• 161
    Go On

    Go On

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    NBC (ended 2013)
    Go On stars Matthew Perry as an irreverent yet charming sportscaster Ryan King, who, trying to move on from a loss, finds surprising solace from the members of his mandatory support group. The Transitions group, led by the controlling Lauren, is juxtaposed with Ryan's office life, highlighted by his boss/best friend Steven and his assistant Carrie.Go On is a single-camera project written by Scott Silveri and produced by Universal TV. The pilot was directed by Todd Holland, who also executive produces.moreless
  • 162
    The Steve Allen Show

    The Steve Allen Show

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    NBC (ended 1960)
    The Steve Allen Show premiered June 24, 1956. For most of the series' run, NBC scheduled The Steve Allen Show Sundays at 8:00pm opposite CBS's "Ed Sullivan Show."
  • 163
    Operation Junkyard

    Operation Junkyard

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    Each week, two teams of four kids get to see which makes the best working machine from their junk. TLC's Operation Junkyard is based on RDF Productions' Junkyard Wars. Each team is given six hours to use their imagination and mechanical skills to build a functional machine such as a catapult, a scooter, a crank, and even a pie-filling machine. Once finished, the teams' creations are tested. The winning team advances to the next round until the final teams are in the finals. The Stars of Operation Junkyard: Rob Czar - Leads the Blue team Kamaya J. - Leads the Red Teammoreless
  • 164
    227

    227

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    NBC (ended 1990)
    This popular sitcom that starred Marla Gibbs, who played Florence Johnston for many years on The Jeffersons, got her own show. She played Mary Jenkins, a housewife who lived with her contractor husband, Lester and their 14-year-old daughter Brenda. Mary's best friend was Rose Lee Holloway, who used to sit out with her on the stoop of the apartment building (#227) and discuss many things, especially Sandra Clark, the wise-cracking, hyperactive, and often scatter-brained woman from upstairs. Rose had a daughter named Tiffany. Next door to the Jenkins was the gossipping, yet loving, Pearl Shay, a crotchety busybody who lived with her grandson Calvin Dobbs, who was Brenda's first love. Throughout the final two seasons, several new characters appeared. Broadcast History September 1985-June 1986----Saturdays----9:30 p.m. June 1986-May 1987----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. June 1987-July 1987----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. July 1987-September 1988----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. October 1988-July 1989----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. September 1989-February 1990----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. April 1990-May 1990----Sundays----8:30 p.m. June 1990-July 1990----Saturdays----8:00 p.m Theme Song There's no place like home. With your family around you, you're never alone. When you know that your loved, You don't need to roam, Cause there's no place like home Time's are changing everyday. We won't get by with the same old ways (Oh, no!). Pulling together will make it right. With help from are friends I know we'll get by, Cause there's no place like home. With your family around you you're never alone. When you know that your loved, You don't need to roam. Cause there ain't no place like, (Better believe it) There ain't no place like (Better believe it) Cause there ain't no place like, There's no place like home! "I mean no place child". Now being shown on TVLand---9:00AM (Sundays) TV One---Weekdays (Check local listings) Nielsen Ratings:(Top 30 or Better) #18 in the 1985-1986 Season #14 in the 1986-1987 Seasonmoreless
  • 165
    Get Smart

