• 121
    Reasonable Doubts

    Reasonable Doubts

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    NBC (ended 1993)
    Mark Harmon stars as Dicky Cobb, a tough, street-smart cop, and Academy Award winner Marlee Matlin portrays Tess Kaufman, an altruistic, by-the-book deputy district attorney, who, although deaf, has a gift for hearing the truth.moreless
  • 122
    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    These people, dressed as they are, come from all over the United States to make deals here at the Marketplace of America, Let's Make A Deal® One of TV's all time greatest and most successful shows, Let's Make a Deal was a game of intuition, skill, luck, decision-making and greed...all mixed into one. It was fun and would have been a success even if the show had stuck with the formal dresses and suits that the game started with on December 30, 1963. That's right, contestants wore dresses and suits in the very early months of LMaD {December 30, 1963-July 31, 1964}. A few months after the show's premiere on February 3, 1964 someone came with a sign to attract host Monty Hall's attention and low and behold, he chose her (or him)! Sometime later on August 3-7, 1964, someone wore a crazy costume and the entire studio changed from a formal, quiet, dignified setting to a free-for-all. The show came alive and became the legendary success it would be known for. Each day, a gallery of 31 contestants (each wearing some loony costume, either their own creation or suggested by the show's producers) vied for Monty's attention. One, two or perhaps three at a time, Monty would choose contestants to make a deal with him. Many of the deals would involve either: * An unstated amount of cash in Monty's hand or an unknown prize behind the curtain. * Keys which unlocked anything from boxes to cars. Usually, the trader had to select from at least three keys. Monty always offered cash or the curtain/box as options. The number of working keys depended on the deal; more than once, every key worked (in the deals involving multiple contestants). Variant: Just three keys shown (only one of which works) and a couple playing for a car chooses the one they think works; Monty always shows one that doesn't work and then offers a substitute prize option. * Deciding if leather wallets contained thousands of dollars in cash or car keys or perhaps only a small amount or nothing at all (except for play money or worthless keys). Before the reveal, the contestant could choose the curtain or box. * Deciding whether an announced prize was real or fake and choosing a cash amount or the box/curtain as a substitute. * Choosing an envelope, purse, wallet, etc., which concealed dollar bills. The contestant could take the cash or trade for the curtain/box, but always risked giving up an announced dollar bill (usually $1 or $5) which awarded a grand prize (usually a car or trip); often, the "consolation" prize was $500, $1000 or $1500. * Choosing four of seven envelopes, each containing $1 and $2 bills, whose contents they hoped added up to at least $7 for a grand prize. * Monty's Cash Register, wherein a couple had to punch keys on a 15-key register. Exactly 13 of the buttons hid amounts of either $50 or $100, and getting to a stated amount (usually $500-$1000) won a grand prize. The couple could stop at any time and keep what they have (always then being tempted with a follow-up keep-or-trade deal) but hitting "no sale" at any time ended the game; if the unlucky button were struck on the first try, hitting the second "no sale" button the very next time also won the grand prize. Otherwise, Monty allowed the couple to take home whatever dollar amount they hit with the next key punch. * Three unrelated traders acted as a team on deals. Sometimes, only one was allowed to speak for the team without consultation of the others; other times, a "majority rules" format was used. Usually after a series of deals, the team was broken up and could individually decide on one or more options on a final deal. * At the start of the show, a contestant given a large grocery item (e.g., a box of candy bars), always containing a cash amount. Throughout the show, he/she is given several chances to trade the box and/or give it to another trader, in exchange for the box or curtain. Only after the Big Deal of the Day was awarded (or if the last trader with said item elects to go for the Big Deal) was the cash amount given. Variant: A "claim check" given to a trader at the start of the show for any prize shown during the regular deals and chances to trade throughout the episode. The prize ranged from cash and cars to zonks. Variant: The "claim check" was played as the very last regular deal with one sure deal offered in lieu of its contents. ...* And much more! Sometimes Monty would either sweeten the deal or allow the contestants to call off the deal for cash. Sometimes, the contestants did very well -- they could win rooms of furniture, appliances, TVs and stereos, cars, furs, trips, thousands of dollars in cash and MUCH MORE... Or they could be stuck with a ZONK! (those silly, nonsense prizes when they made the wrong decision). And yes, there were many zonks -- ranging from: * Live animals (usually from local zoos or farms). These included everything from pigs and cattle to skunks and lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)! * Rooms full of worthless junk. * Antique, broken-down cars (often rusted-out shells with overheated radiators). * Oversized mooseheads, deerheads and more. * Stuffed teddy bears. * Announcer Jay Stewart and model Carol Merrill dressed up as comedy characters. Often, they held such things as oversized paint rollers or were situated on things like jumbo kiddie cars and rocking horses. ... and much, much MORE!!! Not all the games involved luck or speculation. Some were skill games testing a contestant's knowledge of shopping and products (an early version of the 1970s The Price is Right, if you will). Some contestants had to determine which prize was a stated amount (or sometimes, choose two or more items which