matlin portrays Tess Kaufman, an altruistic, by-the-book deputy district attorney, who, although deaf, has a gift for hearing the truth.moreless
  • 119
    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    These people, dressed as they are, come from all over the United States to make deals here at the Marketplace of America, Let's Make A Deal® One of TV's all time greatest and most successful shows, Let's Make a Deal was a game of intuition, skill, luck, decision-making and greed...all mixed into one. It was fun and would have been a success even if the show had stuck with the formal dresses and suits that the game started with on December 30, 1963. That's right, contestants wore dresses and suits in the very early months of LMaD {December 30, 1963-July 31, 1964}. A few months after the show's premiere on February 3, 1964 someone came with a sign to attract host Monty Hall's attention and low and behold, he chose her (or him)! Sometime later on August 3-7, 1964, someone wore a crazy costume and the entire studio changed from a formal, quiet, dignified setting to a free-for-all. The show came alive and became the legendary success it would be known for. Each day, a gallery of 31 contestants (each wearing some loony costume, either their own creation or suggested by the show's producers) vied for Monty's attention. One, two or perhaps three at a time, Monty would choose contestants to make a deal with him. Many of the deals would involve either: * An unstated amount of cash in Monty's hand or an unknown prize behind the curtain. * Keys which unlocked anything from boxes to cars. Usually, the trader had to select from at least three keys. Monty always offered cash or the curtain/box as options. The number of working keys depended on the deal; more than once, every key worked (in the deals involving multiple contestants). Variant: Just three keys shown (only one of which works) and a couple playing for a car chooses the one they think works; Monty always shows one that doesn't work and then offers a substitute prize option. * Deciding if leather wallets contained thousands of dollars in cash or car keys or perhaps only a small amount or nothing at all (except for play money or worthless keys). Before the reveal, the contestant could choose the curtain or box. * Deciding whether an announced prize was real or fake and choosing a cash amount or the box/curtain as a substitute. * Choosing an envelope, purse, wallet, etc., which concealed dollar bills. The contestant could take the cash or trade for the curtain/box, but always risked giving up an announced dollar bill (usually $1 or $5) which awarded a grand prize (usually a car or trip); often, the "consolation" prize was $500, $1000 or $1500. * Choosing four of seven envelopes, each containing $1 and $2 bills, whose contents they hoped added up to at least $7 for a grand prize. * Monty's Cash Register, wherein a couple had to punch keys on a 15-key register. Exactly 13 of the buttons hid amounts of either $50 or $100, and getting to a stated amount (usually $500-$1000) won a grand prize. The couple could stop at any time and keep what they have (always then being tempted with a follow-up keep-or-trade deal) but hitting "no sale" at any time ended the game; if the unlucky button were struck on the first try, hitting the second "no sale" button the very next time also won the grand prize. Otherwise, Monty allowed the couple to take home whatever dollar amount they hit with the next key punch. * Three unrelated traders acted as a team on deals. Sometimes, only one was allowed to speak for the team without consultation of the others; other times, a "majority rules" format was used. Usually after a series of deals, the team was broken up and could individually decide on one or more options on a final deal. * At the start of the show, a contestant given a large grocery item (e.g., a box of candy bars), always containing a cash amount. Throughout the show, he/she is given several chances to trade the box and/or give it to another trader, in exchange for the box or curtain. Only after the Big Deal of the Day was awarded (or if the last trader with said item elects to go for the Big Deal) was the cash amount given. Variant: A "claim check" given to a trader at the start of the show for any prize shown during the regular deals and chances to trade throughout the episode. The prize ranged from cash and cars to zonks. Variant: The "claim check" was played as the very last regular deal with one sure deal offered in lieu of its contents. ...* And much more! Sometimes Monty would either sweeten the deal or allow the contestants to call off the deal for cash. Sometimes, the contestants did very well -- they could win rooms of furniture, appliances, TVs and stereos, cars, furs, trips, thousands of dollars in cash and MUCH MORE... Or they could be stuck with a ZONK! (those silly, nonsense prizes when they made the wrong decision). And yes, there were many zonks -- ranging from: * Live animals (usually from local zoos or farms). These included everything from pigs and cattle to skunks and lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)! * Rooms full of worthless junk. * Antique, broken-down cars (often rusted-out shells with overheated radiators). * Oversized mooseheads, deerheads and more. * Stuffed teddy bears. * Announcer Jay Stewart and model Carol Merrill dressed up as comedy characters. Often, they held such things as oversized paint rollers or were situated on things like jumbo kiddie cars and rocking horses. ... and much, much MORE!!! Not all the games involved luck or speculation. Some were skill games testing a contestant's knowledge of shopping and products (an early version of the 1970s The Price is Right, if you will). Some contestants had to determine which prize was a stated amount (or sometimes, choose two or more items which added up to a given amount), arrange items in order of value, remember which product was beneath the letter of a car, etc. Usually, Monty gave the contestants either a cash buyout or substitute prize either as the game progressed or just before the correct answer was revealed. Even if the contestant lost, he/she was given $50 or $100 as a consolation gift. Sometimes, two or more contestants or couples competed in a single deal to guess the prices of items with the closest guessers getting increasing amounts of cash (usually but not always, $100, $200, $300 and $400); if the trader won $700, they won a car. Even the loser