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    Sesame Street

    Sesame Street

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    PBS
    Sesame Street is a widely recognized and perpetually daring experiment in educational children's programming. This show has taken popular-culture and turned it upside-down. The fast-paced advertisements that had parents of the new era worrying for their children were the basis for the original format of this show. The show has often satirized pop culture, and made itself easier for parents to watch along too. And thus, the positive impact this show has had on modern society is beyond another. No show is more recognized the world over by as many generations and walks of life. Shown in its original format or with changes to reflect a regional education focus, Sesame Street is now seen in over 140 countries. The show that Entertainment Weekly named the "20th Best Ever Show" has changed the education scene to focus on "entertainment." This has turned out to be a valuable theory that not only helps the medicinal learning go down easier, but it also increases the effectiveness of the information being taught. In an almost backwards sense, the show stays fresh by recycling programming ideas every three years, by which time a new group of kids is watching. Unlike most PBS Kids shows, which have an original run, then go into continuous repeats until getting dropped by PBS or sold to another network, Sesame Street has created many new episodes every season since its debut Nov. 10, 1969. American teachers now expect children to arrive on the first day of school knowing the basics about letters, numbers, and language. "Kindergarten now does what first grade used to do," creator Joan Ganz Cooney has said, "and I think that's directly due to Sesame Street." International versions have changed Sesame Street to be more relevant to their culture and environments. They adjust the unique American inner city, with a cast made up mainly of Muppets, African-Americans, Spaniards and Chinese to reflect their own lifestyles. For example, Canada's Sesame Park features a small suburban town inhabited by folks like an otter and a bear, a bush pilot, a disabled child in a wheel-chair and her cat and Russia's Ulitsa Sesame set in a Russian dvor (courtyard) has a 9-foot tall tree spirit who has his joyous and problem-solving Muppet friends. No show can help in tumultuous or troubled times like Sesame Street. For example: • The Israelis and the Palestinians have now merged their independent spin-offs, to help teach the fighting cultures to accept each other for who they are, not what they have done in the past. • The original American Sesame Street helped children deal with the incidents of 9-11 • On the week of October 4-8, 2004, Sesame Workshop actually dug up reruns of Sesame Street episodes from its 32nd season, in which a hurricane plundered the neighborhood. This move was to come to grips with those disabused by the four hurricanes that struck Florida in a six-week span the previous August and September. It also sent a message about the news' propensity for covering violent acts. • The current South African government has not taken much action on the matters of HIV and AIDS, so in 2003, the South African version of Sesame Street added in a 5-year-old girl monster who manages to go about daily life with ease, even though she intercepted HIV through a blood transfusion shortly after birth. This led to an American backlash, even though her exposure in the States has always been restricted to sesameworkshop.org. Undoubtedly, she is the hardest-edged Muppet since Jim Henson's ill-fated "Creatures from the Planet Gorch" on Saturday Night Live's first season. • No other puppet than a Muppet, namely Elmo, could be taken seriously when asking America's congressional Education Appropriations Subcommittee for more funding to school music programs, so that "when Elmo goes to school, there will be the instruments to play." (Unfortunately, Newt Gingrich's Congress chose instead to divert to Sesame Street production funds from other PBS series. Among the casualties was one of Sesame Street's godchildren, Ghostwriter.) •In the mid-70s, they introduced Linda Bove, a deaf actress playing a deaf librarian that lives a life equal to all the rest of the area's inhabitants. Please note that Sesame Street's air time varies between various PBS stations in America. In recent years, a few PBS stations have dropped the show (including WNYE in New York, whose last airing was in June 2003). sesame street even had a touring show, SESAME STREET LIVE,which has just recently celebrated 25 years of performing. Characters Cookie Monster Cookie Monster has always had a passion for cookies, gobbling them up whenever he can. However, in order to promote healthy eating habits, Cookie Monster recently learned that cookies are a "sometime" food. So now, Cookie Monster also eats fruits and vegetables in addition to his trademark snack. Elmo Elmo is a cute little red monster, who wants to know more about the world he is growing up in. Oscar the Grouch Oscar lives in a dustbin, sure its not the most hygienic of places, but Oscar isn't the most hygienic of creatures. He likes to cause mischief but also enjoys learning. Ernie and Bert Best friends and room-mates, both showing us how people get along with each other and how sometimes you may even fall-out with your best friend. The Count The Count, would teaches us to count, whether it be really difficult numbers or easy numbers, the Counts thing is maths and counting, and he sure is good at it. Big Bird A huge yellow bird, who's everyone's friend. No matter what species, color or race you are.moreless