added up to a given amount), arrange items in order of value, remember which product was beneath the letter of a car, etc. Usually, Monty gave the contestants either a cash buyout or substitute prize either as the game progressed or just before the correct answer was revealed. Even if the contestant lost, he/she was given $50 or $100 as a consolation gift. Sometimes, two or more contestants or couples competed in a single deal to guess the prices of items with the closest guessers getting increasing amounts of cash (usually but not always, $100, $200, $300 and $400); if the trader won $700, they won a car. Even the loser got to spend any accumulated winnings on a curtain or box with more cash options thrown in as well. When about 7-8 minutes were left, Monty would call on the top winners from the show and ask them if they wanted to trade what they already won for a shot at the Big Deal of the Day � usually worth $2000-$5000 on the daytime show and from $7500 to $15,000 or more on the nighttime and syndicated versions). Once two contestants were selected, they would - with the top winner going first - select a curtain. There were no zonks at this stage, but the contestants risked going home with much less than they won (ergo, trading in a new $2000 kitchen for a color console TV worth $500 or a couple hundred dollars in cash). More than once, contestants traded cars for a chance at the Big Deal, and while they were usually lucky, there was at least one occassion where someone traded their car for less than $100 in prizes! Many times, the Big Deal of the Day was a fantastic prize -- such as a motorhome, a cabin cruiser, a four-seat airplane, a mink sable, a modular home, a Cadillac Eldorado convertible and a 60-day trip around the world...or in some cases, $10,000 or more in cash were among the many examples. The show debuted on NBC on December 30, 1963-January 3, 1964 and switched to ABC on December 30 1968-January 3, 1969. NBC (and later on ABC) later premiered a weekly prime-time version of the show (NBC's appeared in 1967; ABC's in February 1969) which was a major hit with viewers. A twice-weekly syndicated LMaD surfaced in 1971, and was (yup) a big hit. During the 1975-76 season, the Big Deal winner could risk his/her top prize for a shot at the Super Deal, where behind one of three doors was hidden a $20,000 grand prize; selecting the $20,000 window allowed the contestant to keep the Big Deal, though the Big Deal was forfeited if they chose incorrectly (they received a $1000 or $2000 consolation prize; later, $2000 and another unknown consolation amount between $3000 and $8000). LET'S MAKE A DEAL finished and goes out of business on July 9, 1976. During its final original-run season in syndication (1976-1977), the show was taped in Las Vegas, with the final shows taped in December 1976. The Super Deal feature was scrapped, and the last show was said to have featured no zonks. An unsuccessful five-day-a-week revival surfaced in syndication in 1980-1981, but would be a modest success when Monty tried again in five-a-week syndication in 1984-1986. While cheap prizes were the norm very early in the 1984-1986 run (the most expensive cars were often Chevrolet Sprints and Pontiac 1000s(!)), the show held its own and eventually gave away decent cars -- including a fully equipped $13,000 Chevrolet Camaro and a $15,000 Madza RX7. The most notable change was with a new feature, Door 4. Played twice a week or so, Door 4 was totally a surprise (announced only by sudden quick siren and at times, camera zoom fanfare). A People-Picker computer selected the contestant, and he/she would be presented a check worth $1000. He/she could keep the check or spin a carnival-type wheel for a chance at a new car, $100, $200, $2000, $3000, $4000...or perhaps a zonk (I was ZONKED by Money Hall T-shirt)! Regardless of what he/she decided, they were always asked to spin the wheel just to see what would've happened (when they decided to keep the check, the contestant usually would find out they passed up the car!). A short-lived NBC revival surfaced in 1990-1991, with Bob Hilton serving as host. He didn't last long and Monty was soon making deals; alas, even his return couldn't save the show. An embarassingly bad remake called Big Deal, surfaced in 1996, where contestants performed stunts as part of the game. The revival, which aired on FOX, didn't last long. Neither did a March 2003 hour-long remake of LMaD, with Billy Bush as host. The ratings started off decently and the show appeared promising. However, some critics pointed to questionable content (the opening deal in the premiere had women reaching underneath a stagehand's undergarments to retrieve part of their deal) as a prime reason the revival quickly soured; putting LMaD up against American Idol didn't help. In August 2001, Game Show Network (as of March 2004, simply GSN) began airing reruns of the 1970s LMaD, with the 1980-1981 and 1984-1986 runs part of the package. The show has been (and remains) a wonderful addition to GSN! NBC Broadcast History December 30, 1963-June 26, 1964, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:25pm June 29, 1964-September 29, 1967, Monday-Friday at 1:30-1:55pm May 21, 1967-September 3, 1967, Sunday at 8:30-9:00pm October 2, 1967-December 27, 1968, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm July 16, 1990-January 11, 1991, Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30am March 4-18, 2003, Tuesday at 8:00-9:00pm ABC Broadcast History December 30, 1968-July 9, 1976, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm February 7, 1969-May 9, 1969, Friday at 9:00-9:30pm May 16, 1969-January 9, 1970, Friday at 7:30-8:00pm January 24, 1970-January 2, 1971, Saturday at 7:30-8:00pm January 18, 1971-August 30, 1971, Monday at 7:30-8:00pm Syndicated History September 13, 1971-September 10, 1977 Various Times September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981 Various Times September 17, 1984-September 12, 1986 Various Times Depending on the TV Market of the area.moreless
  • 123
    The Cosby Mysteries