    Get Smart

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    In 1965 the cold war was made a little warmer and a lot funnier due in part to the efforts of an inept, underpaid, overzealous spy: Maxwell Smart, Agent 86. The hit comedy series 'Get Smart' is the creation of comic geniuses Buck Henry and Mel Brooks. Henry teamed with Brooks to create what has undoubtedly become one of the finest parody/satires of all time. The project seemed headed for success from the start: ABC had green lighted it based on the strength of the concept, and they had an actor already under contract to play Smart. Brooks was approached to write the pilot. As he was looking for a way to finance his new movie The Producers, he agreed. Deemed "not funny", the initial script was rejected by ABC. Undaunted, the production team shopped the script around and NBC accepted it with one minor change. They wanted Don Adams in the title role. And so, an unlikely legend was born. Set in Washington, D.C., the show features Agent 86 (Maxwell Smart), his boss (The Chief), Smart's partner and later wife (Agent 99) and a host of other agents both good and evil. Perhaps one of the most important elements of the show is the gadgetry created to help Smart in his quest to keep the free world free. On this show, anything including the kitchen sink can be a phone, a tape recorder, a camera or weapon. Looking for an Agent? Check under your seat cushion. Want a weapon? Try your finger-gun. Need to make a phone call? Open up that bologna sandwich. The show was painted in the broadest of strokes and played every moment for its own delightful reality. In order to give the agents of CONTROL, a series of worthy opponents, KAOS was created. Smart and 99 battled the likes of Mr. Big, The Claw, and Siegfried. On the home front, Max and 99 had a relationship that developed as the show ran and eventually they married. 99 soon gave birth to twins (a boy and a girl) and the Smart family (and the show) began to experience some growing pains. Get Smart ran from 1965 through 1970 on both NBC and CBS. For one month in 1995 FOX attempted to bring the series back with some changes; Max as the Chief, 99 as a Congresswoman, and the Smart twins were now inexplicably only one child. Despite the lack of success experienced by the sequel, Get Smart remains a favorite by agents and civilians alike. (TV Land) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Telecast NBC September 18, 1965 - September 20, 1969 CBS September 26, 1969 - September 11, 1970 Broadcast History Sep 1965 - Sep 1968, NBC Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1968 - Sep 1969, NBC Sat 8:00-8:30 Sep 1969 - Feb/Apr - Sep 1970, CBS Fri 7:30-8:00 Episodes 138 Episodes On Film 1 Episode in Black And White; 137 Episodes In Color -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------moreless
  • 166
    Bat Masterson

    Bat Masterson

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Bat Masterson carried a gold topped cane, wore a derby, and clothes that were more suited for an eastern city than in Tombstone, Arizona. He was a professional gambler, a scout, an Indian fighter and a lawman. He used his cane and his 'wits' before resorting to his gun. The series is based upon the legend created by the real William Bartley "Bat" Masterson.moreless
  • 167
    Profiler

    Profiler

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    NBC (ended 2000)
    Sci-fi cop drama about a forensic psychologist with an eerie talent — she 'sees' crimes being committed after probing the murder scenes. She not only envisions what happened, but does so through the eyes of both the victims and the killers.moreless
  • 168
    Hunter

    Hunter

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    Former NFL football player Fred Dryer starred as Detective Sgt. Rick Hunter. Stepfanie Kramer starred as his partner, Detective Sgt. Dee Dee McCall. The series aired on NBC from 1984 to 1991. Hunter and McCall investigated homicides for the Los Angeles Police Department, sometimes resolving cases with the use of deadly force. The show included a mix of action, mystery, drama and humor. Stepfanie Kramer left the show after Season 6. Fred Dryer stayed on through the end of the series. Hunter returned to NBC in 1995 for the TV movie The Return of Hunter: Everyone Walks in L.A., although Stepfanie Kramer did not join this first reunion. A second TV movie, Hunter: Return to Justice, aired in November 2002. This time, both Fred Dryer and Stepfanie Kramer returned. The characters were now based in San Diego. The success of the TV movie led NBC to renew the entire series, starting with a third TV movie, Hunter: Back in Force, which aired in April 2003. Three individual episodes also aired. But NBC canceled the revival series without airing two other filmed episodes. The show remains popular. As of December 2015, the series can be seen in the U.S. on the Heroes & Icons channel.moreless
  • 169
    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

    Let's Make A Deal (1963)

