• 241
    The Blues

    The Blues

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    PBS (Mini-Series 2003)
    Martin Scorsese Presents the Blues — A Musical Journey
  • 242
    Wall $treet Week

    Wall $treet Week

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    PBS (ended 2005)
    Welcome to the Wall $treet Week guide at TV.com. Since November 1970, Wall $treet Week has been the standard by which all other financial shows are judged. Each program presents thoughtful insight on the week's past business events, gets word from a panel of experts plus a guest, and consults "elves" who try to predict what the markets will do in the upcoming weeks. Louis Rukeyser had been at the forefront of Wall $treet Week with Louis Rukeyser for 21½ years until, in a controversial move, he was replaced. The show then became Wall $treet Week with FORTUNE. Regardless, it is still produced by Maryland Public Television for PBS stations across the country.moreless
  • 243
    Powerhouse

    Powerhouse

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    PBS (ended 1983)
    Every episode of this teen-targetted PBS drama delivered a new challenge for the Powerhouse gang: a group of teens (Jennifer, Lolo, Kevin, Pepper and Tony) who hung out at a community center run by Brenda Gaines. In the process of solving each episodes problem, important life lessons were learned all around. The show tackled similar issues to the famous "Afterschool Special" series. Major life issues such as alcoholism, anti-semitism, kidnapping, communicable diseases, government corruption and even worker outplacement were covered making this show surprisingly grown-up for what looked like a PBS kids show. The show also memorably featured a series of "un-commercials". Appearing at the same time breaks where a regular TV commercial might appear, these custom made public service announcements promoted such things as healthy eating and exercise. A common tagline of the ads was "don't just sit there, do something."moreless
  • 244
    The Dooley and Pals Show

    The Dooley and Pals Show

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    PBS (ended 2000)
    South Carolina ETV, the series' co-producing agency, called The Dooley and Pals Show "A terrific children's series from a star far, far away." Designed to fit in with most other PBS Kids shows, The Dooley and Pals Show cobined live-sized space creatures Dooley and his robot friend M.A.R.T.I.E. with ordinary Earth people. Among Dooley's new friends were children Nick (male) and Maxx (female). The show was replete with 3-D animation, children's drawings, and vox pops (incorrectly identified by some as "kid on the street" segments). Programs always ended with a Dooley log entry summarizing the lessons learned, and a lively song praising the "Dooley Day" he had just shared. Produced in the facilities of The Disney-MGM Studios in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, The Dooley and Pals Show was distributed by American Public Television from April 2, 2000 to April 1, 2003. After that date, the eleven-station ETV Network in South Carolina was the only place to find The Dooley and Pals Show. Despite this setback, ETV is negotiating with co-producer Mark Riddle to revitalize the series. In addition, Dooley stil appears at some ETV-sponsored events, such as the South Carolina State Fair, held in Columbia, SC each October.moreless
  • 245
    Regency House Party

    Regency House Party

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    PBS (ended 2004)
    In the tradition of The 1900 House, Manor House, Frontier House and Colonial House, PBS presents Regency House Party, a series of four episodes in which 10 modern-day men and women get in on the romantic action and the way of life that typified the Regency era. Regency House Party aired on PBS Wednesdays from November 3 to November 24, 2004. Originally premiered February 14, 2004 as an eight part series in the UK on Channel 4 and aired Saturdays at 9:05pm. A hardcover companion book to the series by Lucy Jago is also available and can purchased at Amazon.com in the US and Amazon.co.uk in the UK. A 2-disc DVD set of the series became available November 23 (Region 1).moreless
  • 246
    ThinkAbout

    ThinkAbout

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    PBS
    For ten years, a group in Bloomington, Indiana called AIT had been producing "consortia" series for public television. These were instructional series developed by a consortium of state and provincial education agencies. Their names are legendary: Ripples, Inside Out, Self Incorporaed and Trade-offs. But with 1979 came AIT's magnum opus. Welcome to the ThinkAbout guide at TV Tome. All the skills essential to learning that AIT had cultivated over a decade were poured into ThinkAbout, and many men and women helped in completing this master series. Producers included the Educational Film Center in Virginia, Alberta-based Access, TVO in Toronto (sometimes with help from The Film Works), KERA Unlimited in Dallas, KOCE in Huntington Beach, the Utah State Board of Education, KETC in St. Louis, and the growing South Carolina ETV Network. Together they created these master lessons that defined everything the AIT originally stood for. The content of ThinkAbout was developed by a consortium of more than 40 state and provincial educational agencies, working with the late Larry Walcoff in the AIT code: "Together, serving education."moreless
  • 247
    Julia Child and Company

