Nip/Tuck

Season 2 Episode 4

Mrs. Grubman

1
Aired Wednesday 10:00 PM Jul 13, 2004 on FX
SUBMIT REVIEW

Episode Fan Reviews (7)

8.9
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199 votes
  • Ageing The Only Way Possible Written by Jennifer Salt Directed by Jamie Babbit

    8.0
    I know there’s a certain shameless quality Nip/Tuck possesses that makes it must see TV but even I didn’t think this series was this audacious. Entering puberty at the early age of eight, the most underused McNamara gets her own storyline this week. Yes, little finally has something to do and her entry into womanhood not only allows us to get re-acquainted with the vile Suzanne, who eerily tries to educate Annie and the other princess Mensies about sex through fairytale metaphors but it seems the pressures of getting older can even affect someone as young as Annie when she is hospitalised and Julia learns what her daughter’s fears are. It’s a thread that relates into everyone in this episode as Julia unwisely took Suzanne’s advice and starts eating food that looks more likely to cause your body harm rather than good in the long run.

    Speaking of long run, we’ve gone through six episodes without so much as a murmur and guess what? Mrs Grubman is back! When the guys refuse to be blackmailed by her into performing another unnecessary surgical procedure she pulls out the “my daughter has cancer and me looking beautiful will help her through it” card. A new one I know and I for one thought she was lying her ass off. Grubman is so desperate for surgery I’d wager she’d do it on herself if needs be. But shock, horror, she was actually telling the truth and her latest trip under the knife goes horribly wrong, her cancer stricken daughter Claire is the first one to blast Sean and Christian. In fairness, it’s not their fault as Grubman refused to disclose she was on anti-depressants and she winds up being paralysed. I’ve always kind of understood but never really sympathised with this character’s desperation to retain her looks but the fact she willing withheld information made me curse at the screen. Her daughter was right to call on Sean and Christian’s indulging her insipid surgeries (why did they wait so long?) but she should have also said something to her mother too. However I did love the scene with Christian and Grubman where she gave him kind advice on how to be a good parent and requested surgery for her daughter. What a sweetie, the both of them in that scene.

    Christian on the other hand, the battle with Gina to keep Wilbur was always going to be filled with different twists and turns and writer Jennifer salt didn’t fail on that score. First off, we got James allying himself with Christian in order to beat Gina and then there was Kimber as a character witness against Christian, which we had to deal with. Following her defunct modelling career and relationship with Merrill, life has really dealt her some harsh blows. In case I haven’t made it clear in the past, I’ve never been a huge fan of Kimber and the majority of her appearance in this episode didn’t do her any favours either. She still has pangs for Christian which obvious and only decided to help out Gina to hurt him until the consequences of her out of control drug habit forced her to reconsider her position. Kimber barked sarcastic comments at her ex-lovers while bleating on about her acting aspirations (Meryl Streep she ain’t) but a leaky septum showed how bad thing have really become for her. I admit I felt kind of bad for her but to contradict the fairytale theme, maybe Kimber should asserting some independence rather than relying on some guy to save her.

    However things really turned in this episode when James after having Wilbur christened, decided to finally accept the boy as his own much to Christian’s heartache. I guess I should have seen it coming but it took me by surprise as much as it took Christian. I like James and I do think he would be a good dad to the kid but even still I don’t Wilbur to go and I really wished Christian had fought more for him too.

    Also in “Mrs Grubman”

    Opening patient of the week: Cheerleader getting liposuction.

    Liz: “You look like someone’s just stolen your first born”
    Christian: “Well someone is trying”.

    Did anyone else want to slap Suzanne for little victory remark about Sophia? I certainly did. Why would Julia tolerate this woman?

    Christian: “Do you lie awake at night thinking of new ways to torture your body and us?”
    Mrs Grubman: “Spare me the moralistic lecture, Dr Troy. If I was paying, you’d have me in faster on the books than shit goes through a goose”.

    Suzanne: “Newsflash Julia, those little angels dripping with hormones and if you think the old boys can’t smell it, then you and your daughter are in for a rude awakening”.

    Character bits: Gina’s had 292 sexual partners in the last three years, Grubman’s had ten surgeries in the last six months and James has been married for the last 39 years.

    Kimber (to Christian): “You couldn’t love anyone, your heart’s made of granite”.

    Matt (re food): “Where do I get the courage to take the first bite?”
    Sean: “You’re a big boy, Matt. Just do it”.

    No Gina in this episode despite a heavy role she played in the episode and although credited, Ava doesn’t appear either.

    Christian (re Gina): “My intention is to bring the bitch to her knees which ironically enough, is her favourite position”.

    Grubman (to Christian): “Just because I feel dead, doesn’t mean I have to look embalmed”.

    Standout music: “Cosmopolitans” by Erin McKeown and “Moonlight Sonata” by Dankesh York.

    Again, no chronology is present in this episode, Liz had nothing of interest to do and we still didn’t learn Grubman’s first name but even still “Mrs Grubman” is continuing on an excellent path for the series. The theme in Season Two is definitely about age and the effects surrounding it and there was a funny fairytale twist with Sean and Julia explaining sex to Annie, which tied into Kimber’s new career in porn.


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