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    NBC (ended 2003)
    These people, dressed as they are, come from all over the United States to make deals here at the Marketplace of America, Let's Make A Deal® One of TV's all time greatest and most successful shows, Let's Make a Deal was a game of intuition, skill, luck, decision-making and greed...all mixed into one. It was fun and would have been a success even if the show had stuck with the formal dresses and suits that the game started with on December 30, 1963. That's right, contestants wore dresses and suits in the very early months of LMaD {December 30, 1963-July 31, 1964}. A few months after the show's premiere on February 3, 1964 someone came with a sign to attract host Monty Hall's attention and low and behold, he chose her (or him)! Sometime later on August 3-7, 1964, someone wore a crazy costume and the entire studio changed from a formal, quiet, dignified setting to a free-for-all. The show came alive and became the legendary success it would be known for. Each day, a gallery of 31 contestants (each wearing some loony costume, either their own creation or suggested by the show's producers) vied for Monty's attention. One, two or perhaps three at a time, Monty would choose contestants to make a deal with him. Many of the deals would involve either: * An unstated amount of cash in Monty's hand or an unknown prize behind the curtain. * Keys which unlocked anything from boxes to cars. Usually, the trader had to select from at least three keys. Monty always offered cash or the curtain/box as options. The number of working keys depended on the deal; more than once, every key worked (in the deals involving multiple contestants). Variant: Just three keys shown (only one of which works) and a couple playing for a car chooses the one they think works; Monty always shows one that doesn't work and then offers a substitute prize option. * Deciding if leather wallets contained thousands of dollars in cash or car keys or perhaps only a small amount or nothing at all (except for play money or worthless keys). Before the reveal, the contestant could choose the curtain or box. * Deciding whether an announced prize was real or fake and choosing a cash amount or the box/curtain as a substitute. * Choosing an envelope, purse, wallet, etc., which concealed dollar bills. The contestant could take the cash or trade for the curtain/box, but always risked giving up an announced dollar bill (usually $1 or $5) which awarded a grand prize (usually a car or trip); often, the "consolation" prize was $500, $1000 or $1500. * Choosing four of seven envelopes, each containing $1 and $2 bills, whose contents they hoped added up to at least $7 for a grand prize. * Monty's Cash Register, wherein a couple had to punch keys on a 15-key register. Exactly 13 of the buttons hid amounts of either $50 or $100, and getting to a stated amount (usually $500-$1000) won a grand prize. The couple could stop at any time and keep what they have (always then being tempted with a follow-up keep-or-trade deal) but hitting "no sale" at any time ended the game; if the unlucky button were struck on the first try, hitting the second "no sale" button the very next time also won the grand prize. Otherwise, Monty allowed the couple to take home whatever dollar amount they hit with the next key punch. * Three unrelated traders acted as a team on deals. Sometimes, only one was allowed to speak for the team without consultation of the others; other times, a "majority rules" format was used. Usually after a series of deals, the team was broken up and could individually decide on one or more options on a final deal. * At the start of the show, a contestant given a large grocery item (e.g., a box of candy bars), always containing a cash amount. Throughout the show, he/she is given several chances to trade the box and/or give it to another trader, in exchange for the box or curtain. Only after the Big Deal of the Day was awarded (or if the last trader with said item elects to go for the Big Deal) was the cash amount given. Variant: A "claim check" given to a trader at the start of the show for any prize shown during the regular deals and chances to trade throughout the episode. The prize ranged from cash and cars to zonks. Variant: The "claim check" was played as the very last regular deal with one sure deal offered in lieu of its contents. ...* And much more! Sometimes Monty would either sweeten the deal or allow the contestants to call off the deal for cash. Sometimes, the contestants did very well -- they could win rooms of furniture, appliances, TVs and stereos, cars, furs, trips, thousands of dollars in cash and MUCH MORE... Or they could be stuck with a ZONK! (those silly, nonsense prizes when they made the wrong decision). And yes, there were many zonks -- ranging from: * Live animals (usually from local zoos or farms). These included everything from pigs and cattle to skunks and lions, tigers and bears (oh my!)! * Rooms full of worthless junk. * Antique, broken-down cars (often rusted-out shells with overheated radiators). * Oversized mooseheads, deerheads and more. * Stuffed teddy bears. * Announcer Jay Stewart and model Carol Merrill dressed up as comedy characters. Often, they held such things as oversized paint rollers or were situated on things like jumbo kiddie cars and rocking horses. ... and much, much MORE!!! Not all the games involved luck or speculation. Some were skill games testing a contestant's knowledge of shopping and products (an early version of the 1970s The Price is Right, if you will). Some contestants had to determine which prize was a stated amount (or sometimes, choose two or more items which added up to a given amount), arrange items in order of value, remember which product was beneath the letter of a car, etc. Usually, Monty gave the contestants either a cash buyout or