Now and Again

Season 1 Episode 1

Origins

0
Aired Friday 9:00 PM Sep 24, 1999 on CBS
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
28 votes
1

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Episode Summary

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Origins
AIRED:
Michael Wiseman, a middle-aged insurance seller with a family, dies in a subway accident. The government rescues his brain and offers him a new life, in a new body. A new genetically engineered and enhanced body at that. The only condition is that he can never have any contact with his family and friends from his previous life.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Awesome start to the show.

    10
    Starts off like a typical action adventure show, but there's a difference here, it's not scary, it's a bit funny. John Goodman is a good central character who in the course of the plot gets transformed to the much younger Eric Close. This is a really cool plot twist. Two actors playing the same role, but we stop thinking of the narrative trick, we just accept that plot and go along with it. The show's not so serious, that's another good thing about the show, you don't have to take this show very seriously, you just have to enjoy watching the show.moreless
Christine Baranski

Christine Baranski

voice of Ruth Bender [uncredited]

Margaret Colin

Margaret Colin

Lisa Wiseman

Dennis Haysbert

Dennis Haysbert

Dr. Theodore Morris

Gerrit Graham

Gerrit Graham

Roger Bender

Eric Close

Eric Close

Michael Wiseman

Heather Matarazzo

Heather Matarazzo

Heather Wiseman

John Goodman

John Goodman

Michael Wiseman

Guest Star

Chad Lowe

Chad Lowe

Craig Spence

Guest Star

Chip Zien

Chip Zien

Gerald Misenbach

Guest Star

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (10)

    • Michael: Now I work for Craig.
      Roger: Well, you're on his team.
      Michael: "His team"? I'm on his damn "team"? What is this, gym class? Who started this "team" crap, anyway?

    • Michael: Well, I could go for a devil dog now. You wouldn't have anything like that here, would you?
      Dr. Theo: We would ask whenever you're at home you use this lavatory. Which has been specially equipped to collect both your liquid and solid waste for further study.
      Michael: You know what? I'm not really hungry anymore.

    • Dr. Theo: Call it mother's intuition, but I think our boy's about to check his package.
      Michael: (to himself) Holy crap!
      Dr. Theo: Damn right. Made in America, baby. Made in America.

    • Dr. Theo: I know what you're thinking. What's the catch? And of course, there is a catch. Pretty big catch. Not huge, but formidable. In return for saving you life, and let me remind you that for all intensive purposes you are already dead and buried Mr. Wiseman. In return for the gift of sight, mobility, and tactile sensation, for being able to walk, talk, taste, and touch, all your government asks in return is that you stay dead. By that we mean you may have no contact of any kind with anyone who you knew in your first life. Ever. That's all. We know you didn't choose to die, Mr. Wiseman. We know there were no good-byes, we're sure your desire to let friends and loved ones know you're here, know you're well...But like I said, I saw your family. I know how precious they must be to you. But your government can't let anyone know of the existence of this technology. You reaching out to anyone from you past absolutely guarantees your immediate and final death. And the death of whomever you confided in. I need you to tell me you understand and agree to that.
      Michael: What if I say no? What if I won't do it?
      Dr. Theo: Well, hey, this is America. That's your right. Of course, we'll have to take our 3 billion dollars worth of logic sensors, voice stimulators, computer driven neuron transfer generators, and those assorted other doodads, and go home. (chuckles) Let nature take its course. I figure it'll take about sixteen seconds for you to turn into a memory. Aw, forget memory, it'll take about sixteen seconds for you to turn into waste. But please, do think about it. I'll check back.

    • Michael: Am I alive? Am I dead? What am I?

    • Dr. Theo: We built a man with the speed of Michael Jordan, the strength of Superman and the grace of Fred Astaire. A guy who's going to look good, be young, be omnipotent. Wild, huh? Just can't lick the mind thing.

    • Dr. Theo: Let me be the first to tell you, you had a beautiful funeral, Mr. Wiseman.
      Michael: I did?
      Dr. Theo: Absolutely. Day before yesterday. I certainly hope when it's my time to go that my loved ones send me off in as spectacular a fashion.

    • Roger: Act of God, act of God, act of God!
      Michael: Bad steel is not an act of God! It's an act of negligence. What if it had been your wife or your kids in one of those cars.

    • Michael: Is that all I'm gonna get, is "fine?"
      Heather: What else do you want?
      Michael: Well, I don't know --- maybe a complete sentence, a little smile, some eye contact?
      Heather: (smiling and making eye contact) Daddy, do you have any money I can borrow?
      Michael: Maybe if you give me a little kiss.
      Heather: Forget it.

    • Michael: Can I fly?
      Dr. Theo: What?
      Michael: Can I fly? You know, like, uh, Superman?
      Dr. Theo: Mr. Wiseman, over the past 6 months we've performed a complicated series of operations. I'm tempted to call them transplants, but in truth, there is no "you" to transplant them to. Let's call them operations. In fact, let's agree that you have been the recipient of some of the most sophisticated surgical thinking and practice in the history of medicine. In addition, you have been innoculated with and intravenously fed over 700 highly experimental and, I believe extraordinarily promising hormones, steroids and vaccines that also were developed uniquely for you in this project. Now I mention all that because, and I'm embarrassed to admit it, that in the midst of all those surgeries, all those implant procedures, all the beta trials, tests, failures and successes... it just never occurred to any of us to shove a rocket up your ass. No, I'm sorry. You can't fly. You can't see through people's clothes either.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (0)