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    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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    PBS (ended 2001)
    "In a little toy neighborhood, a tiny trolley rolls past a house at the end of a street. Welcome toMister Rogers' Neighborhood." In the annals of children's TV, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood ranks among the longest-lasting and beloved shows. Upon its conclusion, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood was the longest-running series in PBS history (a record eclipsed by Sesame Street in 2003). Host Fred Rogers (known to millions as simply "Mister Rogers") used his gentle charm and mannerisms to communicate with his audience of children. Topics centered on nearly every inconceivable matter of concern to children, ranging from everyday fears related to going to sleep, getting immunizations and disappointment about not getting one's way to losing a loved one to death and physical handicaps. Rogers used simple songs and, on nearly every show, segments from the Neighborhood of Make-Believe (NOM) to make his point. A scale-model trolley was often (but not always) used to segue into the Make-Believe segments, said neighborhood being inhabited by puppet characters including King Friday XIII, Lady Elaine Fairchild and Daniel Striped Tiger. Many shows also featured visits from cast members – most often Mr. McFeely (tagline: "Speedy Delivery"), Robert Trow, Joe Negri and Chef Brockett (the local baker). Many times, Rogers also visited the neighborhood shops of both the regulars and guests. Each show began and ended with a camera panning over a scale neighborhood (said to represent the town where Rogers lived). Production History While today's longer-running PBS Kids shows reinvent themselves every five years, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood achieved, throughout its 31 seasons, that rarest of elements: consistency. It is a legacy that can all be traced through every aspect of Fred Rogers' television career. Some of the characters in Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, both real and imagined, had appeared in two of Fred Rogers' earlier programs, The Children's Corner for Pittsburgh's WQED in 1954 and the CBC's Misterogers in 1963. It was for Misterogers that Fred first appeared on-camera. Rogers returned to WQED in Pittsburgh to begin writing and hosting Mister Rogers' Neighborhood May 22, 1967. Several other public television stations from Chicago to Boston carried the show on a trial basis that year. Beginning February 19, 1968, the Mister Rogers' Neighborhood program that we know today, began airing nationwide on National Educational Television (NET), the predecessor to PBS. This was also the year David Newell, returned from Europe, began work for Rogers. He was in charge of the production as well as the neighborhood's Speedy Delivery service. (AN ASIDE: Rogers wanted to call the delivery man Mr. McCurdy after the man at the Sears-Roebuck Foundation, whose support launched Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. But the people at Sears-Roebuck called Rogers and said "Mr. McCurdy" was too self-serving. Thus Rogers went to his roots to rename Newell's deliveryman. "McFeely" was Rogers' middle name and the last name of his maternal grandfather.) Shows were produced as a daily strip from 1968 to 1976, at which time production was suspended. Counting black-and-white episodes, 590 shows were produced in that span. Production resumed at the beginning of the remote video age in 1979. Rogers went on location more, supervising videos of how people make things (a precursor to the TVO series Here's How!). Other characters would be introduced in the subsequent two decades. In all, 305 new programs were taped from 1979 through 2001. Of that volume, the most notable shows came in 1991, with Rogers focusing on calming children's fears during the first U.S. war with Iraq. PBS gradually narrowed the window for the 460 "pre-79" episodes with each new season from 1980 onward. When the number of "post-75" episodes was enough to cover entire years, the classic shows were retired, last airing on PBS in the summer of 1995. Despite the production stoppage and the subsequent passing of Fred Rogers on February 27, 2003, PBS continues to repeat Mister Roger's Neighborhood in all its original glory–an accomplishment unique among all PBS Kids shows.moreless
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    NOVA

    NOVA

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    PBS
    Seen in more than 100 countries, NOVA is the most watched science television series in the world and the most watched documentary series on PBS. It is also one of television's most acclaimed series, having won every major television award, most of them many times over. Each week NOVA takes an in depth look at a particular topic or individual in the science field. NOVA's topics cover all branches of science and engineering. NOVA's unique way of presenting each topic can be interesting to both those with no prior knowledge or those whose life's work is being covered.moreless
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    Que Pasa, USA?