substitute prize either as the game progressed or just before the correct answer was revealed. Even if the contestant lost, he/she was given $50 or $100 as a consolation gift. Sometimes, two or more contestants or couples competed in a single deal to guess the prices of items with the closest guessers getting increasing amounts of cash (usually but not always, $100, $200, $300 and $400); if the trader won $700, they won a car. Even the loser got to spend any accumulated winnings on a curtain or box with more cash options thrown in as well. When about 7-8 minutes were left, Monty would call on the top winners from the show and ask them if they wanted to trade what they already won for a shot at the Big Deal of the Day � usually worth $2000-$5000 on the daytime show and from $7500 to $15,000 or more on the nighttime and syndicated versions). Once two contestants were selected, they would - with the top winner going first - select a curtain. There were no zonks at this stage, but the contestants risked going home with much less than they won (ergo, trading in a new $2000 kitchen for a color console TV worth $500 or a couple hundred dollars in cash). More than once, contestants traded cars for a chance at the Big Deal, and while they were usually lucky, there was at least one occassion where someone traded their car for less than $100 in prizes! Many times, the Big Deal of the Day was a fantastic prize -- such as a motorhome, a cabin cruiser, a four-seat airplane, a mink sable, a modular home, a Cadillac Eldorado convertible and a 60-day trip around the world...or in some cases, $10,000 or more in cash were among the many examples. The show debuted on NBC on December 30, 1963-January 3, 1964 and switched to ABC on December 30 1968-January 3, 1969. NBC (and later on ABC) later premiered a weekly prime-time version of the show (NBC's appeared in 1967; ABC's in February 1969) which was a major hit with viewers. A twice-weekly syndicated LMaD surfaced in 1971, and was (yup) a big hit. During the 1975-76 season, the Big Deal winner could risk his/her top prize for a shot at the Super Deal, where behind one of three doors was hidden a $20,000 grand prize; selecting the $20,000 window allowed the contestant to keep the Big Deal, though the Big Deal was forfeited if they chose incorrectly (they received a $1000 or $2000 consolation prize; later, $2000 and another unknown consolation amount between $3000 and $8000). LET'S MAKE A DEAL finished and goes out of business on July 9, 1976. During its final original-run season in syndication (1976-1977), the show was taped in Las Vegas, with the final shows taped in December 1976. The Super Deal feature was scrapped, and the last show was said to have featured no zonks. An unsuccessful five-day-a-week revival surfaced in syndication in 1980-1981, but would be a modest success when Monty tried again in five-a-week syndication in 1984-1986. While cheap prizes were the norm very early in the 1984-1986 run (the most expensive cars were often Chevrolet Sprints and Pontiac 1000s(!)), the show held its own and eventually gave away decent cars -- including a fully equipped $13,000 Chevrolet Camaro and a $15,000 Madza RX7. The most notable change was with a new feature, Door 4. Played twice a week or so, Door 4 was totally a surprise (announced only by sudden quick siren and at times, camera zoom fanfare). A People-Picker computer selected the contestant, and he/she would be presented a check worth $1000. He/she could keep the check or spin a carnival-type wheel for a chance at a new car, $100, $200, $2000, $3000, $4000...or perhaps a zonk (I was ZONKED by Money Hall T-shirt)! Regardless of what he/she decided, they were always asked to spin the wheel just to see what would've happened (when they decided to keep the check, the contestant usually would find out they passed up the car!). A short-lived NBC revival surfaced in 1990-1991, with Bob Hilton serving as host. He didn't last long and Monty was soon making deals; alas, even his return couldn't save the show. An embarassingly bad remake called Big Deal, surfaced in 1996, where contestants performed stunts as part of the game. The revival, which aired on FOX, didn't last long. Neither did a March 2003 hour-long remake of LMaD, with Billy Bush as host. The ratings started off decently and the show appeared promising. However, some critics pointed to questionable content (the opening deal in the premiere had women reaching underneath a stagehand's undergarments to retrieve part of their deal) as a prime reason the revival quickly soured; putting LMaD up against American Idol didn't help. In August 2001, Game Show Network (as of March 2004, simply GSN) began airing reruns of the 1970s LMaD, with the 1980-1981 and 1984-1986 runs part of the package. The show has been (and remains) a wonderful addition to GSN! NBC Broadcast History December 30, 1963-June 26, 1964, Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:25pm June 29, 1964-September 29, 1967, Monday-Friday at 1:30-1:55pm May 21, 1967-September 3, 1967, Sunday at 8:30-9:00pm October 2, 1967-December 27, 1968, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm July 16, 1990-January 11, 1991, Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30am March 4-18, 2003, Tuesday at 8:00-9:00pm ABC Broadcast History December 30, 1968-July 9, 1976, Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00pm February 7, 1969-May 9, 1969, Friday at 9:00-9:30pm May 16, 1969-January 9, 1970, Friday at 7:30-8:00pm January 24, 1970-January 2, 1971, Saturday at 7:30-8:00pm January 18, 1971-August 30, 1971, Monday at 7:30-8:00pm Syndicated History September 13, 1971-September 10, 1977 Various Times September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981 Various Times September 17, 1984-September 12, 1986 Various Times Depending on the TV Market of the area.moreless
  • 170
    The Gong Show