    The Cosby Mysteries

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    NBC (ended 1995)
    From the creator of Columbo and Murder, She Wrote comes The Cosby Mysteries. Starring three-time Emmy winner Bill Cosby, the series focused on Guy Hanks, a brilliant NYPD criminalist who retired from the force after hitting a big lottery jackpot. Instead of settling down and enjoying his free time, he found himself being called in as a consultant on tough-to-crack cases. He used his wits and his knack for forensics to nab the criminals. Though the series was canceled after just one season, it boasted an impressive pedigree. William Link and David Black were the co-creators and executive producers. Along with Cosby, the cast included Tony winners James Naughton and Rita Moreno, Lynn Whitfield and a young Mos Def. Originally airing on NBC in the 1994-95 season, The Cosby Mysteries has been re-run on A&E and TVOne.moreless
  • 124
    Roland Garros

    Roland Garros

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    NBC
    With over 80 years of history, Roland Garros has become the most famous and acclaimed tennis tournament to be played on clay in the world. Played and televised in mid-May until early June this French tournament is one of the premier events on the tennis calendar. The second Grand Slam of the annual tennis season and the first Grand Slam tournament to join the Open era in 1968, it keeps attracting the elite of the tennis world to its orange courts in Paris every year.moreless
  • 125
    Working (1997)

    Working (1997)

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    NBC (ended 1999)
    At the start of the first season: Matt Peyser (Fred Savage of The Wonder Years) is a young, idealistic college graduate who is about to embark on his first job. He goes to work for Upton-Webber and believes that his hard work and ideas will make a difference. He has to contend with his boss Tim (Maurice Godin) , who doesn't seem to have any real business sense at all; Hal (Sarah Knowlton), a Yale grad who is underutilized within the company; Abby (Arden Myrin), who just wants to please everyone; and Evelyn (Yvette Freeman), the operarions manager who doesn't have time for idle chit-chat. He has to learn to get through his daily job routine and make some sense of it all.moreless
  • 126
    One World