    Que Pasa, USA?

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    PBS (ended 1980)
    Welcome to the ¿Qué Pasa, U.S.A.? guide at TV.com. ¿Qué Pasa, USA? was and still is America's first bilingual situation comedy. The program explored the trials and tribulations faced by a Cuban family, named Peña,in Miami as they struggled to cope with a new country and a new language. The series focused on the identity crisis of the teenage members of the family as they are pulled in one direction by their elders who want to maintain Cuban values and traditions - and pulled in other directions by the pressures of living in a predominantly Anglo society. The series is bilingual, reflecting the mix of language often heard in Cuban-American neighborhoods from Spanish in the home and English at the supermarket to the inevitable combining of both into "Spanglish."moreless
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    Great Performances

    Great Performances

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    PBS
    Great Performances is the longest running performing arts anthology on television. It is part of of the PBS tradition of bringing the arts to viewers free of charge. The show began as Theater in America in 1972. The next year, several arts productions, including Dance in America, were brought together under the Great Performances umbrella. Great Performances at the Met would join the family in 1977. Over the years the productions have moved more toward music than plays. Check your local listings for air times.moreless
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    Austin City Limits

    Austin City Limits

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    PBS
    Austin City Limits has established a reputation for showcasing great live musical performances. The show's studio allows for intimate and engaging performances by independent, mainstream, critically acclaimed, and popular artists. The show was originally created to display the emerging talents of the alternative country music scene in Austin, TX in the 1970s. Soon, however, the show branched out to include all types of music: alt country, pop rock, bluegrass and zydeco are just a few. Many television historians attribute MTV, CMT and VH1'a success to the contributions of this groundbreaking musical series. On Wednesday, November 12th, 2003; President Bush presented ACL with the National Medal of the Arts. ACL was the first television show (ever) to win the award.moreless
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    Masterpiece Theatre

    Masterpiece Theatre

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    PBS
    Welcome to the Masterpiece Theatre guide at TV.com.

    On the air since 1971, in its early days the show consisted entirely of British drama productions, more than half of them from the BBC. Since the year 2000, some classic productions from the American Collection have also been included, but the bulk of the show still comes from the UK.

    Masterpiece Theatre has won thirty Primetime Emmy Awards, as well as many other awards. To buy episodes of Masterpiece Theatre on DVD, visit its online store.moreless
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    Zoom

    Zoom

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    PBS (ended 2005)
    Welcome to the ZOOM guide at TV.com.

    Originally shown in the 70s the Emmy award winning show is back!

    ZOOM is a show targeted at ages 6-11 but many people older than that watch it too! The show makes ZOOM-dos, CafeZooms, Znacks, ZOOMsci's, and more that you can do at home! They are time friendly and kid friendly! Many people watch the show because it is made by kids and for kids. Being shown on PBS Kids (Public Broadcasting Service), the show is nonviolent and is played without commercial interruption.

    Each season of ZOOM consisted of seven average kids (3 boys, 4 girls)called ZOOMers. The ideas for activities for the show were sent in by the viewers either by e-mail or snail-mail (Z-O-O-M box 350, Boston Mass.) At the beginning of each season, some of the old cast members would leave and be replaced with new kids, only two cast members stayed more than two seasons (Caroline, seasons 2-5, and Shing Ying, seasons 5-7).