    The Gong Show

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    NBC (ended 1980)
    And now, let us introduce, for your viewing pleasure: • A bearded, demented-looking dentist taunts his hapless patient as he drills her teeth, flipping the drill's switch to the tune of "Stars and Stripes Forever." • A petite homecoming queen, obviously nervous, is duped into singing the National Anthem after she and fellow members of the choir have been introduced as collectively performing "The Star Spangled Banner." • A grossly overweight man tap-dances to music from "Swan Lake"; later his equally obese wife squeezes into a tiny tutu and, after fitting her head in a teacup, spins around while playing "Old Folks at Home" on the mandolin. • An Elvis impersonator sings "Hound Dog," but his voice is a monotone. Who didn't live for acts such as those on The Gong Show, the classic parody of ameteur talent contests? Chuck Barris was the straight man (yeah, right) to a panel of three celebrity judges – usually singer Jaye P. Morgan, comedian Arte Johnson (of Rowan and Martin's Laugh In) and Jamie Farr (of M*A*S*H*); plus one or more guests – each assigned the task of enduring and judging the ameteur acts that performed, either solo or in groups. Yes, some of the acts that performed had legitimate talent and did very well, although all of good acts were ameteurs because of Barris' strict rule against allowing professionals as contestants. However, the real fun came in watching those hilariously awful acts. Just a short list of acts might include: • The mustached-magician trying to get his "talented" pigeons to dance. • The teen-aged girls in pastel-colored prom dresses singing "People Who Need People" while dancing in a conga line. • The young comic who did impressions of modern-day actors performing Shakespeare. • An older woman whose dog had the knack for imitating other barnyard animals. • A man who broke eggs over his head while making faces in a sheet of Plexiglas. • "Professor Flamo" – a man who sang out in pain while lowering various body parts onto burning candles. Joey D'Auria was "Professor Flamo" and would later become Bozo the Clown on WGN (1984-2001). • An entire episode dedicated to contestants singing their rendition of "Feelings." ... and countless other acts that were wild and outrageous. Do those acts sound bad? Of course they did, and any one of the celebrity judges had the right to terminate the act by striking his/her mallet against an oversized "gong" (often, two or all three did, and several times, they fought to get to the gong first). The act had to immeidately cease and were out of the running for the grand prize. Early in the run, some acts were "gonged" just seconds into the act, prompting Barris to implement a mandatory 45-second wait (though judging by the frequent reactions of the celebs, that was often way too long). Acts that did reach their conclusion (the longest performances were usually two-and-a-half minutes) were scored by the panelists on a scale of 0 to 10, with a high score of 30 possible. The highest-scoring act of the day won the grand prize – $516.32 on the daytime show, $712.05 (later $1,000) on the syndicated version; however, a grand-prize winner was not necessarily guaranteed, particularly if all of the acts were gonged. The 1976 syndicated version, which debuted months after the NBC version began, was identical to the daytime version, except that Gary Owens hosted (until 1978, when Barris took over that job). Acts on The Gong Show became more and more risqué during the final months of the daytime version. The final straw came during a 1978 daytime telecast, when many viewers declared a certain act obscene (The Popsicle Twins) (that act would fit in quite nicely with Game Show Network's overtly sex-littered 1998 revival, called Extreme Gong); NBC apparently agreed and – whether on its own accord or bowing to pressure from viewers and advertisers – cancelled The Gong Show. Not to worry for original Gong Show fans; the fun continued unabated in syndication until 1980. Running gags featuring the show's regular cast were also popular. Some included: • An inept musician (Larry Spencer) who announces his intention to "play" a certain musical instrument "right now" (with the instrument failing on cue) • Barris reading a children's story with alternate endings (and enacted by the show's cast). • Brief skits from the "Unknown Comic" (comedian Murray Langston) and "Gene Gene the Dancing Machine" (Gene Patton). There was also Scarlett & Rhett where every joke was a dirty one that constantly required the "OOPS!" sign to flash! Also, guest performers – former winning contestants with legit talent and real celebrities, including Alice Cooper – were invited to perform in non-scoring, non-gongable segments. John Barbour (later of Real People) was supposed to be the host, but his straight-man style didn't work out and Barris let him go before the first aired episode taped. Barris took over the job himself and the rest was history. The Gong Show quickly became a part of American popular culture, with local versions staged as fundraisers by college, high school and civic groups. There were two unsuccessful attempts to revive The Gong Show. A 1988 revival, hosted by Don Bleu didn't catch on with viewers and was cancelled after less than 26 weeks. Critics panned the aforementioned Extreme Gong (a revival to play off the popularity of reruns of the original series), thanks in large part to the risqué content; hosted by comedian George Gray, the celebrity panel was replaced by a 1-900 number for viewers to judge the acts.moreless
  • 171
    The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