    Julia Child and Company

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    PBS (ended 1979)
  • 248
    The Huggabug Club

    The Huggabug Club

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    PBS (ended 2000)
    This PBS one-hit wonder features former Playboy stars Audrey and Judy Landers, leading the "Buggsters" on adventures through learning, from various life lessons (expressing your feelings, good hygiene habits, good sportsmanship, etc.) and topics of children's interest (farm animals, dinosaurs, music, etc.), with some help from the mascots:

    UNCLE HUGGABUG - a four-armed blue bug, with a cowboy hat (and twang, to boot), who enjoys a good "power-packed hug"

    MISS OOPS-A-DAISY - a clumsy pink flower who reminds kids that making mistakes is OK, though she makes some herself

    AUNTIE BUMBLE - a grandmotherly bee, who explains friendship, caring, and other values to the Buggsters

    LOVEY-DOVEY - a Jamaican dove (tells the story, but nothing more)

    It appeared on select PBS stations, such as WLVT (Lehigh Valley, PA) and WNYE (Brooklyn, NY), from 1995-2001. It can still be seen today on KTV (a Christian channel).

    THEME SONG LYRICS:

    Join us at the Huggabug Club- Sunshine, laughter, and a whole lot of love! The Huggabug Club is fun, fun... fun for everyone!

    At the Huggabug Club, there's a lovable bug... there's a flower so sweet... and there's a bumblebee you've just got to meet!

    We call them Oops-A-Daisy... and Auntie Bumble... and then there's Huggabug, too...

    Come and join us - at the Huggabug Club. The place for kids - is Huggabug Club. We know you'll love... THE HUGGABUG CLUB!moreless
  • 249
    Science Demonstrations

    Science Demonstrations

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    PBS (ended 1967)
    How do you do, ladies and gentlemen and boys and girls? I wish to honor Prof. Julius Sumner Miller. Physics was his business. Consider the following: A 58-year-old physicist has become a celebrity, playing Professor Wonderful on the original Mickey Mouse Club. In Australia during the mid-1960s, he is known to millions as the host of Why Is It So? He has also made multiple appearances on all the talk shows. The man says he is too old for any work, any position at a major college. But he can still lecture. An offer comes from the new Western Instructional Television. In it, Miller is given a free hand. He tells audiences that he would not lecture. Rather, he would show the beauty and drama of physics through a series of demonstrations involving scientific equipment, household items, and toys. This, he said, would make physics fun for children ages 4 to 94. The whole point of these programs was, for Miller, intellectual fun. He wanted to show his audience how Nature behaves. This was, for the Professor, the most satisfaction he got from his later years: intellectual fun. Watch it… watch it… watch it… There it is.moreless
  • 250
    Mercy Street

    Mercy Street

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    PBS
  • 251
    3-2-1 Classroom Contact

    3-2-1 Classroom Contact

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    PBS (ended 1992)
    One year before it was removed from PBS, 3-2-1 Contact had some of its most enduring sequences re-edited for classroom use. The result was 3-2-1 Classroom Contact, a little-known production of the Children's Television Workshop (as it was then called). Dominating the new series of 30 episodes was Stephanie Yu, the only cast holdover from the original 3-2-1 Contact. She handled most of the links, introduced a great many bits from the old show, and generally acted as "sole survivor" of the legendary science series from the 1980s. All original airdates listed are based on airings as seen on WVIZ in Cleveland. The show is still being rerun on PBS stations as well as in schools.moreless
  • 252
    Wish Kids

    Wish Kids

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    PBS (ended 1992)
    Welcome to the Wish Kids guide at TV.com. The spin-off from Kids Inc., this television show is from the producers of Kids Inc, and Sesame Street. It's about 2 girls, who let their imaginations run wild, though always managing to run into conflict. Becoming princesses then having to battle the pressures of evil witches, becoming astronauts and battling aliens, growing up and finding the pressures of adolescence. Though this show only lasted a year, it lead a good run with children from 3-11 and managed to climb itself up the charts of Kids Choice Television series in US to number 7.moreless
  • 253
    The Robert MacNeil Report