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    Truly American

    Truly American

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    PBS
    "Truly American is an educational series that originally aired on PBS in 1974. It consists of 32 twenty-minute episodes and is suitable for use in an American history class from 5th through 10th grade. Each episode provides a biography of one or two Americans using recreations and archival footage. Many of these Americans will already be familiar to the students, although not all of them are famous. The first episode covers the lives of Benjamin Franklin and Benjamin Banneker. Franklin is well-known as a printer, scientist and politician. Banneker was a free African-American who lived in the eighteenth century and was an almanac author, astronomer and surveyor. The next episode is about Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, the third and seventh United States presidents respectively. The third episode in this series deals with James and Dolly Madison, the fourth U.S. president and his wife. Eddy Halas is the host and Bob Halas is the narrator for this series."moreless
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    The Electric Company 1970s

    The Electric Company 1970s

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    PBS (ended 1977)
    On the heels of its fabulously successful Sesame Street, the Children's Television Workshop (CTW) created The Electric Company. With its roots in Motown Sound, Broadway and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, The Electric Company drew attention for six years as the most popular instructional television show. It would win an Emmy for Outstanding Children's Series, and its soundtrack album earned a Grammy. Targeting children ages 6 through 10, The Electric Company aimed to teach basic reading and grammar skills to the young viewers. The show's cast of skit players helped teach these concepts through the use of skits, songs, cartoon and blackout segments and regular features; all of them revolved around sound clusters (e.g., sh-, -ly, -oo-), contractions, punctuation marks, etc. The series provided material for elementary schools, as CTW published a biweekly TEC Teacher's Guide detailing program contents. Quickly, the cast members began to establish themselves with various personas: • Skip Hinnant (who had played Schroeder in the off-Broadway production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown) had one of the best known characters: Fargo North, Decoder. Early in the run, this Peter Sellers knock-off interpreted messages that people gave to him when they couldn't understand what had been written. • The show also made Morgan Freeman. He created Easy Reader, the cool dude who loved reading anything he could get his hands on. Freeman also played radio disc jockey Mel Mounds, who usually introduced The Short Circus tunes (see below). • Rita Moreno created her tagline, "Hey You Guys!", while playing Millie, the Milkman's helper. She put the same fire into playing Otto the Director, who fumed as her actors didn't read their lines properly. • Judy Graubart, alumnus of The Second City in Chicago, became Jennifer of the Jungle, teaching bits of phonetics to her friend Paul the Gorilla. • And who can forget J. Arthur Crank? Jimmy Boyd (B. 1939) created the character, strictly as a voice on a telephone during the first season. In all future years, Crank was seen as that bad-tempered loud dresser. Complimenting the adults in the cast was The Short Circus, a group of five teenaged performers usually involved in songs or dances. Members of The Short Circus drew names from a hat to determine what would be their character name. While the Short Circus changed its talents from one season to the next, they did keep one member constant: June Angela. The show also set itself apart with the cloud sets by Nat Mongioi (which members of the cast called "Limbo Land"), cool music by the late Joe Raposo and others, unique sound effects Dick Maitland pinned to punctuation marks, and the high-tech computer animation. The logo above can only suggest these elements, which seemed to represent the New Era back in the 1970s. Among the most popular of the regular features was Spiderman, a live-action segment added during the series' fourth season. The Spiderman segments (for which there were about two dozen or so made) featured The Electric Company cast as various characters. Beginning in 1972, there was also The Adventures of Letterman cartoon series. The evil Spell Binder would cause trouble by using his magic wand, replacing key letters to make the worse of situations (e.g.: Train into Rain). Then Letterman would take