    One World

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    NBC (ended 2001)
    Created by Peter Engel ('Saved By The Bell', 'California Dreams', 'Hang Time', 'City Guys', 'All About Us', 'Malibu Ca' and 'USA High') 'One World' follows the everyday issues of a large suburban family. The family is made up of three boys and three girls, who were adopted by two loving parents who couldn't have their own children. The show was cancelled in 2001, after the mother had a baby of her own.moreless
  • 127
    Malibu Shores

    Malibu Shores

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    NBC (ended 1996)
    Malibu Shores was a short lived NBC series starring Keri Russell and Tony Lucca, both stars of the popular Disney show, "The All New Mickey Mouse Club." Even with a run of only ten episodes, the show dealt with many serious teen issues, and was loved by many fans. The show also served as a starting point for many current popular actors and actresses, like Keri Russell ("Felicity"), Charisma Carpenter ("Buffy the Vampire Slayer", "Angel"), Randy Spelling ("Sunset Beach"), Susan Ward ("Sunset Beach"), Greg Vaughan ("Charmed", "General Hospital"), Michelle Phillips ("Dawson's Creek"), Essence Atkins ("Half & Half") and others. This series also featured Christian Campbell (Neve's broher) and a former "Power Ranger", Walter Jones.moreless
  • 128
    The John Larroquette Show

    The John Larroquette Show

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    NBC (ended 1996)
    A fascinating case study in how to destroy a successful situation comedy. In its first season The John Larroquette Show was a daring dark comedy and a hit. Set in a St. Louis long distance bus terminal, with a recovering alcoholic protagonist adrift in a sea of losers, hookers, and street people, black and white, gay and straight, this was unlike anything seen in a sitcom since Hot'l Baltimore a generation before, a comedy that addressed issues on the dark side of the American dream: race, class, gender, abuse of authority, substance addiction, etc. In the second and third season NBC carefully removed each and every element that had made the show interesting, making nonsense of a premise and bland stereotypes of its hard-edged/bizarre characters, then cancelled the show abruptly once everyone had deserted its ridiculously bland fourth season; a great shame. In Germany the show is titled Nachtschicht mit John ("Night Shift with John")moreless
  • 129
    Golden Globe Awards

    Golden Globe Awards

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    NBC
    Near the end of each year, the Hollywood Foreign Press Association gathers to recognize outstanding achievement in film and television. Nominees are announced in December, and the awards ceremony is held and televised in mid-January. It's one of television's most intimate, spontaneous, and fun events. The profits made from the Golden Globe Awards are donated to entertainment - related charities by the HFPA. The organization offers scholarships to budding entertainers and supports educational institutions educating people on film and television.moreless
  • 130
    Mr. Rhodes

    Mr. Rhodes

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    MR. RHODES was a short-lived sitcom starring Tom Rhodes who plays an acclaimed but unsuccessful writer (with the same name) who decides to return to his old private school to teach English. There, Tom will meet Nikki (Farrah Forke), a girl from his past, who is now working as a guidance counselor. As days go by, Tom will become a much beloved professor, and sometimes a major punch-line.

    Sadly, the show was cancelled after only one season, and 2 episodes remain unaired.moreless
  • 131
    Nightmare Cafe

    Nightmare Cafe

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    A mysterious and mystical all-night cafe gives second chances to deserving people. It's staffed by Fay and Frank, two people who made bad choices in life and whose paths crossed with the cafe in the first episode. There's also Blackie, another enigmatic figure who has been working with the cafe longer. Together, the three use the powers over time and space that the cafe grants them to help the worthy and punish the evil, just as they themselves have been helped. First seen on a darkened dock, the cafe would eventually begin transporting itself to different locations wherever it was needed. This 1993 effort by noted horror director Wes Craven was short-lived, canceled after only six episodes. It was Robert Englund's first role after he finished his run as Freddie Krueger in the Nightmare on Elm Street series of motion pictures (although he would revisit that role one last time a decade later).moreless
  • 132
    The Powers That Be