    The Robert MacNeil Report

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    PBS
    Welcome to The Robert MacNeil Report guide at TV.com. On October 20 1975 a new evening television news program first broadcasted weeknights on PBS in the United States. Unlike most other evening newscasts in the country, it is an hour in length. The program runs longer segments than most other news outlets in the U.S., with in-depth coverage of the subjects involved. The NewsHour avoids the use of sound bites, playing back extended portions of news conferences and holding interviews that last several minutes. The program was initially hosted by Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer, but MacNeil left the spotlight in 1995. The show continues to be produced by their joint production company, MacNeil/Lehrer Productions. Broadcast History MacNeil and Lehrer had covered the United States Senate Watergate hearings for PBS starting in 1973, which led to an Emmy Award. This recognition helped them as they worked to create "The Robert MacNeil Report" with Jim Lehrer as a half-hour local news program for WNET in 1975 that covered a single issue in-depth. A few months later, the program was renamed "The MacNeil/Lehrer Report" and began to be broadcast nationally on PBS stations. The program changed formats and extended to an hour in length in 1983, becoming known as "The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" until MacNeil left the program and now the title is "The News Hour with Jim Lerher". Compared with other shows, The NewsHour runs at a slow pace. At the start of the program, a news summary that lasts a few minutes is given, briefly explaining many of the headlines around the world. This is typically followed by three or four longer news segments running 10-15 minutes that explore a few of the headline events in greater detail. The program usually wraps up with a debate between two journalists. As of 2004, the two people who usually debate are Mark Shields and David Brooks. According to Nielsen ratings at the program's website, 2.7 million people watch the program each night, and 8 million individuals watch in the course of a week. It is broadcast on more than 300 PBS stations, reaching 99% of the viewing public, and audio is broadcast by some National Public Radio stations. Broadcasts are also made available worldwide via satellites operated by various agencies. Archives of most of the shows are available in several streaming media formats (including full-motion video) at the program's website. The program originates in Washington, D.C., with additional facilities in San Francisco, California and Denver, Colorado, and is a collaboration between the WNET, WETA, and KQED television stations.moreless
  • 254
    Take a Girl Like You

    Take a Girl Like You

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    PBS (ended 2001)
    A Masterpiece Theatre adaptation of Kingsley Amis's novel about four men trying to seduce the same young woman. She may be willing but she wants to be engaged first as the sexual revolution of the 1960's hasn't happened yet. Set 1950s-era England.moreless
  • 255
    Betsy's Kindergarten Adventures

    Betsy's Kindergarten Adventures

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    PBS
    Betsy's just starting kindergarten, and she's having so much fun. Join her as she experiences school for the first time and makes lots of new friends.
  • 256
    Evening At Pops

    Evening At Pops

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    PBS (ended 2005)
    A show featuring the Boston Pops Orchestra.
  • 257
    Gardens of the World

    Gardens of the World

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    PBS (ended 1993)
    This was the only TV series Audrey Hepburn ever starred in.
  • 258
    Madison Heights

    Madison Heights

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    PBS
    Madison Heights is a PBS television documentary series that is set in the K-8 Madison Heights School. The series features the challenges faced by many families in the Madison Heights community as they strive to improve their lives. Madison Heights shares their real-life stories and encourages parents to improve their reading skills and spend time reading to their children. Madison Heights uncovers the deeper significance of the No Child Left Behind Act and highlights the importance of literacy in the United States.moreless
  • 259
    Debbi Fields Great American Desserts

    Debbi Fields Great American Desserts

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    PBS (ended 2002)
    Debbi Fields' Great American Desserts Series description: Traditional and unique versions of popular American desserts.
  • 260
    The Power of Choice

    The Power of Choice

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    PBS
    The Power of Choice is a documentary series that highlights the ideas and theories of the Nobel Prize winning American economist, Milton Friedman. The American Public Broadcasting System produces this series, starting with a short biography of Friedman's life. Actor Michael O'Brien narrates the economist's humble upbringing in Brooklyn, New York, and takes the audience on a journey through Friedman's life up to his teaching commission at the University of Chicago. PBS then focuses on Friedman's conservative economic theories that embrace small government and strict monetary policy. Interviews from leading economists, including Alan Greenspan, Gary Becker and Paul Samuelson, play throughout the season. The famous men talk about how Friedman's ideas, implemented into American society by President Ronald Regan, contributed to a freer and more liberal nation. PBS cameras also travel to South America and Europe in search of economic leaders who grasped Friedman's progressive ideas. By the end of the season, viewers become well informed on the subjects of consumption analysis and complex stabilization policy. moreless