the letter(s) off his varsity sweater and correct the hazard. Muppet characters from Sesame Street (including Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch and Grover) also visited on occasion through the years. A total of 780 episodes of The Electric Company aired from 1971 to 1977 on PBS; reruns of the final two seasons aired through the fall of 1985. Programs always ended with one of its cast members stating: The Electric Company gets its power from The Children's Television Workshop. This was followed by a superimposed caption: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1971 to 1977 In 1972, CTW began issuing The Electric Company magazine. Appropriately enough, the mag contained feature articles, games and other activities featuring members of the show's cast. It was published until the late-1980s, when replaced with a magazine called Kid City. A sister magazine, Spidey Super Stories (also issued and endorsed by The Electric Company's producers) contained children's reading level-versions of the web slinger's battles with his arch-enemies plus comic strip versions of the The Electric Company Spiderman segments. Spidey Super Stories were published from October 1974 to January 1982. Sixty-five episodes of The Electric Company from various seasons – a good share from the 1972-1973 and 1973-1974 seasons – began airing on Nickelodeon's new Noggin network in the spring of 1999 (kicked off with a two-hour retrospective of the show on TV Land, another Nickelodeon sister network). The shows were edited slightly, removing all program numbers and show-ending teases (see Notes within Show 131). Also for the Noggin run, CTW gave credit to Marvel Comics, which had never received a copyright notice on the original run. Thus all episodes from Seasons 4 to 6 had their copyrights redisplayed: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1974 to 1976 The use of the character Spiderman was provided as a courtesy to the Children's Television Workshop by Marvel Comics Group. © Copyright Marvel Comics Group 1974 to 1976 At first, Noggin aired The Electric Company during several daytime and overnight time slots seven days a week. By the time CTW was renamed Sesame Workshop in 2000, however, the show's timeslots were downgraded to late-nights and then, in 2002, only a couple of weekend overnight airings. In early 2003, with the value of Sesame Workshop's interest in Noggin even less (if not zero), The Electric Company was pulled from Noggin's schedule altogether. (Note: Classic episodes of Sesame Street, which were shown under the title Sesame Street Unpaved, had also been a part of Noggin's schedule. Noggin had shown 65 classic episodes (originally airing between 1969 to 1986) of the series. Like The Electric Company, Sesame Street Unpaved had originally aired weekdays before being placed in downgraded timeslots (eventually weekend overnights). Both shows had attracted primarily adults (who had watched the show as children) and college-aged fans, and both shows were too dated for their intended childhood audience. Noggin underwent a total personality change beginning April 1, 2002, placing more emphasis on original programming (in addition to airing reruns of Nickelodeon kiddie shows). The general effect of removing The Electric Company from the airwaves, has not been a pleasant one for American society. Some people believe Sesame Workshop discusses The Electric Company only when lowering the wrecker's ball on those who have violated their copyrights. (To this day, The Electric Company™ and the logo are trademarks and service marks of Sesame Workshop, © 1971-1977.) Though it appears Sesame Workshop chooses not to live in the past, it has been digitizing segments from all its old shows in preparation for DVD releases. The first DVD of The Electric Company is scheduled for release in 2006. (This is the result of an independent campaign for a TEC DVD release; see below.) The Electric Company will always be remembered by its fans as an entertaining series which taught children to read. Elementary classroom teachers regularly scheduled their days so their students could watch the show, and reading scores increased as a result of in-class and home viewing. Hey You Guys! petersmith among them We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power We're gonna light up The dark of night Like the brightest day In a whole new way We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power It's coming down the line Strong as it can be Through the courtesy Of The Electric Company™ from The Electric Company Theme Music and Lyrics by Joe Raposo © 1971 Jonico Musicmoreless
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    The Letter People