    The Powers That Be

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    NBC (ended 1993)
    Situation Comedy 21 episodes This series, created by David Crane and Marta Kauffman, revolves around the life of Democratic Senator William Powers (John Forsythe, who starred in Dynasty), an ally of Bill Clinton. Senator Powers is a good guy, but, even after twenty-six years in Washington, D.C., lacks the political smarts to survive in national politics. Fortunately, Senator Powers is backed up by his family and staff, who, mostly, do have the political qualities necessary for political life in Washington, D.C. Family: Senator Powers's wife, Margaret (Holland Taylor, Evelyn Harper on Two and a Half Men), sees herself as the woman behind the man, and believes that her top priority is to maintain her status in Washington. Margaret and William Power's ditzy daughter Caitlyn Van Horne (Valerie Mahaffey; Eve on Northern Exposure) is married to US Representative Theodore Van Horne (David Hyde Pierce, Dr. Niles Crane on Frasier). Theodore registers a rather low almost zero on the political and marital power scale, and is constantly looking for a way out of his life, but is a little too submissive to follow through on exiting. Theodore and Caitlyn's son is Pierce (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Tommy Solomon on 3rd Rock From the Sun). Pierce might rather run and play with kids his own age, but must always be ready to reflect well on the family (he is always dressed smartly for anyone that wants to take a photograph). Rounding out the family is Sophie Lipkin (Robin Bartlett, Debbie Buchman on Mad About You), the Senator's illegitimate daughter, the product of a wartime romance. Sophie appears to exhibit a stable personality. Staff: Margaret must fight with Jordan Miller (Eve Gordon) for Senator Powers affections. Miller is Senator Powers Administrative Assistant, and mistress. Further assisting the senator is Press Secretary Bradley Grist (Peter MacNicol, Alan Birch on Chicago Hope, John Cage on Ally McBeal, and who is currently in a 2005 CBS midseason show Numbers), who sees himself as a man of power and influence, but in reality, might be less powerful and competent than he thinks. Rounding out the staff is the overworked, underappreciated maid, Charlotte (Elizabeth Berridge, Officer Eggers on The John Larroquette Show). After Clinton's presidential victory, The Powers That Be was abruptly canceled. The two events might not in fact be connected, and might just be coincidence. Creators other Creations David Crane & Marta Kauffman (creators of The Powers that Be) together also created Dream On (1990, Wendie Malick), Family Album (1993, Giovanni Ribisi), Friends (1994), and Veronica's Closet (1997, Kirstie Alley). Executive Producers Other Shows Executive Producer Norman Lear created The Deputy (1959), All in the Family (1971),Sanford and Son (1972), Maude (1972), The Dumplings (1976), All That Glitters (1977), Fernwood 2Night (1977), Apple Pie (1978), and Sunday Dinner (1991). Lear also executive produced All in the Family, Maude, Good Times (1974), One Day at a Time (1975), Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman (1976), The Nancy Walker Show(1976), A Year at the Top (1977), Forever Fernwood (1977), Hanging In (1979), AKA Pablo (1984), Sunday Dinner, 704 Hauser (1994), and Channel Umptee3 (1997). Lear is credited for developing Good Times, The Jeffersons (1975), Hot L Baltimore (1975), One Day at a Time, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, and In the Beginning (1978). Executive Producer Rod Parker is credited for being executive producer for Maude, All's Fair (1976), The Nancy Walker Show, Phyl & Mikhy (1980), Love, Sidney (1981), Gimme a Break! (1981), Dear John (1988) and Empty Nest (1988). Awards Joseph Gordon-Levitt was nominated for the Young Artist Award for the category Best Young Actor in a New Television Series in 1993 (in the same year, Toby Maguire was also nominated for this award (for the show: Great Scott!); Christopher Babers won this category for his work in Rhythm & Blues). Aired March-April . . .1992 ................Saturday 08:30 pm-09:00 pm August-September.1992 ................Saturday 08:30 pm-09:00 pm November.........1992 to January 1993 Saturday 08:30 pm-09:00 pm June.............................1993 Saturday 10:30 pm-11:00 pm Competition March-April 1992 Saturday 08:30 pm-09:00 pm ABC: Growing Pains CBS: CBS Saturday Night Movie FOX: Cops August-September 1992 Saturday 08:30 pm-09:00 pm ABC: Covington Cross CBS: Brooklyn Bridge FOX: Copsmoreless
  • 133
    Camp Candy