    The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    Welcome to The Ghost and Mrs. Muir guide at TV.com.
  • 172
    Better Late Than Never

    Better Late Than Never

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    NBC
  • 173
    The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show

    The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show was an animated series which featured the pint sized hero Atom Ant and super-sleuth Secret Squirrel. Other characters had episodes as well including the Hillbilly Bears, Precious Pupp, Squiddly Diddly and Winsome Witch.moreless
  • 174
    Matinee Theater

    Matinee Theater

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    NBC (ended 1958)
    Welcome to the Matinee Theater guide at TV.com. This daily anthology show - created and produced by Albert McCleery and hosted by John Conte, featured original teleplays, as well as adaptations of literary classics. The final credit at the end was a shot of producer Albert McCleery's signature on a card. A crew member, showing only his hand and arm, would underline his signature with a flourish. One day McCleery's wife was watching the show at home and complained of the unkempt appearance and poor grooming of the signer. McCleery had a wax cast of his hand and arm made and from then on crew members used this wax hand to sign his ending credit each day!moreless
  • 175
    Men Behaving Badly (US)

    Men Behaving Badly (US)

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    This series is the US version of the UK series of the same name that was created by Simon Nye. When shown in countries that have already seen the UK version, the US series is retitled It's a Man's World. The theme song "Bad Boy" written by Larry Williams is performed by Marshall Crenshaw.moreless
  • 176
    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In turned out to be one of the most successful mid-season replacements, ranking right up there withAll in the Family and it was just as controversial. This memorable variety show that gave us such memorable sayings like "very interesting", "ring my chimes", "look that up in your Funk and Wagnalls", "sock it to me", "You bet your Sweet Bippy", "Here Comes The Judge!", "Its Time to Say Goodnight Dick", as well as many others, proved to be unlike any variety show that ever graced television. Hosted by Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, this unique variety show was a fast moving barage of jokes, one-liners, running skits, musical numbers as well as making fun of social and political issues of the late 1960's. It was the group of regulars, particularly those from 1968-1970, that made it memorable. Gary Owens, Judy Carne, Arte Johnson, Ruth Buzzi, Alan Sues, Goldie Hawn, Chelsea Brown, Henry Gibson and Jo Anne Worley seemed to make the most lasting impressions with viewers. Lily Tomlin joined the cast in 1970 at a point when most of these original regulars were leaving. Gary Owens was the announcer, Judy Carne was the "Sock it to Me" girl, Arte Johnson frequently portrayed the German soldier who spouted "very interesting" or the dirty old man that would annoy the frumpy Gladys played by Ruth Buzzi. Goldie Hawn was the blonde dingbat and Chelsea Brown was the only black female who was later replaced by Teresa Graves. Henry Gibson usually recited poetry and Jo Anne Worley usually was seen singing with her loud voice. In 1970, most of the originals left the series and the ratings began to slowly drop. Lily Tomlin was hired and instantly her characters began to energize an already sagging show. Ernestine, the wacky telephone operator was probably the most popular. The final season, had almost a totally new set of regulars with the exception of Ruth Buzzi and Gary Owens. Lily Tomlin was seen occasionally on account of the fact that she was planning on leaving the show. The series ended in 1973. In 1993, NBC aired a 25th Anniversary Special that garnered fantastic ratings and prompted two more specials to air, one in December 1993 and one in February of 1994. NBC Broadcast History January 1968-May 1973-----Mondays----8:00 p.m. For the first time since it originally aired, Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In was seen in its original hour-long episodes on the cable network Trio. Previously, the series had been shown on Nick at Nite but only as edited half-hour episodes. Also, on the Comedy Network in Canada, There is a Valentines Day Special and periodically the 25th anniversary special is repeated on that channel.moreless
  • 177
    B.J. and the Bear