    The Letter People

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    PBS (ended 1976)
    The Letter People were created in 1972 by a group in Waterbury, Connecticut called New Dimensions in Education. The principles were simple: This was an educational show that taught children in kindergarten through first grade how to read using characters to represent letters of the alphabet. Theme Song: Come and meet the Letter People Come and visit in the family Words are made of Letter People A, B, C, D, Follow me The original Letter People were shaped in a quickly-identifiable fashion. All the consonants were called "Letter Boys," and the vowels were "Letter Girls." It was a perfect compliment to Title IX that Letter Girls had to be in every word the Letter People made. The Letter People television series was produced 1974-76 in the facilities of KETC in St. Louis. That station held TV distribution rights for the series, even after a "new generation" of Letter People came about in 1997. (By this time, New Dimensions in Education had become part of Abrams & Co. Publishers.)moreless
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    The Magic Basket

    The Magic Basket

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    PBS (ended 1971)
    Welcome to The Magic Basket guide at TV.com.

    THE MAGIC BASKET was a children's series created by Bill Hayden and produced by PBS for national airing. The seires involved (primarily) child actors presenting fractured fairy tales each week. Each episode/new fairy tale was presented by the friendly yet mysterious narrator who would find the stories in her magic basket.

    If you happen to have been involved with the series or were a fan who saved episodes on an early tape format, please contact enchantedheartprods@lycos.com with more information about the series. Currently, PBS and its affiliates are indicating that they destroyed all episodes a few years ago. Yet, with Mr. Hayden's unbridled enthusiasm to spur us on, we believe that someone, somewhere has more information about THE MAGIC BASKET to share.moreless
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    The Great American Dream Machine

    The Great American Dream Machine

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    PBS (ended 1972)
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    Vegetable Soup

    Vegetable Soup

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    PBS (ended 1979)
    Before there was Chicken Soup for the Soul, there was Vegetable Soup. THEME SONG: Come on along and join us Come on along We're gonna have some fun Come on along and join us In a little bowl of Vegetable Soup It takes all kinds of vegetables All kinds of vegetables All kinds of vegetables To make a Vegetable Soup Welcome to the Vegetable Soup guide at TV.com. Produced by the Bureau of Mass Communications, New York State Education Department, Vegetable Soup was a melting pot of live-action, animation, puppets, dramas, and games. In two seasons, 78 episodes were produced, with over 200 segments used and reused. To many, Vegetable Soup may best be remembered for the Outerscope serials. These segments opened 70 of the 78 Vegetable Soup episodes, and were always fresh. The first serial starred five puppet kids, all with big hands, who have built a crude but effective spacecraft called Outerscope. During the first season, Outerscope I traveled the galaxy, with each stop giving the kids a lesson in cooperation and harmony between different cultures and races. The latter serial, Outerscope II, sent the five kids in different directions in search of a medallion. Other elements in Vegetable Soup included: The Big Game Hunt, a staple late in the first season, had a girl ready to make up games at any time. Her only threat came from the ever-changing face of bad-tempered Long John Spoilsport. (Long John Spoilsport returned for a live-action game show, The Big Job Hunt, which dominated ten shows of the second season.) Nigel the boa constrictor, segments of which were available independently to schools and media centers. Woody the Spoon (really the voice of Bette Midler), sharing recipes. But perhaps the greatest memory of Vegetable Soup was its versatility. At its peak in 1982, the show could be found on local PBS affiliates (for which it was originally devised), commercial syndication, Nickelodeon, and TBS. That's a program of harmony we just don't see today. Vegetable Soup was produced by the New York State Education Department (NYSED), Bureau of Mass Communications, under a grant from the then U.S. Office of Education, Department of Health, Education and Welfare. The content of and copyright on Vegetable Soup are the responsibility of NYSED, and no official endorsement from the U.S. government is to be implied.moreless
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    Once Upon A Classic

    Once Upon A Classic

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    PBS (ended 1980)
    Between 1976 and 1980 PBS broadcast this series. It included classic stories filmed in England, which were then aired in thirty minute segments over a period of several weeks. Separating the major series there were single episode specials.

    Some of the stories included in the series were: Great Expectations, What Katie Did, Little Lord Faulteroy, Heidi, The Secret Garden, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, The Prince and the Pauper, Dominique, The Leatherstocking Tales, Lights! Camera! Action!, Lorna Doone, Mill on the Floss, Robin Hood, Ivanhoe, The Old Curiosity Shop, A Tale of Two Cities, John Halifax-Gentlemen, and King Arthur.moreless
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    The Way It Was

    The Way It Was

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    PBS (ended 1978)
    Welcome to The Way It Was guide at TV.com. "Nostalgia," according to Webster's Standard Dictionary, "is a sentimental yearning for the return of some past period." For five years, the first four on PBS, The Way It Was provided that sentimental return. Participants of famous games or teams reunited on stage with Curt Gowdy to relive the most talked-about sports events of the 1920s to the early 1970s. Often, the show brought in an original announcer to do replicated play-by-play. The Way It Was spent the years 1974 to 1977 in the studios of KCET in Hollywood. The 1978 season, consisting of five shows produced for syndicated television, were taped at the Las Vegas Hilton. We would like to thank the contributor who singled out airdates for two episodes of The Way It Was. More episode titles are being forwarded to the Episode List. Should this contributor be able to find airdates, that would be excellent.moreless
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    NatureScene