    Camp Candy

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Camp Candy is a summer camp for kids run by John Candy, head counselor, cook, and handyman. The kids participated in all sorts of summer activities, from boating to fishing, and usually something they did reminded John of an experience or story, which John would proceed to relate. There is scheming Rex de Forest, who wanted to shut down Camp Candy so he could clear the forest and build condos and the rivalry between Camp Knuckles and Camp Candy. Live-action segments were added in 1990, in which John spoke about nature and ecology. A few years ago Camp Candy aired on Fox Family as part of the cartoon block. Later when Fox Family was bought by Abc it was dropped along with many other shows on Fox Family. The channel Fox Family was once on is currently ABC Family.moreless
  • 134
    John & Leeza from Hollywood

    John & Leeza from Hollywood

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    NBC (ended 1994)
    John & Leeza from Hollywood is a daily entertainment talk show hosted by John Tesh and Leeza Gibbons. Both had formerly worked on Entertainment Tonight and NBC made an attempt for an early version on their network. The last new program would be on December 17th, 1993 with reruns airing until January 14th, 1994. The show was retitled to Leeza! and ran until 1999.moreless
  • 135
    Encore! Encore!

    Encore! Encore!

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    NBC (ended 1999)
    Joe Pinoni (Tony winner Nathan Lane) is a world-famous opera singer, but because of an accident while pumping his stomach in Italy, he will never be able to sing again. Having squandered all of his money and lost all of his friends, Joe returns home to his mother, sister and nephew, who run a vineyard. The show only lasted 13 episodes but only 11 when to air. The ratings were never great.moreless
  • 136
    Mann & Machine

    Mann & Machine

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    A sci-fi/police adventure "Mann & Machine" featured a tough street cop partnered with an android who has all the knowledge but none of the experience. Although canceled after four weeks, the nine existing episodes are highlighted as Yancy Butler\'s first starring role, as well as numerous actors who reappeared in later Dick Wolf productions.moreless
  • 137
    Final Appeal: From the Files of Unsolved Mysteries

    Final Appeal: From the Files of Unsolved Mysteries

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    In this spin-off of the popular Unsolved Mysteries, Robert Stack presents an investigation of criminal trials from the perspective of both the prosecution and defense. The evidence in the case is examined as is the fairness of the trial to determine if the convicted deserve a final appeal.moreless
  • 138
    TV Nation

    TV Nation

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    NBC (ended 1995)
    Producer Michael Moore presented this newsmagazine as a humorous presentation that reports on things that big corporate media tends to avoid. These topics include a running feature on crimes by business corporations, positive reports on labour union activity, debunking right-wing political claims, and the general exploitation of the little person by the privileged and powerful in society.moreless
  • 139
    Players (1997)

    Players (1997)

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    NBC (ended 1998)
    Three con men are released on parole and recruited by the government to use their skills to take down other criminals. Charlie O'Bannon is a computer hacker, Isaac (Ice) Gregory is a street hustler, and Alphonse Royo is a conman and smooth talker. Under the supervision of FBI agent Christine Kowalski they take on a major criminal with some kind of elaborate scheme. Players ran on NBC at 9:00 PM from 1997 to 1998, but was cancelled due to low ratings, which were due in part to frequent pre-emptions and the occasional timeslot jump. The network gave the timeslot back to the affiliates toward the end of the run, so many areas did not air the final episodes. Since the end of Players, each cast member has shown up in numerous film or television appearances. Creator Dick Wolf later cast Ice-T in Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as Detective Fin Tutuola, and prior to that, co-starred with Costas Mandylor in Exiled, the Law & Order movie that focused on former castmember Chris Noth's character Mike Logan.moreless
  • 140
    Scrabble