got to spend any accumulated winnings on a curtain or box with more cash options thrown in as well. When about 7-8 minutes were left, Monty would call on the top winners from the show and ask them if they wanted to trade what they already won for a shot at the Big Deal of the Day � usually worth $2000-$5000 on the daytime show and from $7500 to $15,000 or more on the nighttime and syndicated versions). Once two contestants were selected, they would - with the top winner going first - select a curtain. There were no zonks at this stage, but the contestants risked going home with much less than they won (ergo, trading in a new $2000 kitchen for a color console TV worth $500 or a couple hundred dollars in cash). More than once, contestants traded cars for a chance at the Big Deal, and while they were usually lucky, there was at least one occassion where someone traded their car for less than $100 in prizes! Many times, the Big Deal of the Day was a fantastic prize -- such as a motorhome, a cabin cruiser, a four-seat airplane, a mink sable, a modular home, a Cadillac Eldorado convertible and a 60-day trip around the world...or in some cases, $10,000 or more in cash were among the many examples. The show debuted on NBC on December 30, 1963-January 3, 1964 and switched to ABC on December 30 1968-January 3, 1969. NBC (and later on ABC) later premiered a weekly prime-time version of the show (NBC's appeared in 1967; ABC's in February 1969) which was a major hit with viewers. A twice-weekly syndicated LMaD surfaced in 1971, and was (yup) a big hit. During the 1975-76 season, the Big Deal winner could risk his/her top prize for a shot at the Super Deal, where behind one of three doors was hidden a $20,000 grand prize; selecting the $20,000 window allowed the contestant to keep the Big Deal, though the Big Deal was forfeited if they chose incorrectly (they received a $1000 or $2000 consolation prize; later, $2000 and another unknown consolation amount between $3000 and $8000). LET'S MAKE A DEAL finished and goes out of business on July 9, 1976. During its final original-run season in syndication (1976-1977), the show was taped in Las Vegas, with the final shows taped in December 1976. The Super Deal feature was scrapped, and the last show was said to have featured no zonks. An unsuccessful five-day-a-week revival surfaced in syndication in 1980-1981, but would be a modest success when Monty tried again in five-a-week syndication in 1984-1986. While cheap prizes were the norm very early in the 1984-1986 run (the most expensive cars were often Chevrolet Sprints and Pontiac 1000s(!)), the show held its own and eventually gave away decent cars -- including a fully equipped $13,000 Chevrolet Camaro and a $15,000 Madza RX7. The most notable change was with a new feature, Door 4. Played twice a week or so, Door 4 was totally a surprise (announced only by sudden quick siren and at times, camera zoom fanfare). A People-Picker computer selected the contestant, and he/she would be presented a check worth $1000. He/she could keep the check or spin a carnival-type wheel for a chance at a new car, $100, $200, $2000, $3000, $4000...or perhaps a zonk (I was ZONKED by Money Hall T-shirt)! Regardless of what he/she decided, they were always asked to spin the wheel just to see what would've happened (when they decided to keep the check, the contestant usually would find out they passed up the car!). A short-lived NBC revival surfaced in 1990-1991, with Bob Hilton serving as host. He didn't last long and Monty was soon making deals; alas, even his return couldn't save the show. An embarassingly bad remake called Big Deal, surfaced in 1996, where contestants performed stunts as part of the game. The revival, which aired on FOX, didn't last long. Neither did a March 2003 hour-long remake of LMaD, with Billy Bush as host. The ratings started off decently and the show appeared promising. However, some critics pointed to questionable content (the opening deal in the premiere had women reaching underneath a stagehand's undergarments to retrieve part of their deal) as a prime reason the revival quickly soured; putting LMaD up against American Idol didn't help. In August 2001, Game Show Network (as of March 2004, simply GSN) began airing reruns of the 1970s LMaD, with the 1980-1981 and 1984-1986 runs part of the package. The show has been (and remains) a wonderful addition to GSN! NBC Broadcast History December 30, 1963-June 26, 1964, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:25pm June 29, 1964-September 29, 1967, Monday-Friday at 1:30-1:55pm May 21, 1967-September 3, 1967, Sunday at 8:30-9:00pm October 2, 1967-December 27, 1968, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm July 16, 1990-January 11, 1991, Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30am March 4-18, 2003, Tuesday at 8:00-9:00pm ABC Broadcast History December 30, 1968-July 9, 1976, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm February 7, 1969-May 9, 1969, Friday at 9:00-9:30pm May 16, 1969-January 9, 1970, Friday at 7:30-8:00pm January 24, 1970-January 2, 1971, Saturday at 7:30-8:00pm January 18, 1971-August 30, 1971, Monday at 7:30-8:00pm Syndicated History September 13, 1971-September 10, 1977 Various Times September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981 Various Times September 17, 1984-September 12, 1986 Various Times Depending on the TV Market of the area.moreless
  • 120
    The Cosby Mysteries

    The Cosby Mysteries

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    NBC (ended 1995)
    From the creator of Columbo and Murder, She Wrote comes The Cosby Mysteries. Starring three-time Emmy winner Bill Cosby, the series focused on Guy Hanks, a brilliant NYPD criminalist who retired from the force after hitting a big lottery jackpot. Instead of settling down and enjoying his free time, he found himself being called in as a consultant on tough-to-crack cases. He used his wits and his knack for forensics to nab the criminals. Though the series was canceled after just one season, it boasted an impressive pedigree. William Link and David Black were the co-creators and executive producers. Along with Cosby, the cast included Tony winners James Naughton and Rita Moreno, Lynn Whitfield and a young Mos Def. Originally airing on NBC in the 1994-95 season, The Cosby Mysteries has been re-run on A&E and TVOne.moreless
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  • 5:30 pm
    Thursday Night Football
    CBS