    NatureScene

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    PBS (ended 2008)
    Welcome to the NatureScene guide at TV.com. From 1978 to 2002, NatureScene was the most pleasant nature series ever to appear on public television. The South Carolina ETV Commission had initially produced the series as a local program, bringing South Carolina ciewers closer to the varied natural wonders of the State. By 1985, NatureScene was being syndicated throughout America, as hosts Jim Welch and Rudy Mancke went on nature journeys across the continent. They examined Costa Rican rain forests, islands ravaged by hurricanes, and city lots. You name it, they presented it in a pleasant format, augmented by the soothing pastoral music heard throughout each episode.moreless
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    Washington Week

    Washington Week

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    PBS
    Washington Week in Review first aired on February 23, 1967 and became the first local program to air on the new Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) in 1969. With its 40 years of broadcasting it became the longest-running public affairs program on PBS. Every week a group of journalists participate in a roundtable discussion of current news events. Since October 01, 1999 Gwen Ifill is moderating the show. In 2001, the show was renamed Washington Week.moreless
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    The Adams Chronicles

    The Adams Chronicles

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    PBS (ended 1976)
    This was an award-winning, thirteen-episode special by PBS that aired in the mid-1970s to commemorate the Bicentennial. It "chronicles" the story of the Adams progeny over a 150-year span, including John (signer of the Declaration, accomplished diplomat, and our 2nd President), his wife Abigail, his son John Quincy (acclaimed Secretary of State, our 6th President, and prominent abolitionist Congressman), grandson Charles Francis, and much-heralded members of the fourth generation.moreless
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    Meeting of Minds

    Meeting of Minds

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    PBS (ended 1981)
    Welcome to the Meeting of Minds guide at TV.com. Steve Allen, already the originator of the Tonight show, later created what one critic called "the ultimate talk show" and presented, on the PBS network, a series called Meeting of Minds which was constructed in a typical chat-show format, but featured guests who played important roles in the drama of history. Among those who appeared were Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Queen Cleopatra of Egypt, Marie Antoinette, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Paine, Francis Bacon, Thomas Jefferson, Voltaire and Charles Darwin. The multi-award winning series still exists in the form of video cassettes, audio cassettes and a four volume set of books, published by Prometheus. Most of the women's roles were played by Allen's wife, Jayne Meadows. Allen clarified at the time "The idea is that every syllable will be part of an actual quotation. The degree of the exact quotation varies from character to character. In the case of some people who played important roles in the drama of history, of course, there is no record of anything they ever said or wrote. Two examples that come to mind are Cleopatra and Attila the Hun. Nevertheless, they were both fascinating characters for our show. And there's nothing difficult in creating dialog for them. You bring factual information into conversational form -- and commit no offense in doing so. The more scholars know about the people we're dealing with, the more impressed they are with how accurate our renderings are. It's remarkable how little negative criticism we've received." Meeting of Minds encourages the viewer and reader, who may be historically illiterate, to become more familiar with the great thinkers and doers of the past and to whet their appetites for more research and study. It is an exciting classroom tool (through audiocassettes, videocassettes and books) for students of history and philosophy. "I felt that putting the greatest figures of all time together and showing them interacting was an entertaining way not only to have a better understanding of what is going on in the world today, but also to be in a better position to make decisions for the future." It took Allen some 18 years to bring this project to fruition. When it finally reached the national marketplace, it was honored with a multitude of awards, among them the Peabody Award, one national Emmy, three national Emmy nominations, a TV Critics Circle Award, the Encyclopedia Britannica Award and the Film Advisory Board Award. The series was produced in the studios of KCET, the PBS outlet in Los Angeles, with Loring d'Usseau, a prime and early supporter of the Allen brainchild, acting as executive producer. In 1989, Prometheus Books published the 24 scripts in book form, and in 1992, Dove Audio, Inc. released the programs on audiocassette. From SteveAllen.commoreless
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