    Scrabble

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    NBC (ended 1993)
    A six-letter word; it's where you go to read all about your favorite TV shows, including Scrabble. The age-old crossword game that everybody loved to play, but never quite like this, came to television in 1984 for a moderately successful six-year run. Here, contestants used punny and double-entendre clues to fill in words on a gameboard resembling the famous Scrabble game. The format for Scrabble (the TV series) was tweaked several times, but one format lasted longer than others, described below: Crossword Round Two Crossword Rounds were played per show, with two contestants competing at a time. The first game had the returning champion played a challenger, while two new contestants played in the second game. In each Crossword Round, a letter "to build on" is placed in the center "starred" space to begin the game, and host Woolery reads a clue, with the number of letters (five to nine) in the word. Example: A nine-letter word - Drunks hate to see pink ones; bargain shoppers hate white ones. Answer: ELEPHANTS.) A pool of tiles, each representing all the letters in the puzzle plus three stoppers (letters NOT in the puzzle) are placed in the rack between the players. The player chosen to go first draws two tiles from the rack and places them in an electronic reader. The player chooses one and, if the letter was in the word, it was placed in the proper spot (following effects denoting its "search" for the correct position). The player could guess the word or place the other tile in the reader; if he/she still could not guess, then they were allowed to draw two more tiles and play continued. That is, unless he/she chose one of the stoppers, which then passed control to the opponent. If all three stoppers are revealed before the word is guessed, a Speedword format is used, where each of the blanks (save for the last one) are filled in at the rate of one every half-second. The Speedword was also played if time was running short. At least one of the tiles in each word were colored (blue or pink), which provided bonuses for providing a correct answer immediately after filling it in. Those bonuses were $500 for the blue space and $1,000 for a pink space. A player also won the bonuses if he/she buzzed in and guessed immediately after the colored space was filled. After each word is guessed (or sometimes not, if neither player could provide a guess after all but one of the letters were shown), a new word was played, building off a letter in the previous word. The first player to correctly guess three words won $500 and advanced to the Scrabble Sprint Round. Scrabble Sprint Round Here, the winner of the first Crossword Round met the returning champion (or second-round winner, if the champion was defeated). The challenger is timed to the tenth of a second for how long it takes him to guess four words (again, five to nine letters, with shorter ones offered first) correctly. There were no stoppers in these words, and a player could choose from two possible letters in the word. All except the last letter were filled in, and a player offered a guess by hitting the plunger in front of him/her. Penalties were assessed for incorrect guesses (10 seconds) or failing to guess (5 seconds). The champion must then beat the challenger's time, playing the same four words. For either contestant, alternate words were played if they failed to guess or were incorrect. The winner earned $1,000 and advances to the Bonus Sprint Round. Bonus Sprint Round The Bonus Sprint Round was played exactly like the Scrabble Sprint Round, except the player had a fixed 10-second limit to guess two words (one six letters, the other seven). Guessing both words correctly won a jackpot that began at $5,000 and increased by $1,000 for each day it went unclaimed. The champion returns to the next show to face a new challenger. Several other formats were utilized during the run, briefly described thusly: * In the Crossword Round, two new players played. Regular tiles for each word were worth $25, blue ones $50 and pink ones $100, with the money added to a "pot." The winner of three words wins the value of the pot and advanced to the Scrabble Sprint Round to face the returning champion. Each Scrabble Sprint Round win was worth $1,500, with five wins amending his/her winnings to $20,000. A 10th win ammended the winnings to $40,000 and retired the player undefeated. * Later, before the longest-lived format was used, the "pot" was scrapped, and players won $500 and $1,000 bonuses for placing letters on blue and pink tiles. A flat $500 was paid to the Crossword Round winner. Scrabble was known for its highly imaginative clues and its extensive use of sound effects (14, according to several sources). That may have helped draw in viewers, but not so much as the fast-paced gameplay. Scrabble fared fairly well against The Price is Right, but eventually, the show surrendered in the ratings. In 1993, Scrabble returned once again, not in encore reruns (as was the case for Classic Concentration) but in a new, cheaper format. The game rules were the same, but smaller cash awards (a $1,000 base jackpot for Scrabble Sprint Round winners, plus extra money added for guessing words on pink and blue squares) turned off many viewers. It didn't help that demographics had changed and many NBC affiliates chose not to air Scrabble, instead opting for syndicated fare such as The Jerry Springer Show. After Scrabble's successor, Caesar's Challenge was cancelled in January 1994 due to failed ratings, NBC was out of the daytime game show business entirely. Scrabble is a registered trademark now licensed to Hasbro, but the original trademark holder - Selchow-Righter - was acknowledged on each show.moreless
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