    B.J. and the Bear

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    What kind of trouble can a monkey and a trucker get into? This classic series explores just that! BJ McKay was a good-looking young trucker who traveled around the country in his big red & white rig, with a single companion - his pet chimp, Bear. B.J. was based in rural Georgia and was confronted by a succession of corrupt local sheriffs - Elroy P. Lobo (who was later given his own series, Lobo); Sgt. Wiley of Winslow County and his two fellow lawmen, Sheriffs Cain and Masters. The only honest cop B.J. seemed to encounter was the Fox, who spent much of her time trying to trap the crooked local cops. Tommy was a lady trucker friend and Bullets ran the local hangout, the Country Comfort Truck Stop. In 1981, B.J. settled down to run a trucking business in Los Angeles called Bear Enterprises. His new adversary was Rutherford T. Grant, a corrupt politician who headed the state Special Crimes Action Team. Grant was a silent partner in TransCal, the largest trucking firm in California and stopped at nothing to stomp out potential competition. Because of Grant's intervention, B.J. found it impossible to get regular truck drivers to work for him and had to settle for a crew of 7 young, beautiful lady truckers, including a pair of identical twins and Grant's daughter, Cindy. The Theme Song was written by Glen A Larson and sung by Greg Eviganmoreless
  • 178
    Telenovela

    Telenovela

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    NBC (ended 2016)
    Eva Longoria plays Ana Sofia, a popular Spanish language soap opera star who doesn't speak any Spanish. The comedy centers around Ana as she deals with a new boss, a jealous cast, emotionally needy friends and an ex-husband who's been cast as her on-screen love interest. And like any good telenovela, this comedy is full of drama. Telenovela was created by Chrissy Pietrosh, Jessica Goldstein and Robert Harling. The show is executive produced by Eva Longoria, Chrissy Pietrosh, Jessica Goldstein, Josh Bycel, Jonathan Fener and Ben Spector.moreless
  • 179
    Alvin & the Chipmunks

    Alvin & the Chipmunks

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    NBC (ended 1991)
    This show focuses on three superstar chipmunks who have their own band and the crazy adventures they get into. It also features The Chipettes, their female counterparts and girlfriends. If you have any info, please contribute. Broadcast History ----------------- During its run, Alvin & the Chipmunks, existed in 2 forms... Alvin & the Chipmunks (or The Chipmunks (seasons 6-7)) (Seasons 1-7): All of the original episodes have aired on NBC. The Chipmunks Go To the Movies (Season 8): This also aired on NBC, but not as traditional episodes. All of the episodes were spoofs of famous movies. The Characters Alvin Seville Alvin is the oldest of the chipmunks, and also the lead singer of their group. He is most often the one who gets them into trouble, (usually in an attempt to get rich or famous) and tends to be selfish, self centered, and conceited at times. He really hates to be alone and is VERY vain about his looks, although he does suffer from 'small munk complex'. (his height). Regardless of all this, he is very protective of his brothers. Simon Seville Simon is the middle brother of the chipmunks and is considered the brain of the group. He is always the voice of reason and logic behind Alvin's crazy schemes, and usually (unsuccessfully), tries to talk him out of following these crazy ideas.. He is very level headed in tough situations and is a strong believer in following the rules-- though occasionally he does break them along with his brothers to make sure they don't get into too much trouble... In his spare time, he enjoys reading and studying. Theodore Seville Theodore is the youngest chipmunk, considered the nicest out of all the chipmunks and can get along with just about anyone-- although he does tend to be shy at times. He loves to eat and almost always seems to be hungry. He also enjoys cooking and baking in his spare time-- ( which helps explain his cute little plump figure) and tends to scare easily. He usually gets really nervous when he's around a girl he likes, and tends to be a little slow when it comes to learning in school. David "Dave" Seville Dave is the Chipmunks adoptive father, and also their manager. He found the boys after they were abandoned on his doorstep, and loves them as if they were his own. But Alvin is always driving him crazy with his schemes, causing him to yell his name in exasperation. Brittany Miller Brittany is the oldest of her sisters, and also the lead singer of their group. She can be egotistical and selfish, just like Alvin at times, and is EXTREMELY vain about her looks. She enjoys acting, modeling, and singing-- and is constantly competing with the Chipmunks over whose group is better. Since she is supposed to be the counterpart of Alvin, she too is always coming up with different ideas on how to get rich and famous. And again, just like Alvin, she tends to be very protective of her sisters-- although at times, it takes her awhile.... Jeanette Miller Jeanette is the brains of the group, and also the nice one, though she is very clumsy. Yet her personality doesn't resemble Simon's very much (except for her intelligence). In that respect, she is much more like Theodore. She is very kind towards her sisters, and tends to be quiet and shy. She is very confident about who she is, however, and doesn't seem to care what other people think about her. In her spare time she enjoys reading and studying. Eleanor Miller Just like Theodore, Eleanor loves to cook and bake, and because of it, is a little plump. Here though, the similarity ends. Her personality is not really like Theodore's at all: in reality, it's actually closer to Simon's than anyone else's. Like him, she is usually the one who tries to talk Brittany out of following her crazy schemes and tends to gets extremely annoyed and complains when her sister does something stupid. In a way, however, she is also a lot like Alvin: she is very athletic and good at almost every sport and would do anything to help her sisters. In this way, I think Eleanor is supposed to be a combination of all the Chipmunks, even though she is usually meant to represent Theodore's counterpart. Miss Beatrice Miller Miss Miller is the strange, eccentric, but nice, old lady who lives next door to the Chipmunks. She also happens to have a crush on Dave! She eventually ends up raising the Chipettes. Harry A sneaky, greedy, con-artist chipmunk who originally pretends to be the Chipmunks' long-lost mother's younger brother, in order to get them to work for him, with minimum wage: (or nothing at all). The Chipmunks eventually figure out that he's not really their uncle, and so successfully scheme to take the money he made off of them, and leave, returning to Dave. Harry, however, makes several more appearances throughout the television series. At his last, he even cons the Chipettes. Vinny, the Chipmunks' Mother Eventually, the Chipmunks go searching for their long-lost mother, Vinny, and after days of a treacherous search, actually manage to find her! At first, everyone's happy, but eventually Alvin gets upset since he doesn't understand why she abandoned them. Vinny explains that the year she abandoned them there was a horrible winter and all of the animals in the forest were forced to leave their homes because of it. The fact that they were so young, forced her to realize that they wouldn't survive the journey if she brought them with her. So instead, Vinny decided to leave them with a nice man who was always kind to the forest animals (Dave). She said, "Giving up her babies was the hardest thing she ever did," and then told them that when spring came and she could finally return to get them, she saw how happy they were with Dave, and thought they'd be better off with him. Eventually, Alvin forgives Vinny, and they all part ways on a good note: promising to keep in touch. Theme Song Lyrics "Watch out...cause here we come! It's been a while but we're back in style So get set to have some fun We'll bring you action and satisfaction We're the Chipmunks C-H-I-P-M-U-N-K We're the Chipmunks Guaranteed to brighten your day When you feel like a laugh Give us a call we'll give you our all And if you feel like a song Tune in to us and sing right along We're the Chipmunks Coming on stronger than ever before We're the Chipmunks Alvin, Simon, Theodore! Do-do, do-do-do-do!"moreless
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    Loretta Young Show

    Loretta Young Show

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    The Loretta Young Show's trademark was the dramatic entrance Miss Young made at the beginning of each episode. She would come sweeping through a doorway with her full-skirted dress swirling around her and move into the center of the room to introduce the evening's play. Equally distinctive was the program's close, when she would return and read a few lines of poetry or a passage from the Bible that amplified or restated the message of the play just telecast. Miss Young starred in over half the plays aired during the series' eight-season run, playing everything from nuns to housewives. The periods and locations varied, the story may have been serious, amusing, or touching, but all were uplifting. When this series premiered it was titled Letter to Loretta. All of the stories were done as responses to letters that she had received. She would read a letter at the beginning of each show and then star in the dramatized answer. Although the title was changed to The Loretta Young Show on February 7, 1954, this format was retained through the first two seasons. At the start of the 1955-1956 season the series became a straight dramatic show and the letter concept was dropped. Miss Young also cut back her starring appearances to roughly half of each year's episodes.moreless
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